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Shivon Bell S00134450; Sarah Hubbard S00134029; Tess Parton S00135139; Emily Richards S00134486

EDFD 221 Creating Inclusive, Safe and Supportive Schools Assignment 3

INDIVIDUAL LEARNING PLAN NOAH LOTT


STUDENT PROFILE:
Students Age: 8 years 3 months
Grade: Grade 3
Type of difficulty/disability: ADHD; anxiety; hypersensitivity; gifted
Other special needs: Daily medication
CURRENT ATTAINMENT:
Social/Emotional
Characteristics
of Behaviour/
Entry Level of
Achievement

Introverted
(Australian
Parliament, 1999);
Experiences diverse
emotions
(Australian
Parliament, 1999);

Behavioural
Noah can
concentrate for
short periods of
time
(Burgess, n.d.);
Acts on impulse
(Burgess, n.d.);

Takes great risks


(Australian
Parliament, 1999);

Harsh selfassessment
(Burgess, n.d.);

Displays some
inflexibility
(Burgess, n.d.);

Expressive of
emotions
(Burgess, n.d.);

Children with a
learning disability
have a difficult time
processing the
language and
comprehending, as
they have twice the
processing to do
(Profsayeski, 2008).

Unpredictable
(Burgess, n.d.).

Sensory
Noah is sensitive
to his surroundings
- visual; auditory;
vestibular; tactile;
Seeks sensory
input, during whole
class and
individual work
time (Leap, 2011);
Craves oral-motor
input (NSPT,
2014);
Fast and on the go
(Murray Slutsky &
Paris, 2005).

Gifted
Noah learns and
understands
material in much
less time than his
peers, and
remembers what
he has already
learned
(Larkins, 2010);
Passionately
interested in
specific topics and
has difficulty
moving on
(Larkins, 2010);
Operates on many
levels of
concentration
simultaneously,
without paying
direct attention to
them
(Larkins, 2010);
Loves a challenge
and displays a
great deal of
curiosity about
many things; is
constantly asking
questions
(Larkins, 2010);
Uninhibited in
expression of
opinion (confident)
(Larkins, 2010).

Shivon Bell S00134450; Sarah Hubbard S00134029; Tess Parton S00135139; Emily Richards S00134486
Impact;
Behaviour
Documents As

Prefers routine
(Burgess, n.d.);
Sensitive; is more
reactive to certain
situations;
Speaks
passionately about
topics in class;
disagrees
boisterously
(Reynolds, Vannest
& Harrison, 2012).

Teaching
Strategies to
Assist the
Student

Prepare for change


use visuals, sand
timer; timetables,
schedules;
Movement breaks
(Leap, 2011);
Talk through what is
going to happen
next; talk through
and teach what you
WANT to happen;
teach feelings and
emotions (Larkins,
2014);
Focus on changing
the behaviour
before it happens
(Reynolds, Vannest
& Harrison, 2012);

Noah can feel


angry and his selfesteem is affected
by unfair
consequences for
his behaviour.
(Reynolds,
Vannest &
Harrison, 2012);
Noah can try to
avoid the
consequences by
impulsively
running away,
hiding information
about problems
(Reynolds,
Vannest &
Harrison, 2012).

Teach the
behaviour/ social
skill you expect,
make these
expectations clear
and concise, then
practice
(Larkins, 2014);
Get your students
attention, be clear
and specific, give
step by step
directions, ask the
student to repeat
the directions;

Able to multi-task
by engaging other
students whilst
listening to the
teacher
(Burgess, n.d.);
Excessive noise
can create
communication
barriers for both
students and
teachers (Dillon &
Massie, 2003).

Sincerely
inquisitive and can
be very focused
during lessons.
(Larkins, 2010);
Finds it
challenging to
change focus from
subject to subject
(Larkins, 2010);
When disengaged,
Noah can distract
other learners.
(Larkins, 2010).

Be aware of
textures, patterns,
dazzling
accessories,
smells, makeup
(Leap, 2011);

Encourage
independence,
rather than
dependence. Find
out what the child
already knows;

Create an
organised work
space: quiet areas,
hide outs (Miller,
2006);

Student to write
down questions
they want to ask
during teaching
time
(Australian
Parliament, 1999);

Privacy boards as
a physical
boundary (Leap,
2011);

Give a small
number of
Exercise ball or Tdirections at a
stool as an
time, say exactly
alternative to a
what you mean,
regular chair
dont hurry, check (NSPT, 2014);
Develop inside
on progress,
voice to express
praise the student Gum, carrots,
disagreement with
for completion
bubbles as a
other students
(Reynolds,
strategy for oral(Reynolds, Vannest Vannest &
motor input (Leap,
& Harrison, 2012).
Harrison, 2012).
2011).
(Archdiocese of Canberra & Goulburn Catholic Education Office, 2011)

Has difficulty
finding like-minded
friends
(Larkins, 2010);

To group likeminded students


as it provides a
realistic range of
competition that
challenges
students, allowing
them to work at
their own learning
pace. It also
enhances
students selfesteem.
(Gross, 2006).

Shivon Bell S00134450; Sarah Hubbard S00134029; Tess Parton S00135139; Emily Richards S00134486
MAJOR OUTCOME: Noah will self-manage his learning.
Specific Indicators
Noah will raise his
hand before speaking
to the teacher in a
group setting.

Noah will sit still on


the floor when in a
whole group or small
group setting.

How will this be


achieved?

Who will assist?

Teacher to
acknowledge Noah
when he does this
correctly by
responding with
positive body
language and words
when he raises his
hand. (Australian
Sports Commission,
2005).

1. Explicit modelling
by the teacher;
2. Modelling the
behaviour of
peers.

Assessment:
Observation;
Self-reflection.

Hold stress ball or


other fidget toys
(Reynolds, Vannest &
Harrison, 2012).

1. Explicit modelling
by the teacher;
2. Modelling the
behaviour of
peers.

Assessment:
Observation;
Self-reflection.

1. Teacher
instruction;
2. Student (selfinstruction);
3. Student and
teacher to
monitor weekly
work.

Assessment:
One-on-one interview

Remind Noah of the


expected behaviour
before commencing,
and reward him once
its achieved
(Reynolds, Vannest &
Harrison, 2012).
Noahs is encouraged
through differentiated
curriculum to
continue his learning.

Curriculum
differentiation results
in slight to major
modifications of the
curriculum at the
school or classroom
level, through
adjustments to
content, processes,
products and learning
environment.
(ACT, 2004).
The use of
technology (i.e. iPad;
computer) can help
all children to
participate in the
same lesson.
Activities on the iPad
that build on Noahs
interests will be most
beneficial as theyll

Assessment/
Date of Achievement

Date:
July 14th 2014
September 19th 2014
(Term 3)

Date:
July 14th 2014
August 18th 2014
(Weeks 1-5, Term 3)

Date:
Weekly

Continuously monitor
completed work to assess
for improvement/
attainment of goals.
Date:
July 14th 2014
September 19th 2014
(Term 3)

Shivon Bell S00134450; Sarah Hubbard S00134029; Tess Parton S00135139; Emily Richards S00134486
allow him to be
engaged, enabling
access to the same
curriculum as his
peers (Hall, 2010).
Noah will learn when
it is appropriate to
join others in play
and when to leave
play to avoid conflict.

Provide Noah with


coping skills for the
yard (e.g. if he is
starting to feel upset,
to walk away and find
a teacher)
(Reynolds, Vannest &
Harrison, 2012).

1. On-duty teacher
(rewards positive
conduct);
2. Peer modelling
3. Student (selfmonitoring).

Create a selfmonitoring form.


Determine behaviour
to be changed, write
a goal, determine
reward, and monitor
behaviour
(Reynolds, Vannest &
Harrison, 2012).
Noah will take
responsibility for
taking his medication
at the same time
each day.

Noah to wear a
wristwatch with an
alarm. Show student
the schools
medication policy.
Have him help
Administration to
record in the logbook
when he has taken
his medication to
increase his feeling of
responsibility
(Department of
Education and Early
Childhood
Development, 2014).

Assessment:
Continuous observation
and report by yard duty
staff;
Self-assessment; if good
behaviour increases:
rewards, if it decreases:
problem solve and modify.
Date:
July 14th 2014
September 19th 2014
(Term 3)

1. Student
(wristwatch);
2. Administration;
3. Classroom
teacher.

Assessment:
Observation
Date:
July 14th 2014
September 19th 2014
(Term 3)

(Dillon & Massie, 2003)

Shivon Bell S00134450; Sarah Hubbard S00134029; Tess Parton S00135139; Emily Richards S00134486
ASSESSMENT:
These goals will be assessed over a one-year period, although regular meetings will be scheduled
throughout the year to monitor progress (estimated at twice per term), and an attainment times of one
term and half a term have been designated to each goal.
The goals will be modified if those present determine the goals unachievable, or have already been
achieved.
(Dillon & Massie, 2003)
STUDENT INVOLEMENT IN ILP PREPARATION:
Noahs primary involvement involved goal setting. Noah told the ILP team that:
He wanted to take responsibility of his own learning;
He wanted to work on understanding and reading people better;
He wanted to manage his behaviour more appropriately.
(Dillon & Massie, 2003)
TEACHER INVOLEMENT IN ILP:

Long term goals to be discussed regularly;


Short term goals to be discussed regularly;
Noah and teacher to discuss his progress together on a weekly basis.

(Dillon & Massie, 2003)


ADMINISTRATIVE INVOLVEMENT IN ILP:

Request administration allow Noah to fill in his Medication Log Book;


Inform on-duty teachers/staff about Noahs objectives in the yard;
Ensure a stress ball is a part of the classroom resources (including co-curricular learning
environments such as Art, P.E.)

(Dillon & Massie, 2003)


PARENT/GUARDIAN GOALS FOR HOME SUPPORT OF THE ILP:
Parent/Caregiver Involvement
Noah to assist his caregivers in getting his own medication at home;
Spend time talking about how they are feeling and what their facial expressions mean;
Remind Noah when he is interrupting a conversation or when someone else is speaking;
Aid Noah in spending some time sitting still whilst watching television, or conducting an activity
with them.
Proposed Discussion Timeline
A discussion about the ILP will be formally scheduled between the Learning Support Team,
and parents/caregivers, once per term;
The parents/caregivers and teacher will meet at the beginning and middle of each term;
Further discussions may occur more often than this if the parents/caregivers wish to
communicate with the teacher informally.
(Dillon & Massie, 2003)

Shivon Bell S00134450; Sarah Hubbard S00134029; Tess Parton S00135139; Emily Richards S00134486
ILP EVALUATION AND COMMENTS:
Student
What do you like about this plan? What dont you like about this plan?
What do you think will be hard for you to do?
Is there anything that you would like to add to the plan?
Classroom Teacher
Were the goals achieved?
Were you able to track the students progress effectively?
Did you discuss his progress, and the end goals, with the student?
Were the assessment techniques appropriate for the goal and the student?
Parent/Caregiver
Do you agree that these goals need to be attained?
Do you agree that these goals are attainable?
Would you like to change the plan in anyway?
Do you feel the goals were achieved and did you notice a difference at home?
(Dillon & Massie, 2003)
PROPOSED FUTURE GOALS FOR THE NEXT ILP:
1. To assess if the proposed goals have been met;
2. And/or, if modifications need to be put in place;
3. Find if there are any unknown impacts/incidents occurring
(Dillon & Massie, 2003)

Shivon Bell S00134450; Sarah Hubbard S00134029; Tess Parton S00135139; Emily Richards S00134486

REFERENCES:
ACT Government. (2004).Gifted and talented Act. Retrieved from
http://www.det.act.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0020/31952/GAT_Policy.pdf

Archdiocese of Canberra & Goulburn Catholic Education Office. (2011). Essential skills for teachers:
equity, diversity and inclusion-experience the possibilities. Retrieved from
http://leo.acu.edu.au/pluginfile.php/764332/mod_page/content/31/planning%20matrix%20exa
mples.pdf

Australian Sports Commission. (2005). Disability Education Program Presenter Kit. Behaviour
Management Tips. Retrieved from https://leocontent.acu.edu.au/file/52ecc877-9185-076ed1fb-567794d8f389/1/Handout45.pdf

Burgess, J. (n.d). Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD). Retrieved from


https://leocontent.acu.edu.au/file/f11a4705-f8b1-2559-d9be-5336596995a8/1/Wk11ADHD.pdf

Department of Education and Early Childhood Development. (2014). School Policy and Advisory
Guide. Medication Policy. Retrieved from
http://leo.acu.edu.au/mod/page/view.php?id=593912

Dillon, H & Massie, R. (2003). National Acoustic Laboratories Research & Development Annual
Report - the impact of sound field FM amplification in mainstream cross-cultural classrooms:
Teacher and Child Opinions. Retrieved from
http://leo.acu.edu.au/mod/page/view.php?id=593913

Gross, M.U. (2006). To Group Or Not to Group: That is the Question. Retrieved from
https://leocontent.acu.edu.au/file/74cdee09-b046-4413-0d4c8179dc83458d/1/Gross%2C%20M.%20To%20Group%20or%20Not%20To%20Group.pdf

Hall, D. (2010). ICT and Special Education Needs: the ICT Handbook for Primary Teachers.
London: Routledge.

Shivon Bell S00134450; Sarah Hubbard S00134029; Tess Parton S00135139; Emily Richards S00134486

Larkins, G. (2010). Catering for Learner Differences: Giftedness and Talent. [PowerPoint slides].
Retrieved from https://leocontent.acu.edu.au/file/e15c9dc6-4eb2-542b-dbf12af04d69cb60/1/EDFD221_W11_S1_2011%20Addressing%20the%20individual%20needs
%20of%20children-%20Giftedness%20and%20Talent-blackboard.pdf

Larkins, G. (2014). Lecture 5: Autism Spectrum Disorder: EDFD221 Creating Inclusive, Safe, and
Supportive Schools. [PowerPoint slides]. Retrieved from
https://leocontent.acu.edu.au/file/6d786981-ae21-387c-214130beef5641b1/1/EDFD221%20Week%205%20ASD.pdf

Leap Childrens Therapy Limited. (2011). Making you and your classroom more sensory friendly.
[PowerPoint slides]. Retrieved from http://leapchildrenstherapy.com.

Miller, L. (2006). Sensational Kids Hope and Help for Children with Sensory Processing Disorder.
London: Penguin Books Ltd.

Murray Slutsky, C. & Paris, B. (2005). Is it Sensory or is it Behaviour? Austin: Hammill Institute on
Disabilities.

North Shore Paediatric Therapy. (2014). Sensory Strategies for Kids with ADHD. Retrieved from
http://nspt4kids.com/parenting/sensory-strategies-for-kids-with-adhd/

Parliament of Australia. (1999). The Education of gifted and talented children. Retrieved from
http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Committees/Senate/Education_Employment
_and_Workplace_Relations/Completed_inquiries/1999-02/gifted/report/contents

Profsayeski. (2009). Reading and decoding [Video file]. Retrieved from


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xx5kr2T7rK8&feature=related

Profsayeski. (2008). Reading and comprehension [Video file]. Retrieved from


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WbLAt2Hc7Rw&feature=related

Reynolds, C., Vannest, K., & Harrison, J. (2012). The Energetic Brain. San Francisco: John Wiley &
Sons, Inc.