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Sarah Miller
English 11
Mrs. Oberg
January 7, 2015
Pledge of Allegiance; Opposite Opinions

Over the past several decades, centuries even, nations have exercised military control and
popularity. Many do so through propaganda through media outlets and political ties. Countries
like the United States, England and Spain use historical figures and quoting leaders like Gandhi
and Abraham Lincoln, to sway public opinion; using history to remind a nation what it stands for.
The Pledge of Allegiance has been part of this country for the majority of its existence, adapting
as the United States progressed, people who are offended by its current carnation; I pledge
allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America and to the Republic for which it stands,
one nation under god, indivisible with and justice for all, can opt out, protected by rights made
by the same government body, children, too.
The Pledge of Allegiance has been part of the United States history for nearly 150 years,
more than of its entire history. The Founding fathers may not have made the Pledge; however,
it does have a very similar history to the Declaration of Independence; the Declaration was a list
of complaints to the British Empire, the Pledge of Allegiance was a way to promote patriotism
and generate money made by a Baptist minister named Francis Bellamy. Neither one had a grand
beginning, but both had been adopted by the American people. Only the Declaration was a
written historical document that cant be changed. The United States Constitution is much like
the pledge of Allegiance; they are both more of an idea that can be altered over the past
centuries; I pledge my allegiance to the flag of the United States of America was one of the
changes made to the pledge to the response of growing immigrants. The Pledge, unlike the

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Declaration, evolves alongside the people, in the changing times. Its original version was in fact,
I pledge allegiance to my Flag and the Republic for which it stands, one nation, indivisible, with
liberty and justice for all( Relgious Tolerance, The U.S Pledge of Allegiance, Background
material). It serves as a reminder to who we can be. During the Cold War, when the United States
and Russia were very close to open warfare, the Knights of Columbus, a mens Christian group
had added Under God into the pledge. The change was partly motivated by a desire to
differentiate between communism, which promotes {atheism}, as a way to remind everyone
how different they are from the Soviet Union (Religious Tolerance, The U.S Pledge of
Allegiance, Background material).
Many people take offence by the wording of the pledge, at least, in its current
incarnation; I pledge allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America and to the Republic
for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible with and justice for all, and it is easy to
see why, Under God is a clear reference to those under the Christian faith. But the majority of
the nations young generations dont truly understand what it means, as stated by Erik Nielson,
they are too young [to] understand in the first place (Stand Up for Liberty by Sitting Out the
Pledge of Allegiance). Children are impressionable; they are young and curious about the world
around them and often fail to see the consequence of their actions. They are trained in school and
at home to obey authority figures and to do what is asked of them. Now parents are concerned
about children subjected to say the pledge, especially atheist parents, but students are free, if
they choose, to recite the pledge or any part of it that they see fitas well to choose to abstain
[and are not required] to articulate a reason for his or her choice to do so (Under God in
Pledge of Allegiance is constitutional, says Massachusettss highest Court). This means that even

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though the pledge is recited everyday across the nation, it isnt a mandatory requirement. They
are free to edit the pledge as they see fit or not participate at all.
Since the founding of the United States, there have always been a religious reference in
one document or another; ranging from the Presidents inauguration to the Declaration itself,
there is a reference to God. So why arent these being challenged as well? Because unlike the
Pledge itself, these documents and speeches are either written or spoken by a person who only
says it once or twice, they are considered, mostly, as non-sectarian. They affirm the solemnity
or seriousness of certain occasions (One Nation Under God? A Constitutional Question). As
stated before, there are several references to religion in the United States, however, in the many
major documents or speeches, it is to make it more serious, such as that all men are created
equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these
are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness (The Declaration of Independence). It doesnt say
God, but it does say Creator which, no matter how someone phrases it, means a higher power.
Much like when writers use words like blood-red or deathly quiet, it is to affirm seriousness.
As a historical nation that has sprouted from the Christian Pilgrims, God has always been a
higher power that people swear to, from the most devout follower to the most adamant atheist; it
has always been something that people swear under.
The Pledge is an old part of the United States history, and it is one of many things to have
changed as the nation has progressed. And while people have their concerns about the Pledge of
Allegiances, they also have their rights. They have the right to abstain from reciting if they desire
and students share that right. The religious references in the Pledge, and in all similar documents,
are a mere means affirm a sincerity to that document.

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Citations;
Religious Tolerance The U.S. Pledge of Allegiance Ontario 2002 by B.A Robinson
Under God in Pledge of Allegiance is constitutional, says
Massachusettss highest court, by the Volokh Conspiracy, Eugene Volokh on
May 9, 2014
Declaration of Independence by the Founding Fathers, 1700s
One Nation Under God? A Constitutional Question by the Pew Forum on
Religion & Public Life released on March 19, 2004
Stand Up for Liberty by Sitting Out the Pledge of Allegiance University
of Richmond, Nielson Erik, April 4th 2013