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EDU 484 Chapter 8 resources

http://www.ixl.com/math/grade-3/multi-step-word-problems

Tori saved $37 in March. She saved $18 in April and


$45 in May. Then Tori spent $78 on a keyboard. How
much money does Tori have left?
Janelle saved up $23. Then she got $11 for her
allowance. Janelle spent $9 on a pair of gloves, $10 on
a winter hat, and $12 on a scarf. How much money
does Janelle have left?
Linda bought stamps at the post office. Some of the
stamps had a snowflake design, some had a truck
design, and some had a rose design. Linda bought 3
snowflake stamps. She bought 3 more truck stamps
than snowflake stamps, and 2 fewer rose stamps than
truck stamps. How many stamps did Linda buy in all?
Connor walked 3 blocks from his house to the bus
stop. He rode the bus 3 blocks to the library. Later, he
came home the same way. How many blocks did
Connor travel in all?
In Dayton's desk drawer there are 7 yellow
highlighters. There are 7 more pink highlighters than
yellow highlighters, and there are 8 more blue
highlighters than pink highlighters. How many
highlighters are in Dayton's desk drawer in all?

http://www.mathperspectives.com/pub_amc.html

In primary-grade classrooms, we learn most about how our students think and what th

beside them, engage them in conversations, observe their actions, read their reflection
mathematical work. Because of the ages and capabilities of these young students, mat
should rely more on observation and conversations and less on writing. What students
only a glimpse of what they know and think.
What students write on paper offers only a glimpse of what they know
and think.

PUBLICATIONS
Assessing Math Concepts

In primary-grade classrooms, we learn most about how our students think and what th
beside them, engage them in conversations, observe their actions, read their reflection
mathematical work. Because of the ages and capabilities of these young students, mat
should rely more on observation and conversations and less on writing. What students
only a glimpse of what they know and think.

Assessing Math Concepts, a continuum of nine assessments that focuses on important


related Critical Learning Phases that must be in place if children are to understand an
mathematics. These assessments help teachers to assess their students and give them
information they need to plan their instruction regardless of what curriculum or progra
their classroom. The information teachers get can be used to guide their instruction an
students who need extra help or intervention.

It is widely recognized that too many middle and high school students have gaps in the
understandings that interfere with their ability to be successful as they move into algeb
those who have been successful in elementary math are not successful in later years, r
ability to get right answers does not ensure an understanding of the underlying mathe
going to prepare students for future success, they must have a greater understanding
foundational concepts that determine success or failure in the long run.

This set of nine assessments identifies Critical Learning Phases that are crucial to the u
concepts. The information teachers get about each of their students from these simple
assessments provide them with information that is more important to their math instru
assessment they'll use and answers the questions:
"What are the foundational mathematical ideas children need to know?"
"How can teachers know the children are learning these important ideas?"
"What do teachers do if the children are not learning what they need to know?"