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TAG Strategy Lesson - Decision Making Stephanie Beckles

TAG Strategy Lesson - Decision Making Stephanie Beckles Title: Who Would Win? Subject: Science / ELA

Title: Who Would Win?

Subject: Science / ELA

Grade Level: 1st grade

Duration: 2 x 45 minutes or longer as a modification for students that need it.

Type of Lesson: Decision Making

Standards and Elements:

TAG - HO/CTS #3: The student conducts comparisons using criteria.

HO/CTS #4: The student makes and evaluates decisions using criteria.

ELA - Reading Informational 1.RI.7: Use illustrations and details in a text to describe its key ideas.

Science - S1L1d: Students will investigate the characteristics and basic needs of animals:

Compare and describe various animals—appearance, motion, growth, basic needs.

Summary: Using background knowledge and criteria, students will make a decision about which animal is better.

Enduring Understanding: At the end of this lesson the students will have used higher order

critical thinking skills to make a decision.

Essential Question: How can decision making be reflected in informational literature and science?

Evidence of Learning:

What the students should KNOW: Students should be able to compare animals, take

notes, and make a decision based on criteria.

What the students should BE ABLE TO DO: Communicate their decisions and their justifications in a small group or as part of a whole-class discussion.

Suggested Vocabulary: criteria, diet, appearance, weapon, molting, anatomy

Procedure:

Hook: Lead a discussion in which children relate their own decision-making experiences, for example, how would you decide who is on your team for a game of soccer.

Background Information: Read the book “Who Would Win? Lobster VS. Crab” (showing it on the IWB with the document camera), and complete the T-chart which shows facts from the book for each animal. Do this with children as you go. They write on their own t- chart at the same time. Clarify any questions students may have.

Criteria: With student input, create a list of criteria that the students will use to compare the two animals. (E.g. size, weapons—claw type/spikes, eyes, armor). Use the “Who has the advantage? checklist” in the back of the book and have children look at their t-chart and decide which of these things (size, shell, claws, legs, teeth, speed, tail) would make the best criteria for deciding which animal would win the fight.

Decision Making: Students will use the criteria checklist to make a decision about which animal they think would win.

Communicating the decision: Allow students to communicate their decision and their justification in their table small group.

Synthesis Activity: Have students write and draw about their decision in their Science Journal.

Extension Activity: Provide time for students to reflect and share their personal thoughts and feelings about the content and their decision-making process.

Assessment: Take pictures of the children as they are working. Use a rubric to grade

children on the various elements of the decision making process.

Technology Integration: Use the document camera to display the picture during the Background Information section. Use the Interactive Whiteboard to show the t-chart and criteria chart as a model for children to complete their charts.

Differentiation: Allow children to work in groups of two instead of individually to allow them to discuss their thoughts during the decision making part of the lesson. Allow extended time for students that need longer to make their decision or write/draw in their journal.

Resources/Materials: document camera, interactive whiteboard, story “Who Would Win? Lobster VS. Crab”, Science journals, “Decision Making” criteria chart and Lobster vs. Crab t- chart ( on IWB and copies for children).

Decision Making

Criteria

Total Points Animal
Total
Points
Animal

For each criteria, give the solutions a score: 1=bad, 2=great. Then add up the scores for each solution. The highest score wins!

NAME:

Assessment: Rubric for Decision Making Strategy DATE:

 

1

2

3

4

Below the

Approaching the

Meets the

Exceeds the

Standard

Standard

Standard

Standard

TAG—HO/CTS

The student does not use criteria to compare.

The student uses one criteria to compare.

The student uses two criteria to compare.

The student uses more

#3: The student

than two criteria to compare.

conducts comparisons using criteria.

     

TAG—HO/CTS

No decision made.

Decision made, but it is not based on criteria

Decision made is

Decision made is based on criteria and includes justification for their decision.

#4: The student

partially based on criteria.

makes and evaluates decisions using criteria.

 

ELA—1.RI.7: Use

     

Describes multiple key ideas from the text with supporting information.

illustrations and details in a text to describe its key ideas.

Not able to describe key ideas from the text.

Describes 1-2 key ideas from the text.

Describes 3-4 key ideas from the text.

Science—S1L1d:

Student does not participate in investigation.

Student participates in investigation and discussion some of the time.

Student participates in investigation and discussion most of the time and is able to compare animals using one criteria

Student participates in investigation and discussion all of the time and is able to compare animals using different criteria.

Students will

investigate the

characteristics and

   

basic needs of

animals: Compare and describe various animals— appearance, motion, growth,

   

Total Score:

TAG-Decision Making Lesson

TAG-Decision Making Lesson Communicating their decisions
TAG-Decision Making Lesson Communicating their decisions
TAG-Decision Making Lesson Communicating their decisions

Communicating their decisions

TAG-Decision Making Lesson Communicating their decisions
TAG-Decision Making Lesson Communicating their decisions

Decision Making Work Samples

Decision Making Work Samples These journal entries show the synthesis activity.
Decision Making Work Samples These journal entries show the synthesis activity.
Decision Making Work Samples These journal entries show the synthesis activity.

These journal

entries show

the synthesis activity.

Who Would Win? Lobster or Crab

TAG Decision Making Lesson Reflection

During the hook, the children were keen to offer their thoughts about how they make decisions. For the most part, they said they use strategies like: “Rock, paper, scissors”, or tossing a coin, or their parents decide for them after they hear all the ideas. So I was excited to see if this lesson would allow them a new process to be able to use to make decisions.

For the background information, I put the book on the document camera, and read it to the children page by

page, discussing certain interesting facts as we went along. After a few minutes, I had some children that I

had to redirect throughout the remainder of the 30 minutes it took to read the book. In retrospect, I would have the children complete the T-chart at the same time as reading the book, in order to keep them engaged in what was being read, and to allow them to see that there was a purpose for the reading.

When we moved onto the T-chart, I modeled what to write, with help from the children, and they wrote on their own charts at the same time. Some children needed an additional 20 minutes to complete this writing activity.

During the Decision Making phase, I modeled the use of the criteria checklist, and showed children how to

choose three criteria to base their decision on. This also worked very well, and they went back to their seats

and completed their own criteria checklist independently. Once their decision was made, using the criteria

they had chosen, they communicated their findings with their table buddies (3-4 children per table), and they

did a great job of justifying their decision using their criteria as well.

They were very excited to begin the synthesis activity, and for the most part, this was completed within the timeframe given. There were just three children that needed extra time to complete the journal writing and drawing.

Overall, I really liked this activity, and could see myself using it with first grade students again. They were engaged, for the most part, and the lesson moved along at a good pace for them. Having done the criteria

activity in the Creative Problem Solving lesson, helped the children to be more comfortable with using criteria

in this lesson. Also, modeling the criteria chart, really helped them work on their own chart independently.

I only had time to have a few students complete the extension activity, and it was very interesting that the students who are currently in TAG, view this as a new skill that they can use to make decisions, but the other students (non-TAG) said that it is easier just to do rock-paper-scissors.