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Heston Hybarger

Andrew Rusnak
Case 2
Unit: Math

Grade: 4

# of students: 15

Lesson #: 2

Teaching Style: Direct

Indiana Math 4th Grade Standards:


4.NS.3 through 4.NS.5:
Express whole numbers as fractions and recognize fractions that are equivalent to whole numbers.
Name and write mixed numbers using objects or pictures.
Name and write mixed numbers as improper fractions using objects or pictures.
Compare two fractions with different numerators and different denominators.
Recognize comparisons are valid only when the two fractions refer to the same whole.
Lesson Overview:
The overlying point of the lesson is to learn about fraction concepts such as adding and subtracting
fractions as well as comparing fractions with different numerators and denominators. Students and their
CMFK buddies will work together using food to demonstrate these skills.
Lesson Objectives
Students will be able to express whole numbers as fractions and recognize fractions that are equivalent to
whole numbers while making less than 3 errors.
Students will be able to identify mixed numbers using objects or pictures while making less than 3 errors.
Students will be able to use objects or pictures to write mixed numbers as improper fractions while
making less than 3 errors.
Students will be able to compare two fractions with different numerators and different denominators to
determine which is larger while making less than 3 errors.
Required Materials

2 graham crackers per student (30 Total crackers)


Paper plates
Pencil and eraser for each student
Pre-made worksheet
Description of Learners and Learning Environment

15 students in 4th grade


Each student has a buddy that is a student of Purdue University
Classroom will be in the basement of Hicks in room 980D
Small whiteboards for each group available
Internet is available to all students
Projector at the front of the room available to the teacher

Procedures:
1. Have students wash their hands before handling the food, and have kids sit in a circle around the
mentors.
2. Cut 1 piece of each graham cracker into 5 pieces and the other piece into 4 pieces.
3. Show the students that all of the pieces together make a whole. Fractions can be part of a whole or part
of a set.
4. Cut the graham cracker in half and ask the students how many pieces there are. Show them that 2
halves equal one whole (2/2 = 1). Have the students eat half of the graham cracker, ask the class what
fraction is left. ()
5. Show students a whole graham cracker. Have them subtract of the second graham cracker from 4/4
of the whole graham cracker. Ask them what that equals. ()
6. Bring in the graham cracker. Show students you have 2/6 pieces of one graham cracker, and of the
other graham cracker. Ask the students which is bigger. Explain how to find a common denominator. (12)
7. Show students you can only compare fractions when there is a common denominator.
8. Demonstrate to students how to simplify fractions by using the graham crackers.
9. Review with students to make sure they understand the correct proportions each fraction would have on
the projector.
10. Pass out worksheet to students that requires them to color in the correct amount of space for the fraction
given in the shape while their buddy is helping them by demonstrating with the food.
11. As they are working on this, give students remaining food to eat equally.
Assessment:
The students will fill out the attached worksheet with help from their buddy. The teacher will then grade
the worksheet and see if any of the students need more instruction in a particular area.
Journal Articles:
Promising Practices for Student Learning. (2014, June 22). Retrieved March 30, 2015, from
http://www.stemreports.com/2014/promising-practices-for-student-learning/
This article discusses how the use of mobile technology has steadily increased in the classroom
over the last few years. Since 2012, there has been almost a 20% increase in mobile technology use.
This increase has mostly come from technology integration in STEM classroom settings. This article is
useful to us for this case because it shows us that using some technology is a proven way to teach STEM
lessons.

Who Said Math Has to be Boring. (2013, December 7). Retrieved March 30, 2015, from
http://mobile.nytimes.com/2013/12/08/opinion/sunday/who-says-math-has-to-be-boring.html?
pagewanted=all&_r=0&referrer=

This article talks about the importance of STEM being taught in schools. It cites statistics like 90%
of students who took the ACT indicated they didn't want to pursue a career in a STEM related field to
show just how few people are interested. It then goes on to discuss several ways to get more students

involved. The article states that a more flexible curriculum, more exposure at a young age, better teacher
preparation, and real world experience would all help with that. This article was useful to us for this project
because it talked about several ways to make the lesson more enjoyable for students and how to get
them involved in the STEM related fields.

Resources:

http://www.doe.in.gov/standards
http://www.lessonthis.com/math/fraction-fruit/
http://www.education.com/files/73701_73800/73768/practicing-fractions-least-greatest.pdf

Video Presentation of Partial Lesson


http://youtu.be/s6h97D1AWCY

ASSESSMENT