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Annual Narrative Report Football 4 Peace, Israel

January 1st to December 31st, 2014


Activities and Results
Activity One
Leader Seminar February 20, 2015
Jordan Valley Municipality, Israel
Evaluation and consultation with Program Directors and Community Coordinators
49 staff members
Coaches
Israeli (41)
Of which: Arab (25)
Jewish (16)
Jordanian (1)
EU (1)
F4P Management (6)
Total

Male

Female

24
16
1
1
5
47

1
0
0
0
1
2

Seminar divided into three sections:


1) Key Note Lectures
Football 4 Peace history
Understanding Football 4 Peace
Instructions on application process for program participants
2) Discussion Groups
Recent program developments
Evaluation of program to date
Future of the program
3) Casual Socialization
Discussion without agenda
Lunch, dinner, water activities at local swimming pools
Discuss feedback, opinions, key findings of program

Comments from Seminar


Important for communities to choose the right people to work with program participants
Some communities have developed brochures and hosted meetings for parents
EU staff should be hosted by families of communities where program occurs
Mutual agreement should be drafted between host and guest
Lowering age of participants to 9-12 was successful
This age group seemed more willing to get along
Expand age range for females in program
Fewer females participate in program than males
Look for youth participants that could be potential coaches in program in future
Easier to learn coaching methodology by having undergone it during program
Communities should choose children to be hosted by another community
Parents of different communities will also meet each other
Create Football 4 Peace Facebook group to update followers of future activities
Link Facebook page with Football 4 Peace website

Activity Two
Football 4 Peace Management Meetings February 21st to 22nd
Kibbutz Maagan, Israel
Discussed comments from Activity One
6 staff members
Results
Final decisions for Football for Peace 2014
EU coaches to be hosted by families of communities where program occurs
Encourage communities to fundraise and create intrigue about program in media

Activity Three
Training Workshop March 29th to April 3rd
Eastbourne, United Kingdom
Coaches hosted at University of Brighton
128 staff members
Coaches
Israeli (48)
Of which: Arab (26)
Jewish (22)
Jordanian (9)
EU (65)
F4P Management (6)
Total

Male

Female

21
18
9
40
5
93

5
4
0
25
1
35

Event Design
Taught values, philosophy, and methodology of program and curriculum to coaches
Gave coaches ability and knowledge to implement summer programs in Israel and Jordan
Divided coaches according to experience and role in program
Bonded coaches into an effective team
Activities
Soccer, social games, outdoor activities
Lectures, indoor activities
Activities implemented smoothly
Training successful in teaching and bonding coaches
Coaches familiar with values and methods of program

Activity Four
Training Workshop July 1st to 2nd
Netanya, Israel
Coaches hosted at Wingate Institute
144 staff members
Coaches
Israeli (117)
Of which: Arab (71)
Jewish (41)
Jordanian (7)
EU (3)
F4P Management
Total

Male

Female

58
35
5
2
4
104

13
6
2
1
0
40

Event Design
Planned by 8 coaches at Eastbourne training workshop
Taught methods and knowledge gained from Eastbourne training workshop
Jordanian coaches divided into pairs and housed with Israeli families
Bonded coaches into effective teams
Established connection between Jordanian and Israeli coaches

Activity 5
Israel Summer Program July 3rd to 8th
13 communities across Israel
1,023 youth participants
Arab Communities
Beuna Nujeidat
Dabouria
Tuba Zangria
Shefaraam
Tamra
Beel El Maksour
Kfar Manda
Nazareth
Ibillin
Kawkab
Yafeia
Al Battouf
Bustan El Marj
Sakhnin
Khura
Rahat
Abu Gosh
Beit Saffafa
Tel Aviv
Total

# of Participants
51
34
57
27
29
48
30
53
17
23
16
38
21
18
40
10
25
34
50
621

Jewish Communities
Tiberius
Kfar Tavor
Lower Galilee
Upper Galilee
Matte Asher
Emek Hayarden
Nazareth Illit
Misgav
Ramat Ishai
Megiddo
Beit Shean
Gilboa
Akko
Beer Sheva
Merhavim
Meitar
Jerusalem
Tel Aviv

# of Participants
27
9
19
35
37
45
12
23
21
26
21
25
16
30
10
10
16
20
402

Activity 6
Conference entitled Sports as a Mediator between Cultures September 15th to 17th
Wingate Institute in Netanya, Israel
Delegates from 30 countries
74 Israeli coaches, 27 Jordanian coaches, 5 F4P Management, 3 EU coaches
Conference Design
Development of sports programs with intercultural approach
Peace building in Israel region and other areas in turmoil
Analysis of potential of sports/physical education in conflict settings
Benefits from intercultural cooperation through sports
Development of program structure that is linked to existing societal structures
Potential for future programs

Activity 7
Football 4 Peace Management Meetings September 18th
Nazareth, Israel
Reviewed feedback from program coaches
Reviewed Football 4 Peace budget
Agreed on activities for 2015

Activity 8
Football 4 Peace Management Meetings November 7th to 10th
Ramat Gan, Israel and Nazareth, Israel
Audit and revision of finances to inform planning for 2015
Dates confirmed for training workshops and summer program in Israel

Activities Planned but not Executed


Football 4 Peace League
Communities should have greater input on design of league
Football 4 Peace Coaching Association
More time and resources needed

Assessment of Activities
Evaluation by EU coaches
High level of cooperation between Jewish and Arab youth participants
Majority of coaches were professional and coached according to manual
Arranging buses, soccer fields, equipment, and social activities well organized
Evaluation by Israeli coaches
Almost all youth participants involved were happy to be part of program
High level of cooperation between communities
Leaders, coaches, and youth participants established long lasting relations
Nazareth Illit coaches underprepared
Lack of training for some coaches
Communication issues
Conclusion
Football 4 Peace connects communities that had little to no connections before program
Feedback suggests year long program that would further strengthen relations

Thank you to those that reviewed my unit two first draft. Your suggestions for revision
were very helpful, as many of your ideas were incorporated into the final draft. As pointed out in
the peer reviews, my professional document needed to be lengthened considerably to reach the
one thousand word minimum. I did add much more text to the document by adding more detail
to the section I had outlined in my first draft, as well as adding several more sections. In the peer
reviews, comments were made that said there was a discrepancy between the title of the
document and the content within the document because I had only included one activity in
February. I have addressed this critique, by adding several more activities spaced throughout the
year to give the document a more realistic feeling that it was truly documenting a years worth of
a non-profits activities.
The following document is an annual narrative report for a youth soccer program that
seeks to bridge the gap between hostile communities. The program does so by engaging the
youths of these communities with soccer competitions and other sports related activities. This
document discusses the activities that were implemented during the program and the results of
those activities. This document is used as a reflective tool to see what activities worked and what
did not work over the course of a full calendar year. This document also offers suggestions for
improving the program in the future for both the coaches and the youth participants. The
document was written by the coordinators of the program, and is intended to be viewed by the
staff associated with the program. This document would be viewed online via the youth soccer
programs website. The youth soccer program reviewed by this document does involve coaching
under dangerous and stressful environments due to the program being held in locations that
experience varying degrees of violence between ethnic groups, such as Israel, Ireland, and
Jordan. Therefore, the staff involved with the program are required to undergo training designed
to help the coaches create a safe environment for the programs participants and to impart the
principles of soccer, teamwork, and respect. This program is open to the public for all youths in
the area who wish to participate and engage with other youths from different ethnic
communities, such as Arabs, Jews, and others. This program was designed by a conglomeration
of British Universities and mainly carried out by the University of Brighton.

Works Cited
Football 4 Peace International. Web. 20 Feb. 2015. <http://www.football4peace.eu/>.