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NORTHVIEW HIGH SCHOOL SYLLABUS

Chemistry
Semester One
James Haveman/Brian Kammers/John Wojciakowski
Conference Hours: By Appointment
jhaveman@nvps.net/bkammers@nvps.net/jwojciakowski@nvps.net
Room 1243/1241/1235
http://haveman.weebly.com
CATS Hours: Wednesdays 2:45 PM 3:45 PM
TEXTS:
T. Buthelezi, L. Dingrando, N. Hainen, C. Wistrom, D. Zike. (2008). Chemistry: Matter and Change. New York:
Glencoe Science
REQUIREMENTS:
Students will be required to keep a lab notebook. Students are allowed to use any type of lined paper notebook.
Bond notebooks are preferred.
Students should be able to access the textbook online using the following directions:
Each student will have access to a textbook online, as well as, have access to a textbook in the classroom. To access
the textbook follow the steps below:
1.

An online version of the textbook can be found at: http://www.glencoe.com/ose/

2.

The access code for the book is B2C3EA6AA9.

3.

You will need Abode Flash Player 10 or higher on your computer. If you need to download this program
go to http://get.adobe.com/flashplayer/. Once you have installed Adobe Flash Player the you should be
able to access the online textbook.

Students must also follow the Lab Write-Up Rubric listed below:
Lab Write-Ups/Presentations:
The labs completed require following or developing processes and procedures, taking observations, and data
manipulation. Students communicate and collaborate in lab groups; however, each student writes a laboratory writeup each week using the process listed below.
Chemistry Lab Guidelines
Question
Is the question doable/testable? (Are materials available, Is there
enough time, etc.)
Knowledge Probe
Write down what you already know about the question/topic (prior knowledge)
Write down what others know about the topic/question (outside sources)
Properly cite outside sources.

Prediction:
Is the prediction connected to the question?
Is the prediction connected to the information found during the knowledge probe?
Investigation Plan
Numbered steps
Each step should start with an action
Steps are written in a logical order
Includes multiple trials
Is replicable (very specific and detailed so that someone else could replicate the investigation).
Includes steps/instructions that will help to avoid lab error.
Observations
Records observations in a neat and organized manner (typically in the form of a data table)
Includes units for data (can be done at the top of each column in the data table)
Records all raw data (not just averages)

Data Analysis
If using formula application
Givens are listed
Equations are listed in variable form
Work is clearly shown
Answers are labeled with units
If using graphical analysis
A sketch of the graph is provided or a print out from Excel.
Axes are labeled with what was measured (M, t, etc) and also the units it was
measured in
When linear, a line-of-best fit is drawn (do not connect the dots)
Appropriate calculations are made (slope, r2, etc.). If these calculations were done
using linear regression on your calculator, please stateused linear regression on
calculator.
Units are provided for numbers that are taken from the graph (ex. Units for
slope, etc). If using another methodwork is clearly shown in an organized manner.
Explanation
Every part of your explanation should include complete sentences.
Claim
Answers the question being investigated.
Evidence
Provides data from the lab that supports the claim.
In most cases, actual numbers should be provided here.

Units are given for any numbers discussed.


Does not explain the why behind the evidence at this point (that is done in the reasoning
piece)
Sentence starter ideas: The data suggests Based on . According to the data . Our data indicates.
Reasoning
There are two parts to your reasoning section.
Part One: Explains the evidence
Links the claim with the evidence.

Explanation Continued

Explains why the evidence justifies the claimexplains the why behind your evidence. It is
often helpful here to explain how you did your data analysis, explaining why you chose the
calculations you did or why graphed what you chose to graph.
Typically links back to any scientific theories or prior knowledge that help justify your claim. For
us, scientific theories are typically formulas. These should be discussed here.
Sentence starter ideas: This evidence supports the claim because The evidence was analyzed by .
Part Two: Fair Test:
Explains why you think the investigation was a fair testwhy your data is reliable. Discusses
steps you took to avoid error and insure accurate results.
Sentence starter ideas: Our investigation was a fair test because This evidence is reliable because

Evaluation
Answers all questions using complete sentences unless otherwise stated.
Example Questions:
What further questions do you have that relate to this investigation?
If you could conduct this investigation again, what would you do differently?
Discuss three possible sources of error. These errors should be unavoidable errors. Errors that
mention you measured wrong or calculated incorrectly are avoidable errors and should not be
listed as a true source of error. Errors that could have occurred even if you did the lab perfectly
are the errors you should discuss here.

GRADING POLICY:
1.
2.

Determination of grade:
Grades will be calculated as an average of total points earned over points possible in each sub
category.
Grades are determined by points earned on the following types of assignments.

Type of Assignment
Tests and Quizzes
Projects/Lab/Activities/Grade
d Homework

% of Total Grade
70%
30%

3.

Grading Scale:

100-92.5%
92.4-89.5%
89.4-86.5%
86.4-82.5%
82.4-79.5%
79.4-76.5%
76.4-72.5%
72.4-69.5%
69.4-66.5%
66.4-62.5
62.4-59.5
59.5%

A
AB+
B
BC+
C
CD+
D
DF

HANDING IN ASSIGNMENTS:
1.
2.

All homework assignments will be due the following day, unless otherwise specified.
All work must be your own. Using other students work does not all me to properly assess your
progress.

MAKE-UP WORK:
1.
2.

It is the responsibility of the student to obtain and make up assignments missed due to excused
absences.
No late work will be accepted after the unit review is complete.

RETESTING:
1.

Student will be allowed ONE retest this semester on Unit Tests. DOING YOUR VERY BEST
ON THE FIRST TEST IS PARAMOUNT!

ASSESSMENTS:
Formative Assessments will be used within each Unit. Students will be asked to work in Groups, as well as,
individually on Formative Assessments. Formative Assessments will provide FEEDBACK to the student, but will
NOT be placed in the Gradebook.
Summative Assessments will be complete at the end of each Unit. A list of the Semester Summative Assessments
are below:
The Atom:
The Nucleus:
The Electron and Periodic Table:
Bonding:
Equations:

100 Points
100 Points
100 Points
100 Points
100 Points

SCHEDULE:
Unit 1: The Atom
1.

Describe how and where all the elements on earth were formed.

2.

Describe the potential energy changes as two protons approach each other.

3.

Describe the atom as mostly empty space with an extremely small, dense nucleus consisting of the protons
and neutrons and an electron cloud surrounding the nucleus.

4.

Identify the location, relative mass, and charge for electrons, protons, and neutrons.

5.

Recognize that protons repel each other and that a strong force needs to be present to keep the nucleus
intact.

6.

List the number of protons, neutrons, and electrons for any given ion or isotope.

7.

Recognize that an element always contains the same number of protons.

8.

Calculate the average atomic mass of an element given the percent abundance and mass of the individual
isotopes.

9.

Predict which isotope will have the greatest abundance given the possible isotopes for an element and the
average atomic mass in the periodic table.

10. Write the symbol for an isotope, XA Z, where Z is the atomic number, A is the mass number, and X is the
symbol for the element.
Unit 2: The Nucleus
1.

Determine the age of materials using the ratio of stable and unstable isotopes of a particular type.

2.

Illustrate how elements can change in nuclear reactions using balanced equations.

3.

Explain why matter is not conserved in nuclear reactions.

4.

Understand the difference between fission and fusion.

5.

Discuss the radioactive decay of unstable isotopes continually generate new energy within the Earths crust.

6.

Use observations to support the Big Bang Theory. Theory versus Law.

7.

Investigate how hydrogen and helium where formed in the Big Bang.

8.

Discuss the expontential decay.

Unit 3: The Electron and the Periodic Table


The Electron:
1.

Describe the fact that the electron location cannot be exactly determined at any given time.

2.

Describe energy changes in flame tests of common elements in terms of the (characteristic) electron
transitions.

3.

Contrast the mechanism of energy changes and the appearance of absorption and emission spectra.

4.

Compare various wavelengths of light (visible and nonvisible) in terms of frequency and relative energy.

5.

Write the complete electron configuration of elements in the first four rows of the periodic table.

6.

Write Lewis Structure structures for main group elements.

7.

Predict oxidation states and bonding capacity for main group elements using their electron structure.

8.

Study the stars light spectra and brightness to determine the stars composition and age.

Trends in the Periodic Table:


1.

Identify metals, non-metals, and metalloids using the periodic table.

2.

Explain properties of various solids such as malleability, conductivity, and melting point in terms of the
solids structure and bonding.

3.

Identify elements with similar chemical and physical properties using the periodic table.

4.

Predict general trends in atomic radius, first ionization energy, and electronegativity of the elements using
the periodic table.

5.

Predict reactivity specifically with water and oxygen.

Unit 4: Bonding
Chemical Bonds (Ionic, Polar and Nonpolar Covalent)
1.

Explain the changes in potential energy (due to electrostatic interactions) as a chemical bond forms and use
this to explain why bond breaking always requires energy.

2.

Explain why it is necessary for a molecule to absorb energy in order to break a chemical bond.

3.

Predict if the bonding between two atoms of different elements will be primarily ionic or covalent.

4.

Predict the formula for binary compounds of main group elements.

Bond Polarity
1.

Identify if a molecule is polar or nonpolar given a structural formula for the compound.

Nomenclature
1.

Name simple binary compounds using their formulae.

2.

Given the name, write the formula of simple binary compounds.

3.

Given a formula, name the compound.

4.

Given the name, write the formula of ionic and molecular compounds.

Lewis Structures

1.

Draw Lewis structures for simple compounds.

Strengths of Bonds
1.

Describe the relative strength of single, double, and triple covalent bonds.

Intermolecular Forces:
1. Recognize that solids have a more ordered, regular arrangement of their particles than liquids and that
liquids are more ordered than gases.
2.

Recognize that substances that are solid at room temperature have stronger attractive forces than liquids at
room temperature, which have stronger attractive forces than gases at room temperature.

3.

Compare the strength of the forces of attraction between molecules of different elements. (For example, at
room temperature, chlorine is a gas and iodine is a solid.)

4.

Describe energy changes associated with chemical reactions in terms of bonds broken and formed
(including intermolecular forces).

5.

Compare qualitatively the energy changes associated with melting various types of solids in terms of the
types of forces between the particles in the solid.

6.

Identify the elements necessary for hydrogen bonding (N, O, F).

7.

Given the structural formula of a compound, indicate all the intermolecular forces present (dispersion,
dipolar, hydrogen bonding).

8.

Explain why ionic solids have higher melting points than covalent solids.

9.

Explain why at room temperature different compounds can exist in different phases.

10. Predict whether the forces of attraction in a solid are primarily metallic, covalent, network covalent, or
ionic based upon the elements location on the periodic table.
11. Compare the melting point of covalent compounds based on the strength of IMFs (intermolecular forces).
12. Compare the relative melting point, electrical and thermal conductivity, and hardness for ionic, metallic,
and covalent compounds.
13. Relate the melting point, hardness, and electrical and thermal conductivity of a substance to its structure.
Unit 5: Equations and Reaction
1.

Balance simple chemical equations applying the conservation of matter.

2.

Investigate the evidence of chemical reactions.

3.

Distinguish between chemical and physical changes in terms of the properties of the reactants and products.

4.

Draw pictures to distinguish the relationships between atoms in physical and chemical changes.