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Some / Any / Much / Many/

A lot of/ A few/ Few/ A little/ Little

Countable/ Uncountable Nouns

Some
A little, a few or small number or amount.
We usually use some in positive sentences for countable
and uncountable nouns. If it is countable, it goes with
the noun in plural. (some friends)
I have some friends in London.
I usually drink some milk with my meal.
Sometimes we use some in a question, when we expect
a positive YES answer.
Would you like some tea?
Could I have some more sugar please?

Countable/ Uncountable Nouns

Snow
People
Relatives
Water
Time
Times
Mushrooms
Animals
Gold
Soap
Traffic
Money
Books
Friends
Butter

Magazines
Pizza
Meat
Homework
Furniture
Paper
Papers
Cake
Cakes
Rain
Ice
Chairs
Bottles
students

Countable/ Uncountable Nouns


Some (countable)

Some (uncountable)

birds

water

Countable/ Uncountable Nouns


Some (countable) (dai)
People
Relatives
Times
Mushrooms
Animals
Books
Friends
Magazines
Papers
cakes
Chairs
Bottles
students

Some (uncountable) (mazliet)


Snow
Water
Time
Gold
Soap
Traffic
Money
Butter
Pizza
Meat
Homework
Furniture
Paper
Cake
Rain
Ice

Any
One, small or all.
When asking questions and in negative sentences, and
when a sentence is grammatically positive, but the
meaning of the sentence is negative.
Do you have any ice cream left for me?
I dont have any books.
My brother never does any chores.
We use any for both countable and uncountable nouns.
Do you have any cheese?
He doesn't have any friends in Paris.

A lot of (lots of)


It is used to talk about quantity in affirmative (can be in
negative sentences and questions) sentences with
countable and uncountable nouns.

Bill Gates has got a lot of (lots of) money.


There are a lot of(lots of) pictures on the wall.

Many
It is used to talk about quantity with countable
nouns and usually in the questions and
negative sentences.
I don't have many English stamps in my
collection.
Do you have many English stamps in your
collection?
Do you have any English stamp in your
collection?

Much
It is used to talk about quantity with
uncountable nouns and usually in the
questions and negative sentences.
They don't have much money to buy a present.
Have you got much homework to do today?
Charlottes got a lot of money.
Charlottes got much money.

A few(few)/ A little(little)
The expressions a little and a few mean some (dai, mazliet).
If a noun is uncountable, we use a little.
Example: a little money (mazliet naudas)
If a noun is countable, we use a few.
Example: a few friends (dai draugi)
It's a difference if you use a little / a few or little / few.
Without the article, the words have a limiting or negative
meaning (maz).
a little = some
little = hardly any
Example: I have a little money. - I have some money.
I have little money. - I have hardly any money.
a few = some
few = hardly any
Example: A few friends visited me. - Some friends visited me.
Few friends visited me. - Hardly any friends visited me.

Help the cook to check the food in his fridge.


"Hello, my friends. Please help me to fill in the
blanks.
Okay, first I need ___ (a/an) knife to start dinner. Now let me
see if I have got everything. Well, there is _______ (a lot of/
many) milk, isnt there? Oh, Ive only got _____ (little/some,
few) after all. Hum, just half a bottle. And lemons?
How _______ (many/ much) lemons are there? There are
plenty. Good! There arent _______ (many/ much) tomatoes,
are there? Well, therere only two left. No problem. Have I
got enough meat for dinner? Yes, there is ________ (much/
many/ lots of) meat. But is there _______ (some/ any/ an
)oil? Let me see. Oh, there is ______ (no/ any/ some) oil left.
Well, I will have to buy ________ (any/ some). What about
butter? Oh no, there isnt ______ (little/ many/ much/ few)
left, is there? And there are only ________ (few/ little/ a)
sausages, right? No, actually there are lots of sausages.
Good! But I still need _______ (a/ an/ some) oranges. Not
many, just two or three. Oh, I almost forgot. I will also
need ______ (a/an/ some) apple. Yes, thats it. Thanks!"

Thank you for attention and


patience!
Agita Ozolia
Jelgava State Grammar School

Agita Ozolia, Jelgava State Grammar


School