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6th Grade English/Language Arts Curriculum Map

Course Description
This course is designed to address the following Common Core State Standards English/Language Arts strands:
Language
Writing
Reading for Literature: Stories, Novels, Dramas, and Poetry
Speaking and Listening
Reading for Informational Text: Literary Nonfiction and Historical, Scientific, and
Technical Texts

Course I Can Statements


In this course, the student will be able to satisfy the following I Can statements.

Reading

I can comprehend a variety of literature independently and proficiently.


I can comprehend literature by analyzing, inferring, and drawing
conclusions about literary elements, themes, and central ideas.
I can comprehend literature by using knowledge of literary structure and
point of view.
I can read and comprehend a variety of nonfiction independently and
proficiently.
I can extract and construct meaning from nonfiction texts using a range
of comprehension skills.
I can understand nonfiction text using knowledge of structural
organization and authors purpose and message.
I can understand nonfiction texts by evaluating specific claims and
connecting ideas.
I can acquire, refine, and apply vocabulary using various strategies and
sources.
I can build my comprehension by determining or clarifying figurative,
connotative, and technical meanings.

I can write simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex


sentences.
I can demonstrate the commands of the conventions of capitalization,
punctuation, and spelling.

Writing
I can write effectively for a variety of tasks, purposes, and audiences.
I can develop and refine writing skills by writing for different purposes
and to specific audiences.
I can produce essays by planning, drafting, editing, and collaborating with
others.
I can build knowledge about the research process and the topic by
conducting research.

Language

I can use a variety of pronouns correctly.

P a g e 1 | 25

Revision Date: January 2015

6th Grade English/Language Arts Curriculum Map


Course Standard Links
Teachers may find access to additional information on the Common Core State Standards at the following websites:

http://www.doe.in.gov/achievement/curriculum/resources-implementing-indianas-common-core-standards
Other Standards
Although ELA will implement the Common Core State Standards, teachers are expected to integrate the standards for Information and
Technology Skills and English Language Development. You can find these standards at the following websites.
Teacher created, digital lessons designed around the Common Core Standards. The lessons can be used during instruction, to support
teachers understanding of the Common Core Standards, and provide online support to students. http://learnzillion.com/
Resources to implement the Common Core State Standards. The site contains current, relevant, evidence-based tools and professional
development to smooth the transition to Common Core. http://educore.ascd.org/default.aspx This website is full of free content designed to
help educators understand and implement the Common Core State Standards. It includes practical tools designed to help students and
teachers see their hard work deliver results. It was created in the spirit of collaboration. Please steal these tools and share them with others.
http://www.achievethecore.org/

TIMELINE

UNIT

35 days
August 5September
30

Introducti
on to 6th
grade
Language
Arts

MAJOR
CONCEPTS

Indiana CCR
Standards

STUDENT I CAN
STATEMENTS

ACADEMIC
VOCABULAR
Y

NOVELS, SHORT
STORIES, POETRY,
INFORMAL TEXT

1
Organization of
Writing

Reading
Nonfiction:
6.RN.2.2

Topics/Ideas for
Writing
Graphic Organizer
Types of Sentences
Genres
Fiction/Nonficti
on

Reading
Literature:
6.RL.2.2
6.RL.2.3

I can determine how a central


Genres:
idea of a text is conveyed through fiction
particular details and provide an nonfiction
objective summary of the text.
Text Features:
Bibliography
Index
Headings
I can determine how a central
Graphics
idea of a text is conveyed through
Captions
particular details.
I can explain how a plot unfolds
in a series of episodes.

Plot
Close Reading
P a g e 2 | 25

I can interpret figures of speech

Parts of a
Paragraph:
Main Ide
Supports
Conclusion

Fiction:
Romeo and JulietAdapted from the play
by William
Shakespeare
Eleven-Short Story
(SpringBoard)
Holes-Louis Sachar
Nonfiction:
The Mighty Mars
Rovers: The Incredible
Adventure of Spirit and
Opportunity-Elizabeth
Rusch

Revision Date: January 2015

6th Grade English/Language Arts Curriculum Map


Text Features
Figurative
Language
Main Idea

Reading
Vocabulary:
6.RV.3.3

Writing:
6.W.3.2
6.W.6.1
6.W.6.2

in context.

I can:
Introduce a topic, organize
ideas, and provide a conclusion
statement.
Use appropriate transitions to
clarify the relations among
ideas and concepts
I can write simple, compound,
and complex sentences.
I can demonstrate command of
the conventions of standard
English in my writing.

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS THAT GUIDE


UNIVERSAL UNDERSTANDING
What are the differences between fiction and
nonfiction?
How do text features help readers
understand nonfiction?
What are the essential parts of a perfect
paragraph?
How can graphic organizers help writers
create a paragraph?
What are the five parts of a traditional plot?
Why is textual evidence important?
P a g e 3 | 25

Sentences:
Simple
Compound
Complex
Plot:
exposition
rising action
climax

falling
action
resolution

Holy Cow!-Laura
McClure
(www.readworks.org)
Various Tween Tribune
Articles
Various SCOPE Articles
Poetry:
Let it Go-Song from
Disneys Frozen

Personification
Simile
Metaphor
Hyperbole
Onomatopoeia

_______
Tier Two
Vocabulary
Instruction
Caesars
English Book
2
Units 1-2

STUDENT
REQUIRED
WRITING
Structure of a
Paragraph
Topic Sentence
Supporting Details
Concluding
Sentence
Summaries of texts
Teacher-modeled
Guided Practice
Student-written
GIST Format
Informational Essay

Revision Date: January 2015

6th Grade English/Language Arts Curriculum Map

How can figurative language enhance a text?


How can I use textual evidence to write a
summary?

TIMELINE

UNIT

MAJOR
CONCEPTS

Indiana CCR
Standards

STUDENT I CAN STATEMENTS

Reading
Literature:
6.RL.2.3
6.RL.3.2
6.RL.4.1

I can explain how a plot unfolds in a


series of episodes.

ACADEMIC
VOCABULA
RY

Teacher-modeled
Guided Practice
Student-written
Five Paragraphs
Supporting Details
Word Choice
Transitions
Introduction
Conclusion
Thesis Statement

NOVELS, SHORT
STORIES, POETRY,
INFORMAL TEXT

2
12 Days
October 123

Stories
of
Person
al
Change

P a g e 4 | 25

Figurative
Language
Theme
Point of View
Problem/Resolut
ion
Informational
Writing
Sentence
Fluency

I can explain how an author develops


the point of view.
I can compare and contrast the
experience of reading a story with
listening to an audio version of the
text.

Figurative
Language:
Simile
Metaphor

Onomatopo
eia

Alliteration
Imagery
Personificati
on

Fiction:
Flipped-Excerpt by
Wendelin Van Draanen
(SpringBoard)
Nonfiction:
My SuperpowersDan Greenburg
(SpringBoard)
Kira-Kira-Excerpt by
Cynthia Kadohata

Revision Date: January 2015

6th Grade English/Language Arts Curriculum Map


Reading
Nonfiction:
6.RN.4.2
6.RN.2.1

Reading
Vocabulary:
6.RV.2.1
6.RV.3.3

Writing:
6.W.3.2
6.W.6.2
6.W.3.3
6.W.6.2a
6.W.6.1a
6.W.6.1e

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS THAT


GUIDE UNIVERSAL
UNDERSTANDING
Why is textual evidence important?

Media
Literacy:
6.ML.2.1

I can integrate information presented


in different media or formats.
I can site textual evidence to support
analysis of a text.
I can use context to determine or
clarify the meaning of words and
phrases.
I can interpret figures of speech in
context.
I can:
Introduce a topic, organize ideas,
and provide a conclusion statement.
Use appropriate transitions to clarify
the relations among ideas and
concepts
I can demonstrate command of the
conventions of standard English in my
writing.

Point of
View:
First
person
Third
person

(SpringBoard)
The Jacket-Gary
Soto
(SpringBoard)
Various Tween Tribune
Articles

Informational
Narrative

Various SCOPE Articles

Capitalization
Punctuation
Constructed
Response

Poetry:
Imperfect Me from
Hormone Jungle-Brod
Bragert
(SpringBoard)

_______
Tier Two
Vocabulary
Instruction
Caesars
English
Book 2
Units 3-4

STUDENT
REQUIRED
WRITING

I can use a variety of pronouns in the


appropriate writing setting.
I can use evidence to evaluate the
accuracy of information.

How can figurative language enhance a


text?

Constructed responses
to nonfiction articles
using textual
evidence.

What are the necessary tools in the


construction of an Informational piece of
writing?

How can recognizing point of view

P a g e 5 | 25

Teacher-modeled
Guided Practice
Student-written
Paragraph/Yes,
MAAM form
Used sentence
starters that show

Revision Date: January 2015

6th Grade English/Language Arts Curriculum Map


enable the reader to better understand
the text?

evidence was pulled


from text.

Personal Narrative

How can I use textual evidence to write


a summary?

TIMELINE

UNIT

23 Days
October 26
November
25

Stories
of
Change

MAJOR
CONCEPTS

Indiana CCR
Standards

STUDENT I CAN STATEMENTS

Reading
Literature:
6.RL.2.3
6.RL.3.2
6.RL.4.1

I can explain how a plot unfolds in a


series of episodes.

ACADEMIC
VOCABULA
RY

Develop events and


characters through
dialogue, pacing,
and descriptive
details.
Sequence events
Transitions
Word Choice
Pronoun Use,
Sentence Variety,
Dialogue

NOVELS, SHORT
STORIES, POETRY,
INFORMAL TEXT

P a g e 6 | 25

Plot
Theme
Point of View
Setting
Problem/Resolut
ion

I can explain how an author develops


the point of view.

Parts of a
Story:
Theme
Setting
Plot

Fiction:
The Cay- Theodore
Taylor
Hatchet-Gary Paulsen
"Thank you M'am"Langston Hughes

Revision Date: January 2015

6th Grade English/Language Arts Curriculum Map


Sentence
Fluency

I can compare and contrast the


experience of reading a story with
listening to an audio version of the
text.
Reading
Nonfiction:
6.RN.4.2
6.RN.2.1

I can integrate information presented


in different media or formats.
I can site textual evidence to support
analysis of a text.

(SpringBoard)
Point of
View:
First
person
Third
person
Narrative
Capitalization

Reading
Vocabulary:
6.RV.2.1
6.RV.3.3

I can use context to determine or


clarify the meaning of words and
phrases.
I can interpret figures of speech in
context.

Punctuation
Constructed
Response
Short Story

Writing:
6.W.3.2
6.W.6.2
6.W.3.3
6.W.6.2a
6.W.6.1a
6.W.6.1e

Media
Literacy:
6.ML.2.1

I can:
Introduce a topic, organize ideas,
and provide a conclusion statement.
Use appropriate transitions to clarify
the relations among ideas and
concepts
I can demonstrate command of the
conventions of standard English in my
writing.
I can use a variety of pronouns in the
appropriate writing setting.
I can use evidence to evaluate the
accuracy of information.

P a g e 7 | 25

_______
Tier Two
Vocabulary
Instruction
Caesars
English
Book 2
Units 5-6

Pandora and the


Whispering Box from
Enid Blytons Tales of
Ancient Greece
(SpringBoard)
The Treasure of
Lemon Brown-Walter
Dean Myer
(SpringBoard)
The Mysteries of
Harris Bcrurdick-Chris
Van Allburg
(SpringBoard)
Nonfiction:
Call of the Deep
Wilds Reading Street
Bear Attack: The
Story of Seven Boys
and One Grizzly
Article in Readers
Digest
http://www.rd.com/tru
e-stories/survival/bearattack-the-story-ofseven-boys-and-onegrizzly
About Gary
Biographyhttp://www.randomhou
se.com/features/garyp
aulsen/about.html

Revision Date: January 2015

6th Grade English/Language Arts Curriculum Map


Various Tween Tribune
Articles
Various SCOPE Articles
Poetry:
Survival on the Cayhttp://www.writersbub
ble.com/survival-onthe-cay-poem-basedon-the-cay-book/

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS THAT


GUIDE UNIVERSAL
UNDERSTANDING
What are the five parts of a traditional
plot?
What is learned during the different
parts of plot?
Why is textual evidence important?
How can recognizing point of view
enable the reader to better understand
the text?
How can I use textual evidence to write
a summary?

STUDENT
REQUIRED
WRITING
Constructed responses
to nonfiction articles
using textual
evidence.

Short Story

P a g e 8 | 25

Teacher-modeled
Guided Practice
Student-written
Paragraph/Yes,
MAAM form
Used sentence
starters that show
evidence was pulled
from text.
Conflict
Characters
Setting
Point of View
Sequence
Exposition and
resolution
Transitions
Word Choice
Pronoun Use

Revision Date: January 2015

6th Grade English/Language Arts Curriculum Map

TIMELINE

UNIT

MAJOR
CONCEPTS

Indiana CCR
Standards

STUDENT I CAN STATEMENTS

ACADEMIC
VOCABULARY

NOVELS, SHORT
STORIES,
POETRY,
INFORMAL TEXT

Reading
Literature:
6.RL.2.2
6.RL.4.2

I can determine how a theme or


central idea of a work of literature is
conveyed through particular details.

Theme

I can provide an objective summary of


the text.

Inference

Fiction:
"The Little
Mermaid-Excerpt
by Hans Christian
Anderson
(SpringBoard)

4
November
30December
17

The
Power
of
Change

Theme
Setting
Summary
Textual
Evidence

I can compare and contrast works of


literature in different forms or genres
in their approach to similar themes
and topics.

Informative
Writing
Argumentative
Writing

Reading
Nonfiction:
6.RN.2.1
Reading
Vocabulary:
6.RV.2.5
6.RV. 3.2

I can cite textual evidence from a


nonfiction text.

I can consult reference materials, both


print and digital, to find the
pronunciation of a word or determine
its meaning.

I can write informative compositions


that introduce a topic, organize ideas,
and provide a concluding section.
I can edit and revise my work.

P a g e 9 | 25

Credible
Sources

Love that DogSharon Creech

Persuasive
Techniques
Informative
Editing
Revising

I can determine the meaning of words


and phrases as they are used in
nonfiction text.
Writing:
6.W.3.2
6.W.4

Cite

_______
Tier Two
Vocabulary
Instruction
Caesars
English Book 2
Units 7-8

Hate that CatSharon Creech


Nonfiction:
My Life in Dog
Years-Gary Paulsen
He Might Have
Liked Me Better
with My Tail-Ima
Mermaid
(SpringBoard)
Travels with
Charley-Excerpt by
John Steinbeck
(SpringBoard)
Saying Farewell to
a Faithful Pal-John
Grogan
(SpringBoard)

Revision Date: January 2015

6th Grade English/Language Arts Curriculum Map

Dogs Make Us
Human
From Animals In
Translation-Temple
Grandin and
Catherine Johnson
(SpringBoard)
My Story From
Animals In
Translation-Temple
Grandin and
Catherine Johnson
(SpringBoard)
Various Tween
Tribune Articles
Various SCOPE
Articles
Poetry:
And Although
the Little Mermaid
Sacrificed
Everything to Win
the Love of the
Prince, the Prince
(Alas) Decided to
Wed AnotherJudith Viorst
(SpringBoard)
P a g e 10 | 25

Revision Date: January 2015

6th Grade English/Language Arts Curriculum Map


Film Clip:
Temple Grandin
(SpringBoard)

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS THAT


GUIDE UNIVERSAL
UNDERSTANDING

STUDENT
REQUIRED
WRITING

What are the necessary tools in the


construction of an Informational piece of
writing?

Constructed
responses to texts
using textual
evidence.

Teacher-modeled

Guided Practice

Student-written

Paragraph/Yes,
MAAM form

Used sentence
starters that show
evidence was
pulled from text.

How does using textual evidence


enhance a response to a piece of
nonfiction?

Informational Essay

Engaging hook

Clear thesis

Insightful
conclusion

Variety of
transitions

Topic sentences

Integrate
evidence from
various sources
Parallel structure

P a g e 11 | 25

Revision Date: January 2015

6th Grade English/Language Arts Curriculum Map

TIMELINE

UNIT

MAJOR
CONCEPTS

Indiana CCR
Standards

STUDENT I CAN
STATEMENTS

ACADEMIC
VOCABULARY

NOVELS, SHORT
STORIES,
POETRY,
INFORMAL TEXT

Argumentative
Claim
Counterargument
Bias
Persuasive
Techniques
Tone

Nonfiction:
Dont Ban Peanuts
at School, but Teach
About the Dangers
Register Editorial
Board
(SpringBoard)

Writing Process
Editing
Revising

Penny Problem: Not


Worth Metal Its Made
Of-Yunji de Nies
(SpringBoard)

5
28 Days
January 4January 29

Changing
Perspectiv
es

Textual Evidence
Argumentative
Writing

Reading
Nonfiction
6.RN.2.1
6.RN.4.1

I can trace and evaluate the


argument and specific claims in
a text.

Research

Reading
Literature
6.RL.3.2

Reading
Vocabulary:
P a g e 12 | 25

I can cite textual evidence to


support analysis of what a text
says.

I can explain how the speaker


impacts the mood, tone, and
meaning of a text.

Research

Should Dodge Ball


Be Banned in
Revision Date: January 2015

6th Grade English/Language Arts Curriculum Map


6.RV.2.3
6.RV.3.2

Writing:
6.W.3.2
6.W.4
6.W.5

I can distinguish among the


connotations of words with
similar denotations.

Cite
Credible Sources

Vocabulary
Building
I can determine the meaning of
words and phrases as they are
Connotation
used in nonfiction text, including Denotation
figurative, connotative, and
technical meanings.

_______

I can write an argument that


introduces a claim, supports the
claim with clear reasons, uses
appropriate transitions,
establishes a specific style and
tone, and provides a concluding
section.
I can apply the writing process
to plan and develop; draft;
revise and edit to strengthen
writing that is clear.
I can conduct short research
assignments and tasks to build
knowledge about the research
process.

Tier Two
Vocabulary
Instruction
Caesars
English Book 2
Units 10-12

Schools?-Time for
Kids
(SpringBoard)
Most Dangerous
Sport of All May Be
Cheerleading-Lisa
Ling and Arash
Ghadishah
(SpringBoard)
High School Football:
Would a Pop Warner
Ban Limit
Concussions?-Tina
Akouris
(SpringBoard)
Letter on Thomas
Jefferson-John
Adams
(SpringBoard)

The Pros and Cons of


Social Networking for
Teenagers: A Parents
Guide-Kristin
Stanberry
(SpringBoard)
Social Networkings
Good and Bad
Impacts on KidsScience Daily
(SpringBoard)

P a g e 13 | 25

Revision Date: January 2015

6th Grade English/Language Arts Curriculum Map


Pro & Con
Arguments: Are social
networking sites good
for our society?
(SpringBoard)

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS THAT GUIDE


UNIVERSAL UNDERSTANDING
How is an argumentative piece of writing
different from a persuasive writing? What
are some of the key features in each that
demonstrate the differences?
What is the significance behind critically
analyzing a source's information? Why must
I use a credible source when supporting
claims in an argumentative piece?
How does using textual evidence enhance a
response to a piece of nonfiction?
How does the correct use if transitions
enhance the flow of my writing?

P a g e 14 | 25

STUDENT
REQUIRED
WRITING
Responses to texts
using textual
evidence
Paragraph/Yes,
MAAM format
Use sentence
starters that show
evidence was
pulled from text.
Argumentative Essay
Clear Claim
Counterclaims
Evidence
Facts, Details,
Quotes
Transitions
Word choice

Revision Date: January 2015

6th Grade English/Language Arts Curriculum Map


TIMELINE

UNIT

MAJOR
CONCEPTS

Indiana CCR
Standards

STUDENT I CAN
STATEMENTS

ACADEMIC
VOCABULAR
Y

NOVELS, SHORT
STORIES, POETRY,
INFORMAL TEXT

6
20 Days
February 1stFebruary 26

The
Freedo
m that
Comes
with
Change

Textual
Evidence
Review of
Genres of
Writing
Compare and
Contrast

Reading
Nonfiction:
6.RN.3.3
6.RN.4.1

I can determine an authors


perspective or purpose in a text, and
explain how it is conveyed in the
text.

Narrative
Argumentative

I can trace and evaluate the


argument and specific claims in a
text.

Reading
Literature:
6.RL.2.1
6.RL.4.2

Writing
6.W.3.1
6.W.3.2
6.W.3.3

Textual
Evidence

I can cite textual evidence to


Context Clues
support analysis of what a text says
as well as inferences drawn from the Genre
text.
Informational
Narrative
I can determine the meaning of
Argumentat
words and phrases as they are used
ive
in a nonfiction text.

Reading
Vocabulary:
6.RV.3.2

I can write a compare and contrast


essay that:
Introduces a topic
Organizes ideas
Develops the topic with relevant
facts
Provides a concluding statement

Includes transitions
I can:
Write an argument that introduces a
claim, supports the claim with
clear reasons, and provides a
concluding statement.
P a g e 15 | 25

Informational

_______
Tier Two
Vocabulary
Instruction
Caesars
English Book
2
Units 13-14

Fiction:
Boys Life-Excerpt by
Robert McCammon
Emancipation: A Life
Fable-Kathryn Hulik
A New Start-Letter
PARCC Practice Book
The Fun They HadIsaac Asimov- Writing
Workshops (SpringBoard)
Dog Breath- Dav Pilkey
Nonfiction
A New Arrival
PARCC Practice Book
"The Benefits of Pets
Writing Workshops
(SpringBoard)
Fun and Feisty-Writing
Workshops
(SpringBoard)
Various Tween Tribune
Articles
Various SCOPE Articles

Revision Date: January 2015

6th Grade English/Language Arts Curriculum Map

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS THAT


GUIDE UNIVERSAL
UNDERSTANDING
What are the components of a
narrative essay?
How is the use of dialogue important
in a narrative?
What are the components of an
Informational essay?
What are the components of an
argumentative essay?
How does using context clues and
other active reading strategies help
oneself have a better understanding of
the vocabulary?
How do literary elements help to
convey the author's purpose?
How does recognizing the author's
purpose give the reader a better
understanding of the text?

I can write an Informational


composition that:
Introduce a topic, organize ideas,
and provide a conclusion
statement.
Use appropriate transitions to
clarify the relations among ideas
and concepts

STUDENT REQUIRED
WRITING
Responses to texts using
textual evidence

I can write a narrative that:


Engage the reader by developing
an exposition
Organize an event sequence
Use dialogue, pacing, and
descriptions to develop events

Provide an ending that follows


from the narrated experience.

Paragraph/Yes, MAAM
format
Use sentence starters
that show evidence was
pulled from text.

Argumentative Essay

Clear Claim
Counterclaims
Evidence
Facts, Details, Quotes
Transitions
Word choice

Informational Essay

Engaging hook
Clear thesis
Insightful conclusion
Variety of transitions
Topic sentences
Integrate evidence from
various sources

Narrative

P a g e 16 | 25

Conflict
Characters
Setting
Point of View
Sequence
Exposition and

Revision Date: January 2015

6th Grade English/Language Arts Curriculum Map

TIMELINE

UNIT

MAJOR
CONCEP
TS

Indiana CCR
Standards

STUDENT I CAN
STATEMENTS

ACADEMIC
VOCABULA
RY

resolution
Transitions
Word Choice
Pronoun Use

NOVELS, SHORT
STORIES, POETRY,
INFORMAL TEXT

7
February 29March 24
26 Days

Changes in
the World

Conventio
ns
Context
Clues

Reading
Literature:
6.RL.2.2
6.RL.3.1

Central
Idea of
Text
Authors
Perspectiv
e/
Authors
Point of
View

Reading
Nonfiction:
6.RN.3.3

Conflict

Reading
Vocabulary:
6.RV.3.1

Debate

Writing:
6.W.1
6.W.6.1
6.W.6.2
P a g e 17 | 25

I can determine how a theme or


central idea of a work of
literature is conveyed through
particular details.
I can analyze how a particular
sentence, chapter, scene, or
stanza fits into the overall
structure of a work of literature.

I can determine an authors


perspective or purpose in a text,
and explain how it is conveyed.

Theme
Authors
Perspective/
Authors Point
of View
First Person
Third Person
Limited
Third Person
Omniscient
Third Person
Objective

Conflict
External
Man Vs.
I can determine the meaning of
Society
words and phrases as they are
used in works of literature.

_______

I can write routinely over a


variety of time frames for a
range of tasks, purposes, and
audiences.

Tier Two
Vocabulary
Instruction
Caesars

Fiction:
Among the HiddenMargaret Haddix
Nonfiction:
Skyscraper FarmsKathryn Hulick
(Indiana DOE)
China Today-Chinas
Population
http://www.readworks.or
g/passages/china-todaychinas-population
Vertical FarmingRavindra Krishnamurthy
http://permaculturenews.
org/2014/07/25/verticalfarming-singaporessolution-feed-localurban-population/
Various Tween Tribune
Articles
Various SCOPE Articles

Revision Date: January 2015

6th Grade English/Language Arts Curriculum Map


I can demonstrate command of
English grammar and usage.
I can demonstrate command of
the conventions of standard
English in my writing.
Discussion and
Collaboration:
6.SL.2.1

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS THAT


GUIDE UNIVERSAL
UNDERSTANDING
How can recognizing and understanding
theme enable the reader to better
understand the text?
Why is it important to analyze particular
chapters, scenes, or stanzas within a work
of literature?
Why is it important to understand the
authors purpose for writing a particular
text?
How can bad conventions negatively affect
an otherwise well-told piece of writing?
Why is it important to use correct grammar
and conventions in writing?

P a g e 18 | 25

English Book
2
Units 15-16

Poem:
Another Mountain
(Reading Street)

I can engage in collaborative


discussions building on others
ideas and expressing personal
ideas clearly

STUDENT REQUIRED
WRITING
Journals for literature
responses
Responses to texts using
textual evidence
Paragraph/Yes, MAAM
format
Use sentence starters
that show evidence
was pulled from text.
Debate
Engage in discussion
Build on others ideas
Express personal
ideas clearly
Use evidence to
support

Revision Date: January 2015

6th Grade English/Language Arts Curriculum Map

P a g e 19 | 25

Revision Date: January 2015

6th Grade English/Language Arts Curriculum Map


TIMELI
NE

UNIT

MAJOR
CONCEPTS

Indiana CCR
Standards

STUDENT I CAN STATEMENTS

ACADEMIC
VOCABULARY

NOVELS, SHORT
STORIES,
POETRY,
INFORMAL TEXT

Argumentative
Bias
Credible
Sources
Thesis
Statement
Hook
Claim
Counterargume
nt
Citing Textual
Evidence

Fiction:
Space Cadets-A
Drama by David
LaBounty
(Reading Street)

8
April 4April 29
20 Days

Changes
in Space
Explorati
on

Summary
Textual Evidence

Reading
Literature:
6.RL.2.1
6.RL.2.2

I can cite textual evidence.


I can provide an objective summary of
the text.

Argumentative
Writing

Reading
Nonfiction:
6.RN.4.1

Reading
Vocabulary:
6.RV.2.5

Writing:
6.W.3.1
6.W.4

I can trace and evaluate the argument


and specific claims in a text.

I can consult reference materials, both


print and digital, to find the
pronunciation of a word or determine its
meaning.

I can:
Write an argument that introduces a
claim, supports the claim with clear
reasons, and provides a concluding
statement.
Use credible sources when
supporting claims.
I can edit and revise my work.

P a g e 20 | 25

Writing
Techniques
Editing
Revising
Primary and
Secondary
Sources

_______
Tier Two
Vocabulary
Instruction
Caesars
English Book 2

Nonfiction:
Human Travel to the
Moon and Mars:
Waste of Money or
Next Frontier? USA
Todays Debate:
Voice and
Perspectives
The Mighty Mars
Rovers: The
Incredible
Adventure of Spirit
and OpportunityElizabeth Rusch
The Domes of Mars
Casper Brundle
(Leveled Reader
Read Aloud)
Markie the
Moonman
(Leveled Reader
Read Aloud)

Revision Date: January 2015

6th Grade English/Language Arts Curriculum Map


Media
Literacy:
6.ML.1
6.ML.2.2

Units 17-18
I can critically analyze information
found in electronic, print, and mass
media.
I can identify the target audience of a
message.

The Solar System


and
Beyond-Jen Coates
Conroy- teacher
selected
excerpts
(Leveled Reader)
The United States
and
Russian Space
RaceKathleen Cox
teacher selected
excerpts
(Leveled Reader)
Destination: MARSScott Gillam
teacher selected
excerpts
(Leveled Reader)
"Exploring Space
Travel
(Reading Street)
Summary of the
Pros and Cons of
Human Space
Exploration
http://thefutureofspac
exploration.wordpress.
com/2012/06/06/sum
mary-of-the-pros-andcons-of-human-spaceexploration-26-2/

P a g e 21 | 25

Revision Date: January 2015

6th Grade English/Language Arts Curriculum Map


Pros and Cons of
Space Exploration
http://apecsec.org/p
ros-and-cons-ofspace-exploration/
Various Tween
Tribune Articles
Various SCOPE
Articles
Poetry:
Song of the Stars
http://www.windows
2universe.org/art_a
nd_music/songstars.
html
Film Clips:
http://www.cbsnews
.com/news/neilarmstrongs-2005interview-first-man/
Pros and Cons of
Space Exploration
http://apecsec.org/p
ros-and-cons-ofspace-exploration/

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS THAT


GUIDE UNIVERSAL
UNDERSTANDING
How is an argumentative piece of
writing different from a persuasive
writing? What are some of the key
features in each that demonstrate the
differences?
P a g e 22 | 25

STUDENT
REQUIRED
WRITING
Argumentative
Essay
Clear Claim
Counterclaims
Evidence
Revision Date: January 2015

6th Grade English/Language Arts Curriculum Map

What is the significance behind critically


analyzing a source's information? Why
must I use a credible source when
supporting claims in an argumentative
piece?

Facts, Details,
Quotes
Transitions
Word choice

Responses to texts
using textual
evidence
Paragraph/Yes,
MAAM format
Use sentence
starters that
show evidence
was pulled from
text.

How can I use textual evidence to write


a summary?
How can I determine the theme in a
work of literature through particular
details?

Summary
GIST Writing
Format

TIMELI
NE

UNIT

MAJOR
CONCEPTS

Indiana CCR
Standards

STUDENT I CAN
STATEMENTS

ACADEMIC
VOCABULARY

NOVELS, SHORT
STORIES, POETRY,
INFORMAL TEXT

9
May 2May 20
15 Days

Changes in
People

Research
Bibliography

Reading
Nonfiction:
6.RN.3.2

I can analyze how a particular


sentence, paragraph or chapter,
or section fits into the overall
structure of a text.

Evaluating
Sources
Plagiarism
Note-Taking
Skills
P a g e 23 | 25

Reading
Fiction:
6.RL.2.2

I can write an objective


summary of a text.

Research
Bibliography
Plagiarism
Paraphrasing
Parenthetical
Reference
Evaluate
Credible
Sources
Note Cards

Fiction:
Zoo
(Reading Street)
Nonfiction:
My Life With ChimpanzeesBiography
Jane Goodalls Career
(Reading Street)

Revision Date: January 2015

6th Grade English/Language Arts Curriculum Map

Reading
Vocabulary:
6.RV.2.1

Writing:
6.W.5

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS THAT


GUIDE UNIVERSAL
UNDERSTANDING
How does using textual evidence
improve a response to literature?
Why is it important to have credible
sources when researching?
How does using context clues help the
reader better understand the text?

I can use context clues to


determine the meaning of words
and phrases.

I can conduct a short


research assignment that:
Formulates a research question
Gathers relevant information
from multiple sources
Assesses the credibility of each
source
Quotes or paraphrases the
information and conclusions of
others
Avoids plagiarism and provides
basic bibliographic information
Presents information

Zoos Then and Now


(Reading Street)

_______
Tier Two
Vocabulary
Instruction
Caesars
English Book
2
Units 19-20

The Chimpanzees I Love


(Reading Street)
Going Ape over
Language
(Reading Street)
Poem:
Helen Keller- Poem
http://www.poemhunter.co
m/poem/helen-keller/

STUDENT REQUIRED
WRITING
Responses to texts using
textual evidence
Paragraph/Yes, MAAM
format
Use sentence starters
that show evidence was
pulled from text.
Informational Paragraph

P a g e 24 | 25

Revision Date: January 2015

6th Grade English/Language Arts Curriculum Map


Why is it necessary to provide a
bibliography?

P a g e 25 | 25

Summary of the
research
Integrate evidence
from a variety of
sources

Revision Date: January 2015