Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 101

:

:
AKTTBi

24-25 2009 .

-
2010

87

:
..., . . .
..., . . . .
. . .

?
.

24-25 2009 .

:
..., . . .

? . ( )
., - , 2010. 200 .
ISBN 978-5-93597-086-4

-
. .

.. ,

..

A.M.
.
:



:
:
, 2.1.3/3801

, 2010
-
,
2010

9
16
31
40

. . - -.

49

.. :

57

., .. :
Huebner . Revolution d e r Aesthetik Aesthetik d e r Revolution
Bakke M. Somaesthetics in the P o s t a n t h r o p o c e n t r i c
Perspective

71
80
94


.. , ,

.. ?
?

115

.. :

129

..
-

139

.. :

(
)

248

..

154

..

168

.. .
?

181

184

24-25 2009

.
,
: X X , ,
, ,

. , ,

, (
, , , ).

,
, , .., .
: ,

, , -
, .


,
. ,

.
, XVIII
,
(
, ,
) ,

, ,
,
.
2006

. 2008 .

XXI
:

?
,

,
,
,

,
.


,
.

, ,

..

-,

,

, ,
.
,

.
,
( ).

,

), , , ,

,
, - , ,
[1]

:
,
,

.
[2]
,

-
.
, ,
,
.[3]

10

,
- , , , .
,
,
?

, (),
- ,
,

,

, .

,
, (
) [4],
,
. [5].
:

.

.
,
, ,
, ,


,
,
( - ).

, .

.
- .
,

II

?

, .
,

. , ,
, ,
,
,
, ,
,
. -
,
,

,
, .
,

- -
,
, .
. ,


. ,
,
,
. ,

[6],
,

. ,
,

, ,
.

,

,
.
X X
.

12


.

, , ,
,

. , , .
: ,
. ,
,
. , ,
,
.
-


.

,
, ,
!]


. , X X

, .
.

, , , ,

.
,

. ,

,
,
,

,
, ,
,
.
,

13

, ,
, ,



,
,

-
.
,
, ,

,
,
.

,
,



. :

,
,
?
,

(
, ,

..),
, ,
.. ,
, ,
,
.
.
,
, (
),

14

.
:
, ,
,

.
- , ,
, ,
. ,
, ,
,
, ,
,
,

,

, ,
.
,

,
,
,

[ 8 , .24].

,
,

.


,

15

,

, ,

,
.

.
,

, ,
[9].
,

,
,

, ,
,
, .

,

.

. ,

.

, ,
..
,
,
.

1- .. ? //
..,2008
2..

..

.// ..,2002

16

. .., ..

-
).// .
..2002
4.Dickie G. Art and Aesthetics. Ithaca 1974
5.Danto A. The Artistic Enfranchistment of Real Objects: The
Artworld.//Aesthetics. A Critical Anthology N-Y 1977
. A.A. . 2004
7. .. . .,1968
8. .: . //
.,1997
9. . .
? //
. 1997

..

,


-
? - ,
, .
?
? ,

?
?
,
?

, ?
,
: 1)
, ; 2)
, -
.

17

, ,
.
, ,
,
, .

,
.
,

, ,
, ,
.

[ 1 ] ,
,
.


, .. ,
.
- ,
,

,
.

. -, ,
, , ,
, ;

.
-,

- ,
, .

, , .

,

IS

.

, ,
. , ,

. , ,
XVIII (, ,
) :

, .. ,

, .
. X V I I I
.? XVIII .? ?
, , , .
,
X V I I I ., ,
.
,
, ,
. .
, ,
( )[2].
,
, , ,
( ) , ,
( ) [ 3 ] .
, -
, -

()
.
,

);

XVIII .

19

,
:
,
, , ,
, .

: ,
- ,
, ,
, .. , .
-, ,

,

, -
,

( ),

,
, ,
,
. :
, ,
, .
,
.
,
,
.
,
(),
- , ,
,
.

(Marta
Woodmansee) ,
. (1994).

, ,

20

, ,

[4].
, , ,
, ,
XVIII .,
.
,
(1714)

.

;
,
, , ,
[ 5 ] . ,
, ,

. ,

, ,

,
, , ,
.
, ..
.

,
,

:

[ 6 ] .
( ) ,
.

( ) ,


. ,
,

21

, ,
,

, ,


.

,
, ,

, .

,
,

, ..
, ,


, , , , ..
, ,

.
,

^ ] . , ,
, ,
(!)

,

. ,
.

,
, ,
.
, .

22

,
; .
.

,
,
(). ,
X V I I I .
, ,




.

- ,

( sui generis) ;
,
(
,

,
.

,

, ..
.
, , ,
,
?

.
,

.
(1986)[8] ,

23

, ,
.
, ,

. , ,

( . ) .
, , ,
( ) ,
, -

. ,

.
,
? ,
, ?
.
XVIII (!)
, ,

. ,
- . , XVIII .
,

. , (

),

(
),

: ,
, ,
.
, ,
- , .

, .
,

24

,
.
XVIII ,

; -
. , ,
,
, .
...
, [ 9 ] .

. ?
?

,
. .
,
, ,

) .
, ,
, , ,
, [ 1 0 ] .
, , ,
. ,
,

.
, ,

,

.

, ( )

. ,
,

25

. ,

[11]. ,
,
.
[12]. ,
,

.
,

,
( )
,
.

,
,
XVIII . ? ,
, , ?
? , ,
? :
! ,
, , .
[ 1 3 ] .
, ,
.
,

,
, ,
?
,
; ,

. XVIII .
,
- ,
..
,

26

,
,

( ,

-
[ 1 4 ] .
,

,
( ) .

, ,

,
, XVIII
. ( ) , ,
,
,

.
,

.
, ,

.

, ,
,
.
. ,
, ,

?
.
.

27

().
, , , ,
, /
. ?
(
),
,

..
,
,
. ,
, .
( ) .
, , .

.
,
,
(, )
.

,
. ,
( ) ,
, ,
.
, .
,
-
,

( ,
) . ,
,
,
.
,
,

.
, ;

28

,

.
, post
factum, ..
, .

, ..
,
, .
,

, .
.
,

, .


,
-
:

(,
)


,
. ,
,

[15],

.

, : 1)
; 2)
,
,
.

29


,

,

.
,
, ,
, ..
.
,
, ,
-
.

,
,

. , ,
, ,
,
..

. .
, ,

.
?
()?

1- Welsh Wolfgang, Aesthetics beyond Aesthetics//Rediscovering


Aesthetics. Transdisciplinary Voices from Art History, Philosophy, and Art
Practice. Stanford University Press, 2009. p. 178-192.
2. . : . . 2002.

30

3. .. . .1997.
..
4. Woodmansee Marta. The Author, Art, and the Market: Rereading the
History of Aesthetics. Columbia University Press. New York. 1994. p. 4.
5. Ibid., pp. 87-102
6. .:
. // .2000.
45. . 22 - 87, : .
// . 2003. 60. . 17-29.
7. -
.
8. Berleant Arnold. The Historicity of Aesthetics - II // British Journal of
Aesthetics. Vol. 26. pp.195-203.
9. Danto. Arthur. C. Foreword to: Woodmansee Marta. The Author, Art,
And the Market/ Rereading the History of Aesthetics. Columbia University
Press. New York. 1994. p.XV.
10. . . .:
. 1999. .18 -19.
11. Luhmann Niklas. Art as a social system. Stanford University Press.
Stanford. 2000. p. 4
12.
,
, .
: . / //
XXI : ? ( )., , 2008. .24.
13. ,
:
. .: . .
.: . 2004. .45-62.
14. , ,
: .: Kristeller Paul Oskar "The Modern
System of Arts" (1951) in Morrits Weits, ed. Problems of Aesthetics. New
York. Macmillan. 1970. pp. 160-161.
15. M. the -
. . .: .
// :
. - : , : , 1997.
. 178. ... : ,
, ,

31

,
,
... ( : Beardsley Monroe . The
Aesthetics Point of View. Metaphilosophy. Vol.1. 1, January, 1970. pp.
39- 58).

A.M.

,
-,


X V I I I
.
- ,
,
, , ,
, ,
.
, ,
, ,
, ,
[1].
,
XVIII
, . ,
, ,

(.)

, ,
,
.
, , , ,

,
,
,

,
.

34

,

.
, ,
,
,

. .

,

.

,

,
, .

,
,
.
,


,
.
,
, ,


, ,

. , ,
,

55

:

,
,
, , . . . [ 2 ] .

.

,
,
.
, ,
, -
,
.

, , - ,
.
,
, ,
.
,
,
.

- - .
-

,

.
,
-

36

. ,
, , .


, -.
-
,
, , ,

,
,

. ,

,
,
. ,
,
, ,
. ,

. -
,

[ 3 ] .
,
, ,

, ,

. , ,
, ,

.
, X X

.

37

,
, , ,
, .
,
, ,
,

. ,
:
, ,
, ,
, ( ,
),

,
.

. , ,
.
,
,

,


. -
, ,
.

, ,
. ,

,
,
.

.
,
, ,
. -
, , ,

38

-
[ 4 ] .
, .
,

,
, .
,


.
, -,
,
,

.
- , , ,
. - ,
. ,

,

. ,


X X .
, ,
, .
-
.
, , , ,
. ,
,
,
,
.

39

, ,

- ,
,

, ,
. :

,
.
,
.

. - ,
:
,

[5]. -
, ,
,
,

.
...

, ,
,
? ,
.
, ,
, [ 6 ] ?
,

-
,

. , -

.
-

40

. , -
,

, ,
, ,
-, ,
.

1. . . , 1998. . 39.
2. . . , 2006. . 69.
3. . . , 2007. . 54.
4. Danto A. Artwork! // The Journal of Philosophy, Vol. 6 1 , No. 19. P. 581.
5. . , //
. , 2004. . 297-298.
6. . . . , 2006.
. 164-165.

.

,
-,


:
,

. ,
,
,
,
. ,
,
, ,
.
-

41

, ,
. ,
, - ,

- ,
.
, ,
,
-

,
, ,
- X I X
,

.
.
: ,
,
, ,
-
, ,
, ,
, ,

, ?...
,
,

![1]


-
, , , ,
, , -
,
. ,
,
, , ,

42


.

,

,
-
,
,

,
, , -
,
,

.
, ,
[2], - . ,

, ,
. ,


,

. , ,
, - -
,


, -
,
.
, ,
, ,
.
,

43

- ,

.
,

,
. ,

- , ,
, .
, , XVIII

,
, ,
-
,
. ,
-
.

.


,
.

,
.
,
.

, ,
.
, ,
- .

,
,

44

. -
, ,
. , ,
,
- , ,

,
,

,
, -
,

,
,
,
- . . . ,
, ,
, - ,
, -
.


. , ,
,
, ,
.
, , -
,

,
,
, . ,
, ,
,

, ,

.
-

45

[3], , ,
,
,
, .
[ 4 ] , - . - . ,
, ,
, ,
, ,
.
, -
, ,

[5]
( - ..), - .
,

, ,

: . . . , ,
,

,

[ 6 ] , - ,
[ 7 ] . , ,
,
, " " , " "
; " "
[8].
, ,
,
- , .
,
,

,
, , ,
,
- .

, ,

46

,
. - , , ,
, , , ,

. " h o m o aestheticus"



-
..

[ 9 ] . ,
, ,
, ,
[ 1 0 ] . "cogito ergo
s u m "

[ 1 1 ] .

, , , - (
).

:

-opusa,
.
, ,
, ,
,
,
,
h o m o aestheticus, ..
. , ,
-
, . ,
. ,

,
, , ,
,

47

: ,
,
,
- ,
[12].

, , ,

, , ,
, -
,
,
.

,
,

. ,
,
, , , ..
.
,

. ,

,
,

, ,
,
. , ,
-
,

,

,

,
.
- ,
.
. ,
,
: ,

48

- ,
...
,

,
[13].

, -
, X X
, ,
. ,
,
, ,
.

.
,
,
,
,

[14].
,
-
,
, ,
.
, ,
.
,
,
,
.

1. . . ., 1993. .286.
2. .. . .,
2004. .38.
3. ... . T.I. ., 1999. .80
4. .. .
. , 2001. .316.
5. .
6. .. . .,
2004. .42.
7. . . ., 1994. .361-362.

49

% .. . .,
2004. .42.
9 .. opus-posth . .,
2008. .91.
10. . .93.
. . .95.
12. . .96.
13 . : . ., 2005. .79.
14. . , . ., 1996. . 10.

. .
-,

- -.

( - 2008/09)
fort/da,


,
,
,
(, ) , ,
.

-

,
- [, 4 9 7 ] -
, , ,
, ,
:
, - X I ,
,

, ,
- , , ,

50

. fort/da

,
: , - .
,
, .
,
, , ,
,
, ,
, ,
. ,
,
, ,
, , ,
, ,
,

: -
.

: , ,
.
, ,
,
, ,
[Le Gaufey, 2 0 ] . ,
, ,
.
,
,
.
, , - .
,
( ,
,
,
, ),

51

-
- .


, ,
,

-
[, 5 0 3 ] :
, ,
, ,
,
, ,
,

fort da, .
, ,
, .
,
,

[, 506-507].
, ,
S2 S1 :
- , .
,
,
,
,
;

da

fort/fort.
,
,
fort/da, -
, ,
, -
, .
,

52

, ,
fort []. [, 4 9 8 ]
, , -
-
. ,

( -
) , ,
.
[, 4 9 5 ] ,
, ,
( ) , ,
-, -, - . , , - ,
,
, , - ,

.

: ,
,
, , -
, .
, , ,
, ,
:
,
- j o u i s s a n c e - ,
:
- ,
,

. , ,
, ,
.
,
- ,

53

.
, , ,

. ,

,
- .
fort/da
, :

( ) ,

, , ,
, , ,
.
,
,
, ? (
, ,
, ,
; ,
, , - ) . ,
,
, ,
, ,
[, 4 6 9 ] , .. ,
.
, , ,
: ,
:
.
, , ,
, -
: ,
. ,

,
, ,
,

54

: , , - [, 4 7 4 ] .
,

,
, ,
,
,
. ,
, ,
, ,
, .
- ; -
- . ,
, ,
,

( :
, ),
, ,
, ,
, ,

,
.
,
fort/da, ,
, ,
,
. - ,
, , , ,
,
, , , .
- - .
, :
- ,
, :
,
-

55

.
:
,
,
, - ,
_
,

.
, ,
,

-,

. ,
, ,
.

, , ,

,
, -,
. -
, , ,
.
fort/da
,
( , ,
) , ,
,
, ,

-,

, ,

, , .
,

,
,
, ,
( , ,

56

) , , .
fort/da - .
,
,
[, 4 8 4 ] , ,
, , , ,
, .
, ,
, ,

,
,
,
, ,
, ,
, , ,
, , .
,
, ,
,
, ,
.
.
,

,
, , .
, - ,
[, 4 8 5 ] , - -, ,
, fort/da,
,
.

1. . .//
. , 1999. . 401 - 644;

57

2 3. .//
. : , . 340 - 377;
3 Le Gaufey G. Le lasso speculaire. Une etude traversiere de l'unite
imaginaire. Paris: E.P.E.L., 1997. P. 288;

..

,

:

What is your substance whereof are you made,
That millions of strange shadows on you tend?
Since everyone hath, every one, one shade,
And you but one, can every shadow lend.
Shakespeare
[
?

.

,
,
.

]
,


,
?
. ,

, . . . .
,
?

58

, , ,
.

.
.

-?

.., . ,
.,
., ..
( . ) [ 2 ] ,
, ,
,
- [11],
- .
-
, , ,
,
- (. . , . , . medius>>).
,
,
- ,
- ,
. ,

,

.
(, ,
) ,
(,

),

( . ) ,
.


, , ,
- .
,
, ,
, .

59

, ,

, -
. , , ,
- .
,
,

, ,
. ,
, ,
. , ,
,
, .
,

, .
, ,
.

,
,

,
,
(. The Chronicles of Amber),
, , ,
. (. Pattern)
,

, .


. ,
,
-.

,
. ,

, , ,
. (

60

, - S h a d o w s ) , ,
. ,

,
. , ,
.
- ,

. ,
,
(kalpa, , ) ,
( ) , ,
( ) .
,
, .

.

.
,

,
,

[8,
. 618].
,
-,

.

,
.
.
, , , ,

(,
) ,
. (
. . ) , ,

. .

61

- ,
, , -.
, ( .), . - (Logrus).

- ,
.
, , , - ,
( ),
,

,
.
-,
,
( panta rei). -,

( ,
. [4]),
. , -
,
( ,

). - ,
,
,
, , ,
--,
(). -
- (.), ,
, ,
,
.
.:
,
[7].
, :
, . . ,
[5,
' 1 4 1 ] . ,
.

.
, . ,

62

m e t a media,
. - ,
.
. ,
,
,
.


: - , ,
.
,
, ,
, , , ,
. ,

.

.
,
, ,

,
. ,
,
.

- - --.
- -
,

,
,

--,
, ,
, .
, ,
: ,
,

,
,
- . , ,

,
,

63

. ? ,
,
,
.
,
. ,
- , ,
,
, , ,
.
, ,
,
, .


, . -
- , ,
.
, ,
,
,
( ) .

.
.
, ,
.
, -, ,
(,
, ) , , ,

, ,
.. ,
,
. ,
, ,
.

, ,

64

.
.

. ,
, , ,
' , . -
,
, .
,
.

, ,

-.

,
,
, :


,
, ,
? . . . , ,
.

,
: , ,
.
,
[3, . 156].

,
.

,

,
. ,
online,
.

.

65

,
( )
. (-),
( - ) . ,
,
,
- ,
,
. , - ,
, -. . [6,
.61-74].
,
, ( . ) ,

.
,
. ,
, ,
.
, , ,

...

-
, , ,
.
, . , - [10],
. , ,
, ,
,
, .

, ( . . ) .

66

,
, .
,
-,

.
,
,
.

.

,
.
, ,
.
,
,
.
, ,
,

, ,
: , , , ..

, , , ,
- ,

:
, ,
, .
, - ,
,
--,

, .

: , .

,
. ,

,
, .

67

,
. ,
,
.

, . . : , ,
[9, . 7-212].
--
, ,
- - - ( - - ) .

>->-

>
.
&
.
,
,
, , . , , ,
.
-
,
, ,
(),
(),

().

,
.
, ,
-.
- .
- - , - - ,
--. .
-
. . , . ,
,
.

68

,
, . ,
, ,
.
,
, [ 4 , . 124].
, ,
, ,
,

, . . ,

.

-,

, .
,
, ,
[4, . 116].
, , , , ,
: ,
, . ,
.
, - , .
, , ,

. ,
,

,
. .
?
(),
.
. .
. . , ,

69

. . .
. I K E A . .
- .
. ,
, .

,
( . ) .
,
.
- ,
( ,
, , ).

.
. .
. . ,
. ,
... , ,

: .
, .
: .
.
. , . . . .
.
, ,
, .

.
,
. , ,
. ,
. . .
. . . ,

70

.
....
,
?
,
, .

,
, ,
[9, .44]. ,
-
- ,
. , ,
(
) . ,
.
,
,
, .

, ,
, .
,
, ,
, ,

.
,
.

.
, .
,
. ,

71

. . ,
-
.

1. . . . ,
2006. .200.
2. . // ..2- ..,2006.
.258.
3. . : . ., 2001. .398.
4. . . ., 1999.
5. . . 1: -. 2: - / .
. - .: Ad Marginem, 2004. .622.
6. . . .,1999. .238.
7. . //., 1996.4., .83-93.
8. : . 2- . -1.- .:
, 1987. .671.
9. .. .2. / .. - .: , . -, 2001. .320.
10. . . ., 2007. .264.
11. .. / .. // . 2003. 11.-http://magazines.russ.ru/zvezda/2003/l

. .
-,


. ,
, .
-
,
.

72

73

:
. , ,

. .
, ,
.
-
. :
. .
, .
, .. ,

,
,
, . ,
:
-

.
, ;
, ,
, ,
.
X X ., .
.
, .
: ( ), ,
, . .
, ,
:
,
. X X .
-
, .

. ,
, :

,
, ! .
, .
- , , ,
.

.

,
,
, ,
:
- ,
- ,
- .
.
, ,
. -

74

(Poincare-Bendixson),
.

(
) .
-

.

, ,
,
. ,

. ,

( ,


).

.
:
, 1972

.
,
,
. ,
.

, .

,
.

. ,

75

,
.

,

.
,

.
,

.
- , ,
( ),
, .
, , - .
. .
, .
,

76

77

al-

jabar.
,
, ,
,
,

, . ,
, ,

.
:

,

.

, ,
,
, , , .

, , , , , ,
,
, .
-

, .
, ,
, - feerie
, .
()

,
.


. 1933
,

,
,
,
.
.
-

,
.

.
.

, ,

.
, , . . .
.
,
. - , ,

,
. , ,
,
.

,
,
. ,
.
, ,
,
, .
- ,
,
,


.
,
,
,
- .

, .

.
,
- 6 0 0 : 1 .

,
, .
,
, .

(, )
.

.

79



,
.

,
.
, , .
,
-,
.

.
. ,
, ,

80

.
,

,
. , ,
, ,
- .
, .
,
. ,
, , ,
.
. - .
.

,
,


,
,

.
,

(1735),
.

81

. : ,
,

--.
, , ,
, ,
. ,

,
,

,
.
,
-
.
,
, ,
, ,
(=).

.
-
,
.

,
. ,

-
,

.
, .

,
, arte-facta,
natura-facta.
X X ,
.

60-70
.
.

,
. arte
natura-facta

82

(
, ,
, , )
: .
: ..

REVOLUTION DER ASTHETIK ASTHETIK DER REVOLUTION


1. Teil
Als ich Svetlana N i k o n o v a die Z u s a g e m a c h t e , an diesem
Kongress teilzunehmen, hatte ich nur den Titel gelesen, nicht das
Programrn, u n d es fiel mir z u m Titel des Kongresses Asfhetik ohne
K u n s t ? " spontan das T h e m a ein: Revolution der Asthetik - Asthetik
der R e v o l u t i o n " [ l ] . Dieses T h e m a deutet darauf hin - und ich bitte
Sie, es als eine B e h a u p t u n g zu verstehen, die hier b e w i e s e n werden
m u s s - dass die Asthetik - als Theorie der K u n s t - ab einem
bestimmten A u g e n b l i c k revolutioniert w e r d e n musste, damit wir von
der Asthetik der Revolution" sprechen k o n n e n in d e m Sinne, dass
Revolution, eine bestimmte Revolution - u n d w e n n Sie wollen auch
eine bestimmte Gewalt, Terror - mit Asthetik zu tun haben kann. Die
Verwandtschaft zwischen Asthetik u n d Revolution ist mir vertraut
seit den spaten 60er Jahren des v e r g a n g e n e n Jahrhunderts, als ich die
Erscheinungen der Renaissance der marxistischen Revolution" im
W e s t e n , in Deutschland/Europa und den U S A , verfolgte und dabei
feststellte - in einem Essay 1970[2] - , dass diese neben soziopolitischen, ideologischen Aspekten in starkem MaBe ludische,
spielerische, hedonistische, also asthetische Elemente aufwiesen,
siehe das polit-happening.
U n d dies zu einer Zeit, als die
sozialistische Revolution im osflichen Europa, in Russland zum
Beispiel, biirokratisch zu erstarren schien, w e n n nicht schon erstarrt
daniederlag. W a s i m Westen an R e v o l u t i o n a r e m geschah, musste bei
den A k t e u r e n asthetischen Motivationen gehorchen, oder es musste
von den V o y e u r e n asthetisch goutiert w e r d e n konnen.

83

Nun habe ich erst in den letzten W o c h e n das P r o g r a m m dieses


Kongresses gelesen und musste zu m e i n e m Schrecken feststellen,
dass Sie wohl als Beitrag fur diesen Kongress etwas anderes erwartet
haben im Sinne einer m e h r allgemeinen theoretischen Diskussion
(iber asthetische Fragen. Aber da w a r es schon zu spat fur mich,
abgesehen davon, dass ich mich dafflr nicht fur kompetent gehalten
hatte. U m Sie daher nicht allzu sehr zu enttauschen, m u s s ich Sie
bitten, Ihre Erwartungen umzulenken, von d e m allgemeinen
Programm dieses Kongresses auf m e i n e n Titel. Vielleicht zeigt m e i n
Beitrag dennoch einige Aspekte auf, die in einem erweiterten Sinne
zu einer Theorie des Asthetischen beitragen, diese gar erweitern
konnen.
Ich weiB nicht, wie Sie, die Teilnehmer, nach d e m Titel des
letzten Kongresses X X I : ? , in
dem von Kunst nicht die Rede war, den Titel des heutigen
Kongresses Asthetik ohne K u n s t ? " verstehen, in d e m die Kunst,
allerdings mit einem Fragezeichen versehen, explizit ausgeschlossen
ist. Wie gesagt, ich werde tiber Revolution der Asthetik - Asthetik
der Revolution" sprechen u n d m u s s dabei einige V o r a u s s e t z u n g e n
machen.

Odo Marquard, ein im heutigen Russland leider wenig bekannter


deutscher Philosoph - von ihm k o m m t ubrigens der A u s d r u c k
Inkompetenzkompensationskompetenz" - hat darauf hingewiesen,
dass seit der Aufklarung in der Philosophic drei neue wichtige
Disziplinen entstanden sind: die wissenschaftliche Anthropologic,
die Psychologie und die Asthetik, abgesehen davon, dass Disziplinen
wie die Ethik als anthropologisch fundamentierte Ethik oder
Diskursethik, in n e u e m Licht gesehen w e r d e n mussten.
M a n kann sagen, dass die Sattelzeit, die Aufklarung, das D a t u m
des Beginns von geistesgeschichtlichen, kausal-logischen
Prozessen
markiert, die zur Erosion u n d z u m Z u s a m m e n b r u c h des teleob g i s c h e n SINN-Systems[3] des Christentums gefuhrt u n d damit den
metaphysischen Identitats-Bruch des m o d e r n e n M e n s c h e n bewirkt
haben. Dass diese Prozesse nicht linear sondern dialektisch verliefen,
mochte ich hier nur a m R a n d e erwahnen. Gerade das heutige
Russland, w e n n meine Informationen stimmen, bestatigt dies[4].

84

M e t a p h y s i s c h e r Identitats-Bruch ist zu verstehen als die Entzweiung


des Ich mit j e n e m A N D E R E N (Mythologie, Religion), das bislang
die Identitat des M e n s c h e n wesentlich konstituiert hatte. Folge des
metaphysischen
Identitats-Brachs:
D a s Ich wird von
dem
A N D E R E N , in d e m es A n t w o r t e n gefunden hatte auf seine
existentiellen Fragen, auf sich selbst zuriickgeworfen u n d sich in
seinem In-der-Welt-Sein frag-wiirdig. D e r Z u s a m m e n b r u c h des
A N D E R E N als
fe/eo-logisches
S I N N - S y s t e m wird somit zur
N o t w e n d i g k e i t , aber auch zur Moglichkeit, zur Chance des modernen
Ich, aus sich selbst heraus von n e u e m zu b e s t i m m e n , w i e die Welt ist
u n d w a s es in ihr zu suchen hat.
A n d e r e Termini fur diesen Sachverhalt sind Geworfenheit
(Heidegger), auch Dekonstruktion (Derrida). Ich selbst benutze mit
Vorliebe den der De-projektion (des M e n s c h e n von d e m A N D E R E N
auf sein Ich), der auf der einen Seite auf M y t h e n , Religionen als
v o r a n g e g a n g e n e , jenseits-metaphysische Projektionen[5], auf der
anderen Seite j e d o c h auf die Moglichkeit neuer Re-projektionen
hinweist.
Sieht m a n v o n den diesseits-metaphysischen SINN-Systemen
( H e g e l / M a r x ) und den Faschismen/Nationalismen verschiedener
couleur der letzten Jahrhunderte ab, Systemen, in denen sich der
M e n s c h wieder auf A N D E R E S re-projiziert hat, u m sich von diesem
her ?e/<?o-logisch zu verstehen, k a n n m a n sagen, dass die Philosophic
in
den
letzten
Jahrhunderten
vorwiegend
nihilistischexistentialistisch gepragt war/ist i m Sinne des Fortbestehens der
Fragwiirdigkeit menschlichen In-der-Welt-Seins, aus der auch
Heideggers seyns-philosophische B e m u h u n g e n die M e n s c h e n nicht
befreit haben. A u f dieser Linie finden wir vor allem die subjektiven,
authentischen
Philosophen
wie
Feuerbach,
Schopenhauer,
Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Stirner, Heidegger, Sartre und andere. Sie
k e n n z e i c h n e n sich alle dadurch, dass bei ihnen die existence vor der
essence k o m m t , wie Sartre es ausgedriickt hat. Weiter sind wir
m e i n e s Wissens geistesgeschichtlich nicht g e k o m m e n , w e n n wir
nicht die kapitalistisch-technologische Fortschritts-Ideologie, die sich
in ihrem W i r wissen nicht wohin, dafiir sind wir u m s o schneller
dort" in der gegenwartigen Krise[6] fatal bestatigt hat, als essence[l)
ansehen oder gar in der Asthetik viel- und das heiBt nichts-deutig

85

utiser existentielles Dilemma als Ego-fugismus z u m A u s d r u c k


bringen wollen[8]. In beiden Fallen wird dasselbe besagt.
Die existentiellen Fragen, die sich d e m durch den metaphysischen
Identitats-Bruch auf sein eigenes Ich de-projizierten, in seinem In(jer-Welt-Sein fragwurdig g e w o r d e n e n M e n s c h e n n u n stellten,
betrafen, wie angedeutet, vor allem den kognitiven (gnoseologischen,
epistemologischen) Aspekt der Welt (ontologische, deskriptive
Aussagen) und vor allem den ethischen Aspekt unseres Verhaltens
zur Welt (ethische, praskriptive A u s s a g e n ) . Dabei k a n n die Ethik
auch die Asthetik betreffen im Sinne einer Ethik der Asthetik, w i e
gerade angedeutet, w o das Ich in seiner existentiellen Aporie, o h n e
Antwort auf seine ek-sistenziellen Fragen, des Asthetischen bedarf
als der Kompensation ethisch-metaphysischer Defizite. In d i e s e m
Zustand erweist sich die existentielle, nihilistische L a n g e w e i l e als
das signum des modernen, v o n einem A N D E R E N auf sein eigenes
Ich de-projizierten M e n s c h e n , ein signum, das all die o b e n genannten
Philosophen und viele Dichter (Baudelaire u.a.) gekennzeichnet hat.

Ich habe soeben den Begriff Asthetik in einem anderen Sinne


verwendet als in seinem ursprunglich griechischen und spater von
Alexander Gottlieb B a u m g a r t e n in den Meditationes
(1735) als einer
Theorie
der sinnlichen
Wahrnehmung"
(Asthetik=aw//?es/s)
ubemommenen
Sinne.
Wichtig
geworden
war
nach
dem
Zusammenbruch
des
fe/eo-logischen
SINN-Systems
des
Christentums mit seinen vorgangigen Interpretationen der Welt, dass
der Mensch von neuem, aus sich selbst heraus, die Welt w a h r n a h m ,
um zu bestimmen, wie die Welt ist und er, betroffen durch die Welt,
genauer durch die W i r k u n g e n der W a h r n e h m u n g der Welt, eine
Antwort fand, wie er sich zu ihr verhalten und in ihr handeln sollte.
Wichtig g e w o r d e n w a r vor allem, dass der M e n s c h aus seiner
existentiellen Aporie, sprich Langeweile - Folge der De-projektion , herauskam und sich auf den W e g machte, in B e w e g u n g setzte zu
neuen Zielen, wohin auch immer. B e w e g u n g u m der B e w e g u n g
willen, blofie Emotionen, reine Asthetik erwiesen sich dabei als
innengewendete, egofugale Ziele[9], w o sonst das Ich, das keine
neuen, auBengewendete Ziele sich zu setzen vermochte, v e r d a m m t
a r , in d e m Kerker des Ich=Ich zu erstarren.
w

86

Eine Theorie sinnlicher Wahrnehmungen


wurde also wichtig, wo
die
metaphysische
Welt
ubersinnlicher
Vorstellungen[\Q]
zusammengebrochen
war.
Und
die
psychisch-emotionalen
Wirkungen der sinnlichen W a h r n e h m u n g e n der Welt traten in den
geistigen Interessensbereich des M e n s c h e n , w o auf der einen Seite
der M e n s c h nicht m e h r vorgangig ethisch-metaphysisch (religios,
ideologisch) mit der Welt vermittelt u n d in sie eingebunden war, und
w o auf der anderen Seite - siehe psychisches V a k u u m , Langeweile ein Bedurfnis an p s y c h i s c h e m Erleben, Bewegung, Emotionen
entstand. D a s heiBt: Die P s y c h o l o g i e w u r d e z u s a m m e n mit der
Asthetik zu einer Disziplin der . P h i l o s o p h i c , z u m besonderen
G e g e n s t a n d der Reflexion, w o die geistig-psychischen Note des
M e n s c h e n metaphysisch nicht m e h r aufgefangen wurden.
Dieses Bedurfnis an p s y c h i s c h e m Erleben, B e w e g u n g (an
i m m a n e n t e r Transzendenz) hatte zur Folge, dass der M e n s c h begann,
die Welt so w a h r n e h m e n zu wollen,
dass sie ihn psychisch
b e w e g t e f l l ] , Wie dies sich in irdische Utopien iibersetzte, wie sie
nach der Aufklarung entstanden, soli hier nur am R a n d e erwahnt
w e r d e n [ 1 2 ] , J e d o c h Asthetik als sinnliche
Wahrnehmung
der Welt
erfolgte auch immer mehr u m der Asthetik als der
psychischen
Wirkungen der W a h r n e h m u n g e n der W e l t willen. Die W e l t wurde
nicht m e h r nur auf ihre asthetischen, emotionalen Wirkungen
abgeklopft im Bereich der arte-facta,
sondern auch in d e m der
natura-facta
(Schopenhauer: O h , wie asthetisch ist d o c h die
N a t u r ) " . SchlieBlich musste die Welt i m m e r mehr asthetisiert werden
- u m der psycho-asthetischen W i r k u n g e n willen (Asthetisierung der
Welt).
In d i e s e m weiten Sinne k o n n e n wir v o n Asthetik sprechen, ohne
uns auf die K u n s t beschranken zu mussen. Je mehr es u m die
psychischen
Wirkungen der W a h r n e h m u n g e n der Welt ging, weil ein
zunehmendes
Bedurfnis
an
ihnen
entstand,
umso
mehr
k o n n t e / m u s s t e sich der Bereich der sinnlichen W a h r n e h m u n g e n der
Welt iiber die arte-facta hinaus auch auf die natura-facta
beziehen.
Nicht m e h r nur die Kunst, kiinstlerische P h a n o m e n e wie Malerei,
Bildhauerei, Theater, Literatur im h e r k o m m l i c h e n Sinne waren
Quelle asthetischer E m p f m d u n g e n ; sondern alles, w a s in irgendeiner
W e i s e d a z u beitragen konnte, das einsame Ich zu reizen, zu
b e w e g e n , w u r d e asthetisch relevant, bis zu bloBen Vorstellungen wie

87

^ versenkte Kilometer von de M a r i a oder Gott, der (sich) als bloBe


Idee geniigt, u m zu w i r k e n [ 1 3 ] . Allein durch diese subjektive
Wendung einer auf die sinnliche W a h r n e h m u n g von Objekten
gerichteten asthetischen Theorie zu den psychischen W i r k u n g e n
dieser
Wahrnehmungen
konnte
Asthetik
als
eigenstandige
philosophic entstehen, wie sie W e l s c h und andere postulieren. Durch
die nicht-sinnliche, namlich geistig-psychologische E r k e n n u n g der
Wirkungen
sinnlicher
Wahrnehmungen
(visuell,
akustisch,
olefaktorisch, haptisch . . . ) im Bereich des Emotionalen, erschlossen
sich dem M e n s c h e n Aspekte, auf die er bislang nicht reflektiert
hatte[14].
Die Asthetik w u r d e revolutioniert, als sie sich der h e t e r o n o m e n
wahrheits-asthetischen
Auflagen
entledigte,
um
autonome
Faszinations-Asthetik zu w e r d e n . U n d in diesem revolutionaren
faszinations-asthetischen Sinne konnte die 60/70er Revolution - das
ist meine Behauptung, die hier bewiesen w e r d e n soli - zu einem
eminent asthetischen P h a n o m e n werden.
Ich wiederhole: Die Asthetik musste revolutioniert werden, damit
die Asthetik der Revolution oder w e n n Sie wollen das Asthetische an
der Revolution erkennbar w e r d e n konnte. Die Asthetik als sinnliche
Wahrnehmung von G e g e n s t a n d e n (arte- und natura-facta)
erwies
sich als Um-willen des Asthetischen als psychischer W i r k u n g e n von
Wahrnehmungen u n d H a n d l u n g e n [ 15]. Dies ging so weit, dass die
Erzeugung dieses Asthetischen, der Asthetik der psychischen
Wirkungen, mit w e l c h e n Mitteln auch immer, a u c h
der
gesellschaftlichen Revolution, verbunden mit Terror, Ziel, wie
gerade erwahnt, menschlichen H a n d e l n s w e r d e n konnte: Revolution
um der Revolution willen.

2. Teil
Diese fand i m W e s t e n in d e n 60/70er Jahren des vergangenen
Jahrhunderts statt. W a s die Bundesrepublik Deutschland betrifft, so
muss man sich vergegenwartigen: W i e Phonix aus der A s c h e war
Westdeutschland 20 Jahre n a c h der totalen Niederlage i m Jahre 1945
materiell
wieder
erstanden.
Man
sprach
weltweit
vom
Wirtschaftswunder
Deutschland,
die
Industrie
bliihte,
die
Gewerkschaften verzeichneten jahrlich progressive Lohnerhohungen.

88

Und die Zukunft? Sie erschien - abgesehen von d e m Kalten Krieg a m Horizont in rosigen Farben, und sie schien auf die M e n s c h e n im
wahrsten Sinne z u z u k o m m e n , naturgesetzlich[16], ohne dass die
einzelnen M e n s c h e n grofl etwas dafiir zu tun brauchten. Die
M e g a m a s c h i n e w a r noch nicht in Frage gestellt, weder okonomisch
noch okologisch. U n d die sich auftuenden individuellen Frei-Raume
der
Burger
wurden
durch
den
wachsenden
materiellen
Asthetikkonsum
erfullt,
die
metaphysischen
Defizite
also
uberwiegend asthetisch kompensiert.
Doch plotzlich w a r das Gespenst da. Ein Gespenst geht u m in
Europa - das Gespenst des K o m m u n i s m u s " [ 1 7 ] . Diesmal tauchte
dieses G e s p e n s t vor allem in Universitatsstadten auf, und es war, wie
schon
mehr
als
ein
Jahrhundert
davor,
gefiirchtet,
ein
Schreckgespenst. D o c h viel mehr als epater le bourgeois
war
ernsthaft nicht drin. D e n n die meisten M e n s c h e n erkannten keine
materielle Not und somit keine Not-wendigkeit
fur eine
gesellschaftliche marxistische Revolution, die den Wohlstand der
Besitzenden zugunsten der Nichtbcsitzenden bedrohte. Zu sehr
w a r e n die M e n s c h e n im Westen alle schon in irgendeiner Weise
Besitzende.
Die Revolution w a r - nach d e m wirtschaftlichen Aufschwung eher uberfliissig, und so mussten die G r u n d e fur sie im Uberflussigen
gesucht werden, vor allem bei den Akteuren, denen sie aus
materieller Sicht a m wenigsten etwas bringen konnte und vor allem
sollte. D a r u m ging es j a nicht. Nicht unmittelbar eingebunden in die
Gesellschaft handelte es sich bei den Akteuren um Studenten
biirgerlicher Provenienz, die an den Unis g e n u g Zcit hatten, sich iiber
das flache Leben des establishments
h i n w c g in ideale W e l t e n hineinund h o c h z u t r a u m e n , womit sie sich geistig immer m e h r der
wohlstandsgefalligen Gesellschaft, in der sie nichts verloren hatten,
entfremdeten, einer Gesellschaft, die ihnen fur die Zukunft im
schlimmsten Fall die Wiederholung dessen bot, womit sie sich jetzt
schon, in der Gegenwart, diskonform fiihlten.
K e n n z e i c h n e n d fur die Revolution w a r ihre Plotzlichkeit, sie kam
w i e ein Blitz aus heiterem H i m m e l , verbreitete sich schnell in den
groBeren Universitatsstadten bis in die Provinz, und war nach einigen
wenigen Jahren wieder weg aus der Offentlichkeit, verpufft. Konnte
m a n sie ernst n e h m e n ? Ihre Hauptakteure waren, wie erwahnt,

89

(jberwicgend j u n g e Leute, Studenten, und ihre Aktionen stellten sich


jar als ein widersprtichiges G e m i s c h aus Spiel, usefull play fullness,
StraBentheater, amiisanten graphisch-akustischen Transparenten u n d
hochgeistigen,
ernsthaften,
den
sozialistischen
Weltgeist
beschwdrenden
endlosen
Uniund
Medien-Debatten
und
publikationen, die durch ihr N i v e a u uber den asthetischen
Ursprungs-Charakter der Revolution hinwegtauschen, v o n ihm
ablenken konnten. Durchsetzt waren die Aktionen gleichzeitig durch
aktuelle moralische Versatzstucke, Impulse: Vietnamkrieg (Ho-tschiminh)[18] und Befreiungskriege in Lateinamerika (Che Guevara),
und in Deutschland gait es, nationalsozialistische Vergangenheit zu
bewaltigen u n d in der neu erstandenen Demokratie autoritare Reste
auszumerzen. Fiir mich zeigte sich schon zu Beginn der u b e r w i e g e n d
asthetische Charakter dieser Revolution, an d e m auch das
sozialistische D r e h b u c h nichts andern konnte, das nach ihrem
Ausbruch, also a posteriori[19], in den Marx-Seminaren vor allem in
Berlin und Frankfurt von Ideologen wie Rudi Dutschke geschrieben
wurde, u m die spontan (Spontis) entstandene Revolution theoretisch
zu untermauern und geschichtsmetaphysisch[20] einzuordnen. D e n n
es storte die Asthetik der n e u e n klassenkarnpferischen Revolution,
dass die Arbeiter - im Gegensatz zu den Renault-Arbeitern in Paris bei den Demonstrationen in Berlin nicht zu sehen waren. Diejenigen,
denen die Revolution zugute k o m m e n sollte, fiihlten sich durch den
Kapitalismus nicht ausgebeutet, im Gegenteil, sie sahen in i h m eine
willkommene Moglichkeit fur ein immer besseres materielles Leben.
Im besten Fall n a h m e n sie als belustigte Zuschauer, als Zaungaste an
den studentischen Demonstrationen teil, und sollte sich einer von
ihnen in ihren Reihen verlieren, w u r d e er quasi als Held gefeiert[21].
Der Widersprach, der darin bestand, dass das sujet der marxistischen
Revolution der Arbeiter ist, der real existierende Arbeiter im
Kapitalismus j e n e r Jahre j e d o c h von Sozialismus nichts wissen
wollte, musste dadurch aufgehoben werden, dass m a n sich den
revolutionaren Arbeiter durch entsprechende
Aufklarungsarbeit
heran erzog. So gingen viele studentische Linke in die Fabriken, u m
die Arbeiter in harter Aufklarungsarbeit von ihrem
falschen
Gesellschafts- u n d Geschichtsbewusstsein zu befreien und als
Klassenkampfer zu rehabilitieren[22]. K e i n Wunder, dass m a n c h e
Studenten bei ihrer padagogischen Arbeit auf keine Sympathie

90

stieBen, eher auf Feindschaft von Seiten der Arbeiter, die sich i
kleines kapitalistisches Gliick ungern v o n besserwisserischen
Studenten n e h m e n u n d gegen ein zukunftiges Arbeiterparadies
eintauschen lieBen. Als dann n o c h die Chefideologen z u m langen
M a r s c h durch die Institutionen" bliesen, horte der SpaB bei den
meisten Studenten auf. Hinzu k a m , dass es immer m e h r zu einer
Gewalteskalation g e k o m m e n war. Ich hatte das Kaviaressen satt"
gab Susanne Albrecht, Mitglied der B a d e r - M e i n h o f - G r u p p e " , nach
d e m G r a n d ihrer Teilnahme a m M o r d des Dresdner Bankdirektors
befragt, an. Die Sattheit am Kaviar k o n n t e den meisten ernsthaft
nicht A r g u m e n t sein, u m eine ^ / / - R e v o l u t i o n zu rechtfertigen - und
daranter m a c h t e n es viele Revolutionare nicht - , die das Leben von
M e n s c h e n kostete. So horte die Lust an der Revolution, am
Revoltieren auf, n a c h d e m sie z u m todlichen Ernst eskaliert war in
einem Augenblick, als gleichzeitig das marxistische D r e h b u c h an der
Wirklichkeit scheiterte. U m der W A H R H E I T eines Systems, um
einer Theorie willen, mochte sie n o c h so heilig sein, konnte die
Wirklichkeit[23] nicht m e h r langer geleugnet werden.
n r

U m zu wiederholen: Die neomarxistische Revolution erfolgte aus


einem uberschussigen Handlungsbedurfnis der Akteure heraus, das
im tiberfluss begriindet war. Nicht weil es ihnen materiell schlecht,
sondern weil es ihnen gut, zu gut ging, revoltierten sie zugunsten
einer gesellschaftlichen Klasse, die v o n diesen Gunsten nichts wissen
wollten. D a s s die G r a n d e im Uberflussigen gesucht w e r d e n mussten,
ist wortlich zu verstehen. D e n n es w a r gerade der Mangel an Not, der
den A k t e u r e n der Revolution, den ,je m 'en foutistes",
buchstablich
zur Not, zur psychischen, ek-sistentiellen g e w o r d e n war. Salopp
gesagt, sie revoltierten, weil sie nichts nichts Besseres zu tun hatten.
Die asthetische Revolutionshypothese w u r d e vor allem auch
bestatigt
durch
die
gleichzeitig
verlaufenden
anderen
Diskonformitatsbewegungen wie d e n Hippies, der new wave, die
allerdings ihre Unzufriedenheit mit d e m establishment,
nicht dadurch
aufhoben, dass sie die bestehende Gesellschaft durch die Schaffung
einer vermeintlich besseren verandern wollten, sondern sich damit
begniigten, unmittelbar ihr Bewusstsein zu verandern, ihren Kopf I
mit D r o g e n [ 2 4 ] . U n d Dauer-Sex.
D o c h der beste Beweis fur d e n asthetischen Charakter der
Revolution war schlieBlich ihr Ende selbst. Nicht weil m a n die

91

ratendierten Ziele erreicht hatte, horte sie auf, sondern weil m a n


sich bewusst wurde, dass das marxistische Drehbuch nicht stimmte
und vor allem, weil die sich eskalierenden Gewaltmittel in k e i n e m
Verhaltnis mehr standen zu d e m , was revolutionar m a c h b a r war.
jytochte die Lust
am Revoltieren
noch
Pudding-Attentate
rechtfertigen, die M o r d e an reprasentativen Personlichkeiten des
Systems konnte sie nicht. Hatte die geistige Arroganz in den 60/70er
Jahren die marxistischen Intellektuellen nicht gehindert, iiber die
Mauer Richtung Osten zu schauen u m zu sehen, w a s aus der
sozialistischen Hoffnung A n d r e Gides v o n 1936[25] g e w o r d e n war,
hatte es die westliche marxistische Studenten-Revolution bestimmt
nicht gegeben. Oder unter e i n e m anderen N a m e n .
BennoHtibner
Zaragoza, 21. 3. 2009

1. Wenn ich hier von der "Asthetik der Revolution" spreche, dann
verwende ich den Begriff Asthetik" in einem anderen Sinne als wenn wir
von sozialistischer oder christlicher Asthetik sprechen. Der Begriff Asthetik
ist derart weit gedehnt worden, auch in diesem Essay, dass es manchmal
fast eine Zumutung an den Leser, mehr noch an den Horer ist, sich jeweils
vorzustellen, wie er gemeint ist.
2. Benno HUBNER, Langeweile verandert die Welt. Zur dialektischen
Liaison von SDS-Ideologie und Hippie-Kult, in: Stuttgarter Zeitung, 28. 8.
1970.
3. Seit Benno HUBNER, Martin Heidegger - ein Seyns-Verruckter, Wien
2008, verwende ich die Ausdriicke fe/eo-logisch und kausalAogisch, um
zwei unterschiedliche Denkweisen zu unterscheiden. Diese werden eigens
thematisiert werden in einem neuen Buch, dessen Erscheinen fur 2010
vorgesehen ist. Derselbe, Der metaphysische Identitats-Bruch. Einbruch des
fa*a/-logischen in das fe/eo-logische Denken.
4. Ich beziehe mich auf Daten, die behaupten, zwei Drittel des heutigen
Russlands waren orthodox. Wenn man diese Daten vergleicht einmal mit
der eigenen 70-jahrigen atheistischen sozialistischen Geschichte Russlands
nd zum anderen damit, dass Spanien, im vergangenen Jahrhundert das
katholischste Land Europas, heute das laizistischste Land Europas ist, kann
man iiber die Logik geistesgeschichtlicher Entwicklungen nur staunen.
u

92

5. Denen eine Anthropologic des meta-physischen Bediirfnisses zugrunde


liegt. Siehe: Benno HUBNER, Der de-projizierte Mensch. Meta-physik der
Langeweile, Wien, 1991.
6. Wohin wir nicht wollten.
7. Was meiner Ansicht nach nicht der Fall ist.
8. Was anthropologisch eher der Fall ist, wenn wir den Menschen
bestimmmen als das Tier, das sich langweilt".
9. Das Ich wird zum Ziel eines Handelns, das darauf gerichtet ist, es von
sich selbst, also aus dem Kerker des Ich=Ich, zu befreien.
10. Die das te/eo/o-logische SINN-System der Religion konstituiert hatten.
11. Erkenntnisse sind in starkem MaBe durch Interesse geleitet:
feministische Gnoseologie, Geronto-Gnoseologie. War die Welt in
Geschlossenen SINN-Gesellschaften sowohl ontologisch als auch ethisch
vorgeschrieben und wurde sie von den Einzelnen durch das homogene
Prisma des Systems wahrgenommen, so wurde sie in Offenen ZweckGesellschaften immer mehr wahrgenommen und erkannt auch durch die
Interessen und Sensibilitaten der Einzelnen.
12. Nach der Liquidation der christlichen Eschatologie (De-projektion) ist
es aus der meta-physischen Bedurfnis-Anthropologie heraus verstandlich,
dass die darauf folgende Epoche der Moderne sich als eine der diesseitsmetaphysischen Utopien kennzeichnete.
13. Wer immer die Kunst besitzt, andere Menschen zu erregen, ist
Kunstler, auch wenn die Erregung nur uber eine Vorstellung induziert wird
von etwas, das nicht ist, nicht zu sein braucht (de Maria). In diesem Sinne
ware Gott der groBte Kunstler oder genauer das groBte Kunstwerk des
Menschen, denn er hat als bloBe Vorstellung, als klingender NAME von
Etwas, das nicht zu sein braucht, das ein Nichts ist, ein Vakuum, in das die
Menschen gewisse Eigenschaften hineingeschrieben haben, um es zu fullen,
die Menschen seit ihren Ursprtingen bewegt, verzaubert. Bewegt auch zum
Handeln. Gott als AESTHETIKUM und ETHIKUM in Einem." (Aus:
Benno HUBNER, Der metaphysische Identitats-Bruch. Einbruch des
fanwaZ-logischen in das /e/<?o-logische Denken, unveroffentlicht.)
14. Die Emanzipation der Kunst von wahrheitsasthetischen (religiosen,
ideologischen, sozialen, sozialistischen) Anspriichen, wie sie Adorno noch
erhoben hatte, hat es moglich gemacht, sowohl blofi faszinationsasthetische
Werke in jcder Menge und Art herzustellen, als auch metaphysische
Terrorakte asthetisch wie ein feierwerk zu konsumieren (11/9/2001)
15. Oder bloBer Vorstellungen: de Maria.
16. Mehr als geschichtsgesetzlich im marxistischen Sinne.
17. Karl MARX, Friedrich ENGELS, Das Manifest der Kommunistischen
Partei, 21. Februar 1848.

93

1 g Revolution um der Revolution willen? Weil es mehr SpaB machte, auch


ethisch sinnvoller war, als sich in Vorlesungen Theorien iiber die
pluralbildung von child zu children anzuhoren. Man vergesse nicht, es war
in Zeiten des Vietnamkriegs.
j 9 Zuerst der Ausbruch der Revolution und dann ihre theoretische
Rechtfertigung. Die Diachronie ist wichtig fur die asthetische SchuldZuweisung der Studentenrevolution.
20. Nach der materialistischen Geschichtsmetaphysik.
21. In Paris demonstrierten kommunistische Renaultarbeiter zusammen mit
Studenten. In Berlin waren Schreie zu vernehmen: Wir haben einen
Arbeiter in unseren Reihen"
22. Das falsche Bewusstsein, Studenten in die Fabriken. Nachdem die
soziale Wirklichkeit keine wirklichen Argumente fur eine gesellschaftliche
Revolution lieferte, Und die Theorie, die Rechtfertigung fur ihr
revolutionares Handeln fanden sie, da in den marxistischen Seminaren. Dort
fanden sie die fehlende Handlungslogik bedurfte (Ziel, Mittel) fur ein
bestehendes Handlungsbedurfnis.
23. Anstatt die neue soziale Wirklichkeit zu akzeptieren, versuchten die
jungen neomarxistischen Chefideologen diese derart umzugestalten, dass
der alte Marx wieder Recht bekam, ein Versuch, der alsbald scheitern
musste. Bei steigenden Lohnen war es auch eine Sisyphus-Arbeit, die
bundesrepublikanischen Arbeiter von der Schlechtigkeit des kapitalistischen
Systems zu uberzeugen.
24. Da die Diskonformitat mit der bestehenden Gesellschaft - schrieb ich in
dem genannten Essay 1970 - die des Bewusstseins der gegenwartigen
Gesellschaft. mit einer vorgestellten besseren ist, kann die Diskonformitat
aufgehoben
werden
entweder
durch
die
Transformierung
(Revolutionierung) der bestehenden Gesellschaft in eine bessere oder durch
die unmittelbare Beeinflussung beziehungsweise Aufhebung und Betaubung
des Bewusstseins durch Drogen.
25. Andre GIDE in Jacques DERRIDA, Ruckkehr aus Moskau, Wien 2005,
59: Das Schicksal der Kultur ist in unseren Kopfen aufs engste mit dem
Geschick der UdSSR verbunden. Wir werden fur sie kampfen" Und weiter:
Wovon wir traumten, was wir kaum zu hoffen wagten, aber mit all unseren
Willenskraften anstrebten, dort fand es statt. Es gab also ein Stuck Erde, wo
die Utopie im Begriff war, Realitat zu werden".

94

[ 1 ] ,
.
,
, .
,
, , , , ,
.


-
, , , ,
(
).
, , ,
,

,
,
[ 2 ] .
,
, ,

(
)

- .
, , ,

,

, - .

95


_ , ,

,



- -
zoe.

,
, .

, ,
, ,
.
, , ,

.
, -
,
( ),

,

,

. , , ,

- zoe,

.
,

, ,
.
, ,

96

,
,

1. Richard Shusterman, Body Consciousness. A Philosophy of Mindfulness


and Somaesthetics. Cambridge University Press, New York 2008, P.8.
2. Ibid., P.14.
:

Dr. Monika

..

Bakke

SOMAESTHETICS
PERSPECTIVE

IN

THE

POSTANTHROPOCENTRIC

There is no doubt that n o w a d a y s b o d y (soma) is in the center of


attention as w e want to look better, live healthier, longer and
experience m o r e pleasure. A s w e seek all that our everyday practices
increasingly revolve around g y m s , y o g a classes, diets but also
medicine, genetics, and biotechnologies as they promise more and
more sophisticated augmentation and vital support for our bodies.
Desires for high performance bodies not only shape the w a y we live
and what w e do, but also influence the w a y w e are and w h o m we are.
Therefore w e need to reconsider the questions of our bodily
belonging and identity, responsibility a n d sustainability in the
environment including new territories such as expanding "extreme"
environments of biotech labs w h e r e technologically augmented
bodies and b o d y parts dwell in a highly controlled set ups of manm a d e environmental networks.
This intense interest in bodies, due to its scale and complexity,
sometimes called a somatic
turn, cannot b e ignored even by
philosophy w h i c h historically rather avoided the nondiscoursive
sphere of body. H o w e v e r , A m e r i c a n pragmatist Richard Shusterman
offers a v i e w of philosophy w h i c h is able to embrace critically
current bodily practices, claiming that: "Philosophy should be
transformational instead of foundational. Rather than a metascience
for grounding our current cognitive and cultural activities, it should

97

be cultural criticism that aims to reconstruct our practices a n d


institutions so as to improve the experienced quality of our l i v e s " [ l ] .
Shusterman refers to the G r e e k and R o m a n tradition to s h o w that
the philosophical attention to the w a y of living or rather a search for
good life has always been closely related to various b o d y practices.
For that, and for n o w , he advocates "practicing philosophy not
simply as a discoursive genre, a form of writing, but as a discipline
of embodied life"[2]. In order to critically embrace wide range of
contemporary b o d y practices and uses, Shusterman proposes a
project of somaesthetics
involved in promoting "hightened somatic
self-awareness"[3] which should find its expression in theory and in
practice. As he claims: "Somaesthetics is devoted to the critical,
ameliorative study of o n e ' s experience and use of o n e ' s b o d y as a
locus of sensory-aesthetic appreciation (aisthesis) and creative selffashioning. It is therefore likewise devoted to the k n o w l e d g e ,
discourses, practices, and bodily disciplines that structure such
somatic care or can improve it" [4].
This n e w discipline of somaesthetics
is meant to b e analytical,
pragmatic, and practical, yet only pursued together these three
branches offer a n e w quality in philosophical attention to b o d y [ 5 ] .
A first branch, analytic somaesthetics
offers a theoretical approach to
questions of bodily perceptions and other bodily practices involved
in creation of k n o w l e d g e and p o w e r relations. It operates in a
descriptive m o d e in the zones of ontology and epistemology.
Pragmatic somaesthetics,
a second branch, focuses on use of bodies.
It's prescriptive and normative character aims at the i m p r o v e m e n t
and critique of b o d y practices. Finally, practical
somaesthetics
differes
significantly
from the previous two branches
of
somaesthetics as it is not devoted to producing texts but advocates
actual, physical involvement in various body practices. He realizes
that the very practical aspect is "the most neglected b y a c a d e m i c
body philosophers" [6] therefore it needs special attention and
encouragement. Shusterman believes that such crucial issues for a
classical philosophical attention as self-knowledge, self-styling and
self-care cannot b e properly recognized without real bodily
mvolvement and participation.
a

However, as already mentioned, somaesthetics


is more of an o n
going project than a given set of ideas therefore its future fully

98

depends on its usefulness. Moreover, Shusterman believes that " [ ]


long as our future involves transformations in bodily use and
experience, somatic self-consciousness should play a central role
tracking, guiding, and responding to these c h a n g e s " [7]. For that we
should estimate directions and extends of possible transformations
and augmentations of bodies. Taking into consideration not only
fashions and popular desires but also recent scientific findings and
the great impact of technologies, w e should realize that w e need a
reconsidered v i e w of body itself. Yet, our changing bodies and
technologically
augmented
body
practices
require
from
somaesthetics to open up to the biological, molecular and digital
perspectives. In respect to technoscientific developments, w e feel the
growing pressure to ask the question of the future of body: what are
the tendencies of body development and enhancement? W h a t are the
m a i n directions in biotechnological d e v e l o p m e n t ? What is the future
ofbody?
a

Bodies in biomedia
Shusterman suggests that the contemporary growing interest in
'real b o d i e s ' m a y actually b e a counter effect of the impact of digital
media, in other w o r d s , a desire for the most real body which is not
mediated but serves as a m e d i u m for oneself c o m e s as a result of
ubiquitous digitalization. Unlike Shusterman, Jay Bolter and Richard
Grusin do not believe in i m m e d i a c y and talk about a "double logic of
m e d i a " w h e n they claim that "[o]ur culture wants both to multiply its
m e d i a and to erase all its m e d i a in the act of multiplying them"[8].
Hence, even for a body, there is n o escape from mediating as we
only deal with a constant process of remediation: "In its character as
a m e d i u m , the b o d y both remediates and is remediated."[9].
A c k n o w l e d g i n g this dynamics a m e d i a critic Eugene Thacker
proposes a concept of biomedia
which situates the b o d y in the
interdisciplinary perspective w h i c h includes life sciences and
biotechnologies which n o w play a significant role in our selfunderstanding and self-creating:
" T h e ' b o d y ' in b i o m e d i a is thus always understood in t w o ways as a biological body, a biomolecular body, a species body, a patient
body, and as a body that is ' c o m p i l e d ' through modes of

visualization,

modeling,

data

99

extraction,

and

in

silico

s i m u l a t i o n ! 10].
Although it has been widely aknowledged that 'future generations
y
see the 21st century as the beginning of the A g e of
n j l o g y ' [ l l ] , Shusterman speaking about 'real b o d i e s ' surprisingly
ignores biological knowledge and biotechnologies and their major
impact on the contemporary understanding and use of bodies.
Shusterman prefers the term s o m a rather than body in order to
emphasize that his "concern is with the living, feeling, sentient,
purposive b o d y rather than a mere physical corpus of flesh a n d
bones"[12]. Hence, it is apparent that he acknowledges the historical
"negative associations of the term ' b o d y " ' [ 1 3 ] , but he also realizes
that "the b o d y constitutes an essential, fundamental dimension of our
identity"[14]. Therefore significant changes in perception of b o d y
would certainly influence and possibly even alter the self-identity.
As Shusterman puts it, somaesthetics,
acknowledges that 'somatic
self-conscious' subject is " a n essentially situated, relational, and
symbiotic self rather than the traditional concept of a u t o n o m o u s self
grounded in an individual, monadic, indestructible, and unchanging
soul"[15]. Life sciences indeed prove that no b o d y c a n survive in
isolation and our survival depends on various symbiotic relations
with nonhuman bodies. For that w e should extend the notion of b o d y
to nonhuman bodies as our bodies without the n o n h u m a n ones
cannot stay alive. N o body is removed from the environment as life
is always located in a specific environment and dwells in an
exchange with it.
Our b o d y is not a sealed vessels but a symbiotic system all the
way down to individual cells, which themselves, as L y n n Margulis
claims, evolved in a process of endosymbiosis
that is incorporation
on the level of o n e cell organisms[16]. Indeed our bodies are
environments within environment, "a sort of ornately elaborated
mosaic of microbes in various states of symbiosis"[17]. H o w e v e r ,
with this move from anthropocentric to a biocentric perspective, the
concept of an individual as the embodied unity needs a revision. A s
Dorion Sagan suggests:
ffla

'Body is not o n e self but a fiction of a self built from a m a s s of


interacting selves. A b o d y ' s capacities are literally the result of what
mcorporates; the self is not only corporal but corporate"[18].
11

100

Life is based on connections, networking, and exchange on all


levels. W e live a m o n g other life forms, affecting and being affected
by the organic and inorganic environment; w e always incorporate
others, one w a y or another. O u r identities as our sexual orientations
are never stable; our bodies are multiplicities
constantly
c o m m u n i c a t i n g and merging with the organic and inorganic matter
w e consist of. E m b o d i e d life in its biological vitality, which now
even in philosophical reflection is not limited only to h u m a n life,
never stops but m o v e s on in a constant flux regardless of any
individual loss.
U n d e r the impact of knowledge p r o d u c e d by molecular biology,
the living T - the h u m a n b o d y can n o longer be understood as
unitary and only human. Stressing this point a philosopher of life
sciences D o n n a H a r a w a y m a k e s a very insightful confession:
"I love the fact that h u m a n g e n o m e s can b e found in only about
10 percent of all the cells that occupy the m u n d a n e space I call my
body; the other 90 percent of the cells are filled with the genomes of
bacteria, fungi, protists, and such, s o m e of w h i c h play in a symphony
necessary to m y b e i n g alive at all, a n d s o m e of which are hitching a
ride and doing the rest of me, of us, n o harm. I a m vastly
o u t n u m b e r e d by m y tiny c o m p a n i o n s ; better put, I b e c o m e an adult
h u m a n b e i n g in c o m p a n y with these tiny m e s s m a t e s . T o b e one is
always to b e c o m e with m a n y " [ 1 9 ] .
D o n n a H a r a w a y for w h o m ' h u m a n nature is a multi-species
interdependency' points out that although w e all k n o w it, we keep
denying it[20]. For this very reason, nonanthropocentric ideas are
still v i e w e d with suspicion a n y w h e r e else than in the life sciences.
A n d yet, this unprecedented situation of not k n o w i n g o n e ' s location
in respect to other life forms, as this location is no longer
anthropocentrically fixed, is destabilizing but desirable because
holding o n to the traditionally established frameworks, makes it
impossible to c o m p r e h e n d and conceptualize our current condition.
Body/Mind and Bios-Zoe
In his project of somaesthetics,
Shusterman claims that his goal
has been to o v e r c o m e mind/body d i c h o t o m y and not empowering the
b o d y side of it. However, I believe that in the biomedia reality of the
posthumanist world what w e need is not an anthropocentric mind-

101

body unity but a radical change in the w a y w e c o m p r e h e n d our


bodily location in the world. For that w e need a refocusing of our
attention from b o d y - m i n d to bios-zoe distinction. T h e latter was
made by the Greeks[21] and n o w proves to b e very useful now. Zoe,
Paul Rabinow points out, "referred to the simple fact of being
alive and applied to all living beings per s e ' while bios 'indicated the
appropriate form given to a w a y of life of an individual or
group"[22]. In the humanities it w a s mainly bios - h u m a n life which has been considered worth philosophical attention while zoe
as its animal other remained marginalized. Somaesthetics, however,
has been clearly focused o n bios (human life). Yet, in the
contemporary situation, while we are strongly effected
by
biotechnologies and informed b y molecular biology, bios can n o
longer be isolated from its vital grounding in zoe. However,
embracing zoe has some significant consequences.
A feminist
philosopher,
Rosi
Braidotti,
in her
book
Transpositions, talks about a return of "real b o d i e s " w h i c h actually
means the return of life understood as zoe[23]. Unlike Shusterman,
she claims that "[w]hat returns n o w is the ' o t h e r ' of the living b o d y
in its humanistic definition: the other face of bios, that is to say, the
generative vitality of non- or p r e - h u m a n or animal life"[24]. She
points out that the binary bios/zoe, w h e r e zoe w a s always the worse
half of bios, has b e e n crucial for western metaphysics. It also has a
gender aspect, as w o m e n traditionally have b e e n situated closer to
zoe than man, b e c a u s e they nourish life not only through their
services related to the realm of the household m u n d a n e but also
passing their biological resources directly from their bodies
functioning as incubators and source of vital nutrients for the
emerging life. It is since Antiquity, as Braidotti puts it, that "zoe
stands for mindless vitality of Life carrying on independently of and
regardless of rational control. This is dubious privilege attributed to
the non-humans and to all ' o t h e r s ' of M a n " [ 2 5 ] . Nonetheless, there is
no bios without zoe and n o life can continue in isolation as life is
always embodied and embedded.
a S

The specificity of the contemporary desire for zoe c o m e s from the


impact of biotechnological a d v a n c e m e n t s and our awareness 'nforrned molecular biology - of w h o m w e are in relation to other
life forms. Desire for zoe prevails and influences contemporary

102

debates about life itself, h u m a n exeptionalism and human-anirn i


relations as m u c h as biotech industries. In this respect, Nikolas R o s
in his b o o k The Politics of Life Itself. Biomedicine,
Power, and
Subjectivity
in the Twenty-First
Century,
gives a very accurate
diagnose of our current situation:
O u r very understanding o f w h o w e are, of the life-forms w e are
and the forms of life w e inhabit, h a v e folded bios back to zoe. By this
I m e a n that the question o f t h e good life - bios - h a s become
intrinsically a matter of the vital processes o f our animal life zoe[26].
Postanthropocentric thinkers rejecting the conviction of human
exceptionalism - therefore against the grain of the Greek and
Christian tradition - and focusing o n p r e - h u m a n and non-human
aspects of zoe - point out the absolute necessity of considering any
living being, including h u m a n animal, as ecological entity[27]. It is
despite m a n y old and n e w attempts and tendencies to isolate some
life forms, a s e.g. h u m a n s or in vitro life, or to reduce the embodied
life, zoe, to the genetic code. Life, however, is affected and affecting,
that is involved in the n e t w o r k o f trans-species symbiotic
dependencies a n d in this perspective even h u m a n b o d y as the
guarantee of self-identity needs to b e reconsidered.
a

B o d y as zoe reveals the necessity o f the endless process of


m e r g i n g o f vitality a n d death. W i t h its disregard for individuality zoe
will always b e an outrage for the anthropocentric subject, yet its
hidden but inherent existence a n d recent emergence is also an
evidence that the humanist subject is already infected b y nonhumans
- actually m o r e infected than ever - as it opens up to the immensity
of the life of w h i c h it consists a n d in w h i c h it can participate with
joy. In bringing together multiplicity and the open-end perspective,
as it is non-anthropocentric and non-teleological, zoe emerges as a
generative p o w e r and its o v e r w h e l m i n g vitality, as Braidotti
postulates, calls for reconsideration in positive terms a w a y from
H a n n a h A r e n d t ' s perspective on life itself[28] and A g a m b e n ' s bare
life[29]. H o w e v e r Braidotti's call for reinvigorating-rejuvenating of
life as zoe should not be confused with transhumanist fantasies of
immortality gained through the eradication of aging and death
possibly available in the future to the isolated h u m a n or posthuman
subjects. Instead, w e need to open u p to t h e n o n h u m a n realm of lif

103

order to "reclaim [our] zoe-philic location"[30] while fulfilling


'the m i n i m u m r e q u i r e m e n t ' , that is, abandoning or actually outliving
anthropocentrism.
from body techniques to
biotechnologies
Unlike b o d y techniques[31] advocated in the project of
somaesthetics, technologies - digital a n d biological - are actually
located outside t h e b o d y a n d v i e w e d in negative terms. S h u s t e r m a n
claims that "[fjhe m o r e information a n d sensory stimulation our n e w
technologies provide us, the greater the need for cultivating a
somaesthetic sensitivity to detect a n d deal with threats of stressful
overload"[32]. H o w e v e r not all the technologies have a negative
impact on our bodies as w e use various prosthetic technologies machines, chemicals and combinations of them, some o f w h i c h are
completely integrated into our bodies a n d constant m o n i t o r i n g o f
them is neither necessary n o r desirable.
Nowadays o u r perception of individual identity is also
technologically mediated and extended into the molecular level.
DNA has b e c o m e our ultimate signature used not only in a dramatic
cases of forensics. A s Thacker points out,"[t]he biological a n d digital
domains are no longer rendered ontologically distant, b u t instead are
seen to inhere in each other, the biological ' i n f o r m s ' the digital, j u s t
as the digital 'corporealizes' the biological"[33]. G e n sequencing,
that is translating b o d y into a code and then b a c k gives u s a
possibility not only to modify bodies but also - in a near future - to
synthesize them. These technologies w o r k 'under t h e skin' and
cannot be considered on the traditional macro level. W e must
acknowledge that, although
often
away
from
our sight,
biotechnologies produce, modify, a n d sustain life in forms n o longer
comprehensible
within
the traditional
Western
conceptual
frameworks but nevertheless these changes have a direct impact on
our own bodies and bodies of future generations. For that, I believe,
somaesthetics should o p e n u p to this molecular gaze a n d e m b r a c e it
a vital part o f its o w n future.
a s

One of the most important areas for the use of biotechnologies


h a direct impact on our bodies is medicine. This brings special
attention to the status of what Susan Squire calls liminal lives. T h e
latter are understood as "those beings marginal to h u m a n life w h o

W l t

104

hold rich potential for our ongoing biomedical negotiations with, and
interventions in, the paradigmatic life crisis: birth, growth, aging, and
d e a t h " [ 3 4 ] . T h e y include in vitro
lives and technologically
a u g m e n t e d therapies and other procedures directly effecting our
bodies.
Let m e stress again, that n o w , m o r e than ever, we need to
recognize not only the impersonal and n o n h u m a n vitality of zoe
shared by all life but also technologically translated and augmented
bodies and accepts t h e m as a part of our world of symbiotic
dependencies and responsibilities. A n d yet, it seems absolutely
crucial not to isolate h u m a n life as exceptional as well as any
technologically augmented life as an object positioned outside of the
ecology w h e r e w e belong. T h e s e n e w technological environments
are our o w n , not only because w e created them, but also because our
o w n lives unavoidably and in a complex w a y are now
technologically augmented.
Postanthropocentric
embodied
subjects
"Sterility" and isolation of the h u m a n subject are n o longer
desired factors of h u m a n existence as w e finally understand that our
sustainability is conditioned b y n o n - h u m a n s . H o w e v e r , this newly
emerging awareness vis-a-vis technologically a u g m e n t e d life and our
realization that even the h u m a n b o d y is not "all h u m a n " subverts the
long established stability of the anthropocentric subject. I believe this
is a highly invigorating shift from the anthropocentric stupor of the
rigid subject isolated from other life forms to the m u c h needed
multiple subject operating in a m o d e of continuity and symbiosis.
Faced with the evidence of life sciences, especially the molecular
biology, w e m a y chose to give up the anthropocentric convictions
and revise the notion of the e m b o d i e d subject. This radical, yet
crucial, reconfiguration of the subject, as Rosi Braidotti explains,
"starts with asserting the primacy of life as production, or zoe as
generative p o w e r " [ 3 5 ] . Here, anthropocentric subject is no longer
privileged because "zoe rules through a trans-species and trans-genic
interconnection, or rather a chain of connections which can best be
described as an ecological philosophy of non-unitary, embodied
subjects"[36]. T h e radical shift from anthropocentric to to zoe-centnc
perspective indicates that life itself can n o longer be considered only

105

a passive object of discourses and actions, on the contrary, it is itself


active as it moves on, no matter what and in whatever form and
mutation it m a y momentarily take.
For the traditional
humanist
subject
of
somaesthetics,
contemporary rejection of anthropocentrism m a y evoke the
unprecedented fear of not k n o w i n g o n e ' s location in respect to other
life forms, as the location of h u m a n s in the environment is n o longer
fixed according to the traditional hierarchies. This n e w case of not
knowing certainly does not m e a n being deprived of k n o w l e d g e or
isolated from it. O n the contrary, for humans it m e a n s being
confronted with an excess of n e w cognitive possibilities, of
awareness of the connections, and the immensity of interrelations
with the n o n h u m a n bodies. T o help us embrace this n e w bodily
awareness is a vital task of somaesthetics of the future which is
already now.
1. Richard Shusterman, Practicing Philosophy. Pragmatism and the
Philosophical life. Routledge, New York and London, 1997, p. 157.
2. Shusterman, Practicing..., p. 176.
3. Richard Shusterman, Body Consciousness. A Philosophy of Mindfulness
and Somaesthetics. Cambridge University Press, NY, 2008, p.8.
4. Richard Shusterman, Performing Live. Aesthetic Alternatives for the
Ends of Art. Cornell University Press. Ithaca, London 2000, p. 138.
5. Shusterman points out that all three aspects: analyticial, pragmatic, and
practical approaches to the body are present in writings of John Dewey and
Michel Foucault.
6. Richard Shusterman, Performing Live..., p. 143.
7. Richard Shusterman, Body Consciousness, p. 14.
8. Jay Bolter, Richard Grusin, Remediation. Understanding New Media.
The MIT Press, Cambridge MA, London UK 1999, p.5.
9- Bolter, Grusin, Remediation..., p.238.
10. Eugene Thaker, Biomedia. University of Minnesota Press, 2004, p. 13.
- http://www.scientific-alliance.org/
12. Shusterman, Body consciousness, p.xii.
13. Shusterman, Body Consciousness, p.xii.
14. Shusterman, Body Consciousness, p.2.
15. Richard Shusterman, Body Consciousness, p.8.
16' Lynn Margulis, Symbiosis in Cell Evolution. Life and Its Environment.
- H . Freeman & Company, 1981.
W

106

17. Sagan 1992, .369.


18. Sagan, 1992, .370.
19. Donna J. Haraway, When Species Meet. University of Minnesota P r
Minneapolis, London, 2008, p.4.
20. Donna Haraway, keynote address at the Kindred Spirits conference.
http://www.homepages.indiana.edu/2006/09-29/story.php?id=854
21. Aristotle, Nicomachean Etics 1180 a 17, Eudemian Etics 1254 a 7
Politics 1333 a 31.
22. Paul Rabinow, French DNA. Trouble in Purgatory. Chicago: University
of Chicago Press, Chicago 2002, p. 15.
23. Rosi Braidotti, Transpositions, p.37.
24. Rosi Braidotti, Transpositions, p.37.
25. Rosi Braidotti, Transpositions. On Nomadic Ethics. Polity Press
Cambridge: 2006, p.37.
26. Nikolas Rose, The Politics of Life Itself. Biomedicine, Power, and
Subjectivity in the Twenty-First Century. Princeton University Press,
Princeton 2006, p.83
27. Rosi Braidotti, Transpositions, p.41.
28. Hannah Arendt, The Human Condition. University of Chicago Press,
Chicago 1998.
29. Giorgio Agamben, Homo Sacer. Sovereign Power and Bare Life.
Translated by D. Heller-Roazen, Stanford University Press, 1998.
30. Braidotti, Transpositions, p. 130.
31. Shusterman concentrates on body techniques developed by
F.M.Alexander, Moshe Feldenkrais, and various of Asian body and sexual
techniques.
32. Shusterman, Body Consciousness, p. 13.
33. Eugene Thaker, Biomedia, p. 7.
34. Susan Merrill Squire, Liminal Lives. Immagining the Human at the
Frontiers of Biomedicine. Duke University Press, Durham 2004, p.9.
35. Braidotti, Transpositions, p.l 10
36. Braidotti, Transpositions, p.l 11

e s s

..

-,

, ,
:

,
.
-, ,
, ,

, ,
.
- ,
,

).

.
,
. ,
,

,
,
(),

,
( ).
,
,

108

:
(

) , ( ) .

,
(
) , (
) .

. -
,
(,
) , - ,

( , ).
,
, ,
,

.
- . -,

, .
, ,
,
,

; ,
.
,
; , ,
,
.
, -,
? -
,
, .

109

,
;
( )
. :
,
, ,
.

, - -
; - ,
- ;
- ,
, - ,
;

, .

,
.
, ,
, .
,
,
, .
0

.
,
(, ) ,
(, );
,
- ,
, ,
,
. -

,
,
).

?
-,

.
,
, ,
,
(
. ,
: ,
(, ); () -
,
,
,
, ) . -,

. , -,

:
,
.

,
. ,
, 9-
( - ,
- , ,
, , , , ,
),
( ,
)
,

;
,
,
, -
(?) .

111


-
. .
,
,
, - ,
, .
, .
, ,
(
),
:
, ! .
- , ! -
,
, ,

.
, ,
,
.

. . .
, :
, ,
(,
: ; ,
. . .
, . . . ) .

-
, , ,
, . . .
.
, .

,
,

112

,
.
?
, ,

- , ,
,
, ,
.
, ,
,
, , .
(,
- , ,
, ) ,
() (),
.
,
,
, ,
, ,
, ,
, ,

,

,
, .

, .. .
.
,
, -

.
,
, ,
, ,

113

. . . :
-1 ,
:
, ,
- ,
.. ,
,

,


,

,
, , .
, ..
( ) ; .
.. , -
: ,

,
.
...
. , ?
. . . .
-,
.
: , . . . ,
. . . ..
:
,
,
. -,
. . .
:
,
,
.

. -,

114

. . . ,
:
, - ,
- .
, ,
.
H e r Q

- , ,
, ...
.
- , ,
. ,
,
. - ,

:

( - ;

, ),
.

, , ,
, , -
, ;
, ,
, -
,
.
( ,
) ,
(
),
, , . ,
, ,
, , ,
; ,
, ,
,
. ,
,

115

; ?
,
.

..

,
-,

?
?
,

.
, ,
, ,
, . ,
,
. ,
, , ,
,
.
,

, ,
.
, ,
- .
,
, ,

, .
,

, ,
^ . .

116

.
,
, - '

.

,
.

.
( ),

. ,
, ,
, ,
.
,
,
.


, . , ,
,
X X . ,

, .
.

, ,
.
,
.
.
. ,
:
- /
: /, /,
, / , /
, / , /
- . .

117

j-r :
: 4 + 1 6 + 1 6 + 4 = 4 0 ;
:
4+16+56+4=80; : 4 + 1 6 + 4 1 6 + 6 0 0 + 8 0 0 0 0 0 = 8 0 1 0 4 0 .

.

:
, ,
, , ( ) [ 1 ] .
,
, , .
, , ,
-

.
a

. . .
:

.

. , ,
. X X [2],
.

, ,
,
. . , ,
() [3],
.

) ,
( ).
. ,

/18

. /.../

/.../;

(..)[4]

, .
,
.,

. , , :

:

-, ,
, ;
,
, ,

:
,
,

ostinato[5]. ,
,
.

-
.
,
,
, .
,

.
,

-
.
,

.
-

.

-
- . ,
,
[ 6 ] . ,

119

-
.

.
. ,
, ,
, ,
.


.,
.,
.,
.


. .
,
, :
, , .
, ,
,
. , ,

, , .
, ,

.

, , ,

[7]. .
,

. , ,
,
. ,
,

. .
.
, , ,

120

.
()
,
. : ,
, -.

,
,

,
.

,
( ) ,
,
.
( - )

, .
,
,
-,

,
.


.

,
:

.,

. ,

, .
,

121

X X !

, . ,
,

-
, ,
. , ,
. ,

.
,
,
,
!
,

..,

,
.
[8].
. ,

,

,
. ,
,
, (
), ,
.

.
, ,
.
,
,

.

122

. . : ,
,
, , ,
,
, ,

,
,
[ 9 ] . ,

,
,
( ,
, ),
,
, .
.
,
. , - .
, -
,
[ 1 0 ] .

. . ,
,

.[11].

,
,

,
, ,

,
, :

'~tf ~3eciHiie

~^11 (
)

, ,
,
, ,
-
,

, ,
, ,
,
.. ,
,

, ,

-,
, ,
-

123

124


(
)

, ,

, ,

, ,

-,
-

, ,
,
.
, ,
.


,
, ,
, ,
. , ,
(
, ) ,
:
. : , ,
. ,

125

-
. ,
.

.. ,
- ,

.

, ,
, .
,

,
,
. ( ),
,
,
, .
. .

,
,

,
,
.

,
,
,
,
, , ,
, .. -
. ,
,
, ,

. ,

,
,
. , ,
.
: ,

,
(, , ) ,
! ,

126

, ,
,
,
. ,
!

,
,
. ,
.
?

. , ,
-
, , ,
[ 1 2 ] .
. ,


- 1935 . ,
, , ,
- ,
, .
,

,
,
.


, .

, , ,
,

.
, ,

.

127

, ,
, .
, , -

.
,

,
,

, .

.

.
: . . .
,
, , , ,
(mind) .

,
,
,
.
.

,
,
[13].
,
. ,
, , ,
.

,
,

,
,
, . ,
, ,
.
,
,
. ,

128



,
,

.

. .
-,

129

1. .. .
. ., 2002. .50- 51.
2. . 3.
// .-., . . ., 1998.
3. .. .
. ., 2002.
4. . : .. . .,
2007; ..
: // XXI : ? .,
2008. .228-251; ..
// :
. . 9. , 2008. .43-51.
5. .: .. :
..
// : . .2.
, 2001. .104-105.
6. . : 3. // 3.
. . , 2008. .191-270.
7. . . ., :
. . ... ,1999; .
. .,1994.
8. : . , 2004. .7.
9. .. .
. . 5. . . , 1997. .85.
10. 3. //
., . . , 1998.
11. . .: . / , 1997.
12. . . . . , 2005.
13. . . . . , 1998.
.95.


. ,
,
. , ,
, (
),

.
-
.
,

,

.
- ,
, ,
..
,

,
.
, - ;
. , , ,
( ,
) , (,
) .

,
, .. ,
, - ,
, ,
.

130

. - .

,
.
, ,

, ..
- , .
, ,
. ,
.
, .
, , -

. . .

, [1].

.

.
?
?
. - ,
-
. -,
- . ,

,
, ?
, -,
?
, ,
.
,
, - .. ,
,
, ,

. ,

131

,
,

,
-

,
.
,
.
.

,
.

,
, ,

.

()
, -
.
, [2],
. -
. , ,
,

, ,
. , .
, ,

.

,
,
.
- , , .


.

- ( , , )
,
, .

. ,

132

,
,
.

- . ,
.
, , . ,

.
,

.
,
,
.
.

,
. ,
.
,
. ,

, , .
,
+, .. ,


.
+ -
- - , , .
,
.
,
+. ,
,
.

? ?

133

[3],
,

.
.
, ,
, .
,

. ,
, ,
( , - ) ,
. , ,

,
,
. ,
,
.
, ,
,
, .
,
.
,
, , .
, ,
.

,
,
, , ,
.
,
, .
, , ,
, ,
. ,
, ,
.

,
.

134


, . ,
,
, . , ,
, -
, , .
, . ,
, , ,
, .
,
, ,
, .
,

,
, .
,
, .

.
( , ),
.

,
,
,

(
). , ,
, ,
.

,

. ,

(
,
),
( -
, - , -
).

135

,
,
.
,


,
,

.

. , ,
,
.
-

: ,
, ,
. ,
, .
, -
, -

.
,
. , ,

(,
,
...).

- , .
,
,

.
,

.
,

. ,

136

.
, , .
, ,
.
,

, ,
-
, ,

, ,
. ,
, ,
,
,
, . - ,
. , ,
.
.

137

.
,
, .
, ,
. , ,
,

,
.
, .

,
.
.
,
- ,
, . ,
,
, , .
, .
,

,
. ,
, , ,
.
,
,
, . ,
.
,
, . ,

, ,
.

. (
),
, ,
.

,
, .
, ,
.
,
.
, . ,
,
. ,

,
.

.
,
- ,
.
,
,
,

138

.
, ,
( ) .

,

,
.

- ,
. ,
, , .
.
,
, .
.
,
, , ,
, .

,
. , , ,
, , - ,
,
.
-
, ,
, ,
. .
,

. - .

, ,
, , ,
.

1. . . , 2006. . 154
2. - ..
,
, .


3,
.

..
-,

139


HE-

, ,
, .
,
,
( ) .
,
,
. ,
,
, ;

,
.
,
, ,
, ,
- .
, ,

,
. ,
,
.
,
,
,

140

,
,
. ,
,

.

, , ,
,
.

,

,
. ,
,
,

,
,

.
,
,
.
,
,

? -
, , ?
.
,
,
,
. ,
,
.
,

,
.

-
(
,

141

),

)
,
,

,
. ,

. -

,
- ,
, .
.

,
. . .
- (
,

). . ,
,

- (

-
.
,

. ,
,
:

, .

, , ,
:

142


, .

, , ,
(
).
-
,

, ,
) .
,

.

- ,
- .

.
, ,
,
( , , ).
,
,
,
.
, .

,

,
.

,
,

.
,
,

143

,
: ,
, ,

[1]. , -
, , -

,
, .
- ,

. . ,

, ,
(
) .
, ,
,
.
, ,
, . ,
,

,
,
, -
,
, .
,
.
(),

.
-,

144

, .,
., . . , ,

,

,
, ,
. ,
, , :
,
. , ,
,
,
"". ,
, ,
[2] .. . ,

[3].


- ,
, .
,
.
- ,
. , ,
,
.
, ,
, ,

,

[4].

,
,
.
,
- ,
. , .

145

Lucida ,
( ) ,
, .
, ,

:
,
,

, [5].
,
- , ,
.
,
, - :
, , ,
, , ,
[6].
, , ,
(,
, ) ,
, .
, ,

, , ,
- punctum - . ,
,
.
, p u n c t u m
- .
, , ,
,

. , ,
, , ,

,
( ) .
, - ,
"

146

, " , -
, , " " ,
, [7].
,
,
, , .
, ,
, , ( ...
,
( )[8]).
,
. - , ,

,
, , :

, ,
[9].
- , ,
. ,
: ()

, (,
,
,
,
)

[10]. :
-
, , .
] ! 1].
,
:
,
. ,
, , ,

, .
, , ,
, ,
- . ,
, ,

147

- , ,
( , ,
).
,

. ,

(, , ),

, .

,
, , , , ..
,
, ,
,
.

,
,
.

, ,
, .
,


,
. , ,
, ,
,
, , ,
. ,
- ,

.
,
,
,
.

148

149

1. Sontag S. On photography. - New York, 1990. P. 17


2. P. Camera lucida: . M, Ad Marginem,
1997.C.115
3. . .
4. . Weinstein Michael A , Photographic realism as a moral practice//
The Journal of Value Inquiry. 2 .1992
5. P. Camera lucida: . - M,. Ad
Marginem, 1997. C.18.
6. . .78.
7. . .// .
. 1 . ,. 2001. .214
8. . . 146.
9. , .202.
10. P. Camera lucida: . , Ad
Marginem, 1997. . 172.
11. . .// .
. 1 . , 2001.. 195-196.

,
.
, ,

.
, .

.
- .

, .
,
-

; ,
-
.
, .
,
.

. .
-,

, , ,

, 2006
. .
-
,

,

. ,
,

. ,


. (
, , )
, ,
,
,

.

:


( )
2 0 0 2
(Kevin M c M a h o n )

(1911-1980),
.

,
, ,
,
,
.

150

,
, (
, , .)
.
,
,
.
,
,
.

- .

, .
,

,
. ,
, ,
,
- , . .

:
.
21 1911 .
(). 1928 . ,
1932- , 1934 - .
. 1936 .

. 1937-
, . 1943 .
,
1942- . 1939 . .
31 1980 . (
http://www.marshallmcluhan.com)

151

,
,
.
.
.
,
. .
1.
!
,
. -
. ,
, (
), (
) ,
,
, , ,
,
. - ,
. , ,
,
, .
,
.

.
,
,
,
, .
.
,
,
.
.
, .
,
, ,

152

.
,
, ,
.

.
,
,
, ,
. , -
-,

.
*


- .
- ,

,
.
, ,
.
2.
,
,

?
, ,
,
. . .
,
.
. , ,
.
,
.
,
.
. ,

153

. -
. .
,
, - .
3.
,

?
,
(
). ,
, .
.
.
, ,
, -
.
,
.
4.

.
,
. ,
- .
.
,

. ,
- , .
, .
, ,
.
.
. .

. , ,
.

154

, .
.

,
. ,
.
, . ,
.
,
( , , ..),
.
,

.

, ,
,
.

..
,



-
.

- , , ,
, ,

- , .
, ,

,
,

155

,
.
,
,
,
,

:
, ?
, ?

-
.


-
,
,

,

, ,

[1].

, ,
( ) ,
- .

. ,

,
,
,

.

156

,

,

,
.
.

...

[2].


,

,

.
-
- ,
,
- .

. -
,

- -
.

,
, ,
- - ,
- . - - , , .

157

-
,
.

--.



- , ,
.

,
.

,
, , ,

.
, ,

.
,
.
, . ,

,
- .
,
.
. , ,
. - , ,
, , , ,
- .
, , .

,
,

158

. ,


.
. , ,
, - .

..

,
,
.

,
. ..,
, . .
,

:
, [ 3 ] .

, ,
.
.

,
:
, - ,

. . . [4].

, .

.
,
,
, .

159

,
, 12 13 1858 :
-
, ,
[ 5 ] .
.
1875
,
- Danse
, .
,

, - ,

.
. . .
,
.
, ,

[6].
..


.
, -
,

.
- ,
,
,
-.

- ,
, , ,
.

.
, ,
-
, -
, ,
. - ,
,

160


, - ,
.

,
,
.
, .

,
, ,

. , ,
.

, -
.

.

- ,
,
.

[7]
, .


.

,
.

161

,
.. :
? , , ,
,
, ,
. ,

,
[ 8 ] . ,

.

.

.

.

.

. ,
, ,
,
,

,

Dies irae.

,
, ,
, , .
,

, .

,
,

..,

162

,
,
.

,
.
, ,

. , , ,
, ,
, -
.

, , ,
. ,
, ,
, ich-Erzalung-,
, ,
[ 9 ] ,
.
, ,

, - ,
,
. ,
- , ,

,
- .
,

,
.
-
.

,
.

163

,
,

,
.
.
.


.
- ,
.

-

.
,

,
,
,
, X I X
. - -
,

-
, ,

- - .

V
,
,
.
,
,
.

,

164


.
II

.
IV
, ,

, ,
V Dies irae.

,

- -
. ,
,
. ,
,
, ,
.

, ,
.
.

,

.
,
, ,
.

16
1830 . , ,

(III
) [ 1 0 ] .

165

, .
,
,

,
.

Allegro,

,
. ,

,
. ,
,
.
.
,

,
.

,
, .

,

X I X
,

, , , -
. .

.

. . . ,

( , , , , , " "
) [ 1 1 ] .

.

166

,
.
X I X ,
, .
, ,
-,
.
.,

, .

. ,

.
,

-
. ,

-
,
. ,
,

.

.

.

,
.
:
, ,
- -
,
, .
,

,
.

167


-
- .
,
.

-,
,

.
- ,

,
, (,
).

,
, ,
, , ,
[ 1 2 ] ,

1. .. . , 1991. .75.
2. : .
//
., 1986. .13.
3. . : .. . , 1987.
.32.
4. , .
5. .. . , 1981. .
6. . . , 2002. .70.
7. . . , 2008. . 9.
8- .. . . //
. ,1974. .110.
9- ..
// . ,

168

- - . .,
2001. .
10. . . ., 1981. .33.
11. . . . 3. ., 1984. .400.
12. .. . ., 2006. .22.

..
,
,




.
-
, , ,
, , ,
,
.
, , 1990-
.
,
[2, 5, 6, 7, 9].
1950-70- . ,

,
,
.

.
[4]

-
,
.

169

,
,

, .

, ,
,


, .
, S-
, (
), ,
,

.. - .

. ,
.
XVI ., ,
,
, ,
. , , - ,
,
,
.
-.
,
, .
, ,
, ,
, . ,

, -
. .
, ,

, , ,

/ 70

[ 8 ] ,
,

. ,
.

,
, ,
,



,
.
, ,
,
,

, ,
. ,
,
,
,
. ,
, ..

, ritrare imitare, ,

, ,
,
,
[ 2 , . 10] -
.
, ,

[8]?
,
, ,


. , ,

171

,
, ,
.

.

,
, .

.
,
-

, ,
,
. ,
,
, ,
, .

-


.


, ,
.
, ,

-
, .
, ,

,
.
, ,

,
.
, ,
, .
,
, , ,
-

172

, - .
.
[ 1 , . 177-187],

.
X I X ., ,

, ,
. ,
, ,
, ,
,
.
,
. , ,
, ,

.

" " . . ,
, , ,
-
, .
, ? , ,
.
,
. ,
, -
. ,
, -
, , -

.
.
, ,
, ,
,
,

173

.
, .

, ,
, ,
(
X V I .).
, ,
.
,
, .
, , ,
,

.

,
.
, ,
.

()
,

,
,
,
. -
.

,
, .
,

.
. ,

174

, .
, ,

: ,
, ,

.
, ,
,

.

, ,
, ,
,
.

.


,

. X X
X X I . ,
.

(
) , ,
.

.

, ,
,
,
.
- , ,
, , ,
,
, .

:

175

; XVII, XVIII .

[12]
.. - , -
. ,

..
, ,


. ,
,
. ,
,
. ,
I . ,
,
.
, ,
, ..
.
,
,
, ..
,

,
.
,
.
, ,

.
.
, ,

176

.
,
.
, ,

. ,

.

.
, -
,
- . ,
-
.

1. . XIX //
. - .-.:, 1939.
2. .. . - 2- . .. .:, 1990.
3. . . - .: ,
1973.
4. . XVI . - .:
- , 1956.
5. . . - .: , 1998.
6. . XVII . - .: , 1999.
7. . (arte sacra) -
// //
. 19-21 1997 . - .,
1998.-.156-178.
8.
.

//
. - 2002.
9. .
XVI XVII //
. - .,1987. - .22. - .123-167.

177

10. L'Art Manieriste, formes et symbols 1520-1620. - Catalogue


d'exposition, 6 janvier-15 mars 1978. - Rennes, Musee des Beaux Arts,
1978.
11. Le triomphe du Manierisme Europeen de Michel-Ange au Greco. Catalogue du Seconde Exposition sous les auspices du conseol de l'Europe.
- 1 julillet- 16 October 1955. - Amsterdam, Rijksmuseum, 1955.
12. H. . - .:, 1963.

. ?

181

..

.
?

17 1987 .

(La Femis)
?.
.
, 18 1989 ,
F R 3 . .
,

, . - . . (JeanMarie Straub, Daniele Huillet. Aigremont: Edtions A n t i g o n e , 1989,
pp.63-77). . , 1998 ,
,
,
Trafic
(27, Autumn,
1998).

2003 ., ,
.,
.. ,
? .
, -
,
,

Trafic .
, -
,
,

. ,

182

,
.
, ,
,

:
1. . - , ,
. .
. -
.
2. . - .
- ,

; - ,
. - ,
, ,
: . .
/ .
3. . -
. ,
. ,
. .
.
, ,

, :
, , ,
( . :

),
,
,
,
, ,

, , , . .:
(
) , , .
, ,
.

. ?

183

, . - 1987 .,
.
- (1983, 1985) ? (1991).
:
. - ,
,
? ; ,
.
.

?:
- , , :
? , .9-47;
- : , .25-27
();
- : ? ,
.149-171;
- : ? , .2072 5 5 , , .64 ( ) ;
- , : , . 167169;
- : , .259263;
- : , . 3 5 9 - 3 6 1 ;
- , /: , .570-573,582586,589;
- , :
? , .9-47;
- : ,
.215-233.
, .

, , ,
- .
,
- ,
, , , ,
,

184

, ,
, ,
.
:
1. . . , 2003.
2. . . , 2004.
3. . . , 2004.
4. , . ? , 1998.

:
: ..

... .
. ...
: , , ,
? , , ,
?
.
, ,
, ,
; :
? -
,
? , , , . ,
, - ,
, -
. . , ,
- - :
. , , , -
. , -

. ?

185

, - , - .
, , - .
, -
- , ,

, :
. , ,
,
- , .
- ?
, , ,
. , ,
.
, , ,
.
, . ,
- ,
, , ,
, .
,
. : ,
- , ,
, , .
. ,
,
- .

-
,

.
, ,
. ,
, . -
, ,
. - ,
.
,
, ,
. , . , ,

186

, , , :
- , : - .
, : - . ,

. , - ,
: ,
, , ,
.
, - ,
, , ,
, ,
. ,
. , ,
, , ,
- . ,
, ?
, , , ,
. : , ,
, ; , - ,
- .
- , , ,
, . ,
, .
.

.

, . , ,
. . . ,
- . ,
, : ,
- , , ,
. ,
. . . . , ,
, ... ,
, ,
. , ?
,
- , , ,
, -.
- , , .

. ?

187

... , ,
, , ,
, - ,
. . , , ,
, ,
, . ,
: . ,
? ,
, , , .
, , ,
.
, . . . ,
, . ,
. , ? ,

[ensembles]. ,
, ,
- ,
, .
,
, : .
... - - ,
,
, ,
,
, ,
- , , , ,
,
-.
, ,
, , , ,
, ,
- ,
- , .
, ,
? - . ,
,
,

188


.
[ 1 ] . . . , ,
. ,
, . : , ,
, , ,
, [2]. ,
, ,
,

.
, , ,

,
, , ...
, .
! ,

-
, ,
, ,
. , ,

.
,
- ,
- ! -
, .
. ,
, ?
! , , ,
, ,
. ,

- ,
.
. ,
, , ,
-

. ?

189

, ,
. ,
,
, ,
,
. , ,
^ ] . - ,
,

.
, , ,
. , , ,
.
,
. . ,
.
,
, ,
,
. , :
, ?
, , , ,
, ,
, .. . ,
. ,

, ,
, .
,
,
;
, -
,
.

.

?
?
, , -

190

, , .
-
.
, . ,
, ... : , , ,
, , , , ,
, . ,
- ,
. , ,
- .
, ... ,
, , , :
, .
, , .
, - ,
, - ,
, , ,
, , .
, , , ,
, : , ,
, , ,
. - , ,
: , , -,
. - ? -
, , ,
, .
, ,
. , , .
,
, ,
. , , . ,
,
, - ! - ,
, . , ,
, , ,
. ,

. ?

191

, ,
, . . .
, ,


-.
, ,
, , ,
, .
, .
, : ?
, ?
, .
,
. , ,
,
, : , ,
?
, .
: , .
,
. ,
, .
, , . :
, . -
. , ,
[ 4 ] . . . . ,
, . .
,
, ,
. , ,
. ,
, . , ,
? , , -
. -
, . , ,
- , -
, , ,
, ,
- ,

192

. ,
, .
. ,
, , , ,
. , .

/ , .
? ,

. [ 5 ] , [ 6 ] ,
[ 7 ] - ?
, ,

?
...
, ? ,
. . . (
, ) ,
,
. , .

, ,
- , ,
. , .
-: - ,.
- ,
, , , , ,
. .
- , .
:
. , , ,
, - ,
,
,
, , , .
. . . ,
,
: ,
, , , .

. ?

193

? , .
, ,
, ,
.
, , ... ,
, . - ,
, ,
.
, ,
. : , ,
, . ,
, .
, , , -
;
? , .
, :
, , , , ,
. ,
.
, ,

, .
, ,
. , ,
? , ,
, ,
, .
,
,
,
, ,
, -
.
, : ,
.
, ,
. -
, ,
? .

194

? , , . . .
, -
. , , ?
, , -
. , ,
. , -
.
: , ,

,

,

, ,
, .
, ,
. ,
, .
,
.
: - ,
.
, , . ,
, , .
,
, .
, , ,
, . ,

,
,
,

. ,
, ,
- (

).
- ? -
-
:
, , , .
.
,
, . , .

. ?

195

,
,
. . , ,
. ,
, .
, ,
. ,

.

, - .

.
... : ,
, . , ,
, , ,
. 50- ,
, ,
:
? , , , , ,
- . ,
, ?
- . ?
?
, ? ,
.
. ...
,
40-50 , ,
, - .
,

, , ,
.
, -, ,
[ 8 ] , . , -
.

. , ,

, , ,
. ,

196

, , ,
,

. .
- .
? , . . . : , - ,
.
?

? : .
, ,
,
.
,

,
,

,
, ,
, .
,

.
. . ?

:
, , ,
- , , , , -
. -
,

.
?
.
.
.
. ,
,
. ,
, -
- .

, , ,
, , , ,

. ?

197

? . [ 9 ]
.
, : ,
.
,
, , :
.
. , ,

? ,
- ,
, - . ,
, , , - ,
, , ,
,

. , ,
, .
, ,
, .
, , , .
, , ,
, , .
,
. ?
? , , , ,
/,
, ,
, ,
: ,
, , , ,
,
, ,
, ,
. ,
, ? .
. -
, [ 1 0 ]
[11],

,
,
,

[ 12] [13]. ,

198

- ? , ,
, ?
,
.
.
[ 1 4 ] , : ", ,
". . ,
, , , ,
" " ,
.
, , : ,
.

, ,
.

?
.
, : " , ".
, , .
- , ,

, .
,
, . , ,
. ,
, .

1.
(1901 -1999) - .
2.
, .
(1956), ' (1962),
.
3.
. (1959),

.
4.
(1903-1986) - .
5.
- (.1935) - .
6.
- (. 1933) - .

. ?

199

7.
(. 1914) -
.
8.
-

. - .
9.
(1901-1976) - ,
.
10. .-. (1975).
11. .-.
(1983) . .
12. .-. (1965).
13. .-.
(1967).
14. (
- 1925 .).

?
( )
: .., . . .

- 04.03.2010 .
60 84 1/16. Times.
100 .
5.
.
199034, .-, , . 5.