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Name:

Jake Bartlett, Shelby Devey

Course/Section:
EDML 325. C01

Unit Topic:
Cellular Reproduction

Subject:
Life Sciences

Grade Level(s):
Grade 7

Submission Date:
November 25, 2014

Student Population
A. Description of the School, Student Population, Diversity, Economics:
Punxsutawney Area Middle School contains grades four through eight. Out of 727 students, 707
associate with being white, non-Hispanic. The remainder is a combination of Hispanic, Pacific Islander,
American Indian, and African American.
B. Age/Grade Level(s):
Students in this grade range in age from 12 to 13 years old.

C. Ability Levels and Students With Special Needs:


The teacher that we are placed with has five sections of life science covering three learning levels. There
is a basic class first period, an advanced class fourth period, and standard classes for fifth, seventh, and
eighth period.

D. Number of Students by Gender: Male/Female


Period 1: 11/4
Period 4: 15/16
Period 5: 10/8
Period 7: 9/11
Period 8: 6/11
E. Background Skills and Knowledge (Prior Knowledge):
In order to complete the unit on cellular reproduction, students must know the general make up of a cell.
They need to know some of the functions of organelles such as the nucleus and centrioles. Students
need to have an understanding of the cell theory describing how all cells come from preexisting cells.
Students will need to know the structure of DNA and chromosomes (i.e. chromosomes are tightly wound
DNA, DNA is made up of proteins, nucleotides, and sugars).

Unit Rationale

A. Why and How the Unit Topic Was Chosen:


Seventh grade life science covers two main concepts: Lifes structure and function and Animal diversity.
These are two of the four subjects from the Glencoe Science series. The unit cellular reproduction was
chosen for this unit because it was the next unit in the text following the unit on cells and cellular
processes.

B. Explanation of How It Fits Into the Curriculum:


The students at this age are growing and constantly going through changes. At this age level, may
students go through the struggle of finding who they are. So it is important that the students understand
how this is happening. By understanding how, they may better understand the why.

C. Projected Student Interest:


The students will be at an interest level of at least 75%. Many students may find the content of cellular
reproduction to be more on the dull side. However, by engaging the students by making a flip book, they
will be able to express their knowledge through a visual means.

Bibliography (APA: At least five entries)

1. Biggs, A., & Daniel, L. (2002). Cell Reproduction. In Life's structure and function (pp. 96117). New York, N.Y.: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
2. Mitosis - When Cells Split Apart. (n.d.). Retrieved November 19, 2014, from
http://www.biology4kids.com/files/cell2_mitosis
3. Ellermeyer, D & Chick, K. (2007). Activities for standards-based, integrated language arts
instruction. Scottsdale, AZ: Holcomb Hathaway Publishers, Inc.
4. Miller, K., Levine, J., & Hall, I. (2004). Introduction to Genetics. In Prentice Hall biology
(Student ed., page 275). Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Prentice Hall
5. Plant Hybrids #1. (n.d.). Retrieved November 24, 2014, from
http://waynesword.palomar.edu/hybrids1.htm

Appendix (All hard copy unit materials and resources) List the entries by day and place all
the actual appendix items with EACH LESSON PLAN)
Day One: Social Studies

I.
II.
III.

Lesson plan
Paper plate timeline direction sheet
Timeline rubric

Day Two: Reading

I.
II.
III.

Lesson plan
Word sort blank worksheet
Word sort completed worksheet

Day Three: Science

I.
II.
III.

Lesson plan
Flipbook direction sheet/exit slip
Flipbook rubric

Day Four: Math

I.
II.

Lesson plan
Meiosis vs. Mitosis/exit slip

Day Five: English

I.
II.

Lesson plan
Chromosome viewpoint direction sheet/exit slip

Unit Plan
STAGE ONE (Desired Results)
PA Academic Standards and Assessment Anchors (where applicable)
3.1.7.B1: Compare sexual reproduction with asexual reproduction.
S7.B.1.2.2: Compare various basic sexual and asexual reproductive processes (e.g., budding, cuttings).
CC.1.4: Writing: Students write for different purposes and audiences. Students write clear and focused
text to convey a well-defined perspective and appropriate content.
3.1.B.A4: Summarize the stages of the cell cycle. Examine how interactions among the different
molecules in the cell cause distinct stages of the cell cycle, which can also be influenced by other
signaling molecules. Explain the role of mitosis in the formation of new cells and its importance in
maintaining chromosome number during asexual reproduction. Compare and contrast a virus and a cell.
Relate the stages of viral cycles to the cell cycle.
BIO.B.1.1.1: Describe the events that occur during the cell cycle: interphase, nuclear division (i.e.,
mitosis or meiosis), cytokinesis.
BIO.B.1.1.2: Compare and contrast the processes and outcomes of mitotic and meiotic nuclear divisions.
CC.8.6.6-8.C: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are
appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
S7.A.1.1.1: Distinguish between a scientific theory and a general opinion, explaining how a theory is
supported with evidence.
S7.A.1.2.1: Describe the positive and negative effects (both intended and unintended) of scientific results
or technological developments.
M07. C-G.1.1.1: Solve problem involving scale drawings of geometric figures, including length and area.

Enduring Understandings (Broad, in-

Essential Questions (Open-Ended questions that

depth statements that capture the big ideas of


the unit)

encourage the students to think in-depth about the


big ideas)

(The students will understand that)

How do cells come from existing cells?


What are the stages of mitosis?
Why is the process of mitosis so important to our
everyday lives?
What happens to chromosomes during cellular
division?
How do the processes of mitosis and meiosis differ?
The students will understand that there were many
scientists involved with the discovery of cells and
invention of the microscope.

Mitosis is a process of cellular division that


creates two identical daughter cells.
The students will understand the process of
mitosis and meiosis.
The students will understand the necessity of
the reproduction of cells.
The students will understand that mitosis and
meiosis produce two different types of cells.

The students will be able to assimilate between


the prefixes of the chromosomes and shapes.
The students will understand that different
organisms can contain different chromosome
numbers.

The students will understand that the during the time


period of cells being discovered, there were many
conflicts between Science and Religion.
What do the different prefixes mean?
How do the prefixes relate to geometric shapes?

Content

Objectives

Formative Assessment

Day 1:
1. The students will read
and determine valuable
information from their
textbook pertaining to the
scientists involved with the
discovery and advancement
of knowledge about cells.

Day 1:
1. The students will be able
to categorize the scientists
on order pertaining to their
contribution with cells.

Day 1:
1. The students will
collaborate in groups and
create a timeline pertaining
to the work associated with
cells.

Day 2:
1. Mitosis vs. Meiosis
A. Terminology

Day 2:
1.A. Students will be able to
properly categorize terms
pertaining to mitosis and
meiosis.
1.A. Students will be able to
differentiate between the
outcomes and processes of
mitosis and meiosis.

Day 2:
1. Students will complete
the worksheet on their own.
2. Students will share
results with the class and as
a class will put the terms on
the board.

Day 3:
1. Process of Mitosis
A. Stages
I. Interphase
II. Prophase
III. Metaphase
IV. Anaphase
V. Telophase
VI. Cytokinesis

Day 3:
1.A.I-VI. The students will be
able to name and describe
the stages of mitosis.
1.A.I-VI. The students create
a flipbook that properly
shows the steps of mitosis
with appropriate
descriptions.

Day 3:
1. Students will present their
flipbooks to each other.
2. Students will answer one
short answer question
pertaining to mitosis on an
exit slip.

Day 4:
1. The students will read
page 110A, which mentions
plants having a different
number of chromosomes.
2. The students will then
relate the chromosome
numbers to geometric
shapes.

Day 4:
1. The students will know
that the prefix pertains to a
certain number.

Day 4:
1. An exit slip with
questions pertaining to the
prefixes and numbers.

Day 5:
1. Chromosomes and
cellular division

Day 5:
1. Students will be able to
describe the process of
mitosis from the standpoint
of the chromosomes.

Day 5:
1. Questions will be asked
throughout the lesson to
check for understanding.
2. Students will complete an
exit slip on the days lesson
before exiting the
classroom.

STAGE TWO (Assessment Evidence)


SUMMATIVE Assessment
Two (2) (Summative Assessments: Align and CODE to the Enduring Understandings) Each unit
MUST have at least one performance assessment.
1. The students will have a traditional based assessment test. The test will consist of
matching, true/false, and short answer questions relating to; the stages of mitosis, the
prefixes pertaining to chromosomes, the scientists that were involved in cellular
reproduction, and
2. The students will create a poster showing the process of meiosis. Students will be
tasked with drawing each stage of meiosis along with providing a description of what is
happening during each phase. The project will be worth a total of 50 points that will be
graded based off of a rubric.

Cellular Reproduction Exam (53 Total Points)


Name:__________________________________________________________________
______
Period: _______________________
Directions: Match the terms with the descriptions below. Write the letter of the correct
term in the blank at the left. (1pt each & USE CAPITAL LETTERS)
A. asexual reproduction B. chromosomes C. DNA D. egg E. fertilization F.
gene
G. sperm H. meiosis I. mitosis J. mutation K. RNA L. sexual reproduction M.
zygote

______ 1. Reproduction in which a new organism is produced when sex cells


combine
______ 2. Cell that forms in fertilization
______ 3. The joining of an egg and sperm
______ 4. A nucleic acid which carries the code for making proteins from the
nucleus to the

ribosomes

______ 5. Structures in the nucleus that contain hereditary material


______ 6. Formation of two nuclei with identical chromosomes
______ 7. Nuclear division that forms cells
______ 8. Coded instructions that control cell activity
______ 9. Segment of DNA controlling production of one protein
______ 10. Any permanent change in genetic material of a cell
Directions: For each of the following, write the letter of the term or phrase that best
completes the sentence. (1pt each & USE CAPITAL LETTERS)

______ 11. Most of the life of any cell is spent in a period of cell growth and
development called
A. Interphase

B. Metaphase

C. Prophase

D. Telophase

______ 12. All of the following are true of animals and plant cells during mitosis
EXCEPT
A. only animals have spindle fibers C. only plants form cell plates
B. only plants have rigid cell walls D. only animals have centrioles
______ 13. All of the following are composed of body cells EXCEPT
A. Bone

B. Kidney

C. Liver

D. Sperm

______ 14. Each human skin cell has ______ pairs of chromosomes.
A. 13

B. 18

C. 23

D. 46

______ 15. Human sex cells have _______ individual chromosomes.


A. 13

B. 23

C. 33

D. 46

______ 16. In sexual reproduction, a new organism is produced when ______


A. cells divide by mitosis
B. sex cells combine
C. an organism divides
D. a new organism grows from the body of its parent
______ 17. By _______, a new organism can grow from just a part of the parent
organism.
A. Fission

B. Meiosis

C. Regeneration D. Sexual union

______ 18. In _____, a new organism grows from the body of the parent organism.
A. Budding

B. Fission

C. Regeneration D. Sexual union

______ 19. The number of chromosomes in a sex cell of an organism is its _______
chromosomes number.
A. One

B. Haploid

C. RNA

D. Zygote

______ 20. Meiosis consists of ________ division(s) of the nucleus.


A. One

B. Two

C. Three

D. Four

______ 21. At the end of meiosis, ______ cells have been produced from one cell.
A. Two

B. Three

C. Four

D. Five

______ 22. Proteins are made of units called _______, which are linked together in a
specific order.
A. Amino acids

B. Centrioles

C. Centromeres D. Ribosomes

______ 23. The code for making proteins is carried to the ribosomes by _____.
A. tRNA

B. DNA

C. mRNA

D. thymine

______ 24. In DNA, adenine always pairs with _______.


A. Cytosine

B. Guanine

C. thymine

D. Uracil

Directions: Outline the following entries using sexual and asexual as main topics.
***SPELLING COUNTS*** (2pts each)
Fertilization

Mitosis

Budding

Meiosis

Sexual

Asexual

1. I. ____________________________________
2.

a. _______________________________

3.

b. _______________________________

4. II. ____________________________________
5.

a. _______________________________

6.

b. _______________________________

Directions: Complete the paragraphs by filling in the blanks. (1pt each)


Cells that divide do so in one of two ways. Body cells divide using a process
called 7._______________. Sex cells divide using a process called 8.
_______________________. During 9. ___________________, a cell grows, makes a
copy of its chromosomes, or 10. ____________________ material, and prepares for
cell division. When a body cell is ready to divide into two new cells, it undergoes the
11. ____________________steps of mitosis. In the first step, called 12.
_________________, the pairs of chromatids become fully visible. In animal cells,
two structures called 13. __________________ move to opposite ends of the cell.
Between these, spindle fibers begin to stretch across the cell.

During the next step 14. ___________________, the pairs of chromatids line
up across the center of a cell. As the process enters the third step, 15.
__________________ each centromere divides and each pair of chromatids
separates and begins to move to opposite ends of the cell. The separated chromatids
are now called identical 16. ________________________.
In the last step, or 17.____________________________, spindle fibers start to
disappear. A nuclear membrane forms around each mass of chromosomes, and a
new nucleolus forms in each new nucleus. Then the 18. ___________________
separates, and two new cells are formed.

Directions: Please read an answer the following question in the space below. 3-5
complete sentences are required. (5pts)
Is mitosis occurring in your body right now and explain your reasoning.

Name________________________________________________

PD_______

Cell division/meiosis poster project


Meiosis is a process of cell division that prepares cells for
sexual reproduction. Your task is to draw each stage of meiosis and
include a description of the stages as you go along. All together,
there should be 11 stages complete with descriptions.
Requirements:
Interphase
Meiosis I
o (Prophase I through Telophase I)
Cytoplasmic division
Meiosis II
o (Prophase II through Telophase II)
Cytoplasmic division
Materials: You will be given a large sheet of paper and have
access to markers, crayons, colored pencils, etc., and research
materials that you may need to complete this project during
class. If it is not finished during class time, you will need to
complete this project outside of class.
DUE DATE:_____________________________________________
The project will be graded based off of the following rubric:
Each requirement has a total worth of 10 points (3 points
for a drawing and 7 points for an explanation).
Interphase Meiosis I
Cell
Meiosis
Cell
(5 pts.)
(20 pts.) Division
II
Division
(5 pts.)
(20
(5 pts.)
pts.)
Drawing
(2 pts.)
Explanatio
n
(3 pts.)

Total:

/50

DAY 1
STAGE THREE (Learning Experiences: Daily Lesson Plan)
Name: Jake & Shelby
Title of Lesson: Social Studies lesson
Grade Level(s): 7
Strategy (Direct/Indirect): Direct
PA Academic Standards and Assessment Anchors (where applicable):
CC.8.6.6-8.C: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are
appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
S7.A.1.1.1: Distinguish between a scientific theory and a general opinion, explaining how a theory is supported
with evidence.
S7.A.1.2.1: Describe the positive and negative effects (both intended and unintended) of scientific results or
technological developments.
Enduring Understanding(s):
The students will understand that there were many scientists involved with the discovery of cells and invention of
the microscope.
The students will understand that the during the time period of cells being discovered, there were many conflicts
between Science and Religion.
Essential Question(s):
In what ways did the scientists change the way people thought when cells first were discovered?
How has the discovery of cells assisted us in medical research today?
Specific Content (Code)

Specific Objectives (Code)

1. The students will read and


determine valuable information from
their textbook pertaining to the
scientists involved with the
discovery and advancement of
knowledge about cells.

1. The students will be able to


categorize the scientists on order
pertaining to their contribution with
cells.

Specific Formative Assessments


(Code)
1. The students will collaborate in
groups and create a timeline
pertaining to the work associated
with cells.

Procedures (Include and Label ALL Components: DETAILED:


Lesson Beginning (Motivation, Review, Overview)
The teacher will have certain excerpts for the students to read from their content textbooks and organizes the
students into groups. The students will be shown an example of the timeline that they will be creating within a
group and will be given the directions sheet. After they have been shown the example, the students can begin
reading the excerpts and taking notes on the various scientists.
Lesson Development
The students will begin to put their paper plate timeline together. There will be 6 plates in total. One for the title of
their timeline, one plate for each member in the group, and a plate at the end for conclusion. They will also be

given 8 pieces of string to tie their plates together, however not all of the pieces of string may be used. Each
member within the group is responsible for one plate to ensure that all students are participating. On each plate
they are to write the name of the scientist that they chose at the top of the plate, draw a picture in the middle of
what that scientist did, and write one sentence at the bottom explaining their picture. When the students have
finished, they should tie their plates together and ask to have it displayed.
Lesson Ending (Review, Preview, Closure)
The teacher will display the plates around the room and allow each group to present their timeline. The three
scientists that are mentioned the leas will be awarded one question each on the chapter test. There is a grading
rubric that will be used to grade their work.
Meaningful Student Involvement (Indicate how the students will be meaningfully engaged in the lesson):
The students will be motivated because they are going to be able to draw how they interpret the information. Also,
by making each student responsible for one plate, they will have to participate in order to receive credit.
Special Adaptations/Modifications:
Instead of drawing and writing on the plate, I can allow the students to type up their sentence and find a picture
online pertaining to their scientist.
Anticipated Difficulties AND Modifications:
The students may need more time to read and do the activity. If so, they can use extra time at the end of the day
or have some extra time the next class period.
Physical Structure:
The students will make their desks come together, forming small groups of four.
Materials:
6 paper plates per group
8 pieces of string per group
Content text book
Notebook
Marker/crayons/colored pencils
Hole puncher
Scissors
Pencil
References (2)
Ellermeyer, D & Chick, K. (2007). Activities for standards-based, integrated language arts instruction. Scottsdale,
AZ: Holcomb Hathaway Publishers, Inc.
Biggs, A., & Daniel, L. (2002). Cell Reproduction. In Life's structure and function (pp. 96-117). New York, N.Y.:
Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Reflection (Efficacy of the PLANNED Lesson: (Each lesson must have a reflection. Even though the lesson
was not taught [exception: peer teaching lesson] a reflection is needed. Discuss the projected efficacy
and why.
With this activity, students would be actively engaged by creating the timeline of the cell theory and
other ideas based on the process of cellular reproduction. This activity works well to get students
thinking about cellular reproduction because it brings up the past and how theories on cell reproduction
came about. The students would be engaged in creating the timeline itself while actively participating in
class discussion on the topic. Students would be able to present their work at the end of the period
which would give them incentive to do a good job or put some real effort into their timeline.

Name:
_______________________________________________________________
PD: ___________
You Saw What?
Directions:
1. The teacher will find certain excerpts from the content text book for
the students to read.
2. The teacher will create an example timeline after reading the
excerpts. Students will look at the timeline as a guide for their own.
3. Hole-punch the top and bottom of each plate. Align paper plates and
connect them with 12 pieces of yarn. Be sure to tie a piece of yarn
to the top plate so it can be displayed.
4. Make a catchy name for your timeline. Then visually depict 4
scientists that helped add to our knowledge of cells. Please write the
scientists name above the picture you drew. Beneath each picture,
write a sentence that describes the picture you drew.
a. (English Language Learners can be paired with a native
English speaker or assisted by an aide)
5. After the students complete their timelines, they will share them with
their peers and have them displayed around the room.
a. (English Language Learners can share their timelines in their
native language or in English)

Rubric For: You Saw What?!

Students:
______________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
______________
Period: ___________________________
Plates

Scientists
Name

Picture
Depicting
Event

A complete
sentence
describing
the picture

Total

Cover Plate
(2 pts)
Plate 2 :
Plate 3:
Plate 4:
Plate 5:
Concluding
plate (2pts)
Each requirement pertaining to the individual plate is 2 pts. So, that
makes plates 2-5 worth 6 points each.

DAY 2

STAGE THREE (Learning Experiences: Daily Lesson Plan)


Name: Jake & Shelby
Title of Lesson: Mitosis Word Sort
Grade Level(s): 7
Strategy (Direct/Indirect): Direct
PA Academic Standards and Assessment Anchors (where applicable):
3.1.7.B1: Compare sexual reproduction with asexual reproduction

BIO.B.1.1.2: Compare and contrast the processes and outcomes of mitotic and
meiotic nuclear divisions.

Enduring Understanding(s):
The students will understand that mitosis and meiosis produce two different types
of cells.
The students will understand the process of mitosis and meiosis.
Essential Question(s):
How do cells come from existing cells?
How do the processes of mitosis and meiosis differ?
Specific Content (Code)

Specific Objectives (Code)

Specific Formative Assessments


(Code)

1. Mitosis vs. Meiosis


A. Terminology

1.A. Students will be able to


properly categorize terms
pertaining to mitosis and
meiosis.
1.A. Students will be able to
differentiate between the
outcomes and processes of
mitosis and meiosis.

1. Students will complete the


worksheet on their own.
2. Students will share results
with the class and as a class
will put the terms on the board.

Procedures (Include and Label ALL Components: DETAILED:


Lesson Beginning (Motivation, Review, Overview)
The lesson will begin with a review of the cell theory.
o 3 main components:
All organisms are made up of one or more cells
The cell is the basic unit or organization in organisms
All cells come from cells

Have the class discuss what is meant by the last statement: All cells come from
cells
o This will act as a segue into todays lesson of mitosis and meiosis

Today will be focused on comparing mitosis and meiosis by using the terms
associated with each.
Lesson Development:
Each student will be given the word sort worksheet

While the worksheets are being passed out, the terms can be placed on the board
and a large t-chart can be drawn.
o Terms include:
Asexual reproduction
Sexual reproduction
Diploid
Egg
Fertilization
Haploid
Zygote
Prophase
Prophase I
Prophase II
46 paired chromosomes
23 unpaired chromosomes
four cells
two cells
budding
regeneration
identical daughter
telophase

The student will individually place the terms under the category they believe to be
true.
After approximately 15 minutes, have the students wrap up any final thoughts.

As a class, have students come to the board and place terms under the categories
written.
o As a student puts a term on the board, have them describe why they have
done so.
o Students may have incorrect placements. If so, ask the class if they agree
and where the term should go.

Lesson Ending (Review, Preview, Closure)


As a class, discuss the correct placements for each term.

An overview of the next day will then occur.


o Tomorrow will be going over mitosis in more detail focusing on the
different stages.
o Students will do an activity to create a flipbook on the stages of cellular
division and mitosis.

Meaningful Student Involvement (Indicate how the students will be meaningfully engaged in
the lesson):
Students will have the opportunity to check their answers while learning from
other students reasoning over choices. Students will be able to get out of their
seats to move terms on the board and explain their reasoning to the class.
Special Adaptations/Modifications:

Students with reading disabilities may have the words and definitions read to
them.
Students with learning disabilities may be given the easier words so there will be
less confusion on where the word should go.

Anticipated Difficulties AND Modifications:


Some students may have difficulties with remembering the definitions to some of
the terms. If so, the students may use their textbook to look up some of the terms.
Physical Structure:
The classroom is set up with the teachers desk and chalkboard in the front of the
class. The desks are split up into two sections with one section facing the board
and the other facing the left side of the room. With this lesson, students will work
individually at their desks to begin and will end the lesson by moving terms on the
board.
Materials:
Note cards
Magnets
Marker
Chalkboard
Word sort worksheet
References (2)
Biggs, A., & Daniel, L. (2002). Cell Reproduction. In Life's structure and function (pp. 96-117). New
York, N.Y.: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.

Miller, K., Levine, J., & Hall, I. (2004). Introduction to Genetics. In Prentice Hall biology (Student
ed., page 275). Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Prentice Hall
Reflection (Efficacy of the PLANNED Lesson: (Each lesson must have a reflection. Even
though the lesson was not taught [exception: peer teaching lesson] a reflection is needed.
Discuss the projected efficacy and why.

I believe that, through this lesson, students would be able to have some
fun with getting out of their seats and still learning about the material. The
chapters of mitosis and meiosis are filled with a lot of vocabulary and this
lesson would be a different way of getting the information across to the
students. With this activity, students would have to think about their
vocabulary and determine which of the division processes each would go
to. This way, they would be making connections with mitosis and meiosis
and the terminology that go with each. Students would be engaged
because they would put the terms in the categories that they believe
would be true and then they would be able to check against the rest of the
class with the correct placements on the board. Word Sort Worksheet
Name:

Mitosis

Meiosis

Word Sort Worksheet


Name: TEACHER COPY

Mitosis

Meiosis

Asexual Reproduction

Sexual Reproduction

Prophase

Diploid

Two Cells

Egg

Budding

Fertilization

Regeneration

Haploid

Identical Daughter

Zygote

Telophase

Prophase I
Prophase II
Non-identical Daughter
Four cells

DAY 3
STAGE THREE (Learning Experiences: Daily Lesson Plan)
Name: Jake & Shelby
Title of Lesson: Flip Right Through
Grade Level(s): 7
Strategy (Direct/Indirect): Direct
PA Academic Standards and Assessment Anchors (where applicable):
CC.3.5.6-8.D: Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and
phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 6-8 texts
and topics.
S7.A.2.1.1: Use evidence from investigations to clearly describe relationships and communicate
and support conclusions.
S7.B.1.2.1: Explain how cells arise from the division of a pre-existing cell.
Enduring Understanding(s): Different organisms can grow, repair damaged cells, and reproduce because of cell
division and mitosis.
The students will understand the process of mitosis.
The students will understand the necessity of the reproduction of cells.
The students will be able to describe the outcome of mitosis.
Essential Question(s):
What are the stages of mitosis?
Why is the process of mitosis so important to our everyday lives?
Specific Content (Code)

Specific Objectives (Code)

1. Process of Mitosis.
A. Stages
I. Interphase
II. Prophase
III. Metaphase
IV. Anaphase
V. Telophase
VI. Cytokinesis

1.A. The students will be able to


name and describe the stages
of mitosis.
1.A. The students will create a
flipbook that properly shows the
steps of mitosis with
appropriate descriptions.

Specific Formative Assessments


(Code)
1. The students will show the
other students their flipbooks.
2. The students will answer one
short answer question
pertaining to mitosis on an exit
slip.

Procedures (Include and Label ALL Components: DETAILED:


Lesson Beginning (Motivation, Review, Overview)
The students begin by reviewing the terms that will be used while creating a flip book. The words are
Interphase, Prophase, Metaphase, Anaphase, and Telophase. From there, each student will be given a set
of directions that pertain to the activity of creating a Mitosis Flip book.

Lesson Development
The students will receive a written copy of the instructions, while the teacher read them aloud. Each
student is given 12 blank notecards as well. First, after reading the instructions, the students will take
five notecards and begin to draw. These first five cards that the students are drawing are the five stages
of mitosis; Interphase, Prophase, Metaphase, Anaphase, and Telophase. Then, five of the seven
remaining notecards will be used as pictures that occur between each stage. One of the two remaining
notecards will be used for a cover page where the student is able to write their name and period. The last
card can be used to write important terms that pertain to mitosis. After completion of the flipbook, some
students will show theirs to fellow classmates. Once that several students have shared, they will place
the flip books in the collection box in order to make sure they are correct.
Lesson Ending (Review, Preview, Closure)
The students will again review the definitions of the stages involved in Mitosis. After the review and
looking over some of the flipbooks, the students will be given an exit slip pertaining to the activity and
content. There is one short answer question for the student to answer on the exit slip.
Meaningful Student Involvement (Indicate how the students will be meaningfully engaged in the lesson):
They have to create a flipbook, which means understanding the full process of cell reproduction.
The students also get to be creative by drawing and coloring notecards.
Special Adaptations/Modifications:
The pictures can be previously drawn out for a student that has difficulty with motor function. The
pictures, if drawn out, can be raised so that a student with vision issues can feel what each step
would be like.
Anticipated Difficulties AND Modifications:
The students may need more time to complete the activity.
Physical Structure:
Typical classroom setting with the teachers desk in front of the classroom. Half of the students
desks face the front of the classroom, while the other half face the left side of the classroom.
Materials:
Colored pencils
Blank notecards
Book for example pictures and stages
An example of the flipbook
Chalk for the chalkboard
A box to collect the flipbooks when they are completed
References (2)
Biggs, A., & Daniel, L. (2002). Cell Reproduction. In Life's structure and function (pp. 96-117). New York, N.Y.:
Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Miller, K., Levine, J., & Hall, I. (2004). Introduction to Genetics. In Prentice Hall biology (Student ed., page 275).
Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Prentice Hall
Reflection (Efficacy of the PLANNED Lesson: (Each lesson must have a reflection. Even though the lesson
was not taught [exception: peer teaching lesson] a reflection is needed. Discuss the projected efficacy
and why.

We were able to teach this lesson to the classes. The students really seemed to enjoy
what they were doing. While they were coloring, we would walk around the class to help them
as they went along. The students were creating flipbooks as a study tool for their unit of
cellular reproduction. I believe that this activity was a tool that could be useful to them because
they were able to see the stages of cell division in their books, draw them onto their cards, and

see the process of cell division as they flipped through the book. They were also able to write
any other information that they thought would be important for them to know for whenever the
test came. Overall, the students did a very good job on their flipbooks. We created a rubric
and graded them based off of whether their pictures contained the information that was
necessary for each step of the process. They were also given points based off of their
drawings. If the student attempted a drawing, they were given the points. The students were
also given points for completing an exit slip. They had an exit slip for each day that they
participated and were given points for completing the prompt. With the exit slips, our goal was
to get the students to think about the final products of mitosis which are two identical daughter
cells.

Flip Right through It


Name: __________________________________________________
PD: _______

Directions:

*You will be making a flipbook about the stages of Mitosis using 12 notecards.
It may be easier for you to draw the stages out in pencil first before coloring.*
1. Count five notecards from your stack of twelve. These five notecards that you
counted will be the five steps in Mitosis. Look on page 101 in your book for
example pictures and descriptions. Please draw those stages now. (One card
per stage)
2. After the first five cards are done, please set them aside. Next, count five more
notecards. These five cards will represent pictures that happen in between
each step. Some pictures, when drawn, may look the same, and that is fine.
Put all ten cards together in the proper order and number them 1-10.
3. Two cards should be remaining. One card will be used as a cover page. This
should include your name and period number on it. The other card goes at the
very end. Put the numbers 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 on the last notecard. Write the
mitotic stage next to the appropriate number.

Exit Slip

*Please answer the following statement in the space below, and you may use the
back if needed. Please write at least 2-3 sentences.*
1. Describe the cells at the end of Mitosis.

Name:_______________________________________________
PD:_______
Flipbook grading sheet

Drawing:

Drawings will be graded based off of completion.


I
Total:

I-P

P-M

M-A

A-T

/10

Content:

Drawings contain important information


Interphase
o Centrioles present ____
o Nucleus/nucleolus visible____
Prophase
o Nuclear membrane disintegrates____
o Chromatids visible____
o Centrioles moving towards opposite polls____
Metaphase
o Chromatids across the middle of the cell____
o Centrioles on opposite polls____
o Spindle fibers attached to centromeres____
Anaphase
o Spindle fibers shortening____
o Chromosomes moving with fibers towards centrioles____
Telophase
o Nuclear membrane reforms____
o Chromosomes begin to unwind____
o Spindle fibers disappearing____
Cytokinesis
o Two identical cells formed____

Total:

/14

Exit Slip:
Instructions are followed and complete sentences are used.
Total:

/6

DAY 4
STAGE THREE (Learning Experiences: Daily Lesson Plan)
Name: Jake & Shelby
Title of Lesson: How many do you have?
Grade Level(s): 7
Strategy (Direct/Indirect): Direct
PA Academic Standards and Assessment Anchors (where applicable):
M07. C-G.1.1.1: Solve problem involving scale drawings of geometric figures, including length and area
S7.B.1.2.2: Compare various basic sexual and asexual reproductive processes
Enduring Understanding(s):
The students will be able to assimilate between the prefixes of the chromosomes and shapes.
The students will understand that different organisms can contain different chromosome numbers.
Essential Question(s):
What do the different prefixes mean?
How do the prefixes relate to geometric shapes?
Specific Content

Specific Objectives (Code)

Specific Formative Assessments


(Code)

1. The students will read page


110A, which mentions plants having
a different number of
chromosomes.
2. The students will then relate the
chromosome numbers to geometric
shapes.

1.The students will know that 1. An exit slip with questions


pertaining to the prefixes and
the prefix pertains to a
numbers.
certain number.

Procedures (Include and Label ALL Components: DETAILED:


Lesson Beginning (Motivation, Review, Overview)
The students will begin the lesson by going over the information on page 110A in their content textbook. The
students will be asked to look at the prefixes when the chromosomes are mentioned.
Lesson Development
The students will be given a piece of paper and will draw a Venn Diagram. This diagram will be used to compare
Mitosis and Meiosis. From there the students will discuss their findings in small groups. After, the students will be
looking for differences that can occur in Meiosis pertaining to the chromosome numbers and the factors that may
cause them. The students will compare different organisms mentioned in the book that have a different number of
chromosomes. By looking at the prefixes of the names associated to different species the students will then relate
the prefixes to geometric shapes. The teacher will draw different geometric shapes on the board and relate them
to the prefixes.
Lesson Ending (Review, Preview, Closure)

There will be a review of the material covered in order to assure that the students understand the differences
between asexual and sexual reproduction, different species have a different number of chromosomes, and that
the prefixes help determine the number of chromosomes represented. The students will be given an exit slip
reviewing the prefixes and their relationship to geometric shapes.
Meaningful Student Involvement (Indicate how the students will be meaningfully engaged in the lesson):
The students will be actively involved because they will have to use their observation skills on order to compare
the different species being discussed. The students will also have to relate the prefixes to shapes, so it shows
that there is a purpose for the names of the chromosomes.
Special Adaptations/Modifications:
The students may need to see the shapes before the prefixes in order to grasp the number it is referring to. A
larger print book may be more helpful for students that have a visual impairment. Students that have a physical
disability can use a computer with assistive technology to complete their Venn Diagram.
Anticipated Difficulties AND Modifications:
The students may need more time to complete the reading. Also, more time may need to be spent on the prefixes
and the relation to geometric shapes.
Physical Structure:
The classroom will be set up like a typical one, with the teachers desk in the front and the students desks in
rows.
Materials:
Content Textbook
Venn Diagram paper
Exit Slip paper
Pencil
Chalkboard
References (2)
Miller, K., Levine, J., & Hall, I. (2004). Introduction to Genetics. In Prentice Hall biology (Student ed., page 275).
Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Prentice Hall
Biggs, A., & Daniel, L. (2002). Cell Reproduction. In Life's structure and function (pp. 96-117). New York, N.Y.:
Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
Plant Hybrids #1. (n.d.). Retrieved November 24, 2014, from
http://waynesword.palomar.edu/hybrids1.htm
Reflection (Efficacy of the PLANNED Lesson: (Each lesson must have a reflection. Even though the lesson
was not taught [exception: peer teaching lesson] a reflection is needed. Discuss the projected efficacy
and why.

With this lesson, I feel as if the students would be engaged in a lesson that would
connect to multiple subjects. There is the discussion of the different prefixes to go with science
and chromosome numbers along with math and geometry. The students would be able to
make connections between shapes such as triangles and hexagons to the prefixes such as triand hexa- when it comes to the number of chromosomes that are involved with meiosis and
cellular division.

Meiosis Mitosis

Name:_________________________________________ Period: ___________


Exit Slip: Please write the prefix and draw a shape next to it. The teacher will say
the number to be drawn.
1.

2.

3.

DAY 5
STAGE THREE (Learning Experiences: Daily Lesson Plan)
Name: Jake & Shelby
Title of Lesson: Letter writing
Grade Level(s): 7
Strategy (Direct/Indirect): Indirect
PA Academic Standards and Assessment Anchors (where applicable):
1.4.7.A: Write poems, short stories, and plays.
CC.1.4: Writing: Students write for different purposes and audiences. Students
write clear and focused text to convey a well-defined perspective and appropriate
content.
3.1.7.A4: Explain how cells arise from pre-existing cells.
Enduring Understanding(s):
Mitosis is a process of cellular division that creates two identical daughter cells.
Essential Question(s):
What happens to chromosomes during cellular division?
Specific Content (Code)

Specific Objectives (Code)

Specific Formative Assessments


(Code)

1. Chromosomes and cellular


reproduction

1. Students will be able to


describe the process of mitosis
from the standpoint of the
chromosomes.

1. Questions will be asked


throughout the lesson to check for
understanding.
2. Students will complete an exit
slip on the days lesson before
exiting the classroom

Procedures (Include and Label ALL Components: DETAILED:


Lesson Beginning (Motivation, Review, Overview)
Lesson begins with a review of mitosis.
o Discuss interphase, prophase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase.
o Ask questions to get the students to describe what is happening in each stage:
Who can tell me what happens in Prophase?
What about the centrioles in Metaphase?
Where do spindle fibers attach to chromatids?
Give the students a preview of what they will be doing for the day
o Students will be looking at the stages of mitosis from the viewpoint of the genetic
material. (chromosomes)
Lesson Development

Students will be given a direction sheet for the activity of the day.
o Directions include: 10-15 complete sentences or approx. two paragraphs
o The students are to start at interphase and work their way through mitosis and
cytokinesis, describing what is happening from the point of view of the DNA.
o Students will have approx. 40 minutes out of a 45 minute period to work.

While students are working, the teacher should walk around the classroom answering
any questions that the students may have.
Students will be able to use their textbook and any other study materials that they have
gained throughout the rest of the unit to complete the assignment.
Lesson Ending (Review, Preview, Closure)
After the ~40 minutes are up, ask the students if there are any of them that would like to
share what they have written down.
With students who have shared their work, direct the students to the bottom of their
direction sheet.
o There will be an exit slip for them to complete before they leave the classroom.
o The exit slip contains a question on the material covered in the lesson.
Meaningful Student Involvement (Indicate how the students will be meaningfully engaged in
the lesson):
Students will be meaningfully engaged because they will be taking the role of a
chromosome. Theyll be discussing the process of cell division as if they were part
of the process. This would allow them to look at mitosis from another viewpoint,
thus helping them learn the material.
Special Adaptations/Modifications:
Students may need extra time completing the writing. If so, they will need to finish
the exit slip before leaving the classroom and some time can be made during free
time that day or the next.
Anticipated Difficulties AND Modifications:
Students may have difficulties taking the role of a chromosome. If so, the
instructor can walk through the steps of cell division with the student to have them
get a better understanding of the process.
Physical Structure:
Students will work alone for the majority of this lesson. At the end of the period,
some students may present their work to the class, but not all have to.
Materials:
Direction sheet/exit slip

Blank sheet of paper


Writing utensil
Textbook

References (2)
Biggs, A., & Daniel, L. (2002). Cell Reproduction. In Life's structure and function (pp. 96

117). New York, N.Y.: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.


Mitosis - When Cells Split Apart. (n.d.). Retrieved November 19, 2014, from
http://www.biology4kids.com/files/cell2_mitosis

Reflection (Efficacy of the PLANNED Lesson: (Each lesson must have a reflection. Even
though the lesson was not taught [exception: peer teaching lesson] a reflection is needed.
Discuss the projected efficacy and why.
With this lesson, I feel as if students will be engaged in learning. Theyll be doing a little
bit of a review of mitosis but this time they would be looking at the stages from a different
viewpoint. By looking at the steps being DNA, the students would better understand the fact that
at the end of mitosis, there are two cells with identical DNA to the parent cell. This is really
important for the students because meiosis creates something different.

Name:__________________________________________________________
PD:_________
Chromosome Viewpoint
Directions:
Mitosis is a portion of cell division that produces two identical nuclei. It is
your job to describe the process of mitosis from the viewpoint of the genetic
material. Starting at interphase and working through to cytokinesis, you are to
describe what is happening in each relating to the DNA. This writing should be
approximately 10-15 sentences or two paragraphs. Be sure to use complete,
grammatically correct sentences, using proper terminology.

Proficient (10)

Sufficient (5)

Insufficient (1)

Total:

Lenth
Student meets
requirements for
length of the
assignment.
Student is 1-2
sentences under
the requirement
for length.

Grammar
Writing contains 2
or fewer
grammatical
errors.
Writing contains 35 grammatical
errors.

Student is 3 or
more sentences
below the
requirement for
length.

Writing contains 6
or more
grammatical
errors.

Content
Student uses
proper
terminology with
correct usage.
Student uses
terminology
correct to the
assignment but in
the wrong context.
Student uses the
wrong terminology
in the wrong
context.

/30
Exit Slip
In 2-3 complete sentences, answer the questions below.

How many cells are produced at the end of mitosis? How does the genetic
material compare to the genetic material of the parent cell?

Name: Jake & Shelby


Title of Lesson: Viruses in todays world
Grade Level(s): 7
Strategy (Direct/Indirect): Direct
PA Academic Standards and Assessment Anchors (where applicable):
Enduring Understanding(s):

Students will understand that there is a great difference between the effects
of viruses from the past to todays world.

Essential Question(s):

What is a virus?
How do viruses of the past differ from viruses of today?

Specific Content (Code)


1. Viruses
1. Viruses in
history
2. Viruses of
today

Specific Objectives (Code)

1.a-b. Students will be


able to make connections
between viruses of the
past and viruses in the
news.
2.a-b. Students will be
able to properly follow
instructions to write two
paragraphs on the topic.

Specific Formative
Assessments (Code)

1. Students will
complete an exit
slip before leaving
for the day.

Procedures (Include and Label ALL Components: DETAILED:


Lesson Beginning (Motivation, Review, Overview)

The lesson will begin with a review what a virus is.


o A virus is a strand of hereditary material surrounded by a protein
coating.
The lesson will follow with a discussion of what will take place in the class for
the day.
o Students will be writing two paragraphs on differences between the
history of viruses and viruses of today.
Topics can include death toll, how viruses were spread, ways to
keep viruses and disease from spreading, and how they are
handled now.
The students will have the use of their textbooks and computers that are in
the classroom.

Lesson Development

A direction sheet will be passed out to the students.


o The direction sheet will describe what the students will be doing for the
assignment.
Students will write two paragraphs describing viruses. The
writing can be about different viruses from history and how they
were handled. This can include procedures for containing the
spread of infection and how many people perished from a
certain virus. Students will compare the information on the virus
from the past to a virus that is seen in the news today.
o While the students are working, the teacher should walk around the
class to check the students for any questions.

Lesson Ending (Review, Preview, Closure)

Near the end of the period, the teacher will pass out an exit slip.
o The exit slip should check for the students understanding of the topic
at hand.
o Students will write two to three sentences on the viruses that they
have chosen.
This will help the teacher to see if the students are on the right
track.

Meaningful Student Involvement (Indicate how the students will be meaningfully engaged in
the lesson):

Students will be involved because they will be comparing something from the
past to something that can be seen in the news today. One virus that would
be very common with this assignment would be the Ebola virus. Students
hear a lot about the virus from parents or the news and this would give them
a chance to do some research of their own and compare it to a virus and
control methods from the past.

Special Adaptations/Modifications:

Students can use larger print or more pictures with the assignment. If needed,
students can have extra time to complete. For students with special needs,
voice to word technology can be used to get the information across.

Anticipated Difficulties AND Modifications:

Some students may have difficulties thinking of some viruses to compare.


They can be directed to the CDC website or any news website to see what
popular viruses in the news are.

Physical Structure:

Students will be working individually with their computers.

Materials:

Direction sheet
Exit slip

References (2)
Biggs, A., & Daniel, L. (2002). Cell Reproduction. In Life's structure and function (pp. 96-117).
New York, N.Y.: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.

(2014, May 19). Retrieved November 24, 2014, from http://www.cdc.gov/


Reflection (Efficacy of the PLANNED Lesson: (Each lesson must have a reflection. Even
though the lesson was not taught [exception: peer teaching lesson] a reflection is needed.
Discuss the projected efficacy and why.