Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 8

ELED 433 LESSON PLAN FORMAT

JMU Elementary Education Program


Jordan Vinson
Mrs. Bartley, SRES
November 20, 2013
November 13, 2013

A. Points, Lines, Segments, and Rays Oh My!


B. CONTEXT OF LESSON
Students are introduced to points, line segments, rays, angles and lines in third
grade. Virginia standard 3.15 states, The student will identify and draw representations
of points, line segments, rays, angles, and lines. In addition, students are expected to
draw representations of points, line segments, rays, angles, and lines using a ruler or a
straightedge. In fifth grade, the standards do not directly address different types of lines.
However, fifth grade students are required to classify angles (right, acute, obtuse, or
straight) and triangles (right, acute, obtuse, equilateral, scalene, or isosceles). It is
important for students to have an understanding of points, line segments, rays, angles,
and lines before learning to classify angles and triangles. The Common Core Standard
5.G.A.1 requires students to use a pair of perpendicular number lines, called axes, to
define a coordinate system.
This lesson will be performed at the beginning of a geometry unit. Prior to the
lesson, students will have completed a unit on measurement, addressing SOL 4.6 through
4.9. During the measurement unit, students will have learned how to estimate and
measure weight and mass as well as identify equivalent measurements between units
within the metric system and U.S. customary system. In October, students learned about
different types of graphs. Therefore, they will have background knowledge of the terms
line and point prior to the lesson. Students will have been introduced to the parts of a
line prior the lesson. The lesson will review and further develop student understanding of
lines, points, segments, and rays. After this lesson, standard 4.11 and 4.12 will be
introduced. Students will learn to identify representations of lines, investigate
congruence of plane figures after geometric transformations, recognize the images of
figures resulting from geometric transformations, and identify and define polygons. It is
important for students to have a developed understanding of the meaning of a line
before they can successfully analyze the relationships between them.
According to CCSS learning progressions, fourth grade students are able to develop
explicit awareness of and vocabulary for many concepts they have been developing,
including points, lines, line segments, rays, and angles. Such mathematical terms are
useful in communicating geometric ideas. Students are able to construct more accurate
and complete mental images associated with geometric ideas and associated vocabulary
when provided with the opportunity to construct examples of these concepts, such as
drawing lines and rays. According to Piagets theory of cognitive development, students
in the fourth grade are in the concrete stage of development. Students are able to see
points and lines as abstract objects. In addition, students readiness level has been
assessed. As noted, the students will have background knowledge about the parts of a
line prior to the lesson. The day before the lesson, students will be introduced to the
terms again. Therefore, the lesson will act as a review with a focus on extending
comprehension. The activity associated with the lesson will be hands on and will provide
students with choices. A pre-assessment has been conducted prior to the lesson. A
selection of students was interviewed to determine their familiarity with parts of a line.

Many students recalled playing a modified version of Simon Says in third grade.
Students (1) made their hands into a fist to demonstrate a point, (2) spread their arms
apart and pointed to show a line, and (3) made their hands into two fists for a line
segment. Only a few students were able to recall the gestures for a ray (one fist and one
finger pointing). Although students were able to recall the gestures associated with
many of the terms, they were not able provide a definition. Based on the results of the
informal interviews, I have concluded that students will benefit from an introductory
vocabulary review of the parts of a line.
C. RELATED VA SOLs and/or CCSS
Math standard 4.10 can be related to fourth grade social studies, science curriculum,
and art. Virginia Studies standard 1i requires students to analyze and interpret maps.
Knowledge of lines, line segments, rays, and points can aid students in their
understanding of such concepts as longitude, latitude, prime meridian, and equator. In
science, a coordinate plane can be used to graph data. Students must have a base
knowledge of lines, line segments, endpoints, and points in order to successfully graph
their data. Standard 4.1 states, data are collected, recorded, analyzed, and displayed
using bar and basic line graphs. Finally, math standard 4.10 can be related to visual
arts standard 4.6. In fourth grade, students learn to analyze how line choices affect the
intent of a work of art and make selections accordingly.
This lesson can also be related to additional mathematical content. According to
mathematics standard 4.11, the student will learn to investigate congruence of plane
figures after geometric transformations and to recognize the images of figures resulting
from geometric transformations. Standard 4.12 requires students to define polygon as
well as identify polygons with 10 or fewer sides.
The mathematical processes that will be utilized in this lesson are communication,
connections, and representations.
D. LEARNING OBJECTIVES
Understand
Know
U1. A line is composed of
K1. Line: A line has only
points, segments, and rays.
one dimension: length. It
continues forever in two
directions, but has no width
at all. A line connects two
points via the shortest path,
and then continues on in
both directions
Line segment: The portion
of the line lying strictly
between two points. It has a
finite length and no width.
Ray: Has a point on one end
and extends infinitely in the
other direction.
Point: Specifies only
location; it has no length,
width, or depth.
K2. Noncircular geometric
figures (polygons) are
composed of line segments
(examples: triangles,
rectangles, squares,
pentagons, etc.)

Do
D1. Identify, describe, and
create representations of
points, lines, line segments,
and rays.

D2. Identify and make


connections to real-life
examples of lines, line
segments, and rays.

E. ASSESSING LEARNING
How will you assess student learning of the objectives? What type of
assessment will you use and why?
Remember every objective must be assessed for every student!
Objective

Assessment
What documentation will you have
for each student?

Data Collected
What will your students do and say,
specifically, that indicate every
student has achieved your
objectives?

U1. A line is composed of


points, segments, and rays

- Discussion
- Observation
- Exit ticket
- Ornament Activity
Photographs and checklist

- Students will be able to


identify, define, and
represent parts of a line
- Students will be able to
explain how a line, line
segment, and ray are
different.

K1. Line: A line has only


one dimension: length. It
continues forever in two
directions, but has no
width at all. A line
connects two points via
the shortest path, and
then continues on in both
directions

- Discussion
- Ornament Activity
Photographs
- Simon Says
- Exit ticket

- Students will identify lines,


line segments, rays, and
points.
- Students will explain the
differences between each of
the terms.
- Students will define each
term in their own words.
- Students ornaments will
include at least one
representation of a line, line
segment, ray, and point.
- Students will successfully
represent a line, line
segments, ray, and point in
the game of Simon Says.

- Discussion
- Exit ticket

- Students will identify what


types of shapes are not
composed of line segments
- Students will explain why
not all polygons are made up
line segments.
- Students will draw their
own shape and identify the

Line segment: The portion


of the line lying strictly
between two points. It has
a finite length and now
width.
Ray: Has a point on one
end and extends infinitely
in the other direction.
Point: Specifies only
location; it has no length,
width, or depth.
K2. Noncircular geometric
figures (polygons) are
composed of line
segments (examples:
triangles, rectangles,
squares, pentagons, etc.)

points and line segments used


to create it
D1. Identify, describe,
and create
representations of points,
lines, line segments, and
rays

- Ornament Activity

- Students ornaments will


include at least one
representation of a line, line
segments, point, and ray
- Students will be able to
define each term in their own
words

D2. Identify and make


connections to real-life
examples of lines, line
segments, and rays

- Discussion

- Students will identify


examples of lines, line
segments, and rays in the
real world

F.
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o

MATERIALS NEEDED
Popsicle sticks
Pom-Pom balls
Glue
Pipe cleaners
Paper plates
String/yarn
Markers
Foldable
Scissors
Computer

G1 ANTICIPATION OF STUDENTS MATHEMATICAL RESPONSES TO THE TASK(S)


The task of the lesson is to identify, define, and create representations of
points, line segments, rays, and angles. There are a number of different strategies
students may employ when engaging in the lesson. First, students may recall the
hand gestures associated with the Simon Says game. Many students recalled
these gestures during the preassessment informal interviews. Secondly, students
may refer back to The Line Song introduced at the beginning of class to aid them
during their ornament activity. Thirdly, students may use their foldables as a
reference during the activity. The foldable will include a definition and depiction of
a line, line segment, ray, and point.
There are several misconceptions that students may have about the parts of a
line. First of all, students may believe that a letter is used to name both arrows and
points. This possible misconception will be addressed through the use of multiple
examples. Secondly, students may have difficulty conceptualizing the meaning of
a line. I will ask students why we represent a line with arrows. In addition, I will
inquire whether or not it would be possible to draw something that never ends.
When introducing the activity, I will ask students how I can represent a line using
pipe cleaners and Popsicle sticks. I will show students how a pipe cleaner can
bend to form an arrow. A third misconception is the belief that a line in geometry
is the same as the line formed by people. I will ask the class if a line of people
ends or goes on forever. When the class lines up to go to lunch, I can reinforce the
concept by asking if they have formed a line or line segment. A fourth

misconception is the notion that a line is able to bend. I will use examples to show
that a line is always straight, but can be horizontal, vertical, or diagonal. The
video that will be aired at the beginning of class will also address these concepts.
G2 PROCEDURE
Before:
I.
The beginning of the lesson will be used to review the terms line, line
segment, ray, and point.
a. I will begin the lesson by asking students what they remember
about lines, line segments, rays, and points.
b. Next, I will play a BrainPop video that discusses the meaning of
the different parts of a line. The video is three minutes and 51
seconds long.
(http://www.brainpopjr.com/math/geometry/pointslinessegment
srays/)
c. After viewing the video, I will ask students to take a minute and
talk to a partner about the meaning of a line, line segment, ray,
and point. I will walk around and listen to students
conversation. After 1-2 minutes of small group discussion, we
will create foldable. The foldable will be divided into 4 parts:
point, line, line segment, and ray. I will first ask students to
raise their hands and give a definition of the terms in their own
words. We will then write the definition of each term and draw
a pictorial representation. I will use the document camera to
display my writing. During this time, I will ask for volunteers to
draw each part of a line on the white board. In addition, I will
ask students how we name parts of a line.
o Foldable Definitions:
o Point: An exact location or space.
o Line: A set of points right next to each other. A
line continues forever on both ends.
o Line Segment: A part of a line with two
endpoints. A line segment does not continue
forever.
o Ray: A part of a line that starts at a point and
continues in one direction forever.
d. Next, I will display a copy of The Line Song on the board
using the document camera. Each student will also receive a
copy of the song. The lyrics of the song are to the tune of If
Your Happy and You Know It. I will first model the song for the
students, who will then sing along with me.
The Line Song
Tune: If Youre Happy and You Know It
A
A
A
A

line
line
line
line

has
has
has
has

A
A
A
A

ray
ray
ray
ray

has an arrow and a point. X X


has an arrow and a point. X X
travels only in one direction
has an arrow and a point. X X

two
two
two
two

arrows
arrows
arrows
arrows

on the end. X X
on the end. X X
that keep going on forever.
on the end. X X

A
A
A
A

line
line
line
line

segment
segment
segment
segment

has two end points. X X


has two end points. X X
stops, it only has two dots.
has two end points. X X

XX = 2 claps
After singing the song two to three times through, students will be
introduced to the activity. An assortment of materials (popsicle
sticks, markers, pom pom balls, pipe cleaners, and glue) will be set up
on a long table. I will tell the students that we are going to create
ornaments. However, this cant be just any ordinary ornament. It is a
line ornament. Each ornament must contain at least one example of
a line, one example of a line segment, and one example of a ray. A
checklist with the terms written out will be provided to each student.
Student will be asked to check off each word as they build it. This
checklist will be collected as a means of assessment. Markers can be
used to decorate and color the Popsicle sticks. Pipe cleaners can be
molded into arrows. Pom poms can serve as points. Students will be
encouraged to use their creativity to create a unique ornament. I will
call students by their table group to collect their materials. A teacher
will be monitoring the table to ensure that students take the
necessary and appropriate amount of materials.
During:
III.
Students will work individually on their creations. During this time, I
will walk around the classroom and observe students at work. I will
ask students how they plan to create a line, line segment, and ray. In
addition, I will engage students in conversations about the meaning
of a line, line segment, ray, and point. I will also take pictures of the
ornaments to be used as a means of assessment. Discussion
questions include:
a. Why do we use 2 arrows to represent a line?
b. How is a line different that a line segment?
c. How is a line segment different than a ray?
d. How is a line different than a ray?
e. What strategy did you use to create your ornament?
f. Is one of the terms harder for you to remember than the
others?
g. Can you find an example of a line segment in the classroom?
h. The video talked about intersecting and parallel lines. Does
your ornament have intersecting or parallel line?
i. Can you think of any shapes that are made up of line
segments? Are there shapes that are not made up of line
segments?
IV.
When students complete their ornament, they will be asked to draw a
rough sketch of their ornament and label a line, line segment, ray,
and point.
V.
I will monitor students work through the use of a checklist.
II.

Example:

Student
Name

Can represent
and define a
line

Student A

VI.

Can
represent
and define a
line segment

Can
represent
and define a
ray

Can
represent
and define a
point

Notes

Put definition
into own words
Included
multiple
representation
s

If students finish early, there will be a number of activities available.


These activities will be set up at the front of the classroom. Activities
include:
a. Constellation Creation: An activity sheet that asks students to
create their own constellation using line segments to connect
the points. This activity connects to their current study of
space.
b. Clip and Flip: A review game that encourages students to selfcheck their understanding. A board will be provided for each
term (line, line segment, ray, and point). Along the boarder of
the board will be boxes. Within each box there will either be a
definition of a term or a pictorial representation. Students
must decide which definitions and drawing correspond to the
given term. They will attach a paper clip to the edge of the
boxes they believe to be correct. In check themselves,
students must flip over the board. The bottom of the board will
reveal which boxes contained the correct information and
which did not.
c.
Geometry Advertising Activity: Students are asked to
imagine that they have been hired by an advertising called
GeoRocks advertising. Their task is to design a magazine
advertisement with a catchy slogan of one of the products
(words) that they must promote and sell to buyers. Students
must choose one of the following words to advertise: line, line
segment, ray, or point.

After:
VII.
Three students will be selected to present their ornament to the class.
These students will be selected based on their ability to define the
terms in their own words and their representations of lines, line
segments, rays, and points. They will present their ornament and be
asked to explain one of the terms to the class. Previous and new
discussion questions will be presented in a whole-group format.
Discussion questions include:
a. How are a line, line segment, and ray different? How are they
similar?
b. What is the meaning of a point?
c. What is the meaning of an arrow on a ray or line? What do
arrows represent? Why do we use arrows?
d. When we line up at the door for lunch, are we making a line or
a line segment? Why?
VIII.
Next, we will play a game of Simon Says.

IX.

a. Simon Says
i. Make a line segment: Students will hold their arms out to
the side and make fists with their hands
ii. Make a line: Students will extend their arms in opposite
directions and point
iii. Make a ray: Students will hold out both arms. With one
hand, the students will make a fist. They will use their
other hand to point in the opposite direction
iv. Make a point: Student will make a fist with one hand.
Finally, students will be provided with an exit ticket. The exit ticket
will ask students to define explain the meaning of a line, line segment
and ray. Students will also be asked to provide an example of a
shape that is composed of line segments and one that is not.

H. DIFFERENTIATION

Content

Process

Product

Students will use a


variety of materials
to create an
ornament that
incorporates a line,
line segment, ray,
and points

Interest

Readiness

I.

WHAT COULD GO WRONG WITH THIS LESSON AND WHAT WILL YOU DO ABOUT
IT?
Students may not understand that segments, rays, and points are part of
a line. I plan to use multiple representations and drawings. I will talk with
students one-on-one to ensure understanding.
Materials and glue could spill during the activity. I will have Lysol wipes
and paper towels to clean up any spills. In addition, students will put their
ornaments on a paper plate to help contain spills.
Students could take too many materials. I will write out the maximum
number of materials students are permitted to take.