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5

Summary

If any problems are expected during operation, every possible option should be used to ana- lyze these potential problems and thus prevent the costs they could incur. CFD simulation is perfectly suited for evaluating flows in intake structures and pump sumps. The aim is to prevent any operating problems in the water system or waste water treatment plant that is to be built. A logical analysis of the plant under consideration is the basis for efficient model testing and CFD analyses. At KSB CFD simulation is a well-established engineering tool that has been used for years. For some pumping stations it makes sense to use a combination of CFD simulation and model testing to optimize the plant and find the best solution.

Structural Design

the plant and find the best solution. Structural Design Fig. 5.11 d: Simulation of a pum-

Fig. 5.11 d: Simulation of a pum- ping station with several pumps

5.11 d: Simulation of a pum- ping station with several pumps Fig. 5.11 e: Structural design

Fig. 5.11 e: Structural design of a KRT pumping station based on calculation

References

References

5

[5.1]

M. J. Prosser, The Hydraulic Design of Pump Sumps and Intakes, BHRA, July 1977

[5.2]

W.H. Hager, Abwasserhydraulik: Theorie und Praxis (Waste Water Hydraulics: Theory and Practice), Springer Verlag, ISBN 3-540-55347-9, 1994

[5.3]

I.E. Idelchik, Handbook of Hydraulic Resistance, 3rd Edition, Research Institute for Gas Purification, Moscow 1994, ISBN 0-8493-9908-4

[5.4]

W. Kröber, Entwicklung eines Abwasserpumpschachts mit optimierter Strömungsführung zur Verhinderung von Schwimmschlammdecken und Sedimentationen, Diplomarbeit an der TU Berlin (Development of a Waste Water Pump Sump with Optimized Flow Passage to Prevent Layers of Scum and Sedimentation, Degree Thesis at the Berlin Technical University), May 1996

[5.5]

Norma Kirchheim, Kanalablagerungen in der Mischkanalisation (Deposits in Combined Sewer Systems), DWA 2005

[5.6]

Hydraulic Institute, American National Standard for Pump Intake Design, ANSI / HI 9.8-1998

Authors Section 1 - Dipl.-Ing. Ralf Hahn Section 2 - Dipl.-Ing. Thomas Pensler Section 3 - Dipl.-Ing. Ralf Kurrich Section 4 - Dipl.-Ing. Günter Grothe, Dipl.-Ing. Karl-Heinz Deutsch Section 5 - Dipl.-Ing. Peer Springer, Dipl.-Ing. Bernd Kothe

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Diagrams

Drawings and Diagrams

Example of a 24-hour load curve

100 1.80 90 1.60 80 1.40 70 1.20 1000 60 1.00 900 800 50 0.80
100
1.80
90
1.60
80
1.40
70
1.20
1000
60
1.00
900
800
50
0.80
700
40
0.60
600
500
30
0.40
400
20
0.20
Flow rate of the in ow
US.gpm
0
3,600
Q in I/s
7,200
10,800
14,400
18,000
21,600
25,200
28,800
32,400
36,000
39,600
43,200
46,800
50,400
54,000
57,600
61,200
64,800
68,400
72,000
75,600
79,200
82,800
86,400
Factor Y1

Time t in s

Fig. 1: Example of an inflow load curve for mathematical modelling. H NPSH H/Q curve
Fig. 1: Example of an inflow load curve for mathematical modelling.
H
NPSH
H/Q curve
B
H A
A 1
NPSH av (2)
A 2
NPSH av (1)
NPSH
reg
Q1
Q 2
Q
A A 1 NPSH av (2) A 2 NPSH av (1) NPSH reg Q1 Q 2

Fig. 1.4: Impact of NPSHa on the constant speed curve of the pump (Reference: KSB Centrifugal Pump Lexicon).

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