You are on page 1of 240

HARIN COUNTY FREE LIBRARY

311110Q1671799

it,

illustrations

THESCUL r

;i

vEOF

PICkSSO

cr

03

Roland Penrose

by

The

and

text

O
o

illustrations oi this lx>ok offer the

most comprehensive account ever published of

number

Picasso's sculpture. Though the

works

only

is

of his

prodigious output

a fraction of his

has produced sculpture

in painting, Picasso

from 1901

to the present,

and

some periods

at

medium

preoccupation with this

life his

ot these

has been paramount. His greatness as a sculptor


has long been recognized, but the true signifi-

within his

total creative achieve-

ment could not be revealed

until after his eighty-

cance

tilth

ol this art

birthday, when for the

sculpture for the

a full-scale retrospective ot his

most part
first

The Museum

be shown,

London, and

Modern Art

ot

This publication
with the

to

in his possession

still

Paris, later in

in

time he allowed

first

is

in

issued

latter exhibition. Its

finally at

New

York.

conjunction

in

260 gravure

illus-

trations reproduce virtually all Picasso's exist-

and the text

ing sculptural oeuvre,


friend

is

by Picasso's

and biographer, Roland Penrose,

who

London and

New

selected the

works

tor the

York shows.

As

Sir

Roland makes

clear, there

between Picasso the sculptor

serious division

On

and Picasso the painter.

the contrary,

throughout the great diversity of


noticeable

how

closely

expression and
arts

It

is

his

knit are

particular

in

question.

in

not "any

is

work

is

forms of

all

the

it

two major

impossible to consider

one without the other."

Sir

Roland accord-

ingly discusses not only the actual sculpture of

works which demonstrate

Picasso but also other

the artist's concern with sculptural problems,

even during periods when he was creating


if

anything
-

in

three dimensions.

that Picasso's sculpture

in the creativity ot pri

tional jxnvcr.

bolism, and
believes, has

its

ive
1

it-

me,

"had

is

little

The author
deeply rooted

man, with

its

emo-

savagery,

its

sym-

magic. Picasso, he
to find his

tl.

way

back to the essentials c

liscovering

-ce. In sculpture

to get

its

even

1 back flap)

CO

RE T

r.

-,

tTO

CENTRAL
^ c
-

CIVIC

CEKTEH

DATE DUE
jrV_30J986
.iiim

6 iaa;

JL fDEO

$H

'Qa8

TFot

Q
730.946

Picasso
Sculpture of
Picasso

Marin County Tree Library


ration

Givic

San

ridiati.

Building

Caiifomia

Digitized by the Internet Archive


in

2011

http://www.archive.org/details/sculptureofpicasOOpenr

THE SCULPTURE OF PICASSO

frontispiece: Glass of Absinth. 1914. Painted bronze


with

silver

ern Art,

spoon,

New

8'/2

York,

inches high.

gift of

The Museum

Mrs. Bertram Smith

of

Mod-

ROLAND PENROSE

THE SCULPTURE OF

PICASSO

CHRONOLOGY BY ALICIA LEGG

THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART, NEW YORK

Ministration

tone Center
*
San R^ael.

CaWon*

IKIMIh
D.W

ID

ROCKEFELL1

)|

UK MI

sUM

OK

rknk d'harnonoourt

CHAIRMAN OK THE BOARD


HENRY ALLEN MOE
WILLIAM S. PALKV

MRS.

\Y

F.

(.(.ENHEIM*

WALLACE

K.

HARRISON

PHILIP JOHNSON-

MRS. ALBERT

MRS.

A.

JOHN

MRS.

NELSON
MRS.

JR.

MRS. ROBERT WOODS BLISS *

WILLIAM

S.

PAYSON

GIFFORD PHILLIPS

BARKER

ALFRED H.BARR,

LASKER

MACCULLOCH MILLER*

C.

MRS. CHARLES

BUTCHER

WALTER BAREISS
R.

D.

JOHN L. LOEB
RANALD H. MACDONALD*

COLIN

TREASURER

ROBERT

WALTER HOCHSCHILD

VICE PRESIDENTS
C.

FORD

JAMES W. HUSTED*

CARDNER COWLES

WILLARD

B.

(.1

MRs.

JAMES THRALL SOBY


RALPH

DOUGLAS DILLON

MRS. SIMON

MRs. BLISS PARKINSON

PRESIDKA

C.

MRv. EDSEL

WHITNEY
VICE CHAIRMEN

JOHN H

MODKRN ART

D.

A.

ROCKEFELLER 3RD
ROCKEFELLER

WOLFGANG SCHOENBORN

MRS. BERTRAM SMITH

MRS. DONALD

M. BURDEN

B.

STRAUS

EDWARD M. M. WARBURG*

IVAN CHERMAYEFF

MONROE WHEELER*

MURRAY CRANE
JOHN DE MEN IL

MRS. W.

*HONORARY TRUSTEE

163G21

MUSEUM OK MODKRN ART, I967


1 WEST 53 STREET, NEW YORK, NEW YORK 1 00
LIBRARY OK CONGRESS CATALOGUE CARD NUMBER 67-29395
(

OPYRIGHT THE

PRINTED IN THE UNITED STATES OK AMERICA

FOREWORD

It does

not seem to picasso himself, he

says, that the

elements of his art have altered from

period to period. Whatever means of expression his subject has called


adopted. His production
other by unity

and

is

characterized

consistency. This has

on the one hand by

become apparent

painting. But until the great retrospective

Horn mage

honor the

life,

artist in

the 85th year of his

Picasso's sculpture, for the simple reason that

and took no
First

interest in exhibiting

and foremost,

first

time on

maximum

in

on the

in exhibition after exhibition of his

a Pablo Picasso

was organized

in Paris to

had been no comprehensive showing

he had kept so

much

therefore, the Trustees of

The Museum

of

of

it

for his

of

own enjoyment

Modern Art acknowledge

generous loans, most of which will be seen for

this side of the Atlantic in the present exhibition.

the sculpture section of the Paris retrospective assembled by Jean

show

variability,

it.

their indebtedness to Picasso himself for his

the

there

he has unhesitatingly

for,

This

is

based essentially on

Leymarie

in 1966. Like the

of Picasso's sculpture sponsored by the Arts Council of Great Britain at the Tate Gallery

London

in the

summer of

1967,

it

who

has been directed by Sir Roland Penrose,

also

wrote

the penetrating interpretive essay for this publication.


Special thanks are due to

and

Andre Malraux, Ministre

to the Association Franchise

d'Etat charge des AfTaires Culturelles,

d'Action Artistique for

its

sponsorship.

throughout by the wholehearted cooperation of Gabriel White and,

fited

Drew

private collectors

many

who

of the works.

We

are especially grateful to

have also bene-

in particular,

of the Arts Council for assisting in innumerable details of organization

the photography of

listed

We

all

and

the

Joanna

facilitating

museums and

have graciously participated in our undertaking and whose names are

below.

No examination
by Alfred H. Barr,

of Picasso

Jr.,

is

possible without reference to the years of study of his

former Director of Collections

at

The Museum

of

Modern

work

Art, cul-

minating

in his classic

Mr. Rarr

in

his

own

monograph

person that the

collection.

The

artist

His Art. Furthermore,

Picasso: Fifty Years of

it

was

to

granted his consent to lend us more than 200 objects from

installation at the

Museum was

designed and executed by Rene

d'Harnoncourt. Alicia Legg, Associate Curator of Painting and Sculpture, has assisted in the

planning and execution of both exhibition and publication since their inception and has
prepared the Chronology (pages 39-47).

Many

others of our

have contributed suggestions and by their combined

efforts

staff,

too

numerous

to

mention,

have made possible the realization

of this project.

Monroe Wheeler
COUNSELLOR TO THE TRUSTEES

THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART

LENDERS TO THE EXHIBITION

Larry Aldrich,

New

York; Mrs. Gilbert

Cummings, Winnetka,
Victor

\Y.

Ganz,

New

Illinois;

W Chapman, New York;

Mr. and Mrs. Sampson R.

Field,

Mr. and Mrs. Alan H.

New

York; Mr. and Mrs.

York; Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Gidwitz, Highland Park,

Illinois;

Joseph

H. Hirshhorn Collection; Mr. and Mrs. Sylvan Lang, San Antonio, Texas; Lady Penrose,

London; Pablo
Sir

Picasso,

Mougins, France; M. and

Mme

Georges Ramie, Vallauris, France;

Robert and Lady Sainsbury, London; Mrs. Bertram Smith,

New

York; Mrs. G. David

Thompson, Pittsburgh;

The Baltimore Museum

of Art;

The Art

Institute of

Chicago;

The Museum

of

Modern

Art,

New York;
Heinz Berggruen,
Leiris, Paris.

Paris; Galerie Beyeler, Basel; Galerie Chalette,

New

York; Galerie Louise

CONTENTS

FOREWORD AND ACKNOWLEDGMENTS


5

THE SCULPTURE OF PICASSO BY ROLAND PENROSE


9

CHRONOLOGY BY

ALICIA LEGG

39

ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE SCULPTURE


49

ILLUSTRATIONS OF RELATED WORKS


211

BIBLIOGRAPHY COMPILED BY INGA FORSLUND


215

CATALOGUE OF THE EXHIBITION


221

INDEX
228

In any speculation
ual arts

first

came

man's consciousness,

to

make

first

it

would be

possible

strong claims for sculpture. That

advance in

human

use of tools, which

about as early

man

gave

vis-

into being in the infancy

of

crucial

which of the

as to

as the

development, the

must have happened

domestication of

fire,

do

a greatly increased ability to

things for himself. But an even greater

change

in his destiny occurred

dawned on him

when

it

that the tool could also be

used as a weapon and could add effectively


to his

The

powers of aggression and

resulting prestige

and emotional

icance of a stone already sharp

wood
an instrument with the power of breaking
This
the tool

remain

is

common

to both.

hand

aesthetic pleasure;

blade

may

rose to great heights

enough

when

it

signifto cut

became

skulls, the arbiter of life or death.

not the place to attempt to trace the transition that seems to have followed from

and the weapon

inally to the

self-defense.

to the

work

of art, but

The admirable

that held

it

and

it

is

precision of

noticeable that certain characteristics

form

to the scraping or cutting

and the implication

of

power contained

of a chipped
it

flint,

was required

adapted orig-

to do, gives us

an

in the club, the axe, or the knife

probably be considered to be analogous to the emotional power of a work of

art.

would suggest

tion, as described

that the link

is

potentially an instrument of aggression

power we

retains the non-violent

In the
fixed

Cook

in the process of diversion of

behavior of animals. In a similar

in the

by ethologists

found

to be

and genocide,

forfeits

its

aim, or ritualiza-

way

the

weapon,

and

yet

and weapons, but they

are

original significance

find in sculpture.

Islands there are jade axe heads designed as tools

on elaborately carved stands so that

impossible for their use to be either utilitarian or

it is

aggressive; instead they are revered ritualistically as objects of

awe and admiration. They

become symbols

tribe.

of a powerful

Independent of

bond

symbolization of power there

this

which seem equally remote, which appears


of sculpture.

Man

and love within the

of unity

to

is

another tendency, the origins of

have a strong influence on the emotional power

has the desire to see in certain objects a likeness to himself or to some other

object of importance,

though

it

consequence, a vicarious form of

be of an entirely different nature, and to attribute to


life.

The

accidental likeness of stones or clouds to the

it,

in

human

head, or of mountains, rocks, or gorges to our anatomy, has without doubt had ominous significance for our ancestors
the ancient

and continues

to

have a baffling fascination for

and universal habit of finding

association

between male

To

us.

fertility

in this spirit he

makes

it

Read

tells

us that

"Some

of Hegel's theories are

(Hegel) suggests that the

first

clear that these objects of veneration

to say

phallic

on

this

worthy of Herodotus and

monuments were

may

we may add

and the

much

shapes of stones. Philosophers, psychiatrists, and art historians have had


account. Herbert

this

phallic,"

but Read also

vary in size from pebbles or amulets to

giant standing stones or menhirs.

Symbolism and metamorphosis

are present in varying degrees in

reach a high degree of significance in the


are not so directly evident in painting,

work

where

illusion,

hands, to model

its

and because

in

more

or less sophisticated,

its

simplest state

and they

it

it

is

at the basis

appeals through the

requires

no

tools;

only

form.

Another more fundamental analogy connects sculpture with


birth brings

sculpture,

of Pablo Picasso. These are qualities that

of visual experience. Sculpture has a fundamental advantage in that


sense of touch as well as of sight,

all

independent living organisms into the world, and

it is

life itself.

in

no way

The

process of

frivolous to

com-

pare this with the creation of sculpture in clay, bone, wood, or any other material that can be

endowed with imaginary

life.

Adam

remarkably close

during his sleep

the subconscious

10

and

is

is

The

biblical

a rib extracted

from

to the current theory that inspiration springs

from

myth

that

Eve was made from

connected intimately with an obsession for a beloved person. Picasso's

IHXXX. j^-^

^ <\^x*S\

assertion that each

one of his works

More than any

other

he

of the other

is

a phial filled

of our time Picasso

artist

by rediscovering

to the essentials of art


qualities,

is

own

with his

blood has an archaic echo.

had the audacity

lias

source. In sculpture, thanks to

its

mediums, including painting,

Studio," a theme not found in his

when,

burst of energy,

Some

he began

its

way back

basic primeval

able to get even closer to the primitive emotional significance of art than in

new

him

metal and with

at

working with

as

was absorbed by an

"The

new ways

art.

Sculptor's

a characteristic

interest in sculp-

Spanish sculptor Julio Gonzalez,

his old friend the

scope to his talent in this

Picasso explored

known

any other time. This happened with

for the second time in his career, he

five years before,

to give

work

any

that he has used.

In the spring of 1933 Picasso produced a series of 46 etchings

ture.

to find his

Gonzalez was an excellent craftsman

of constructing figures in this

in

medium. The

extraordinary inventions that were the result of his friend's assistance did not, however, occupy
Picasso's entire activity for long

figures

modeled

showed more
was

in plaster that

it

was the production

began

similarities to Picasso's

a nude, blonde

his friend. It

is

of greater than life-size heads

overcrowd the

to

own

and voluptuous, than

stables at Boisgeloup.

and female

These sculptures

paintings of the time, in which the dominant theme


to the cactus-like,

wrought-iron sculptures made by

these massive heads (pages 74-77) that appear

among

other sculptures in the

etchings of 1933.

Using the
century

sensitive line of the engraver, Picasso transposed the scene

Normandy

to the

mythical atmosphere of ancient Greece.

The

from twentieth-

sculptor

bearded Athenian, nude like the heroes and crowned with garlands. With him

is

became
his

muse,

sometimes posing for him but more often resting on a couch beside him, naked and beautiful,
in contemplation of the

work

she has inspired. This shift in atmosphere does not happen with-

out a touch of mockery aimed at academic classicism.


characters into his

on himself and

work one can

his

classical prototypes.

suspect that in reality he

own problem
They

Whenever
is

Picasso introduces mythical

making an important commentary

because the characters never correspond exactly to their

are in fact heroes or monsters of his

own

creation.

These engravings

can be thought of as delightful fantasy with no legendary significance, or seen as Picasso's


thoughts and doubts about his
precarious situation arises in

which he

hand, and on the other by the


In the print dated

12

March

own work,

rival

is

its

effect

on

others,

and

its

relationship to reality.

caught by his love for his companion on the one

claims of his overriding passion for his

21 (page

1),

the sculptor

and

his

model

sit

art.

together.

Her

atten-

tion

is

fixed

on

a sculpture of her head,

The drawing

the Boisgeloup workshop.

her portrait. She


bile.

is soft,

one of the great plaster heads finished a year before in

warm,

alive,

no doubt about the difference between her and

leaves

and enquiring, whereas the sculpture

is

hard and immo-

We feel a contrast between the transitory life and ephemeral beauty of the model

more

But there

lasting quality of a stone carving.

the master in her eyes; instead there

The

sion into their lives.

is

no rapt look of reverence

charms. Although there

is

model by

to flatter his

a tantalizing resemblance in the profile, the bust

of the eye, incised on the

demands our

and forehead, the

simple and convincing, uniting hair with cheek, and the outline

elision,

smooth

surface. All these give

it

a personality, a presence of

etching conveys the inevitable contrast between the living model and the

which the sculptor endeavors

to

animate his work.

and melancholy detachment. His


beyond the scope of

his

intru-

a lifelike but lifeless copy of her

attention for other reasons: the exaggerated sweep of the line of nose

The

new

of

reason for her doubt could be that the sculptor has not fallen into the

time-honored trap of attempting

solemn, monolithic

work

for the

a puzzled, contemplative scrutiny of this

is

and the

art the

He already

interest has shifted

fish

ment, transparency, and the baffling

swimming
fluidity of

in a

and

appears to be in a
is

now

its

own.

life

with

state of

doubt

concentrated on things

bowl that he holds

in his hand.

Move-

water are beyond his grasp.

In several engravings the Boisgeloup heads are examined critically in relation to the

model, or rather

reality.

Sometimes they give

a feeling of solidity,

parent, like a diagram plotting in depth the planes


features.

Also there

is

a plate in

which

and

at others

they are trans-

and fundamental construction

of the

a surrealist construction appears, closely resembling

other projects for sculpture of this period where Picasso has invented anatomies composed of

pumpkins, apples,

There

some

are other plates

held precariously together (pages 14, 213).

where the sculptor and

incredible tour de force of his creation.

as three youths
bull,

tables, ladders, or sticks

and

naked maiden (page

17), a bull

recline

on cushions beside

subjects are groups of figures in

motion such

certainly not subjects that Picasso

out,

however, the sculptor


further

is

would

captivated,

the

summer

hopes and fears become even

any sculptor

to choose to carve in the

seriously attempt to realize himself.

amazed, and disquieted by

and examine another

work during

goring two horses, and a centaur embracing a

fact, difficult subjects for

and

trated

companion

performing acrobatic marvels, a bacchanalian dance by a garlanded youth, a

voluptuous nude. In

To go

The

his

his
2

series of

eleven engravings,

own

Through-

invention.

the product of concen-

of 1933, the parallels with Picasso, his work,

clearer.

round,

and

his inner

In early years Picasso found an analogy between himself

13

- in

X*

-v '-.'jvy.

and Harlequin: the amorous, melancholy


speak the truth. In

continued

to

make

many

who

trickster, the outcast, the jester

paintings Picasso even introduced

him

lies in

order to

Harlequin

as a self-portrait.

appearance in a more detached way in cubism and then disappeared.

his

But in these eleven etchings another mythical character suddenly intrudes into the seclusion

The

of the sculptor's studio.


half-beast,

with the

seems immediately acceptable, even enjoyable, as a diversion and liberation from

Surrounded by

restraint.

appearance of the Minotaur in his dual nature, half-man

lusty

artist's

made by

classical busts

model and

the sculptor, the Minotaur reclines amiably

respectfully raises his glass of

wine

to her placid beauty, or plays

with her on a couch.


In the third engraving (page 22) the party
ated

from doubt, has sunk

is

already well under way.

two naked

into the cushions between

with his brutish but captivating companion. The orgy

The monster

is

asleep behind a curtain,

27). In the next plate,

woman from

hump on

The

The

on

in awe, while a

way along

the

the hand. In the

found another kind of penance

first

engraving of

Minotaur had become

time, however, there


is

is

feeling his

the death of Marat.

demigod

lies

stretches

for the

It is

no

way hangs

own mercurial

on any physical

insistence

forward

to

wounded
touch the

monster blindness. In

their boats.
is

and feeling

his

leads

little girl

a detail that strengthens

nature as a painter in Harlequin. This

likeness.

On

the wall toward

which the

a picture of a violent scene suggesting David's painting of

placed upside

no means of knowing how

down and crossed out deliberately by two sweeping

far this

implies that sculpture,

which can be

is

meant

it is

he suggests in paintings such

as

on

clear that the insistence

felt, still exists

lines.

as a deliberate sign that painting has

even though

it

The Blind Man's Meal

now

his sense of touch

cannot be seen. This

iniscent of Picasso's early references to blindness during the blue period

that

(page

Picasso's analogy for himself in the sculptor's role, just

blind Minotaur, but

it

mortally

chastised, blinded,

(page 33 ) there

this series

lost its interest for the

for

woman

an end in June 1933, was given a postscript in the autumn

to

formerly he had found an image of his

is

woman

quay while the astonished fishermen watch from

the view that the

There

by an adoring

like a child

of serenity.

the creature's awful back (page 31).

four dramatic engravings he presents the horned

Minotaur

moment

followed by a

divine beast, the intolerable monster,

spectators look

of the following year. Picasso

as

and exchanges greetings

her horse and assaults her on the ground (page 28). In three etchings following,

This sequence, which came

him by

sculptor, liber-

however, uncontrolled urges break loose the Minotaur throws a

the scene changes abruptly.

in the arena.

watched over

is

girls

The

is

rem-

and the compensation

of 1903

and the etching The

15

-21

men

Frugal Repast of [904, where the hands of blind

bring them satisfaction by feeling and

caressing an object or a loved companion. All this considered,

whom

the ponderous laurel-crowned sculptor himself with

it

seems

likely that

is

it

not

Picasso wishes to associate himself

but rather the Minotaur. Mis powerful, earth-bound, lusty nature, his spontaneous, instinctive
behavior, outrageous

anything

and

in

common

and

yet endearing,

make

Nor

has he

with

his forerunner,

Harlequin, except his amorous devotion to

women

rogue and an outcast from

his reputation as a

analogy more appropriate.

this

endeared both

society, a reputation that

characters to Picasso.

do not wish

to suggest that there

Picasso the painter.

how
It is

On

any serious division between Picasso the sculptor and

is

the contrary, throughout the great diversity of his

closely knit are all

forms of expression and

two major

in particular the

impossible to consider one without the other. There are a great

number

paintings that are virtually projects for sculpture (pages 211-214) and

form

so

is

emphasized

as to

appear

was during

new

appeared (pages 58-64), offering

tions

three-dimensional techniques.
is

It

one that Picasso uses

painter

when he

paints

The

period that the

arts in question.

of drawings

many

first

noticeable

in

and

which the

primarily an

painted construc-

solutions for problems of two-dimensional

and

application of color to sculpture, again an ancient practice,

as a sculptor

human

this

it is

movement was

solid. In addition, the cubist

enquiry into our perception of form.

work

when he

features

on the

result of his frequent reversal of techniques

and

puts color into cubist constructions and as a


flat

surfaces of his sheet-iron sculptures.

his disrespect for conventions

is

The

rich in unex-

pected combinations. Finally both arts become fused completely in his treatment of ceramics.

In his youth Picasso proved his talent as both a sculptor and a painter by becoming highly
skilled in conventional styles

Woman,

Seated
figure
in his

his

is

earliest

1901 (page 50), which he modeled

similar to the crouching

women who

paintings of the blue period.

model, to embrace her with

It is

as

known

though painting had not

all his senses.

The

an opinion that

is

in facial expression, a passion that

among artists

attitude of the

satisfied his desire to

know

that the

and

young painter already

confirmed by two small but extraordinarily

modeled by him some three years

been seriously on the decline

The

a small bronze

simplifications of the folds of her dress

had the

once his interest

twenty.

is

clutch to their breasts their half-starved children

compact shape of her body show

sensibility of a sculptor,

sculpture

when he was

the melting of the limbs into the

expressive bronze heads

,-

and mediums. His

later.

he has never

in general.

lost

The Mas\

In these Picasso

and

showed

at

that in our century has

of a Blind Singer, 1903 (page

51),

is

an example of

sockets are
is

to be

his

power

empty and dead

found between

to

convey character and action with dramatic insight.

in contrast to the

this tortured face

open mouth and tense

and the MasJ{

lips.

Broken Nose, 1903

mouth

carry a strong

extrovert expression. Other heads such as those of Fernande, 1905- 1906 (page 53),

Derain, 1905 (page 53), are equally revealing as character studies, but in the

1905 (page 52), other considerations


Picasso has told

with

Max

Jacob.

how

he modeled

Although

continued to work on

He had become more

it

make
this

eye

A complete antithesis

of a Picador with a

(page 51), where the eyes with their distant stare and the firmly closed

The

Head

and Alice
of a Jester,

their appearance.

head

late at

night after returning from the circus

in the early stages the clay took the

appearance of his friend, he

model was

in the lower part of the face.

until the only likeness to his

interested in the

adding the crowning complement of a


experimental and have not survived.

way

rough broken surface caught the

jester's cap.

Other sculptures of

this

light

and

period were

in

more

In the

summer of

1905 Picasso paid a short

landscape, the opulent forms of the


in sculpture as well as in paint.
is

well-known example of

human form

Her Hair,

stylization. In his' first

During the revolution


of 1906-1907

ciated.

He

when he

made
first

colors, as

massive charms

Belle Hollandaise

he did

nudes of the

later in the colossal

Woman Combing

power

to realize the massive,

show

that followed

enthusiasm of 1905 he was tempted

to

rounded

movement

make

sculp-

happen.

this did not

in his attitude

toward painting that reached

its crisis

in the winter

painted Les Demoiselles d' Avignon (page 211), two surprising

themselves

felt.

became aware

new

Both came from sculpture hitherto unknown or unappre-

of the archaic vigor of

which had recently been found


portrait bust of the

La

as

the exception of the bronze kneeling figure

major preoccupation. However,

influences

known

nude with tenderness and charm, the sculptures

toward simplicity and

to capture their

convey the sculptural qualities of the

his first attempts to

With

him

painting of a nude

1905- 1906 (page 49), an example of Picasso's

strength of a

ture his

The

girls inspired

with subdued

in his paintings

early 1920s (page 212).

Dutch

Holland. Seen against the flatness of the

visit to

pre-Roman Iberian

in excavations near his native

same period, known

as the

Lady

sculpture (page 211),

town Malaga, and of

of Elche,

polychrome

which had been acquired by

the Louvre in 1897. Their unorthodox proportions and their robust lack of refinement attracted
Picasso,

and

brought a

these qualities soon

new

vitality into his

made

themselves

own drawings and

felt in his

paintings and

work. This influence however soon became merged with

another discovery that was to play an even greater role in the growth of his understanding
of the significance of form. African sculpture

Matisse,

and Derain, who had begun

Although they
art,

felt

its

his friends

masks and wood carvings

significance into their

resolved the profound

and

as a testing

monochrome

There were, however, some


particularly in the

from 1907 (page


color (page 211).

wood

55).

him many

subtle implications of these

however, served in some ways


use of color almost to

took

it

to

ground

Vlaminck,

as early as 1904.

and the emotive power

own

years

of

work. Picasso,

combined both the influence of Iberian and African sculpture

ing Les Demoiselles d' Avignon, but

18

to collect

the attraction of the exotic associations

they were unable to incorporate

consternation,

had been discovered by

Negro

to their

in his great paint-

and devious excursions before he

two influences

for sculpture.

in sculpture. Painting,

Already in 1908 he reduced

allow the sculptural to assert

itself

unconfused.

direct results of African influence in three-dimensional

carvings, of

which there

is

a splendid

work,

rough-hewn example dating

For these he sometimes made working drawings with indications

The abrupt and

radical changes of style

his

in

through which he was passing

tore

him away from such

and

direct influences

him on

set

path that was to lead him to

the discoveries of cubism.

Cubism can be

dimensional problems.
object
to

from all

sides,

movement among

described as a
Its

painters toward the sculptor's three-

preoccupation with form and the desire to become conscious of an

even entering into

its

inner structure in order to understand

former movements that had been concerned with impressions of

color,

was opposed

it,

atmosphere, and

and Braque had

outline. In the tearing apart of the external appearance of objects, Picasso

set

themselves the task of penetrating into reality and analyzing form into separate geometric

components while presenting simultaneously


spectator

were walking round

or turning

more ordinary ways

that for a while


effect

it

several views of the

over in his hands.

it

same

The

object, as

though the

were

convincing

results

so

in three-dimensional sculpture of arriving at a similar

did not interest Picasso and never then or in later years held Braque's attention for long.

Apart from three small

isolated studies,

one of a head and two of apples, modeled

only examples of cubist sculpture in the round are the


the Glass of Absinth (frontispiece).
tions.

According

to cut

them up the

tive, of

to

Of

the former

Woman's Head

colors, after all,

planes inclined one

way

"it

had begun

or the other -and then assemble

literally.

He

were

to use in painting

Woman's Head, on which he had


was determined

would have

them according

how

far

The

sufficed

in Gonzalez' studio,

he wished

to the indi-

cubist

in fact closely related to sculpture,

work

set to

to see

of Picasso's reac-

being no more than indications of differences in perspec-

cations given by the color, in order to be confronted with a 'sculpture'."

Picasso

and

of 1909 (page 56)

we know something

Gonzalez, Picasso said that in early cubist paintings

in 1910, the

to

methods

and

in the

apply them

he could revolutionize the perception of an object

in three-dimensional technique.

Talking of

this recently

he said

should continue into the interior.


did not please

him

to

me,

"I thought that the curves

had the idea of doing them

because, he added, "it

was too

in wire."

intellectual, too

you

see

on the surface

This solution, however,

much

like painting."

This

indeed suggests that he was looking for more primitive qualities in sculpture and also that

momentarily he was not inclined


a compromise, in

up

to

pursue

which the head retained

its

this analysis in

solidity

depth any further.

he had used

in cubist paintings

same model.

Having solved
ture in the

decided on

and volume, while the surface was broken

into facets closely related to the analytical geometric planes

inspired by the

He

the problems presented by this particular piece, Picasso abandoned sculp-

round almost

entirely for about

twenty

years.

However, during

this

time the

far-

19

reaching discoveries of cubism led

November
Soirees

19 13 the poet

These met with

The

to a

new form

of union

between the two

Guillaume Apollinaire became editor of

and published four reproductions

Paris,

tie

him

tierce disapproval

arts.

In

monthly review, Les

of cubist constructions

from the subscribers and proved nearly

made by

Picasso.

fatal to the review.

constructions were the logical development of the cubist collage, an invention that had

saved cubism from becoming an esoteric abstract style by the introduction of scraps of news-

among, and creating

paper, cigarette packages, or similar evidence of real objects


to,

the illusions of painting. These constructions (pages 58-64), often brightly painted, broke

the rules

by

its

which demanded

that a painting should

remain two-dimensional and circumscribed

frame; they came more into the category of the

and three-dimensional
as

a contrast

art.

outrageous innovations.

But

The

this

bas-relief, a

was not the only reason

compromise between two-

for the disapproval they aroused

commonplace kind

materials used by Picasso were of the most

and therefore supposedly unworthy

of a

work

of

art.

Any

fragment of paper, wood,

tin,

cardboard, or string that suited his purpose was enlisted into this attack on former standards.

The

result

tion of

was

new

a composition in depth not contained within a frame, a revolutionary concep-

possibilities in

both sculpture and painting.

Among the constructions there is, however, one small but notable three-dimensional polychrome

sculpture, the Glass of Absinth, 1914 (frontispiece).

still-life

paintings and collages in which a wine glass appears (page 211), so dissected and

we

recomposed that

are

made

conscious of

The

hollowness as a container of liquids.


degrees of reality.

On top of

of sugar, but the glass

Each

is

the glass

opened up

is

its

sculpture

its

roundness, and

in cubist fashion to

wax

show

essential

way varying

surface that received such respect

lump

the surface of the liquid within.

sculpture was decorated differently by Picasso


lines

and

and care

to disintegrate in the

An

pointillist color.

gave the appearance of transparency characteristic of

had already begun

its

placed a real absinth spoon holding a replica of a

with a variety of textures or bright contrasts of

The unbroken

transparency,

very close to those cubist

Glass of Absinth combines in a playful

of the six bronze casts of the original

side of the glass

It is still

all

in the

cubist constructions.

in Picasso's early,

Woman's Head

opening

more conventional

of 1909; but cubism

required a deeper penetration, which was to be carried further in the constructions. Here the
object, usually a guitar or violin,
its

dismembered

to exist in

depth by gaps and open spaces between

parts, giving simultaneously a sensation of transparency

Unconcerned with
materials, often using

20

was made

their durability, Picasso chose to

no more than

make

and

solidity.

the constructions in fragile

pieces of cardboard painted

and bent

into shape, with

strings stretched across


tions

made

from point

were not

in recent years they

this impossible. In

consequence

Unlike the Glass of Absinth and other construc-

to point.

many

of

The

cast in bronze.

them

flimsy materials he used

no longer.

exist

It

therefore

is

the

all

made
more

surprising that they should have had such a rapid and widespread influence over sculptors

were looking for new methods of expression and new ways of extending the
their art.

They

are in fact the origin of the

space rather than modeled.

One

About

of

returning to Russia, began to

was purely

As

of sculpture that

of the first indications of their influence

which were polychrome constructions

same time (1914-1916) Vladimir

the

make

who had met

Tatlin,

though

his "corner reliefs,"

a poet

and the

murdered poet by the

as stone

glory."

to be

in

wood,

built in

found

in

Les

of the latest

glass,

and

tin.

Picasso in Paris before

abstract.
first

published in 19 16, he

Bois de

is

is

his approach, unlike Picasso's,

had

interpreter of cubism, Apollinaire

importance of Picasso's use of sculptural volumes created in space. In


sine,

possibilities of

where Apollinaire published four reproductions

Soirees de Paris of June 1914,

works of Archipenko, two

modern conception

who

Meudon,

artist

tells a fantastic

he

"l'Oiseau de Benin"

calls

l'Oiseau de Benin chooses a

and bronze

as "too old,"

Then, having dug

monument

story of the

site in a

and who

is

realized the
his

book Lc Poete Assas-

designed in honor of the

meant

like poetry

and

like

ground, he sculpts the interior in the likeness

had the shape of Croniamantal,

of Croniamantal, the poet, "so well that the void

hole was filled with his phantom."

to be Picasso. In the

clearing where, discarding materials such

he hollows out "a deep statue in nothing,

a life-size hole in the

momentous

that the

Comparable with the constructions, but on

and equally

a larger scale

transitory,

were the

giant figures of the "Managers" (page 212) designed by Picasso for Cocteau's ballet Parade.
It

was produced

showed

his

in Paris in 191 7

by the Russian Ballet of Serge Diaghilev, and again Apollinaire

enthusiasm by writing in

a series of manifestations

his introduction "that

which should completely

alter

he saw in

both

arts

it

the starting-point of

and manners."

Ignoring the revolutionary sculptural consequences of the cubist constructions, Picasso

put
to

all his

energy into painting; and

it

was not

until

more than ten

years later that he

began

develop in three-dimensional sculpture the ideas launched so brilliantly in the constructions.

However,

his painting

was never

distant

from

period of the early twenties (page 212) have


bronzes. Also there

is

The

massive nudes of the classical

common

with the modeling of his early

sculpture.

much

in

a remarkable series of drawings

made

in 1924 (page 212),

which were

21

later

appear
knots

They
its

at first sight to

in a net.

be abstract doodles

But with Picasso

paintings of the same period

life

Le Chef d'ocuvre inconnu. They

published by Vol hud to embellish his edition of Balzac's

are in general based

anthropomorphic

art
it

is

made up

of lines with dots

never abstract, and

becomes

if

of

clear that they arc variations

draw

associations;

and

is

on recurring themes.

like the cubist constructions they are a conception of

and the next development

in the air

still-

on the shapes of musical instruments, particularly the guitar with

based on a

human

become

a logical step

in Picasso's sculpture, the iron

928- 1 929. In these latter space has been enclosed by

they

cross, like the

they are compared with the

transparent three-dimensional form. In this light the drawings


the constructions

where they

lines,

between

and wire sculptures

and the three-dimensional form

figure surrounded by planes that create walls or

windows around

(page 65).

it

form

central transparent, ovoid

environment, giving an architectural homogeneity that

During

in Picasso's

mind,

this interval there

in spite of their
is,

in fact, a

enclosed by

close association

transparent

its

would be impossible

it

any other way. Together these works give us an idea of the

and sculpture

is

to create in

between drawing

being some four years apart in date.

convincing example of the continuous dialogue

An

between two- and three-dimensional means of expression.

almost identical resemblance

occurs between a small painted metal construction of a circular head with a tripod as

and the figure of the painter

and His Model, painted

in a large canvas, the Painter

base

its

in the

same

year, 1928 (page 212).

But Picasso has not always wished


drawings of

this

are so definitely

same period

modeled

to

complete the dialogue. There are paintings and

that appear to be projects for sculpture (page 213). Their forms

in light

and shade

perhaps owing to his distaste for copying his


in his drawings,

both

had

and

as painter

in

however, that there

mind and

take shape. This

of deciding

to

work

often been his

means

which medium was the one

of the

well.

which the

in

in

that

it

acts

should

itself

with him.

(pages 106-107). For this figure Picasso produced a great


small, before he decided

final expression

which the material

Woman's Head

which medium he should

of 1909

Man

with Sheep, 1944

many drawings

(page 214), large

(page 56), for which there exist several drawings (page 211), and the

and

and

is

At other times he has been guided by

process are the development of the cubist

first

indirectly. It

of exploring the subject he has

found or by the spontaneous development

in collaboration

Examples

happened only

this

the most convincing proof that he thinks

is

They have

own work

method has often served him

the material he has

seems

sculptor.

made, but

that the transition could easily be

use.

When

finally

it

was

clear to

him

should be a sculpture, modeled in the round, rather than a painting, the figure was

completed with incredible speed.

The range

of drawings for sculpture

are given strong three-dimensional


classical

way.

Some

is

also interesting in

modeling using

light

its

great variety.

and shade

of these, dating as far back even as 1907,

Many

to obtain

volume

form.

When

Crucifixion, he

in later years Picasso

made from

it

in the

manner

were given

became deeply impressed by Griinewald's Isenheim

drawings that amount

to a sort of vocabulary of fantastic shapes,

a process he carried further in the sheets of drawings

composed

in the

were never translated into sculp-

ture but retained their three-dimensional qualities in paintings; whereas others


solid

drawings

of Bracelli (page 213).

None

made

in 1933 of fantastic

anatomies

of these were translated literally into

23

sculpture, although

Perhaps the
the line

often recognize the shapes reassembled in bronzes of later periods.

style that

drawing

with form. This

we

in

is

both the simplest and the most demanding on the imagination

which the empty space contained by the

becomes mysteriously

line

we

true of representational line drawings such as

is

'The Sculptor's Studio" and

also of abstractions such as the cubist

ishing statements of form in space used as decorations for

is

filled

find in the etchings of

drawings and those aston-

Le Chef d'oeuvrc inconnu (page

212) that are the forerunners of the space sculptures.

There

are also

working drawings such

ture (page 214); closer

sculptures themselves.
to

employ

graphic, or

the drawing of features on the

still is

There

is

combined with

at

Chicago Civic Center sculp-

flat

surfaces of the sheet-iron

thought and of means that permits Picasso

in fact a unity of

draftsman

his talent as a

as the study for the

any time throughout

his

work, whether

be purely

it

collage, or three-dimensional sculpture.

All art to some degree implies a metamorphosis, a change of identity, at least in the
material of
ciated

which

from the

it is

composed. The

early twenties,

in this

with

whom

Picasso

an important challenge

of reality

and

close link

between the theories of Breton and the developments

a fertile

ground

saw

surrealists,

and 1935. This period

painting of the same

title

and

attributes of the female form, but are

describe

them by such

we know during

a definite

acquire an independent reality.


factorily stated except

to

want

awaken

The

By

From

their
this

a living

way

"Woman." They
we

in Picasso's sculpture that took

began with

that

are so

a small

in date with a

organism with many


it

would be wrong

compounded

of

to

what

recognize as a vision from our dreams that

ambiguous nature and convincing power, they


it

can be implied that reality can never be

satis-

is

the guide to a

new and

clearer perception of truth.

It is

these

he has stated firmly, that interest him rather than the search for a harmonious equi-

librium. "I

and

as

in such a

find a

by paradox and that in Picasso's view the consciousness of contradiction

dialectical opposition

tensions,

title

our waking hours and what

they escape categorical definition.

and

composed

we

here that

which coincides

These works suggest

subject.

is

for Picasso

sculpture, called Metamorphosis, 1928 (page 213),

closely asso-

to conventional conceptions

for the germination of poetic images. It

place during the years between 1928

modeled

had become

to

draw

the spirit," he has said, "in a direction to which

it is

not accustomed

it."

great outburst of activity that had

begun with the space constructions of 1928- 1929

continued with metal sculptures composed of rough pieces of iron welded together. Fragments

24

'

of machinery, kitchen utensils,


rated.
in the

They were

more

in a

literal

nearly seven feet

is

way than

sheet iron offered opportunities for

and where they were placed

oped

whose

more

The

and

its

and the use

In these

Woman

biggest, the

immediate

of metal rods

works Picasso

He

began

also

changed according

identity could be

in relation to the other parts of the sculpture.

recent years

were incorpo-

incorporated

It

the space constructions,

to take place in individual parts as well as in the

brilliantly in

tall.

new developments.

to exercise his genius for finding objects

morphosis

that suited his purpose

the most imposing sculptures he had yet realized.

Garden, 1929-1930 (page 67),

environment

and

and any piece of scrap

to

how

obliged a meta-

whole -a process that he has devel-

that has since been widely used

by sculptors

in

many

parts of the world.

An example of

the

way

in

which Picasso mingles

his theories

and

his

work

is

his

sudden

return, shortly after

making

more compressed

form than any he had ever attempted. In 1931, taking long narrow

of

in

his wire

wood, he whittled out of them a

drawings

in space, to sculpture of a very different kind,

series of slender figures that

appear to have the stature of giantesses (pages 70-71). This


so that they appear to be colossal

When

makes

new

is

pieces

because of their proportions

ability to give scale to small objects

present throughout his work.

discovery he does not continue to exploit

it

exclusively for

long, nor did he at this time confine his energies to constructed sculptures.

Remembering

Picasso

his early interest in the treatment of surfaces

the body, he

modeled

in clay or plaster the

and the unifying

virtue of the skin that encloses

group of monumental heads referred

(pages 74-77). These began in 1931-1932 with the bust and bas-relief head of a

Therese Walter (pages 73-74). Starting from


cal features

that

lifelike portraits

he proceeded

with greater freedom, incorporating other influences, such

might be ascribed

to

an imposing Baga mask which

to earlier

girl,

Marie-

to treat her classi-

as the

exaggerated nose

for years decorated the entrance hall

of the chateau de Boisgeloup.

He

relates that

one night he built up a very complicated construction of wire, which

looked incomprehensible until by chance his lamp projected the shadow on the wall. At once
this

looked to him like the profile of Marie-Therese. "I went on, added plaster and gave

"When

present form," he said, explaining:

out of

it.

It is

not indecision, the fact

is it

changes while you are

Picasso during the Boisgeloup period

output. In addition to

many new

you work you don't

was

prolific,

know what

at

is

going

to

it its

come

work."

and there was great

variety in his

conceptions of the female form there are two important

animal sculptures: the Coc\, 1932 (page 83), and the Heifer's Head, 1932 (page 82). There

25

is

Head

also a

ture in

of a Warrior, 1033 (page 87),

which Picasso has enjoyed aiming

field that

has given

opened up when making


continued

is

given

commonplace

full rein,

his

humor

The

Roman

helmet, a sculp-

popular conception of the hero.

great scope for treating conventional ideas with disrespect

richest variety

and

began

do during the

to

thirties,

and has

most surprising inventions come from

the

materials (pages 89-93). His desire to play, never entirely absent,

and while he proceeds

of waste he enjoys himself in the

sophisticated research that

a crest like a

at the

dolls for his children, as he

at intervals since.

his apt use of

him

crowned with

went

to

bring a doll to

same way

as the child for

from the most unlikely

life

whom

it is

made. In

this

scraps

game

metamorphoses of surrealism, and the

into cubism, the

and cunning with which he can juggle with appearances

all

the

skill

unimpeded

play their part with

spontaneity.

Paradoxically

it

was during the occupation

of Paris,

obtain, that Picasso's production of sculpture reached a

was predominantly of the kind

that relies

morphic elements often playing an


were

cast in

composed
tion

bronze in

spite of

essential role.

enemy

new

texture,

With

materials were most difficult to

intensity.

The wartime

and surface

might produce, the bronze

Man

simple and direct methods.

was

were given

casts

new

a year before, he

finally able to achieve the

whole

statue

when

was about

it

interpretation with paint.

had begun

to

make

all,

to collapse.

he deliberately took

to

The

at that

visual

active play of light caught

this careful prepara-

theme

it

in a day.

On

an

the figure with balls of clay, but not

who was

present at the time,

language he chose for

time to

this archetypal

texture of the fester of 1905 (page 52), but

up

Paul Eluard,

In doing so he sacrificed neither vigor nor tension.

The

studies of a bearded

modeling of the seven-foot figure

seemed

immediate appeal. As though he wished

period.

pieces

with Sheep, 1944 (pages 106-107), however, Picasso chose to use

More than

without moments of suspense

stood by

many

Casting gave unity to sculptures that were

restrictions.

already constructed metal armature he rapidly built

that the

tension, with meta-

the help of eager friends,

holding a frightened sheep in his arms, and clearly because of

tion he

sculpture

of heterogeneous elements, but to counterbalance the deadening effect this unifica-

In the great bronze

man

on mass,

when

make

communication

to express

The

this

work was
easily

of

under-

himself in familiar terms.

surface treatment recalls the rough

has none of the melancholy softness of the blue

by the rugged epidermis, combined with the directional

accents in the uneven texture, emphasize the man's rigidity in contrast to the confused
struggles of the sheep.

26

The development
In the drawing of

lamb

a confident
tally.

There

is

its

March

to his

bosom, but
ideal

master but submits to

which

firm grip of the hand.

it is

bond

it

the sheep

of love between

The

them

interesting to follow.

the loving father

this

is

reliance
is

who

has changed fundamen-

replaced by a

more

is

found

in the

felt in

on

the knotted sinews of the forearm

his physical strength

the shepherd

be devoured by

Death's

Head

who preserves

human

makes

it

it

has been

and the

obvious that in an

his flock not for their

made

in the

same

instead of being given a

made smooth and covered with

of the

imme-

society.

(page 108),

the exterior has received an inverse treatment


it,

realistic

The power

Another example of the eloquence with which Picasso can make the surface of
ture speak

clasps

struggling animal no longer enjoys the protection

caught can be

ambivalent way the good shepherd


to

is

is

perforce, putting to test the man's strength.

The man's

good but ultimately

man and

in the sculpture their relationship

caused by necessity.

relentless trap in

diate

between the

30, 1943 (page 214), the shepherd

no longer an

state of tension

of

in the link

his sculp-

year. In this

rough surface

bronze

to enliven

indentations like scars tearing into the dead,

polished covering of an

empty

This should be compared

vessel.

to the effect of fullness pro-

duced by another smooth surface, the tightly stretched skin of the breasts and belly of the
Pregnant Woman, [950 (page 125),

in

which Picasso can arouse two opposite


the effect
into the

order to realize,
reactions

among

other things, the power with

from the quality of smoothness. In the

was obtained simply by building three earthenware

pitchers

from

a rubbish

latter

heap

modeling of the body.

Although he often reminds us of


of sculpture,

it

is

his

in his less conventional

reaction.

His

field the

wartime bronzes such

tactics, particularly his

consummate

moods

use of

as the

the

more

traditional techniques

that Picasso provokes the

humor,

Woman

skill in

affect us

most widespread

deeply and unexpectedly. In

with Apple, 1943 (page 103), "La

this

Madame,"

1943-1944 (page 102), and Figure, 1944 (page 99), are of great importance. They are highly

complex

in technique

and

are the heralds of a long series of sculptures that rely

on modeling,

impressions on the surface of borrowed textures, and the assemblage of objects. Sometimes

|J-\ T\N

these things, picked

up anywhere,

are allowed to keep their identity, while at other times

they are transformed and become something completely different.

The

poetic value of ambiguity has

become

a factor of

major importance

in the art of this

century. Picasso, who, to quote Paul Eluard, holds in his hands "the fragile key to the problem
8

of reality" has always been willing to probe our complacency about the identity of an object

by showing that in certain circumstances

it

mean something

can

surprisingly different

from

the accepted interpretation. In consequence an equation such as "bicycle saddle plus handlebars equals a bull's head" (page 109) has the disconcerting quality of a joke that contains
serious implications.

With

hawk and

the eye of a

the cunning of an alchemist, Picasso assem-

made from

bled a series of important sculptures

a rich variety of objects collected

from

beaches and rubbish dumps. Apart from their aesthetic values they induce a metaphysical

enjoyment diat

With

is

the wealth he

some memorable

made

made

in the

visual puns, such as the

such as the

of

found daily

rubbish around

little

rough pieces of wood,

extracted

from banal

material.

nails,

and

dreamed

which requires the powerful,

seductive,

produced

There are other smaller

screws.

Reading, 1952-1953 (page 135), which are

They

are astonishing for the grace

These metamorphoses are

things the legendary sculptor

in Vallauris, Picasso

his son Claude's toys.

Woman

painted bronze

him

head of the Baboon and Young, 195 1 (page 134),

two small automobiles found among

of

pieces,

not far distant from the doubt and disquiet provoked by Hieronymus Bosch.

way

Picasso's

of doing the impossible

of as he gazed into his goldfish bowl, the

and outrageous innocence

and charm

making

of a Minotaur. In the

of

Goat

Skull and Bottle, 1951-1952 (page 132), a composite sculpture unified by being cast in bronze

and painted, the rays of light coming from the candle planted
sharp carpenter's

nails.

The comparison between

metaphor, a discovery that would be thought


in this bronze smaller nails bristle
ing.

They

sion

is

are a reminder of

its

The limp

light

is

one sculpture by most

a beautiful
artists;

but

between the horns of the dead animal with different mean-

former strength. In both cases the realm of sculptural expres-

rope

by the clumsiness of her boots,

neck of the bottle are long,

and penetrating

sufficient for

enriched. Another attack on the impossible

1950 (page 128).

nails

in the

itself

sails

is

found

in the Little Girl

becomes her support. The

through the

trated sequence of absurdities gives exuberance

which

air

and

girl,

Shipping Rope,

her weight emphasized

above a hard metal flower. This concenlife to this

emblem

of nonsensical high

which might have become

spirits.

There are other examples

tive or

clumsy, result in tense and graceful sculptures such as the Crane, 1952 (page 133), and

the

Angry Owl, 1953 (page

135).

in

The

similar methods,

choice of materials in this

last

restric-

appears to be a deliberate

29

expression of anger and aggressiveness. Pincers, screws, nails, and barbed metal fragments

have served the

well in the transformations he has brought about.

artist

new

In spite of a continuous flow of

he made

in earlier years.

Two

Bunch

open the closed form of the

splitting

show how he could

large bronzes of flowers

sense to a cubist technique. In the

abandon the

invention, Picasso did not

still

it

solid, tightly

of plants

on the

appreciate

jar so as to

like a

bud ready

to burst,

surface. In the other 'bronze,

daring and irrational

and ephemeral

packed

way

a solid

internally as well as externally,

it

appearance

resistant

and added

Flowers

of presenting flowers that

and

is

in a Vase,

the antithesis of

is

Ramie

worked

"The

his ceramics
as a

skill

is

vessel

Picasso a

of clay

comes

to

the

give that which

all

the principles of repre-

is

frail

triumph of flowers.

whose

work on ceramics
Madoura,

pottery, la

and magnificent

rare

fruit or the sinuous strength of a snake.

becomes the

"To make

dove.

years,

is

him

factor in

as naturally as does his

draftsman. His supple, sensitive handling of the material produces forms that

wheel he kneads and

common

twenty

The manipulation

his hands."

have the fullness of ripe


potter's

for nearly

in

it

To

Since 1947 Picasso's activity as a sculptor has been accompanied by his


(pages 120-123, 138-143, 196-197). According to Georges

has

drawings

1953 (page 136),

astonishing.

He

line.

delicate symbolic

sentational art. Picasso's blossoms are an enduring celebration of the

in Vallauris Picasso has

new

give a

of Flowers, 1953 (page 137), he used the device of

but with the flower, fragile and expansive by nature, he has taken the opposite

made

discoveries

wide

twists

lithe

it,

body of

a dove," he has said,

field for

plays an important part.

and without losing the


a

young

"you must

Taking

original fullness of

from the

its

form a

woman or the fluttering shape of a brooding


first

wring

its

neck."

experiment in which the element of chance,

The

a pot fresh

Ceramics have given

so frequently his ally,

boldness of his treatment has often alarmed his expert assistants,

but they have had to admit, after almost every firing, that he can achieve effects impossible
to all others.

Ceramics have the attraction for Picasso of combining painting and sculpture with
itarian function.

He

has pursued each of these paths. There are

with boldness and sensitivity and a wide range of


ture

two

in his

of his

most fundamental

hands and

to

draw

talents

plates, vases,

come equally

tiles

and

on which he has painted

pots. In his

ceramic sculp-

into play: his ability to

rapidly with his brush on the surface.

util-

As

model

clay

a result he arrives at a

complete fusion of sculpture and painting.


Picasso's love of

30

modeling produced

in 1945- 1947 a series of small female figures that

had

in

them

the

same primitive

the oldest forms of popular art

now
yet

cast in

bronze (pages

most enduring
In a

way

his

still

that

is

to be

found

in the

Catalan whistle figures, one of

existing in Mediterranean countries. Picasso's clay figures,

io-i 14), are a proof of his great respect for the

traditions,

less distant

life

which he combines with an unparalleled audacity of invention.


most recent phase

in sculpture

can be traced to primitive origins.

His painted sheet-iron sculptures are born from childhood games.


to

amuse

his sister

most humble and

Lola by his dexterity with

scissors

and paper.

When

he was

He could make

dolls,

with magic speed. Running parallel with the immense variety that

and

fantasies

istic

of Picasso's

his invention.

work

He

is

turned

the continuity with


this talent

which

which throughout
for the

amusement

his life

boy he used

is

animals,

character-

he has followed up

of friends can transform a

wire from a champagne cork into a ballet dancer, and torn paper into creatures of fancy
less

ephemeral things. There are photos by

made

Brassa'i of

to

some twenty folded-paper sculptures

in 1943 (page 214) that are all extraordinarily alive, but

it

was not

until 1953 that

he

-^rtUXx

j^^-rcU^

found the means of enlarging and solidifying the small


out and folded in sheet metal. In
others,

drawn with

maqucttes by having them cut

fragile

some

cases the features of a face are painted

The

result

arc welding.

on the surface;

in

combines the two-dimensional significance of the

drawing, the three-dimensional planes of the bent sheets, and the transparent space between
the

surfaces (pages

flat

4S- 55,

169,

174-195, 198-206, 208).

An

illustration that stresses

both the simplicity of Picasso's methods and the visionary foresight with which they are
conceived
first

is

given by Lionel Prejger,

who worked on

presented by Picasso with a large sheet of

shape had been drawn. "That

cubism

is

their construction.

brown paper on which

a chair," said Picasso,

"and you

He

something

like that."

Picasso then cut out the shape

'

he was

a strange octopus-like

see there

Imagine a chair that has been run over by a steam-roller, well,

says that

an explanation of
it

would produce

and folded the paper along

lines

he had

already drawn, the final result being the Chair, 1961 (page 175).

The

sheet-iron sculptures are

all

carefully planned.

the simple sweeping curves of their outlines


surfaces
is

combine

human

Madame

all

establish.

further example of the continuity of Picasso's ideas

and paintings around 1930, which

fantastic sculptures large

enough

reveal

him

to

for people to live in.

existing in

is

given to the relationship between sculpture and architecture.


ings

He

It is

to

commission one from me."

he has taken

for buildings

his

twenty

surfaces are balconies.

approach

to

"I'll

stories or

more high,

The sweep

There

is

is

series of

solidity against

charcoal

an empty

have to

However, he changed

make

filled large

monu-

his plan

paintings instead because

and low domes gives

me

in conversation. "I

up around him along

the

sketch books with drawings

on

stilts.

On

(since Picasso's

anthropomorphic) a sensation of organic

use curved surfaces for walls?" he said to

32

birds, animals,

life.

an important

like colossal sculptures

of terraces

there

12

imaginary projects further and

everything

them

already noticeable in draw-

Recently, watching the rash of skyscraper hotels that sprout


coast,

of

their

be the potential architect and builder of

Croisette, the seafront at Cannes.

and, as he told D. H. Kahnweiler at the time,

nobody's ready

many

has said he had the idea originally that they should be built as

ments and placed along the

means

found in the attention he has

drawings of strange pregnant anatomies standing with monumental


horizon (page 213).

In

of

and shade on

But whether they are

and movement

possess the tensions

solidity.

economy

Picasso; others are reminiscent of cubist con-

by the impression of transparency they


figures they

a delightful

subtle play of light

movement and

a sense both of

the clear-cut profile of Jacqueline,

structions

or

them

to give

and the

With

life.

would

"Why
like to

their

curved

fundamental

shouldn't you

make

houses

from inside like


In the

last

has presented

human

body, not just walls with no thought of what they enclose."

few years the means of realizing some of

itself.

Immense

his

dreams of monumental sculpture

sandblasted concrete sculptures have been constructed by Carl

Nesjar from Picasso's maquettes,

made

originally of tin or cardboard.

The enlargement

always called for careful consideration using intermediary stages, as in the case of the

has

Woman

with Outstretched Arms, 1961 (pages 192-193).

The most important


steel

some 60

feet

of his gigantic sculptures so far achieved

high that

is

now

duced

model

city.

He

the great head in sheet

being erected in the center of Chicago. In 1964 Picasso

conceived this sculpture in response to an invitation to design a

Center in that

is

monument

for the

had been well supplied with information about the

in iron about four feet

high (page 207), which he

precisely to the size required by the architects

and engineers.

No

insisted

site,

was

to

new

Civic

and he probe enlarged

doubt the result will be very

close to his original conception, a noble

The

the void.

conception of a sculpture built in

of sheet metal, with

iron rods,

is

and severe monument made up of

open spaces contained

ities

in the

connected with discoveries made

constructions of 1912-1914 (pages 58-64).

steel,

composed of

the profiles

forms and

and

surfaces

gaps between them and areas enclosed by

fifty years earlier. Its

The

solid

sources are in the cubist

iron rods in the Chicago

monument have

affin-

with the guitars of the cubist constructions, and the transference of the idea of a musical

woman

instrument to the head of a

The

gives poetic echoes.

conception belongs to the

"drawings" in space of the wire sculpture of 1928-1929 (page 65) and the composite iron

Woman

sculptures such as the

any of

its

predecessors.

in the

Even among

Garden of 1929- 1930 (page 67). However,


recent

work

there

1962 (page 206), which has some of the same features,

dream

Picasso's

more than

of a great

It is difficult to

less

monument, which he expressed

thirty years before, has

only the small

is

Head

it is

of a

unlike

Woman,

convincingly resolved. In this

in charcoal drawings

way

and paintings

been realized.

find an explanation for the considerable difference in attitude that Picasso

has towards his sculpture and his painting. Since his youth he has regarded painting as the

most obvious and legitimate of

and with

his resources,

certain important exceptions he has

always been willing to part with paintings. Sculpture has had for

ment he has always wished


:

to live

surrounded by

it,

and only

him

more personal

since his eighty-fifth birthday

(1966) has he allowed a full-scale retrospective of his sculpture to be shown,

and

later in

London and

anniversary exhibition at
Jr.,

regretted that

saying:

"Had

it

the

New York.

expected), the artist would,

time."

It is

now

possible to

estimate his influence


It is

which

pieces

believe,

Modern Art

in

New York in

show more than

still

1957, Alfred

few of the important

as

H.

of the significance of this art in his

work roughly

into five

on volume and surface

Barr,

sculptures,

was

one of the great sculptors of our

on the development of sculpture throughout the world

rely

in Paris

in Picasso's possession been available (as

have been revealed

form an opinion

possible to divide his

sculptures,

of

possible to

many major

first

In his preface to the catalogue of the Picasso seventy-fifth

The Museum

had not been

attach-

life

and

to

in this century.

major categories: the early modeled

tensions; the cubist bas-relief constructions,

based on indications of the shape of objects in space and built up into a transparent conception
of form; then, after a period of
plasters of the late twenties
its

34

and

emphasis on the use of found

some

years, the

wrought-iron constructions and modeled

early thirties; the sculpture of the


objects,

combined with

plaster

war and postwar

and

cast in

years,

with

bronze; and finally

the sheet-iron

and monumental sculptures with which he

accompaniment during the


and fundamental motive

immense panorama

work

of one

to acclaim

"The

is

make

The

made

to

and

from "The Minotaur," and

2 Milton

S.

Fox,

Bolliger

p.

S.

p.

200

36
244

Pablo Picasso (Geneva, Paris: Trois

(Paris:

cit.,

p.

Picasso, Petit Palais,

325

Lionel Prejger, "Picasso decoupe


Oct.

6/7, 1936, p. 189

L'Edition Bibliotheque des Curieux, 1916)

at

reality.

and G. Ramie, Horn mage a

10 Penrose, op.

Guillaume Apollinaire, he Poete Assassine

admire and wonder

Paris, 1966, n.p. (introduction to ceramics section)

York: Harry N. Abrams, 1956),

Gonzalez, "Picasso Sculpteur," Cahiers d'Art,

vol. 11, no.

by

nos. 83-93
3 Julio

given the opportunity

last

Collines, 1947), p. 38

ed., Picasso for Vollard, introduction

(New

p.

cit., p.

8 Paul Eluard,

Herbert Read, The Art of Sculpture ("Bollingen Series"

Hans

Nov. 1965,

7 Penrose, op.

Footnotes

York: Pantheon Books, 1956),

Roland Penrose, Picasso: His Life and Wo)\ (London:

131,

New

work can be considered

6 Andre Breton, "L'Ecart absolu generique," L'Ocil, no.

page 227.

35:3,

This

assembled as the protean

Victor Gollancz, 1958),

one from "The Blind Minotaur." References are given on

now been

yet another reason to

series

important

clay in the hand.

our vision and our understanding of

with four etchings from the

Sculptor's Studio," four

mold

current exhibition has at

as a great sculptor

An

which the most primitive

clear to all that this aspect of his

his vast production.

Pablo Picasso

illustrated

his ceramics, in

is

for sculpture persists: the desire to

will

it

the contribution he has

This essay

twenty years

of his diverse styles in sculpture has

man, and

major element in

last

occupied.

still

is

12 D.

96 1,

p.

le fer,"

29

H. Kahnweiler, The Sculpture

Rodney

L'Oeil, no. 82,

of Picasso

(London:

Phillips, 1949)

35

Rogi-Andre: Pablo Picasso, 1935. Collection of The

Museum

of

Modern Art

CHRONOLOGY

Concerned

specifically

with Picasso's sculpture, the following outline summarizes only briefly

other aspects of his career,

and omits some events

The most recent general chronology of Picasso

Hommage a Pablo Picasso,

is

of his life not related to this part of his wor\.

contained in the catalogue of the exhibition

held in Paris during the winter of 1966-1967.

ing of exhibitions that include sculpture and ceramics

is

A chronological list-

contained in the bibliography (pages

215-220).

1881

October 25: born Pablo Ruiz Picasso


painter and teacher at the San

Malaga (Andalusia), Spain,

at

Telmo School

of Arts

to Jose

Ruiz Blasco, a

and Trades, and Maria Picasso Lopez.

1891

His father accepts position of


Coruna.
classes

The

settles in

master

at the Instituto

an apartment close

da Guarda, a secondary school in

to the school.

Pablo works in his father's

and soon masters the academic techniques of drawing from

even finishes

Don

family

art

details in his father's

still

Jose recognizes his son's talent

lifes.

Discouraged by his

and hands over

to

him

casts,

own

his paints

and painting; he

artistic

achievement,

and brushes.

1895

The

School of Fine Arts (La Lonja) in Barcelona offers his father a post as professor, and the

family stops off in Madrid, where Pablo


position at the school he

is

drawing, which he passes

allowed

visits

the Prado for the

to take the

first

time.

Through

his father's

entrance examination for the advanced class in

brilliantly.

1897

The academic

interests of his father

and family friends and the school curriculum provide

39

insufficient intellectual stimulus to the

young

accepted in the advanced class

Royal

sporadically, not finding

at the

artist;

leaves for

lie

Academy

of

any more challenging than the

it

Madrid

in

October and

is

San Fernando, which he attends


Barcelona.

scIkxjI in

898-1899

Contracts scarlet fever and returns to Barcelona. Convalesces at Horta de Ebro (now called

Horta de San Juan). Back

Ramon

Casas,

and

Isidro Nonell,

These Catalan

intellectuals interest

Toulouse-Lautrec, and attract

He

northern Europe.

him

also gains

artists

and poets

are Santiago Rusinol,

at

Miguel

and the younger men Ramon Pichot, Sebastian

Junyer-Vidal, Ricardo Canals, and Jaime Sabartes


tary).

whom

("The Four Cats"), among

the cafe Els Quatre Gats


Utrillo,

he joins the group of bohemian

in Barcelona,

him

(who

in later years

in the fin

to other ideas

de

becomes

siecle style of

and achievements

Picasso's secre-

such

in the arts of

artists as

France and

an appreciation of the Spanish masters El Greco, Velazquez,

and Zurbaran, and of medieval Catalan

art.

1900
First

drawings published in the magazines foventut and Pel

December makes

first visit to Paris.

The

&

Ploma.

From

October

to

dealer Berthe Weill buys three paintings.

1901

In Madrid briefly as art editor and illustrator of Arte ]oven, a journal of which only two

numbers appear. Returns


gallery.

His paintings,

of Barcelona

giving
out.

rise to

and

Paris,

reflecting his

own

first

limited funds

exhibition at

and the

The

poet

Max

Ambroise Vollard's

of the streets

life

mood

Woman

Two

(page 50).

and the Mas\

at

modeling:

small sculptures that soon follow, the

Broken Nose (page 51),

him

Mas\

are also related

to blue-period paintings.

to

remain permanently

which he occupies
Jacob brings

until 1909.

many

904- 1 905

in France,

dated tenement called the Bateau Lavoir,

Max

cafes

Jacob comes to the opening and seeks

of a Picador with a

Decides

and

cool, often blue tonalities,

Begins signing himself "Picasso," his mother's family name. First attempt

of a Blind Singer

40

Has

have a pervasive melancholy, accentuated by

the term blue period.

small bronze Seated

in

to Paris in the spring.

and

13,

in the spring

moves

rue de Ravignan

(now

into a studio in a dilapi-

Place Emile-Goudeau),

Kees van Dongen and Andre Salmon are already

there,

and

other writers and poets, including Maurice Raynal and Guillaume

Apollinairc;

it

becomes known

as the

rendezvous des poetes. .Among the

artists

Picasso sees

about this time are the Spanish painters Canals, Pichot, and Juan Oris; the Spanish sculptors

Manolo Hugue, Pablo Gargallo, and

Gonzalez; and, soon

Julio

after,

the

French

artists

Derain, Leger, Rousseau, Matisse, and Vlaminck. Fernande Olivier, a fellow tenant in the
building, becomes his mistress.

1005
Attracted to the

life

of the circus, he paints acrobats

tones, leading to the

term rose period. Vollard

Work

of a Jester (page 52).

and clowns,

his palette

casts a series of br0n7.es,

among them

Cezanne

warm

the

Head

begins to interest American collectors Leo and Gertrude Stein

and the Russian Shchukine. At the Salon d'Automne takes place the
fauves, a revolutionary

to

changing

group centering around Matisse;

first

showing of the

a special gallery of ten paintings

by

especially impresses Picasso.

1906

Becomes acquainted with pre-Roman Iberian sculpture

at the

Louvre, some of which had

recently been excavated; his paintings reflect their robust proportions

and archaic

features.

1907
African Negro sculpture had already been collected by Vlaminck, Derain, and Matisse, but
Picasso

makes

his

own

discovery at the galleries of historic sculpture in the Trocadero.

ous studies

made during

d' Avignon

(page 211). Several carved

55). Meets D.

the previous year

now

wood

culminate in the painting Les Demoiselles

figures

H. Kahnweiler, who has opened

show

new

the

gallery,

same African influence (page

and Georges Braque.

908- 1 909

Begins close association with Braque. Together they develop the


as

cubism. Models small Seated

Woman

Numer-

style that

becomes known

(page 57).

1909

Woman's Head (page

56), a portrait of

in the analytical cubist style

a larger studio at

1,

(page 21

Fernande

1),

is

closely related to his

modeled

drawings and paintings

in the studio of Julio

Gonzalez. Moves to

Boulevard de Clichy.
1911-1912

Painting style gradually alters from the shaded, faceted planes of analytical cubism to the use

41

of

flat

color areas

and pasted paper

Eva (Marcelle Humbert), appear,

collage. In these works, references to his

often in the

form

"Ma

new

mistress,

Jolie."

1912-1914
Principles of collage cubism applied to three-dimensional constructions of painted

commonplace and often ephemeral

board, paper, string, and other

wood, card-

materials (pages 58-63).

1914

Models Glass
differently
tion,

of Absinth (frontispiece) in

and incorporating

wax and makes

six casts in

bronze, each painted

a real spoon. Except for occasional experiments with construc-

he then virtually abandons sculpture until 1928.

1914-1918

With

the outbreak of war, Picasso

serve in the army. Apollinaire

In 19 15, Eva

is

is

separated

from many

of his friends.

Braque and Derain

badly wounded, and dies in the influenza epidemic of 1918.

dies.

1917

Among

other projects for the theater, with which he becomes deeply involved at this time,

he designs the decor for Cocteau's

ballet Parade,

produced by Diaghilev's

Ballets Russes

costumes for the Managers represent cubist constructions on a monumental

his

scale (page 212).

1918
Marries the dancer Olga Koklova. Takes an apartment at 23, rue

During the

la Boetie,

and works

there.

920-1 927

twenties, Picasso's production in painting

is

extremely varied. Almost simulta-

neously he devotes himself to ponderous neo-classic figure compositions (page 212), and to
synthetic cubist

works such

as the

two versions of the Three Musicians, 1921, and the Three

Dancers, 1925. In 1924 he does numerous ink drawings (page 212) whose networks of lines

become transparent

violins

and

guitars, reminiscent of the cubist constructions

ing later wire sculpture. Associates with


the

first

Andre Breton and

the Surrealists

and

and

anticipat-

participates in

Surrealist exhibition at the Galerie Pierre in 1925.

1927-1928

During most summers Picasso has spent holidays

42

in the South, first in Spain, later in southern

summer

France, and often at the seaside. In the


tion in strongly
to be erected

modeled drawings of

of 1927, at Cannes, he uses surrealist distor-

monumental

bathers, conceived as designs for

along the promenade La Croisette (page 156).

The

sculptures

following winter he carries

out this idea in sculpture with a small metamorphic figure in plaster (page 213), and in the

summer,

at

Dinard

in

Normandy, makes

further drawings

on

this

theme.

1928-193
In Paris, in 1928, Picasso enlists the aid of Gonzalez in welding metal, and produces iron-

wire space constructions (page 65) and the painted metal


closely parallel the paintings

sculpture that results

Garden (page

67),

he

is

Head

(page 69). These sculptures

working on (page 212). Other important assembled metal

from the collaboration with Gonzalez includes

and Head

of a

Woman

Woman

in the

(page 68). Several large paintings of 1929, repre-

now

senting bathers with skeletal forms and

the large

called

"bone"

theme. In August 1930 at Juan-les-Pins he begins a

pictures, carry

on the sculptural

series of relief constructions of various

materials covered with sand (page 72).

1931

Through

the years, along with major projects, he turns to

of twisted wire into

human form

and, in 193

1,

manual

crafts,

transforming lengths

whittling small elongated figures out of frame

molding (pages 70-71).


1932

Although he

retains his

apartment in

Paris,

Boisgeloup, a village near Gisors (Eure).


kinds,

and the coach houses

he buys a small eighteenth-century chateau in

He

transforms the stables into studios of various

into sculpture studios.

heads in clay and wet plaster (pages 74-77) of his

he also does

many

paintings,

and who becomes

exhibition at Galeries Georges Petit, in

pages 67-68) are shown.


clay

and

plaster,

and

Here he produces

a series of over-life-size

new model Marie-Therese Walter,


his mistress.

which seven

of

whom

June 16 July 30: retrospective

pieces of sculpture (including those

on

A wide variety of work follows, including further modeled pieces in

relief constructions.

J933
In February does a group of drawings called
ture "bathers" (page 213).

From March

to

An Anatomymore

May

studies for fantastic sculp-

he produces 40 etchings on the theme "The

Sculptor's Studio," finishing the series the following year with six more.

43

J935
Separates from Olga, after several years of estrangement. Ceases to

work

at Boisgeloup.

1936

Outbreak of the Spanish

War. Meets Dora Maar, who

Civil

later

becomes

his mistress.

J937

Takes a

new

work on

studio at 7, rue des Grands- Augustins to

Spanish Pavilion at the Paris World's Fair. Guernica begun


June.

Two of the colossal

is

in Antibes

when war

is

in Paris during the

first

May

He

great risk of being confiscated by


objects out of the

The

German

head (page 75), and


is

seen publicly.

spends part of next year in

940- 1 945

German occupation.

at Boisgeloup.

early in

to Paris.

Paints

and again takes up sculpture

With

take plasters to a foundry at night in handcarts, he casts a large

work done

one

for the

939

des Grands-Augustins, living in rooms adjoining the studio.

ing earlier

and completed

time such work

declared in September.

Royan, near Bordeaux, returning frequently

Remains

mural commissioned

plaster sculptures executed at Boisegeloup,

the other a nude, are placed outside the pavilion, the

Picasso

the help of friends,

number

His hands never

idle,

who

of bronzes, includ-

finished bronzes are brought back the


patrols.

at 7, rue

same way

at

he creates whimsical

most unexpected materials, by simply adding a feather

to a piece of scrap

metal, sticking a paper flower into a crust of bread, or embellishing pebbles with carving and
paint.

Paper

is

torn to

make masks,

figures,

Many of these inventions remain only in

and animals, which he

will later develop in metal.

the photographs of Brassai (page 214)

and Dora Maar.

1942
Begins a
to

series of sketches of a

develop into a

bearded shepherd holding a sheep (page 214), which he plans

life-size sculpture.

Meets Franchise Gilot,


objects,

young

943

art student. Creates

and impressing textures

assembled sculptures incorporating actual

into plaster or clay (pages 98, 100-105, I0 9)-

1944

Models

44

Man

with Sheep (pages 106-107) and Death's

Head (page

108). In October, as a

tribute to his

moral support of the Resistance, he

d'Automne;

five sculptures are

raphy

at the

show

Fernand Mourlot. Franchise, by now

of

works

at the

Salon

945

figures in clay, continuing the series in 1947 (pages

workshop

recent

included (pages 75, 83, 97, 108-109).

Models small

invited to

is

Takes up lithog-

10-1 13).

models

for him.

Museum, which

occupies

his mistress,

1946
In spring goes to Antibes with Franchise. Director of the Antibes
the Grimaldi Palace, offers

the paintings, drawings,

him

space and materials to paint.

done

etc.

Cement

there.

(pages 75, 77) have been added to the collection,

In August 1947, revisiting the


at Vallauris,

near Antibes, he

Madoura

is

casts of

now

He

two

leaves

on permanent loan

of the female heads of 1932

called the

Musee

Picasso.

947- 1 948

pottery of the ceramists Georges

and Suzanne Ramie

delighted to see that the small figures he had casually modeled

there the year before have been fired. This begins an intense interest in ceramics,

occupies

him for more than a

year. In 1948

he

settles in

the small villa

La

Galloise, later taking

over an abandoned perfume factory for painting, sculpture, and graphics studios. In
ber 1948 a large ceramics exhibition

is

held at

La Maison de

la

which

Novem-

Pensee Franchise, Paris. Picasso

has continued an enormous production in ceramics, including both sculpture (pages 120-123,
138-143, 196-197) and decorated bowls, plates,

tiles,

and urns of

infinite variety.

1949

Buchholz Gallery,
This

is

the

first

of

New York,
many

shows 58 works, including the small bronzes of 1945 and 1947.

Picasso exhibitions arranged by Curt Valentin.

1950

Continuing

his

work

in ceramics, he also produces

many modeled works

to

be cast in bronze,

again using the found objects that over the years have distinguished his plastic
these are such important

and the

Woman

La Maison de
1943,

la

works

as the

Pregnant

Woman

art.

Among

(page 125), the She-Goat (page 126)

with Baby Carriage (page 129) and Little Girl Shipping Rope (page 128).

Pensee Franchise holds an exhibition of 43 sculptures dating from 1932 to

and drawings of the

forties.

45

1951

Cast of

Man

with Slice p

erected in Vallauris, and Picasso

is

is

made an honorary

citizen.

'953
Retrospective exhibitions in Lyon,
sented.

Rome, and Milan,

in

which sculpture

is

importantly repre-

Using wooden boards and fragments of molding, he assembles and paints human

figures (pages 146-147) reminiscent of dolls

89-93) but on a

^gcr

and and other constructed

Franchise Gilot leaves Picasso.

scale.

954

In April and

May

same time begins

paints a series of portraits of a


to

work

young

dies.

Moves

his

Sylvette David,

and about the

to create a series of busts

new companion

(pages 148-155).

955

to the large villa

Retrospective exhibition in Munich, also

girl,

and painted

in sheet metal -cut, bent,

and heads of Sylvette and of Jacqueline Roque,

His estranged wife Olga

figures of 1935 (pages

shown

at

La

Californie in the hills above Cannes.

Cologne and Hamburg.

1956

Again builds

figure constructions of scrap lumber,

The Bathers (page 156). Occasionally returns

to this

some

of

which he

casts in bronze,

such as

technique in later years, up to i960 (pages

157-158, 160-161, 164-165).

J957
Seventy-fifth anniversary exhibition at

42 bronzes of

all

periods. Subsequently

shown

ceramics, previously

in

The Museum
shown

Modern

of

in Chicago,

London and Rotterdam,

Art,

and then

New

York, including

in Philadelphia,

are added. This

is

where 75

the largest show-

ing in America to date of his sculptural works.

1958
In

March an

large

mural

exhibition of ceramics

for the

new

UNESCO

is

held at

La Maison de

la

Pensee Franchise. Paints a

building in Paris.

J959

A bronze cast of the


ment

46

to the

memory

194 1
of

Head

of

Dora Maar, donated by

Guillaume Apollinaire

Picasso,

is

inaugurated as a monu-

in a square near Saint-Germain-des-Pres.

In

November i960

begins collaboration with Lionel Prejger in

Woman

sculpture, some, such as

Picasso cuts the

scissors,

marking

the form,

960- 1 963

model

with Outstretched Arms, over

is

large-scale sheet-metal

life size

(page 193). With

directly out of paper or cardboard, then folds

the folds for the artisans

three-dimensionality

making

who

will cut the metal sheets.

it

to

determine

remarkable

achieved.

1961

Marries Jacqueline,

March

13,

and

in June

moves

to present

home,

a large house called

Mas

Notre-Dame-de-Vie in Mougins, near Cannes.


1962

Renewing
Nesjar,

and

his interest in

monumental

sculpture, collaborates with

who has developed a method of casting and

May

a large benefit exhibition, Picasso:

galleries; includes a sculpture section at the

Norwegian

artist

Carl

sandblasting concrete (page 214). In April

An American

Tribute,

is

held in nine

New

York

Otto Gerson Gallery, containing 35 works from

1901 to i960.

1965
Invited by the architectural firm Skidmore,
the

new

207),

Owings and

Civic Center in Chicago. Completes a

which

to

is

model

Merrill to design a

welded

in

steel,

monument

for

41 inches high (page

be developed into a 60-foot-high sculpture by architects and engineers.

1966

From November

18,

anniversary exhibition

1966, to February 12, 1967,


is

Hommage

a Pablo Picasso, eighty-fifth

held in Paris. Includes 284 paintings at Grand Palais; 205 drawings,

187 sculptures, and 116 ceramics at the Petit Palais; and graphic works at the Bibliotheque
Nationale.

1967

From June

9 to August 13, the sculpture, ceramics, and several drawings from the Paris

exhibition, principally

They

also

form

from October

from

Picasso's

own

collection, are

the major part of the exhibition at

11, 1967, to

January

1,

shown

at the Tate Gallery,

The Museum

of

Modern

Art,

London.

New

York,

1968.

47

Unless otherwise noted,

all

wor^s

illustrated are

from the

collection of the artist

Kneeling

Woman Combing Her Hair.

905-1 906. Bronze.

\U\

inches high. The Baltimore

Museum

of Art,

Cone Collection

49

50

above: Mask of a Picador with a Broken Nose. 1903? Bronze,


7'/4

inches high

below: Mask

of a Blind Singer. 1903. Bronze, 5 V% inches high

opposite: Seated

Woman.

1901. Bronze, 5 V2 inches high

Head of a Jester.

1905. Bronze, 15 inches high.

Collection Mrs. Bertram Smith,

New

York

OPPOSITE.

above: Fernande. 1905- 1906. Bronze, 13% inches high

below:

52

Alice Derain. 1905. Bronze,

10%

inches high

53

left:

Head

of a

Woman.

1906. Bronze relief,

4%

X2V4

inches.

Joseph H. Hirshhorn Collection

right: Mas/{ of a Woman. 1908. Bronze, yVi inches high.


Collection Mr. and Mrs.

Sampson R.

Field,

New

York

OPPOSITE.

above: Figurine. 1907. Bronze, after carved wood, 8% inches high

below:

54

Figure. 1907.

Wood, 32 14

inches high

55

56

below: Seated Woman.

1908. Bronze, 4 inches high. Collection

opposite: Woman's Head. 1909. Bronze,

i6'/4

inches high.

Mr. and Mrs. Alan H. Cummings.Winnetka,

The Museum

of

Illinois

Modern Art

57

58

Violin. 1913. Pasted paper, chalk

and gouache on cardboard, 20 x

1 1

inches

OPPOSITE.
left: Guitar. 1912. Sheet metal and wire,

30%

right: Violin. 1913-1914. Cardboard and

inches high

string, 23 inches

high

59

above: Glass, Pipe, and Playing Card.


opposite: Guitar.

60

91 4. Painted metal,

91 4. Painted

37%

wood and

inches high

metal,

13%

inches diameter

Still Life.

62

91 4. Painted

wood with

upholstery fringe,

18%

inches long. Collection

Lady Penrose, London

left: Musical Instruments. 1914. Painted wood,

23%

inches high

below, left: Glass and Dice.


9'/4

1914. Painted

wood,

inches high

below, richt:

Violin

and

Bottle on a Table.

1915-1916. Painted wood, tacks, and string,

18%

inches high

63

Packet of Tobacco. 1921. Painted metal, 18% inches long

below:

Guitar. 1924. Painted metal, 42'/2 inches high

opposite: Construction

64

in Wire. 1928-1929.

19%

inches high

65

Woman. 1930-1932.^011,31%
opposite:

66

Woman

in the

Garden.

inches high

929-1 930. Bronze, after welded iron,

82%

inches high

Head.

1931. Bronze, after welJed iron, 33 inches high

opposite: Head of a Woman.

93

Painted iron,

39%

inches high

69

Carved wood, 193 1.

lefttoricht:
Woman. 18% inches high
Woman. 20% inches high
Seated Woman. 21 % inches high
opposite.

lefttoricht:
Seated Woman. 7% inches high
Seated Woman. 6% inches high
Seated Woman. 6% inches high
Woman. 7% inches high
Woman. 12% inches high

70

7i

Constitution with

72

Clou (By

the Sea). rojo. Cardboard, plaster and

wood on

canvas, covered with sand,

10%

x 14 inches

Head of

Woman.

1932.

Bronze

relief,

27 V% x

23%

inches

73

Head of a Woman.

1931-1932. Bronze,

19%

below and opposite: Head of a Woman.


inches high

74

inches high

1932. Bronze,

50%

76

Bust of a

Woman.

1932. Bronze,

30%

inches high

Head of a Woman.

high
1932. Bronze, 33V2 inches

77

Head of a Woman.

1932. Bronze,

27%

inches high

Bust of a

Woman.

1932. Bronze, 25!^ inches high

79

8o

Reclining

Woman.

1932. Bronze, 27

/2

opposite: Seated Woman. 1 931. Bronze,

inches long

31%

inches high

81

below:

Heifer's Head. 1932. Bronze, 13 x

20%

x 21

opposite: Cocl{. 1932. Bronze, 26 inches high

82

inches

83

below, left: Woman Running.

1933. Bronze, 2o'/2 inches high

below, right: Woman with Raised Arms.

1932. Bronze,

13 inches high

opposite: Woman. 1931-1932. Bronze,

27%

inches high

85

above: Face of a Woman. 1934. Bronze


11

X9%

inches

left: Figure. 1935. Bronze,

opposite:

Head of a

inches high

86

relief,

22%

inches high

Warrior. 1933. Bronze,

47%

87

Woman

with Leaves. 1934. Bronze, 15 inches high

opposite: Figure. 1935. Wood,

88

string,

and found

objects,

44%

inches high

below: Figure.
string

on cement

1935.

Wood,

base, 13

doll's

arm, metal lock,

nails,

and

inches high

OPPOSITE.

left: Articulated Doll. 1935.

richt: Articulated Doll.

90

Wood and cloth, 20% inches high


1935. Wood and cloth, 4 '/8 inches high
i

9i

Figure. 1935.

24%

Wood,

metal, string, and celluloid on cement base,

inches high

below: Woman Carrying a Bowl.


cement

base,

23%

1935.

Wood and

opposite: Figure. 1935. Painted wood on cement


inches high

92

metal on

inches high
base, 23 '4

93

Construction with Ceramic Tile. 1936.

Wood,

metal, plaster,

and ceramic, 10% inches diameter

OPPOSITE.

above: Construction. 1938.

Wood and

below Construction with Flower.


:

94

metal on canvas,

1938.

Wood and

9%

10%

inches

metal on canvas,

8%

10%

inches

95

below:

Cat.

94 1. Bronze, i8!4 x3o'/4 xyVz inches

OPPOSITE.

above: Cat. 1944. Bronze, 14!^ x 21% x

6%

below: Woman Running.

12%

96

1940. Bronze,

inches
inches high; base diameter, 614 inches

97

Woman

Leaning on Her Elbow. 1943. Bronze, 24% inches high

opposite: Figure. 1944. Bronze, 60V2 inches high, on stone base

98

vv--

IOO

Head

of a

Woman.

1943. Bronze, 23

inches high

OPPOSITE.
left: Woman. 1943. Bronze

relief,

right: Reaper. 1943. Bronze,

20%

20% X7/2

inches

inches high

IOI

"La Madame."

1943- 1944. Bronze,

67%

inches high,

on stone base
opposite:
inches high

'r

VH^i
sV

&

Woman

with

\ppU. 1943. Bronze,

70%

Flowering Watering Can. 1943-1944. Bronze, 33 inches high

opposite:

104

Woman

in a

Long

Dress.

943-1944. Bronze,

63%

inches high

>

1^

f
k*

KiVMTti

<'_ T >

left and opposite: Man with Sheep.

106

1944. Bronze, 86/4 inches high

opposite: Death's Head (Flayed Head). 1944. Bronze,


Bull's

Head. 1943. Bronze,

after bicycle seat

1 1

and handlebars,

i6'/2

8%
x

x io!4 inches

16%

5%

inches

109

HO

opposite, below: Female Figures. Bronze, 1945, 947.


1

Collection Mrs. G. David

Other

Thompson, Pittsburgh

casts.

left: Woman. 1945,9% inches high

right: Woman. 1945,9'/^ inches high


OPPOSITE.
left: Woman. 1945,8% inches high

right: Woman. 1945, 10 inches high

III

112

Torso of a

Other

Woman.

1946. Bronze,

casts of figures

on

p.

1 1

inches high, on

wood

base

no.

OPPOSITE AND LEFT:

Woman. 1945. Bronze, 5V4 inches high


Seated Woman. 1947. Bronze, 4% inches high
Woman. 1947. 7% inches high

"3

left: Vase-Woman. 1948. Bronze,

37%

above: Woman. 1947. Bronze,

inches high

7%

opposite: Vase-Face. 1947. Bronze,


Collection Mrs. G.

"4

11

inches high

inches high

David Thompson, Pittsburgh

H5

Hand with

Sleeve. 1947. Bronze, 9 inches long. Collection

Mary and Sylvan Lang, San Antonio, Texas

opposite: Female Form. 1948. Bronze, 50 inches high

Il6

ii7

iS

Glass. 1949. Bronze,

below: Centaur.

8%

inches high

1948. Bronze,

V 2

inches high

OPPOSITE.
left: Animal Head. 1948. Bronze, 14% inches high

right: Mas/^ of a Faun. 1949-1950. Bronze, 15% inches high

119

above, left: Owl. 1949. Ceramic,

7%

x8!4

above, right: Seated Bird. 1948. Ceramic,

x<*>

9%

inches

x 4 14 x

15%

inches

left: Condor. 1949. Ceramic, 17 inches high

opposite, left and right: Woman. 1948. Ceramic, 14% inches


high. Galerie Chalette,

120

New

York

121

left:

Woman

right:

with

Woman

Hands Hidden.

1949. Ceramic, i8!/2 inches high

with Mantilla. 1949. Ceramic, i8!/2 inches high

OPPOSITE.

above, left: Large Sculptured Head. 1950. Ceramic, 15 inches high

above, richt: Large Sculptured Head with Bow. 1950. Ceramic, 14V2 inches high

below, left: Two-handled

below, right: Centaur.

122

Pitcher. 1950. Ceramic, 13 inches high

1950. Ceramic, 17 inches high

!23

Mas{

of a

Woman.

below: Hand.

1950. Bronze, 10

1950. Bronze,

'/4

'/2

inches high

7%

inches

opposite: Pregnant Woman. 1950. Bronze, 41

The Museum
gift of

124

of

Modern

Art,

Mrs. Bertram Smith

New

York,

inches high.

126

Owl, 1950. Bronze,

below: Owl.

high

13 inches

1950. Bronze,

4 V2 inches

opposite: She-Goat. 1950. Bronze,

56%

46%

New

York,

high

after

found

objects,

The Museum of Modern


Mrs. Simon Guggenheim Fund
x

27%

inches.

Art,

127

Little Girl

opposite:

128

Shipping Rope. 1950. Bronze, after found

Woman

objects,

60 % inches high

with Baby Carriage. 1950. Bronze, after found objects, 80 inches high

Had of a
130

Woman.

The Museum of Modern


Benjamin Scharps and David Scharps Fund

1951. Bronze, 21

inches high.

Art, Ne\v York,

Head of a Woman.

951. Bronze,

19%

inches high

I3 1

opposite: Crane. 1952. Painted bronze,

Goat S{ull and

M2

Bottle.

95

The Museum

of

-1

after

found

objects, 29V2 inches

952. Painted bronze, after found objects, 31 x

Modern

Art,

New

York, Mrs.

high

37% x:i':

Simon Guggenheim Fund

inches.

above: Angry Owl. 1953. Bronze,

below: Woman Reading.


Collection Mr.

after

found

of

10%

inches high

1952-1953. Painted bronze, after found objects, 14 inches long.

and Mrs. Gerald Gidwitz, Highland Park,

opposite: Baboon and Young. 195 1. Bronze,

The Museum

objects,

Modern

Art,

New

after

found

York, Mrs. Simon

Illinois

objects, 21 inches high.

Guggenheim Fund

135

36

Vase with Flower. 1953. Bronze, 29 inches high

below: Bunch

of Flowers. 1953. Bronze,

23%

inches high

opposite: Flowers in a Vase. 1953. Bronze, 28% inches high

137

left: Kneeling Woman. 1953. Ceramic,

11

inches high

right: Woman. 1953. Ceramic, 15% inches high


OPPOSITE.

left

Woman

1953. Ceramic,

in a
1 1

Long

Dress,

inches high

right: Woman. 1953. Ceramic,

138

Her Hair Undone.

1 1

inches high

39

above: Owl. 1953. Ceramic, 13% inches high

below: Owl.

140

951. Ceramic,

inches high

above: Owl with Raised Wings. 1953. Ceramic, \2 A


X

inches high

below: Owl with Man's Face (Carnaval).


ramic,

13%

1953. Ce-

inches high

141

W~

above: Dove.

1953. Ceramic, 5

below: Dove.

1953. Ceramic,

142

Y2 xj 7/8 X3V4

5%

x io!4

inches

X5%

inches

above: Dove with Eggs. 1953. Ceramic, 5V2 x

below: Dove.

1953. Ceramic,

5%

9%

8%

7%

X5'/6 inches

inches

Dove. 1953. Ceramic,

% x8'/8

x 5

inches

below, left: Two- handled Wise (Great Hud).

1961. Ceramic,

23 V4 inches high

below, right: Woman


9'/2

Crown of Flowers. 1954. Ceramic,


M.and Mine Ceorges Ramie, Vallauris

tilth a

inches high. Collection

143

44

Dove. 1953. Bronze,

center: Dove.

below

5 V2

^9x4%

1953. Bronze,

Little Bull. 1953.

6%

inches
x 11

x.4% inches

Ceramic, 3|/2 x

9%

5%

inches

opposite: Woman. 1953. Bronze, 20 V2 inches hi-h

145

'

left: Woman. 1953. Painted wood, 54 inches high

right: Woman. 1953. Painted wood, 35

opposite:

146

Woman

/:

inches high

Carrying a Child. 1953. Painted wood, 69 inches high

Bust of Sylvctte. 1954. Metal cutout, lolded and painted, 27

opposite: Bust

I48

of Sylvctte. 1954. Metal cutout, folded

'

inches high

and painted. 27

inches high

^
i
X
,<

Bust of Sylvette. 1954. Metal cutout, folded and painted, 24

150

'

inches high

Bust of Sylvette. 1954. Metal cutout, folded and painted, 23

'

inches high

151

H
^H

w- ri

"

...I'

V,..

<*,

Ir^^

.5
<"..

:-r

'

^H

'&
V

>*.-*

Head of a Woman.
opposite:

1954. Metal cutout, painted, 34

Head of a Woman.

!4

inches high

1954. Metal cutout, painted, 32 inches high

153

154

HcLidoja Woman.

1954.

Wood

cutout, painted, 31

/2
l

inches high

Head of a Woman.

1954. Metal cutout, painted, 30 !4 inches high

155

below: The

Bathers.

19=/'.

Bronze, after wood. Six figures, the largest 8

opposite: Young Man. 1956. Bronzx,

after

feet 8 inches

wood, 31

/i

high (not in exhibition)

inches high

i57

-r

Bull's

Head.

below:

Bull.

1^57. Bronze, 14'


1

y^7- Bronze,

opposite: Arm. 1959. Bronze,


Joseph

158

1.

inches high
x 26 x S

22%

lirshhorn Collection

inches

inches high.

i59

l.i.

r:

Bull. njvS. Bronze, 4*4 inches long. Collection

Mrs. Victor W. Ganz,

New

Mr. and

York

RIGHT: Hull. 1957. Bronze, 6 J/J inches long. Collection


Larry Aldrich, New York
OPPOSITE.
left: Pigeon. 1957. Bronze, 6 x

right: Head of a
i6o

4
1

'

inches high

Woman

9%

x 4I4 inches

with Necklace. 1957. Bronze,

Little Girl.

957-1 958. Painted bronze, 17 inches high

opposite: Figure. 1958. Wood,

162

53^

inches high

-&

Man.

1958.

Wood, 46%

opposite: Bather Playing. 1958. Bronze,

164

x 29V2 x
after

1 1

found

inches

objects, 44

'/2

inches high

i66

Head. 1958. Bronze,

after

wood, 20 inches high

Man.

1958. Bronze, after

wood, 22 '/i inches high

167

Head of a Woman.
opposite:

Head

of a

Woman

1962. Metal cutout, folded

and painted, 12% inches high

with Blonde Hair. 1958-1959. Painted

wood and wicker

basket,

32^

x 21 54 x

2%

inches

169

170

Figure, i960. Bronze, after

wood and found

objects,

48%

inches high

Man

with Javelin, i960. Bronze, after wood,

45%

inches high

171

Man Running,

i960. Bronze, 46 inches high

OPPOSITE.

above, left: Head of a Woman. 1961. Bronze, 10% inches high


above, richt: Woman. 1962. Bronze, 12% inches high

below, left: Man with

Staff. 1961.

below, richt: Musician.

172

Bronze, 15 inches high

1961. Bronze,

17%

inches high

Metal cutouts, folded and painted, 1961.

left:

right:

Woman and Child.

17*4 inches high

Woman and Child.

inches high

opposite: Chair. 43*4 inches high

174

i75

Woman
opposite:

with Bowl. 1961. Metal cutout, folded and painted, 44 7 8 inches high

Woman and Child.

961. Metal cutout, folded

and painted, 50% inches high

177

Metal cutouts, folded and painted, 1961

above: Bust
left:

Little

of a

Woman. 12%

Monkey.

6%

inches high

inches high

OPPOSITE.

left: Head.
richt:

178

I2' 8 inches

Woman

high

with Raised Aim.

13%

inches high

179

Man

180

with Sheep. 1961. Metal cutout, folded and painted,

20%

inches high

Man

with Sheep. 1961. Metal cutout, folded and painted,

17H

inches high

181

above: Owls. 96 1. Metal cutouts, folded and painted.


1

Left, 15

inches high; right, i6'/g inches high

left: Sparrow Haw/{. i960. Metal cutout,

182

inches high

Coc{.

961. Metal cutout, folded

and painted,

8%

inches high

center: Bird. 1961. Metal cutout, folded and painted,


15 inches high

below: Owl. 96 1. Metal


1

9%

cutout, folded

and painted,

inches high

183

Metal cutouts, folded and painted, 1961.

left: Bather.

2o'/8 inches

high

right: Woman. 17 inches high

184

opposite:

Pierrot. 53

'/s

inches high

The Spanish Woman.


left:

6%

richt:
1

86

961. Metal cutouts, folded

inches high

8'/4

opposite:

inches high
11 inches

high

and painted.

i8 7

Head of a Woman.

188

1961. Metal cutout, folded

and painted,

31 /i inches high
x

Head of a Bearded Man.

1961. Metal cutout, folded

and painted,

31

/2

inches high

189

Metal cutouts, folded and painted, 1961.

above: Head

of a

below Head
:

of a

Bearded Man. 16V6 inches high


Bearded Man.

5 inches

high

OPPOSITE.

above, left: Head of a Man.

inches high

above, right: Head of a Woman.

below, left: Head

of a

below, right: Head

190

15 inches high

Woman. 8%

of a

Woman.

inches high

inches high

9I

II

Oman
i

with

Open Arms. n/n. Metal

cutout, folded

ami painted,

inches high

below: Small Woman with Outstretched Arms.


out, folded

and painted,

OPPOSITE:

Woman

1961. Metal cut-

inches high

with Outstretched Arms. 1961. Metal cutout,

folded and painted, 72 inches high

194

Metal cutouts, folded and painted.

left:

kk,h

Man

1:

with Moustache. 1962.

Head

OPPOSI

rE.

above,

leu:

of a

Woman.

1962.

inches high

inches high

Football Flayer. 1961. 22V2 inches high

above, ricmt: Football Player. 1961.23'^ inches high

below, left: Clown.

1961. 12'* inches high

BELOW, EIGHT: Head. [961.6%

inches high

195

I(/)

Ceramic (fragments of
left: Face.

8%

tile),

1963.

x 19 inches

19%

right: Face.

Roman

8%

inches

OPPOSITE.

Ceramic (fragments of hollow hrick), 1962.


above, left Face oj a Woman.
:

8%

x6!4 x }Va inches

above, right: Face of a Bearded Man.

below, left: Face

of a

below, right: Face

Woman. 8%

of a

Woman. 8%

Sy6 X4%

5%

inches

4%

3%

3%

inches

x 3 Vs inches

# # #

197

-,

Jacqueline with a Green Ribbon. 1962. Metal cutout, folded and painted, 20V2 inches high

198

Head

of a

Woman.

1962. Metal cutout, folded

and painted, 19% inches high

199

Head of a Woman.

200

1962. Metal cutout, folded

and painted, 19% inches high

Head of a Woman.

1962. Metal cutout, folded

and painted, 12% inches high

201

Bust of a

202

Woman.

1962. Metal cutout, folded

and painted, 17% inches high

Head

of a

Woman,

i960. Metal cutout, folded

and painted, 13% inches high

203

Head of a Woman.

204

1962. Metal cutout, folded

and painted,

9 ? inches high

Head

of a

Woman.

1962. Metal cutout, folded

and painted, 19% inches high

205

Head

of a

Woman.

1962. Metal cutout, folded, 20 '/2 inches high

opposite: Model for the Chicago Civic Center sculpture. 1965. Welded

The Art

206

steel, 41 !4

Institute of Chicago, gift of Pablo Picasso

inches high.

Women

with Hut. 1963. Metal cutout, folded and painted, 49V2 inches high.
Galerie Claude Bernard, Paris (not in exhibition)

RELATED WORKS
BIBLIOGRAPHY

CATALOGUE OF THE EXHIBITION

T73T
<

.**

<z*
.7

'k
/

i.

Iberian stone bas-reliet from Osuna.

2.

Girl

Combing Her

The Louvre

Hair. 1905. Crayon, 22 x 16 inches. Collection Sir

Robert and Lady Sainsbury, London


3.

Les Demoiselles

d' Avignon. 1907. Oil

The Museum

Modern

Bliss

of

Art,

New

on canvas,

8 feet x 7 feet 8 inches.

York, acquired through the Lillie

Bequest

and watercolor, 24 % x 18% inches

4.

Figure in

5.

Head of a Woman.

6.

Glass and Dice. 1914. Pasted paper and charcoal, 9V2 x

Profile. 1907. Pastel

Heinz Berggruen,

1909.

Conte crayon, 24% x finches

6%

inches.

Paris

211

7.

8.

The Manager from New Yor\. Costume designed by Picasso


1917. From Zervos, Pablo Picasso, vol. II, no. 964 (bibl. 16)
Head.

1928. Construction in painted metal, about 10 inches high.

Cahiers d 'Art, no.


9.

for Parade,

4,

From

1929

The Painter and His Model. 1928. Oil on canvas, 51% x 63% inches.
The Museum of Modern Art, New York, fractional gift, Mr. and Mrs.
Sidney Janis Collection

10.

Page from sketchbook, 1924. Pen and ink. Reproduced

Le Chef d'oeuvre inconnu


11.

Two
tion

12.

Seated

Women.

1920. Oil

Walter P Chrysler,

Study

for

(Paris,

93

in

Balzac's

on canvas, 76% x 64 A
X

inches. Collec-

Jr.

Wire Construction. 1928. Pen and

ink.

From

Zervos, vol.

VII, no. 206

10

212

11

12

&ik

'3

16

15

13.

14.

f/<W

0/ a

Woman

(Design for Sculpture). 1932. Charcoal on canvas,

36 14 x

28%

inches. Galerie Beyeler, Basel

Detail

from

An Anatomy.

1933. Pencil.

From Minotaure

(Paris), no.

1,

1933

and

20^

15.

Crucifixion. 1932. Pen

16.

Page from sketchbook, 1927. Study for a Monument, charcoal. From

ink,

13%

inches

Zervos, vol. VII, no. 92


17.

17

Metamorphosis. 1928.

Plaster,

8%

inches high.

From

Cahiers d' Art,

no. 7, 1928

213

ma.

18

20

21

18.

Head

of a

Woman

(Study for Sculpture). 1962. Pencil, 16 V2 x

10%

inches. Galerie Louise Leiris, Paris

Man

19.

Study

for

20.

Head

of a

with Sheep. 1943. Pen and ink, 51

Woman.

1943. Paper, cut out

and

x 20 inches

folded. Photograph:

Brassai
21.

Carl Nesjar.
crete,

20

Woman

feet high,

with Outstretched Arms. 1962. Sandblasted con-

from model by

wcilcr, Chalo-St. M.irs,

214

Picasso. In

(S/O) France

garden of D. H. Kahn-

BIBLIOGRAPHY ON THE SCULPTURE AND CERAMICS OF PICASSO


Compiled by Inga Forslund

monographs and ceuvre catalogues

Selected

2nd

edition.

plus 37
i

Barr, Alfred H.,


York:

The Museum

of

Modern

New

Reprint edition,

York:

Picasso: Forty Years of

illus.

Arno

Press, 1966.

Based on

93) with

new and

(bibl.

pp.

illus.,

(704 black and white, 37 color).

illus.

First edition 1942.

Art, 1946. 314 pp.

His Art

pi.

Especially extensive

New

Years of His Art.

Jr. Picasso: Fifty

Buenos Aires: Poseidon,

11

Parmelin, HtLENE. Picasso: Women. Cannes and Mougms,


1 954-1 963.

greatly amplified text. Statements, extensive bibl.

London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson,

1965. 199 pp.

illus.

Preface by Douglas Cooper. Translated from the French,

Wilhelm, and Jaime

2 Boeck,

Harry N. Abrams, 1955. 524 pp. illus.


Sections on sculpture (pp. 285-292, illus.
ceramics (pp. 278-284,

New

Sabartes. Picasso.

York:

pp. 432-439)

and

Paris: Cercle d'Art, 1964.

12 Penrose,

Victor Gollancz, 1958. 392 pp. plus

pp. 440-451). Extensive bibl.

illus.

13

3 Cahiers a" Art (Paris), vol. 23, no.

1,

Issue devoted to Picasso. Includes

1948. 208 pp.

illus.

illus., bibl.

Quinn, Edward, and Roland Penrose. Picasso


Garden

Intimate Photographic Study.

"Ceramiques de Picasso,"

at Worf(:

New

City,

Doubleday & Company, 1964. 16 pp. plus 282 illus.


Photographs by Edward Quinn. Introduction and

by Christian Zervos (pp. 72-73); "Picasso Ceramiste," by

Madoura [Georges and Suzanne Ramie]

Roland. Picasso: His Life and Wor/{. London:

(pp. 74-80 illus.);

An

York:

text

by

Roland Penrose.

"Picasso a Vallauris," also on ceramics, by Jaime Sabartes


(pp. 81-83 illus.)

further

illus.

of 446 ceramics, pp. 84-208.

14

Raynal, Maurice.
illus.,

4 Champris, Pierre de. Picasso: ombre


mard, i960. 295 pp. illus.

Sculpture and ceramics pp. 226-236,

New

5 Daix, Pierre. Picasso.

1965. 271 pp.

World

Separate section on

from the French,

"A

study of the

work by Frank

Sabartes, Jaime. See

tions des

Aimery Somogy,

New

Georges Ramie (pp. [40-84]

York:

illus.

at Vallauris,

949-1 951.

and "Ceramiques," by

iHus.);
illus.).

Re-issued with inserted

English translation as Picasso at Vallauris,

New

York:

Reynal and Company, 1959.

biographical study

Oeuvres

16 Zervos, Christian. Pablo Picasso:

Oeuvre catalogue
l'

96 pp.

of

ceuvre de Picasso. Paris: Edi-

de.

Paris:

illus.

works from 1895

to 1957; not

com-

plete for sculpture or ceramics. Still in publication.

Deux Mondes,

195 1

337 pp. plus 142

illus.

Books and

articles

on the sculpture

Jams, Harriet and Sidney. Picasso: The Recent Years 19391946.

Garden

211 pp.
9

work

Odysseus Elytis (pp. [28-39]

illus., bibl.

Elgar.

bibl. 2.

Cahiers d'Art, 1932-1966. 17 vols,

Initiation a

4).

Translated from the

Includes "Equivalences chez Picasso," on the sculpture, by

1964.

Includes "Les Sculptures de Picasso" (pp. 143-159).


8

17-1 19 illus.

Issue devoted to Picasso's

Fernand Hazan, 1955.


Maurice.

Our Time,"

15 Verve (Paris), vol. 7, no. 25/26, 1951

of Art Profiles").

by Robert Maillard." Translated from the French, Paris:

7 Gieure,

of

York: Skira, 1953. 135 pp.

French, Geneva: Skira, 1953.

6 Elgar, Frank, and Robert Maillard. Picasso.

Frederick A. Praeger, 1956. 314 pp.

("The Taste

Section on ceramics pp.

ceramics (pp. 198-202). Translated

Paris: Editions

chron., bibl.

New

illus.

York: Frederick A. Praeger,

("Praeger

illus.

et soleil. Paris: Galli-

Picasso.

City,

New

York: Doubleday

& Company,

illus.

La Souchere, Dor

17 Ajigan,
de. Picasso in Antibes.

theon Books, i960. 68 pp. plus 99

Musee d'Antibes, known

New

1 1

as the

"Official catalogue

Musee Picasso"

(see

page 45). Includes 2 sculptures and 77 ceramics. Translated

from the French.

Maillard, Robert. See

bibl. 6.

10 Merli, Joan. Picasso, el artista y la obra de nuestro tiempo.

bibl. 97.

Giulio Carlo. "Cubismo

tura di Picasso," Letteratura

York: Pan-

illus.

Photographs by Marianne Greenwood.


of the

Aracon, Louis. See

1946.

e surrealismo nella scul-

(Rome),

vol.

1,

no. 4, 1953, pp.

-1 6.

Scultura di Picasso. Venice: Alfieri, 1953. 34 pp.

18

plus

illus.

Italian text followed by

Barr, Alfred H.,

Jr.

See

Boeck, Wilhelm. See

English translation.
bibl. 1, 93.

bibl. 2.

Boccs, Jean Sutherland. See

bibl.

7.

215

19 Brassai [JULES Halasz]. Picasso

New

and Company. Garden

Company,

York: Doubleday &

City,

31

iu66. 289 pp. plus 57

Henry

Miller. Introduction by

Roland Penrose.

32

33 Henze, Anton.

"Neue

1,

1933, pp. 8-29

21

Janis,

France (Paris), no.

On Woman
22

de. See bibl. 4.

Chevalier, Denys. "Propos autour d'une sculpture de Picasso," Arts de

8,

1946, pp. 77-79

Dux,

S.

Harriet and Sidney. See

A.D.B.

bibl. 8.

Sylvester,

London: Rodney

Phillips, 1949.

On Man

with Sheep (pages 106-107).

36 Laughton, Bruce. "Picasso," Arts Review (London), June


"Sculpture

by

10, 1967, p.

Painters: Picasso,"

On

199

illus.

the occasion of Arts Council of Great Britain exhibi-

tion (bibl. 126).

illus.

F[rank]. "Picasso,"

24 E[lcar],

Sculpture, Robert Maillard, ed.

in

Dictionary

New

of

Modern

York: Tudor, i960,

37 Leymarie, Jean. "Hommage a Picasso: Expositions au Grand


Palais et au Petit Palais," La Revue du Louvre et des Musees
de France (Paris),

pp. 239-242

vol. 16, no. 6, 1966, pp.

291-316

illus.

illus.

Sculpture, pp. 312-315

See also

bibl. 6.

Elytis, Odysseus. See

Ceramics pp. 315-316. See also

illus.

bibl. 122.

bibl. 15.

38 Lieberman, William

25 Fermigier, Andre. "Picasso in Paris," Burlington Magazine

Picasso.

(London), Apr. 1967, pp. 246-247.

On

1.

35 Laporte, Paul M. "The Man with the Lamb," Art Journal


(New York), Spring 1962, pp. 144-150 illus.

Minneapolis Institute of Arts Bulletin, May/June 1956, pp.


34-35

in English, opposite p.

Photographs by Brassai. English edition, translated by

bibl. 5.

R[ichard]

illus.

sculpture for the Civic Center (page 207).

23 D|avis],

Kunstwer{

with Apple (page 103).

Pierre. See

34 Kahnweiler, Daniel-Henry. Les Sculptures de Picasso.


Paris: Editions du Chene, 1948.
13 pp. plus 216 pi.

illus.

"The Chicago Picasso," Progressive Architecture (New York),


Nov. 1966, p. 66 illus.

On

Artists (Lon-

illus.

Largely photographs by Brassai.

Champris, Pierre

Enigma," Art and

Plastiken von Picasso,"

summary

Includes brief
(Paris), no.

Picasso

(Baden-Baden), Mar. i960, pp. 17-26

Andre. "Picasso dans son element," Minotaure

20 Breton,

Hahn, Otto. "The

don), Feb. 1967, pp. 20-25 '" us

Photographs by the author. Translated from the French,


Conversations avec Picasso, Pans: Gallimard, [964.

sculpture cubiste," Art d'Aujourd'hui

(Paris), ser. 4, no. 3/4, 1953, pp. 50-58.

illus.

Preface by

Gueguen, Pierre. "La

the occasion of exhibition

New

York:

S. The Sculptor's Studio: Patchings by


The Museum of Modern Art, 1952. [4]

pp. plus 24 pi.

Hommage

a Pablo Picasso

Maillard, Robert. See

bibl. 6.

(bibl. 122).

Merli, Joan. See


26 Gaffe, Rene. "Sculpteur, Picasso?" Artes (Antwerp),
no. 3/4,

bibl. 10.

ser. 2,

947/1 948, pp. 36-37.


In issue devoted to Picasso, on occasion of exhibition

Nesjar, Carl. See

at

bibl. 121, 123, 125.

Parmelin, Helene. See

bibl.

1.

Galerie Artes, Antwerp.

Gascar, Pierre. See

bibl. 121.

Gervis, Daniel. See

bibl. 121.

39 Penrose, Roland. "Espaco e volume na escultura contemporanea," Coloquio (Lisbon), Feb. i960, pp. 1-8 illus.

27 Giedion-Welcker, Carola. Contemporary Sculpture:

Evolution in Volume and Space. 2nd edition.

New

An

"A Monumental

40

ICA

York:

[Institute

Picasso.

41
pp. plus 32

Gielre, Maurice. See

42
Vedres.

La

sculpture en

New

History and an Analysis, 190JYork: George Wittenborn, 1959, pp. 81-83.

tures recentes de Picasso: Galerie 'Cahiers d'Art'," Cahiers


d' Art (Paris), vol. 11, no. 6/7, 1936, pp. 189-191 illus.

2l6

Bulletin,

207).

York: Universe Books, 1961. [13]

biog., bibl.

("Universe Sculpture Series").

Picasso: Sculptures.

("Petite encyclopedie de

30 Gonzalez, J|ulio|. "Picasso sculpteur. Exposition des sculp-

London]

New

York: Tudor, 1965 [16]

Translated from the French, Paris: Fernand Hazan, 1965.

illus.

29 Golding, John. Cubism:

Arts,

pp. plus 24 pi. ("Little Art Library," 72).

France depuis Rodin. Paris: Editions du Seuil, 1945, pp.

1914.

pi.,

New

bibl. 7.

28 Gischia, L[eon], and N[icole]

146-148

Contemporary

Nov. 1966, pp. 14-15 illus.


On the Chicago Civic Center sculpture (page

George Wittenborn, i960, pp. 346-347 and passim. ("Documents of Modern Art," 12).
First edition 1955.

of

Sculpture by Picasso in Chicago,"

See also

1'

art").

bibl. 12, 13, 126.

Art
43 P|orter], F| airfield]. "Picasso Also as a Sculptor,"
News (New York), Mar. 1952, p. 26 illus.
44

Pbampouni, Enrico.

Picasso scultore.

Rome:

Libreria Fra-

Bocca, 1943. 31

telli

illus.

pp.

("Anticipazioni,"

2:

"Serie

60

Arti").

d 'Art

45 Prejcer, Lionel. "Picasso decoupe


Oct.

(Paris), vol. 3, no. 7, 1928, pp. 276-! 289] illus.

L'Oeil (Paris),

ter,"

le

"Sculptures dcs peintres d'aujourd'hui," Cahiers

See also

bibl. 16, 99.

96 1, pp. 28-33.

Quinn, Edward. See

bibl. 13.

46 Read, Herbert. The Art of Sculpture.


Books, 1956, pp. 102, in, 122;

pi.

New
53,

York: Pantheon

191.

Books ami

articles

on the ceramics

("Bollingen
61

Series," 35: 3).

Ballardim, Gaetano. "Picasso


no. 3, 1950, pp. 47-48, plus

" 'Masque d'homme', ein Fruhwerk


47 Riedl, Peter Anselm.
Pablo Picassos," Jahrbuc h derHamburgei Kunstsammlungen
vol. 7, 1962, pp.

On Mas\
48 Ritchie,
Century.

83-92

62 BatIGNE, Kim'

plus

Broken Nose (page

51).

Cahiers d'Art. See

Quadrum

52 Selphor, Michel. The Sculpture of This Century.


York: George Braziller, i960, pp. 318-319 and passim.

New

&

Daix, Pierre. See

fon, 1959.

York), Sept. 1941, pp. 191-198 plus 4

La

from Original

pi.

Uxt

bibl. 28.

chevre. Paris: Editions de Beaune, 1952.

et

nymphes de Pablo
illus.

Picasso.

Geneva:

("Peintres et sculp-

L'homme

Clay Casts

illus.

French, and German.

Aug.

6,

57 Veronesi, Giulia. "Sculture


gamo), Apr. 1951, pp. 146-153

Man

di

Picasso

peintres,"

al

Museo

di

bibl.

&

Decoration

15.

69 Jocffroy, Alain. "Ceramics and Small Sculptures by


Painters," Graphis (Zurich),

280

1950 (page 45).


di Picasso,"

Art

(Paris), no. 30, 1952, pp. 4-7 illus.

May/June

with Sheep (pages 106-

1957, pp. 236-239,

illus.

Text in English, French, and German.

Emporium

(Ber-

70 Kahnweiler, Daniel-Henry. Picasso: Keramil^. Ceramic.


Ceramicjues. Hanover: Schmidt-Kuster. 1957. 127 pp. illus.

illus.

Verve. See bibl. 15.

Text in English, French, and German.

"L'homme

58 Zervos, Christian.

M. "Ceramiques de

illus.

read at installation of

107) in Vallauris,

20/21,

al'agneau de Picasso," Cahiers

945/1946, pp. 84-112

La Souchere, Dor
illus.

with Sheep (pages 106-107).


"Projets de Picasso pour

In

New

Moulds," Graphs (Zurich), May/June

Hering, K.arl-Heinz.5T

au mouton de Pablo Picasso. Paris:

Falaize, 1950. 24 pp. plus 22

d'Art (Paris), vol.

in English,

68 Grand, P.

teurs d'hier et d'aujourd'hui," 25).

59

illus.

illus.

Pierre Cailler, 1952. 39 pp. plus 32

On Man

lit

Faenza," Bolletmo d 'Arte (Rome), Jan./Mar. 1952, pp. 21-25

Faunes

d''Art (Paris), vol.

Plaster

67 Golfieri, Ennio. "Le ceramiche

She-Goat (page 126).

Poem

bibl. 6.

1957, pp. 240-243, 277-279

illus.

56

Decoration

bibl. 5.

66 Gheerbrant, B. "Picasso 'Pates blanches':

54 Verdet, Andre.

&

de. See bibl. 4.

Elcar, Frank. See

53 Sweeney, James Johnson. "Picasso and Iberian Sculpture,"

55

Decoration (Paris), Nov. 1958, pp. 23-25

Champris, Pierre

Translated from the French, Neuchatel: Editions du Grif-

On

bibl. 3.

65 Champigneulle, Bernard. "Picasso: poteries nouvelles,"

illus.

[27J pp.

bibl. 2.

64 Cassou, Jean. "Les poteries de Picasso," Art

region paris-

la

ienne," Aujourd'hui (Boulogne), Sept. 1962, pp. 12-13

Vedres, N[icole]. See

Val-

(Paris), no. 12, 1949, pp. 13-21 illus.

in English, p. 187.

(New

illustrc.

p. 4.

bibl. 2.

51 "Sculpture monumentale de Picasso dans

Art Bulletin

Guide

61 Boiret, Jean. "Picasso, potter," Arts (Paris), Nov. 26, 1948,

(Brussels), no. 5, 1958, pp. 4-10 illus.

summary

visile a Vallauris:

by Madoura [Georges and Suzanne Ramie].

Boeck, Wilhelm. See

50 Salles, Georges A. "Les baigneurs de Picasso,"

Brief

illus.

seum, and "Extraits de t'ouvrage ceramiques de Picasso"

illus.

49 Rosenblum, Robert. Cubism and Twentieth-Century Art.


New York: Harry N. Abrams, i960, pp. 262-268 illus.
Sabartes, Jaime. See

vol. 36,

du Musec tic Vallauris, 1950. |62J pp. illus.


Pretace by Georges A. Salles. Includes chapter on the mu-

Andrew Carnduff. Sculpture of the Twentieth


New York: The Museum of Modern Art, 1952, pp.
1 ,

Une

Faenza," Faenza,

lauris: Editions

illus.

of a Picador with a

25-28, 29, 3 1 -32, 23

i.

4.

71

un monument," Cahiers

no. 8/9, 1929, pp. 342-344 plus 10

same volume, "Picasso

Dinard," pp. 5-21

illus.

illus.

de. See bibl. 9.

Levy, Mervyn. "The Pure Joy: Picasso Ceramics, Arts Council,"

Ait

On

Sews and Review (London), May n,

1957, p. 6.

occasion of ceramics exhibition at the Arts Council of

Great Britain (see

bibl. 107).

217

Leymarie, Jean. Set

Livekwi. Giuseppe. Set

M\i)nu\.

M \ni

\kd,

&e In

$7,

122.

bibl.

114.

bibl.

86

Feb. 1949,

87

{,62,82, no, 120.

lil.

Toem \,Mui<i<

VALUER,

p.

"Picasso, ceramiste," ./#<

100 plus

(Pans), Noel 1963, pp.

Robert. See

Industrie (Paris), no. 14,

kiers

de

la

pp. 21-29

113-1 16

XXe

potcrics

Picasso, "

tic

/>7 <7

1a

ceramiche

di Picasso,"

Venezia, Apr./Junc 1953. pp. 31-35

illus.

949, pp. 43-45

In issue

"La renaissance de la ceramique a Vallauris," CaCeramique et des trts du Feu (Sevres), June 1956,

on

Biennale di

illus.

Picasso, occasioned by exhibition at Galleria

Rome

Nazionale d'Arte Moderna,

(bibl. 100).

Verdet, Andre. See

bibl.

115.

illus.

89 Veronesi, Giuua. "Le ceramiche di Picasso,"


"Vallauris: Picasso ct

74

potiers precolombiens,"

les

(Bergamo), May, 1950, pp. 207-210

New

ion, Eric. "Picasso as Potter," Art

(London), Oct.

illus.

2,

954, pp.

Verve. See bibl. 15.

News and Review

90 Zervos, Christian. "Ceramiques de Picasso." See

8.

Reprinted
76 N'ielsen, Ju>. "Picassos keramik,"

(Zurich), vol.

Graphis

in

5, no. 27, 1949, pp. 260-269, 298, 301-302

See also

News and Review

(London), Mar. 26, 1949, pp. 26-27 iHus.

91

illus.

bibl. 16.

Zucker, Pall. "Clay and Color: The Ceramics


Unpublished

11,110.

bibl.

German

bibl. 3.

illus.

Ouvaliev, Dora. "Picasso's Pottery," Art

Parmelin, Helene. See

English, French, and

in

Dans\ Kunsthaandvaer\

(Copenhagen), June 1950, pp. 101-105


--

Emporium

trts (Paris), Sept. 7-13, 1955, p. 8 illus.

75

Steele

illus.

bibl. 6.

Moi rARD-UuMLY, RenEE. "Lis

73

(Paris),

pi.

I)or\. "Picasso: nouvellts ceramiqucs,"

88 VALSECCHI, Marco.
73

Noureau

of Picasso."

typescript. 6 pp.

Transcription of talk delivered Mar. 27, 1958 on the occa-

Penrose, Roland. See


78 "Picasso convertira
1948, pp. 24-26

bibl. 12, 13, 126.

ceramica,"

alia

Domus

York

(Milan), no. 226,

{see bibl.

Modern

illus.

79 "Picassos Keramik,"

Du

Cooper Union Museum,

sion of the exhibition at

(Zurich), Oct. 1953, pp. 46-50

111).

New

Art,

Copy

in Library,

New

The Museum

of

York.

illus.

Selected exhibition catalogues

80 "Les poteries de Picasso," Esprit (Paris), Feb. 1949,

Qt inn, Edward. See

p. 290.

(arranged chronologically)

bibl. 13.

1932
81

Ramie, Georges. Picasso: Pottery.


15 pp. plus 15 pi. ("Little

New

York: Tudor, 1962.

92 Paris. Galeries Georges Petit. Exposition Picasso. June 16-

Art Library," 48).

July 30, 1932. 77 pp. plus 32 pi.

Translated from the French, Paris: Fernand Hazen, 1962.

236 works (7 sculptures, none reproduced). Documenta-

("Petite encyclopedic de l'art").

tion compiled by Charles Yrancken.

See also

bibl. 15,

15.

82 Ramie, Georces and Suzanne.

New

The Ceramics

York: Skira, 1955. 18 pp. plus 18

of Picasso.

93

Translated from the French, Paris: Albert Skira, 1948.

mer

1950, pp. 10-13

See also

New

(New

York),

7,

1940. 207 pp.

with

R wnal, Maurice. See

Hans K.

bibl. 14.

Barr,

Jr.,

ed.

Nov.

Picasso: Forty
15,

1939-Jan.

illus.

illus.

all

reproduced, and reproductions

Institute of Chicago,

and shown there Feb.

-Mar.

illus.

1940. Also circulated to several other

museums

States.

94 Paris. Societe du Salon d'Automne. Catalogue des ouvrages


de peinture, sculpture, dessin, gravure, architecture et art

decor atif, exposes au Palais des Beaux Arts de

la

I'tlle

de

Paris. Oct. 6 -Nov. 5, 1944. 61 pp.

("All'Insegna del Pesce

Vanni Schweiwiller,

3,

United

1944

84 Sabartks. Jaime. Picasso ceramista. Milan: All'Insegna del


Pesce d'Oro, 1953. [31] pp.

The Art

in the

"Topferarbeiten von Pablo Picasso," Die

illustrate, "

H.

Modern Art.

10, 120.

Kunst und das schbne Heim (Munich), Apr. 1949, pp. 15-18

d'Oro, "4}: "Seria

of

of 2 not exhibited). Exhibition arranged in collaboration

illus.

bibl. 3, 62,

Museum

300 works (4 sculptures,

Sum-

83 Rothel,

York. The

Years of His Art. Alfred

pi.

Excerpts reprinted in Craft Horizons

939- 1 940

Picasso, p. 61 (5 sculptures, 74 paintings).

ed.).

Booklet, translated from the Spanish.

1949
See also
85 Tallon,

W.

J.

bibl. 2, 3.

"An Art

Critic

95

Looks

at:

Design (Columbus, Ohio), Nov. 1949, pp.

2l8

Picasso's Pottery,"
17, 21,

24

illus.

New York. Buchholz Gallery.


Mar. 8-Apr.

2,

1949. [16] pp.

Pablo Picasso: Recent

illus.

58 works (24 bronzes of 1945-1947, 20 reproduced).

]\'oi\.

1950

1956

96 London. Arts Council of Great Britain. Picasso in Provence. Nov.- Dec. 1950. 12 pp. illus.

105

York. Galekie Chalette. Picasso: "The

Woman."
Drawings, Bronzes, hthographs. Apr. i(> Mav

Paintings,

83 works (24 bronzes, 21 ceramics, 6 reproduced). Fore-

word by

New

19, 1956.

Philip James.

20

pp.

illus.

32 works (5 bronzes,

reproduced).

all

1 950- 1 95

'957

97 Paris. Maison de La Pensee Francaise. Picasso: Sculptures.


Dessins. 1950-51. 34 pp.

106

illus.

New
1.

43 sculptures (8 reproduced). Text by Louis Aragon.

New
ings,

Jan.

15-Feb.

York. Curt Valentin Gallery. Pablo Picasso: PaintSculptures, Drawings. Feb. 19-Mar. 15, 1952. [14] pp.

56 works (10 sculptures, 6 reproduced; 6 ceramics, 2

1957.

13

pp.

illus.

34)-

Mi

107 Rotterdam.

illus.

9,

IATES. Picasso: Sculptures. Part

26 works (17 reproduced). Includes "The Sculptures of


Picasso," by Daniel-Henry Kahnweiler (excerpt from bibl.

1952
98

York. FlNB Akis Assot

re-

I36] pp.

produced).

bei

m BoYMANS.

Picasso ceramic^. July ic

illus.

74 works (29 reproduced). Enlargement of exhibition

1953

99 Lyon. Musee. Picasso: Exposition organisee sous I'egide du


Syndicat d'Initiative de Lyon. 2nd edition, 1953. [54] pp.
plus 21

108

New

The Miselm

York.

Modern Art.

Anniversary Exhibition. Alfred H.

B.irr,

Picasso: 75/A
ed.

Jr.,

May 22-

illus.

Sept. 8, 1957.

179 works (20 sculptures, 12 ceramics, none reproduced).

Picasso," by

Rene

"Le

Jullian;

16 pp. illus.

reproduced). Also

cubisme," by Daniel-Henry Kahnweiler; "L'arriere-

Oct. 29-Dec.

"Humanite de

saison de Picasso," by Christian Zervos;

295 works (45 sculptures, 36 reproduced; 2 ceramics, both

Includes: "Picasso et l'Espagne," by Jean Cassou; "Picasso


et le

of

at

London.

the Arts Council of Great Britain,

8,

illustrated books,

savoir voir," by Marcel

Museum

shown

at the

Art Institute of Chicago,

and (with the addition of

1957,

and further ceramics)

at the

prints,

Philadelphia

of Art in 1958 {see bibl. 109).

Michaud.
100

Rome. Galleria Nazionale d'Arte Moderna. Mostra


Pablo Picasso. May-July

5,

1953.

Rome: De Luca. 69

1958

di

pp.

109 Philadelphia.

plus 171 pi.

of

246 works (32 sculptures,

all

duction by Venturi. Chron.,


101

and Nello Ponente.

Illustrated Booths. Jan.

reproduced). Preface by

Intro-

Loan Exhibition

8-Feb.

Prints,

23, 1958. 144 pp. illus.

Henry

Clifford. Exhibition ex-

panded from Picasso: j5th Anniversary Exhibition

bibl.

Milan. Palazzo Reale. Pablo

573 works (46 sculptures, 13 reproduced; 75 ceramics, 13

reproduced). Catalogue by Lionello Venturi, with the collaboration of Eugenio Battisti

of Art. Picasso:

His Paintings, Drawings, Sculptures, Ceramics,

and

reproduced; 39 ceramics, none

Ml slim

Sept.- Nov.

Picasso.

Milan: Amilcare Pizzi. 116 pp. plus 236

bibl. 108)

1953.

by the addition of ceramics shown

and London

illus.

329 works (32 sculptures, 14 reproduced; and 41 ceramics,

no

5 reproduced). Introduction by Franco Russoli. Chron.,

Paris.

(see bibl.

in

(see

Rotterdam

107).

Maison de La Pensee Francaise.

Picasso: cent cin-

quante ceramiques originates. Mar. 8-June 30, 1958. 59 pp.

bibl.
illus.

102

New

York. Curt Valentin Gallery. Pablo Picasso: 1950-

Includes "La terre et

I 953-

Nov. 24-Dec.

melin; and text by Georges and Suzanne Ramie.

19, 1953.

30 pp.

illus.

65 works (18 sculptures, 10 reproduced; 6 ceramics,

produced). Includes "Picasso,

Good Master

of Liberty," by

111

Marlborough Fine Art, Ltd. Picasso: 63 Drawings


10 Bronzes 1945-1953- May-June 1955. 11 pp. plus

28-May

112

New

10, 1958. [14] pp. illus.

366 pp.

Georges A.

1959. [6] pp.

illus.

Salles (bibl. 50).

Also shown

Fine Arts, Boston, Mar. 15- Apr.

illus.

256 works (35 sculptures, 7 reproduced; 13 ceramics, 4 reproduced). Introduction by Maurice Jardot. Extensive

Hamburg.

7,

Includes excerpts from "Les baigneurs de Picasso," by

Picasso 1900-1955. Oct. 25-Dec.

chron. and bibl. Exhibition also

shown

in

Cologne and

bibl. 91.

York. Fine Arts Associates. Picasso: The Bathers.

Feb. 10-Mar.

Munich. Hals der Kunst.

Picasso.

1959

4 bronzes reproduced. Introduction by Rebecca West.

18, 1955.

York. Cooper Union Museum. Ceramics by

92 works (14 reproduced). See also

illus.

104

New
Mar.

IQo5

1953-54.

feu de Picasso," by Helene Par-

re-

Paul Eluard, translated by Roland Penrose.

103 London.

le

at the

Museum

of

15, 1959.

i960
113

New

York. Sidney Jams (Ixllery. Picasso, 1881-

Blue Period (1900-1905). Collection of

His

Pastels, Water-colours

219

and Drawings. Also, the Complete Set of Small Bronzes of


Female Figures 1945-4J. Apr. 25-May 21, i960. [60] pp.

(n

97 works

sculptures,

reproduced; 6 ceramics, 2

all

re-

produced). Introduction by Eleanor Green.

illus.

68 works (24 sculptures,

O'Hana
shire;

Gallery,

shown at the
London; Stoneleigh Ahbey, Warwickreproduced). Also

all

and the Galerie Motte, Geneva, through

120 Vallauris. Galerie Madoura. Picasso: 20 ans de ceramiques

chez Madoura. 1946-1966. July 1966. [41 pp. illus.


120 works (16 reproduced). Introduction by Madoura
]

Sept. 10,

[Georges and Suzanne Ramie J.

i960.

Mi

114 Fabnza,

seo Internazionale delle Ceramiche. 42

ceramiche originali di Pablo Picasso. Aug. i-Oct.

15,

i960.

121

Paris.

Galerie Jeanne Buciier. Picasso

1966.

14

scale

models, and

Daniel L. Gervis. See also


115 Dusseldorf. Kunstverein. Pablo Picasso:
5,

1961-Jan. 21, 1962. 17 pp.

illus.

Hering. Introduction (in French and German) by Andre


Verdet. Also includes "Zur

Keramik von Pablo

Picasso,"

by Georges Ramie.

1962

York. Otto Gerson Gallery. "Sculpture,"

in Picasso:

An American Tribute. John Richardson, ed. Apr. 25-May 12,


1962. New York: Public Education Association. [17] pp. illus.
35 works

(all

reproduced). Section of catalogue of nine

simultaneous exhibitions for the benefit of the Public Education Association.

1964
117 Toronto.

Art Gallery.

Picasso

and Man.

all

966- 1 967

122 Paris. Petit Palais. "Dessins, sculptures, ceramiques," in

Horn mage

a Pablo Picasso. Nov. 1966 -Feb. 1967. [241

all

reproduced, with some com-

mentaries;

all

reproduced).

116 ceramics,

One

of three

parts of 85th anniversary exhibition; paintings

shown

at

Grand

Chron.

in

Palais, prints at Bibliotheque Nationale.

paintings catalogue.

1967

Contemporary Arts Gallery. Picasso


and Concrete: New Techniques and Photographs by Carl
Nesjar. Jan. 11 -Feb. n, 1967. [10] pp. illus.

123 London. Institute of

commen-

bibl.

121.

Introduction by Pierre

Comments by

Carl

d' Avignon'

and

as a Surrealist,"

by

Nesjar. See also bibl. 125.

124 Dallas.

Museum

Retrospective Exhibitions. Feb.

312 works (8 sculptures,


rently at the Dallas

Turner. Catalogue by Jean Sutherland Boggs. Chron.,

ture,

Exhibition also

shown

28-Mar.

at the

Montreal

Museum

bibl.

of Fine

Hamburg. Museum fur Kunst und Gewerbe. Pablo


Mosaiken 1956

Keramik^

194-] bis 1961.

seit 1 96 1.

Lithographien 1956

bis 1961.

Picasso:

Museum

Kunstmuseum.

125 St. Gallen.

21, 1967. [20] pp. illus.

Exhibition similar to

works

(31 ceramics, 28 reproduced). Includes "Kera-

mik," by Daniel-Henry Kahnweiler (excerpts from

Gascar
bibl.

Shown

illus.

concur-

of Fine Arts (paintings, sculp-

(drawings, watercolors, and pastels). Introduction and text

Placate 1948 bis 1962.

22, 1964. [78] pp. illus.

1967. 104 pp.

and graphics) and the Fort Worth Art Center Museum

bis 1958. Linolschnitte

-Mar.

8-Mar. 26,

reproduced).

by Douglas Cooper. Chron.,

31, 1964.

Two Concurrent

of Fine Arts. Picasso:

Robert Rosenblum; "Picasso since 1937," by Evan H.

143

pp.

508 works (187 sculptures,

Exhibition similar to

Includes "Picasso, the Early Years," by Jean Suther-

Cubism," by John Golding; "Picasso

Jan. 31

illus., bibl.

Jan. 11 -Feb. 16,

reproduced, with

land Boggs; "Picasso, the 'Demoiselles

118

Ragon, and

illus.

276 works (8 sculptures,

Arts, Feb.

in

bibl. 123, 125.

Gascar, translated by Joyce Reeves.


1964. 160 pp.

taries).

sculpture

Kerami\ aus der

53 works (12 reproduced). Foreword by Karl-Heinz

New

of

essays by Pierre Gascar, Georges Patrix, Michel

1961-1962

116

plans

molded and sandblasted concrete by Carl Nesjar. Short

Introduction by Giuseppe Livcrani.

Mtinufa^tur Madoura. Dec.

Nov.

illus.

pp.

Photographs,

12 pp. plus 26 pi.

et le beton.

126 London.

(in

bibl.

Picasso et le beton. Apr.

bibl. 121, 123.

9 May

Introduction by Pierre

French and German). Text by Daniel Gervis.

Tate Gallery.

Graphic Wor\. June 9-Aug.

Picasso:
13, 1967.

Sculpture,

Ceramics,

London: Arts Council

70).

of Great Britain. 132 pp.

1966
119

220

275 works (203 sculptures,

Washington, D.C. Gallery of Modern Art. Picasso


1945. June 30-Sept. 4, 1966. 63 pp.

illus.

illus.

since

ceramics,

all

all

reproduced, pp. 26-108; 31

reproduced, pp. 109-119). Introduction and

commentaries by Roland Penrose. Chron.,

bibl.

CATALOGUE OF THE EXHIBITION


October u, 1967 -January

All

works are

catalogue

is

12 Seated

divided into the following categories: Sculpture and

lection

Drawings and

Collages,

stated.

and

Prints,

and

arranged chronologically within each section. Dates and loca-

tions, as well as
tions, are

taken from the catalogue of the exhibition

13

to the original in plaster or clay.


in parentheses

On

the drawings

and

Mr. and Mrs. Alan H. Cummings, Winnetka,

Woman's Head.

The Museum

Modern

of

New

Art,

15

Page

do not appear on the works. Dimensions are given

II

1
,

Violin. Paris, 191 3. Pasted paper, chalk

board, 20 x

iiy4

II

no. 573.

York, purchase. Page 56

Sheet metal and wire,

2.

inches (78 x 35 x 18.5 cm.). Zervos

prints, dates

30%

13%

"j

Page 58

no. 773.

and gouache on card-

inches (51 x 30 cm.). Zervos

II

no. 784.

50.

16 Violin. Paris, 1913-1914.

and centimeters, height preceding length and depth.

Illinois.

.inches

Paris, 1909. Bronzi

14 Guitar. Paris, 191

held June-August, 1967, at the Tate Gallery, London, organized

by the Arts Council of Great Britain. Dates given to bronzes refer

1908. Bronze, 4 inches (10 cm.) high. Col-

(41.3x26.2x27.2 cm.). Signed "Picasso." Zervos

Homtnage

information has been supplied in the catalogue of the exhibition

Woman.

Page 57

dimensions of the sculpture, with certain modifica-

a Pablo Picasso (Paris, Petit Palais, winter 1966-1967). Further

in inches

1968

The

lent by the artist except

Constructions, Ceramics,
is

where otherwise

1,

Cardboard and

string, 23 x 8'/4 x 3

inches (58.5 x 21 x 7.5 cm.). Page 5S

SCULPTURE AND CONSTRUCTIONS


1

Woman.

Seated

5%

Barcelona, 1901. Bronze,

3%

II

2
,

18 Glass of Absinth. Paris,

2 Mast( of a Blind Singer. Barcelona, 1903. Bronze, 5^8 x

Museum

Page 5/

of

Modern

Art,

inches

Painted bronze with

191 4.

spoon, 8/4 inches (21.6 cm.) high. Zervos

2%

8%

wood, 9V4 x
no. 839. Page 63

Paris, 1914. Painted

(23.5 x 22 cm.). Zervos

2%

inches (14 x 8 x 7 cm.). Signed "Picasso c." Page 50

x 3/8 inches (13 x 7 x 8 cm.).

and Dice.

17 Glass

New

York,

II

silver

no. 584.

The

Mrs. Bertram

gift of

Smith. Frontispiece
3 Masl{ of a Picador with a

Bronze,

7%

4%

x 5^8 x

Broken Nose. Barcelona, 1903?

inches (18.5 x 13 x

and dated "Picasso/04" an(^ "04-1905 ";


579.

1.2

cf.

cm.). Signed

13%

metal,

Zervos VI, no.

20 Guitar.

10%

10%

x 5 /2 inches

of a Jester. Paris, 1905. Bronze,

15X 14%

no. 322. Collection Mrs. Bertram Smith,


6 Fernande. Paris, 1905-1906. Bronze,

13%

(34 x 25 x 26.5 cm.). Signed "Picasso"

Woman Combing Her

22

New

no. 830.

9%

x 10/2 inches

II

no. 580.

Hair. 1905-1906. Bronze,

inches (95 x 66

Page 61

91 4. Painted

1914. Painted

5//// Life.

wood with

upholstery fringe, 10 x

x 4 inches (25.5 x 48 x 10 cm.). Collection

and

23 Violin
tacks,

Lady Penrose,

and
II

Bottle on a Table. Paris, 191 5-1 916. Painted


string,

2
,

18%

no. 926.

wood,

x i6 /zx jYz inches (47 x 42 x 19 cm.).

Page 63

24 Packet of Tobacco. Paris, 1921. Painted metal,

31.2 x 29.2 cm.). Signed

Cone

x 26 x y l

London. Page 62

and numbered "8/9."

of Art,

37%

6%

18%

inches (17 x 48 cm.). Page 64

Collection.

25 Guitar. 1924. Painted metal, 42': x 24

9%

inches (108

x 62 x 25 cm.). Zervos V, no. 217. Page 64

Head of a Woman.

1906. Bronze relief,

4%

2%

inches (12.5

26 Construction in Wire. 1928-1929. Iron wire,

x 5.8 cm.). Joseph H. Hirshhorn Collection. Page 54

Carved wood, 32 ',4 x g /z x


2
no. 607. Page 55
(82 x 24 x 21.5 cm.). Zervos II
l

9 Figure. Paris, 1907.

inches

8'/2

27

10 Figurine. Paris, 1907. Bronze, after carved

wood,

8%

2%

and Mrs. Sampson R.

Field,

New

York. Page 54

x i6'/8 x

x 41 x 17 cm.). Page 65

Garden. 1929-1930. Bronze,


'4

inches (210 x

after

17 x 82 cm.).

welded

iron,

Page 67

Cardboard, plaster and wood on canvas, covered with sand,

10%

Paris, 1908. Bronze, 7V2 x 6'/4 inches (19

x 16 cm.). Signed and dated "Picasso 1908." Collection Mr.

x 46 x 32

19%

28 Construction with Glove (By the Sea). Juan-les-Pins, 1930.

inches (22 x 6 x 6 cm.). Page 55

Woman.

6% inches (50
Woman in the
82%

of a

II

wood and

wood, 23% x 14%


inches (60 x 36 x 22 cm.). Zervos II
no. 853. Page 63

8%

18%

York. Page 52

Page 49

Mas{

Zervos

12% x 11V2 inches (41.6 x


"Picasso." The Baltimore Museum

11

9 4. Painted

I,

Page 53

2%

x 8/4 inches

(38.2 x 36.5 x 21.6 cm.). Signed "Piccasso" (sic). Zervos

914. Painted metal,

21 Musical Instruments. Paris,

16%

x 19 cm.). Zervos

"00."

Page 53

7 Kneeling

inches (34 cm.) diameter. Zervos

numbered

(27 x 27 x 14 cm.). Signed "Picasso" and

Head

Paris,

Page 60

Page 5/

4 Alice Derain. Paris, 1905. Bronze,

and Playing Card.

19 Glass, Pipe,

29

x 14 inches (27 x 35.5 cm.). Page J2

Woman.

1930-1932.

(81 x 25 x 32 cm.).

Welded

iron,

31%

9%

12%

inches

Page 66

221

30 Head. 1931. Bronze after welded iron, 33 x

15%

x 14V4

inches (S4 x 40 x 36 cm.)- Pug? 69


31

Head
\

Woman.

of a

1931.

Welded

J4 inches (100 x 37 x 61 cm.).

32 Seated

Woman.

39%

iron, painted,

x 14V2

56

Page 68

Woman.

high. Page J l

21

inches (55.3 cm.)

34 Seated

Woman.

Woman.

[931.

1931.

high. Page 7/

36

Hbmun.
Page

93

Carved wood,

'

inches (18.1 cm.)

1.

93 1

from
.

6%

Carved wood,

inches (17.2 cm.)

Woman.
Page

39

6%

Carved wood,

inches (17.2 cm.)

Carved wood, 18% inches (48 cm.) high.

193

1.

Woman.

Carved wood,

7%

from right

31%

7%

7%

Head

Woman.

14%
47

27%

49

10%

12% x 15%

of a

25^

Boisgeloup, 1932. Bronze,

12%

Woman.

30%

18^

68

Boisgeloup, 1932. Bronze, ij

/i

i6'/8

Boisgeloup, 1932. Bronze

relief,

27V8 x

50%

Boisgeloup, 1932. Bronze,

% inches (24 x 70 x 30 cm.). Page 81


Woman with Raised Arms. Boisgeloup,

Head

ji

222

and

string

metal, string, and celluloid on cement

4%

inches (63 x 8 x 12 cm.). Page 92

wood on cement

base,

23%

inches (59

x 2 x

4%

Wood

and metal on cement

inches (60 x 5 x 12 cm.). Page 92

Wood,

metal, cement,

Wood

and metal on painted canvas,

9%

8%

10%

Wood,

fabric, and metal

on

inches (22.2 x 27 cm.). Dated

Page 95 below

Woman

Running. 1940. Bronze, 12% inches (32 cm.) high;


base diameter 6!4 inches (16 cm.). Page 9J

Head

of a

16%

Woman.

5%

inches (42 x 41 x 15 cm.). Page 109

Paris, 1943.

Bronze, 23 14 x

17%

x 11

12%

x 5 Vl inches (51.5

22%

73

20%

x 21

!4

74

Woman.

9%

x 2jVi x

75

Paris, 1943.

Bronze

relief,

20%

x 7V2 inches (53 x

19 cm.).

Page 100

Woman

Leaning on Her Elbow.

Paris, 1943.

Bronze,

24%

x 11 inches (63 x 42 x 28 cm.). Page 98

Woman

with Apple. Paris, 1943. Bronze,

70%

30%

x 28

inches (180 x 78 x 71 cm.). Page 103


1932. Bronze, 13 x

76 Flowering Watering Can. Paris, 1943-1944. Bronze, ^^ x


x

Page 85

of a Warrior. Boisgeloup, 1933. Bronze,

Woman

5%

nails,

inches (35 x 15 x 15 cm.).

72 Reaper. Paris, 1943. Bronze, 20 '/4 x

47%

15%

Running. Boisgeloup, 1933. Bronze, 20 /2 x 12% x


5^2 inches (52 x 32 x 14 cm.). Page S5
1

15%

jj "La

27!^ inches (121 x 39 x 69 cm.). Page 8j

54

5%

inches (25 x 27 cm.). Dated "10.4.38." Page 95, above

i6'/2

Boisgeloup, 1932. Bronze,

5 /2 x 5^2 inches (33 x 14 x 14 cm.).

Page 89

70 Bull's Head. Paris, 1943. Bronze, after bicycle seat and han-

1 1

53

13%

23%

objects, 44 Vs x

inches (^^ x 52.5 x 54 cm.). Page 82

and found

x 32 x 14 cm.). Page 100

50 Heifer's Head. Boisgeloup, 1932. Bronze, 13 x

52

inches (58 x 28 x 19

inches (59 x 44 x 28 cm.). Page 101

Head

Woman.

/z

arm, metal lock,

doll's

Wood,

dlebars, i6/4 x

33V2 x 14V2 x

Reclining

cm.)

69 Cat. Paris, 1941. Bronze, 18 14 x 30 '/i x j /2 inches (46.5 x 77


x 19 cm.). Page 96

26 inches (128 x 58 x 66 cm.). Pages 74, j$

51

base,

string,

Carrying a Bowl. 1935.

23%

"5.6.38."

Head of a Woman. Boisgeloup, 1932. Bronze,


17% inches (85 x 37 x 45.5 cm.). Page jj
Woman.

Wood,

painted canvas,

inches (69 x 60 cm.). Page jj

of a

inches (53 cm.)

'

x 11 x j

67 Construction with Flower. 1938.

inches (70 x 41 x 36 cm.). Page j8

Head

23%
48

of a

and

12 x 60 x 35 cm.).

66 Construction. 1938.

45 Coc\. Boisgeloup, 1932. Bronze, 26 x 24 x 13 inches (66 x 61

46

cloth, 14 /8 inches (36

20%

and ceramic, 10% inches (27 cm.) diameter. Page 94

inches (78 x 46 x 48 cm.). Page j6

Page 83

Wood

65 Construction with Ceramic Tile. 1936.

43 Bust of a Woman. Boisgeloup, 1932. Bronze,


15 inches (64 x 31 x 38 cm.). Page jo.

x 33 cm.).

Woman
base,

inches (81 x

inches (71 x 32 x 40 cm.). Page 84

18%

cloth,

cm.) high. Page 93


64

Boisgeloup, 1931-1932. Bronze,

Woman.

(1

24% x3'/8

base,

Carved wood, 12% inches (31.5 cm.) high.

1931. Bronze,

Wood,

63 Figure. 1935. Painted

44 Bust of a

inches

Page go

inches (19.7 cm.) high.

Head of a Woman. Boisgeloup, 193 -1932. Bronze, 19%


12% x 10% inches (50 x 31.5 x 27 cm.). Page 74, above
Woman.

inches

62 Figure. 1935.

20 x 20 cm.). Signed "Picasso." Page 80

42

13%

61 Figure. 1935.

(51. 1 cm.) high.

ji, far right

40 Seated

41

60 Figure. 1935.
x

ji, second

Woman.
Page

10%

Page 86

cm.).

left

on cement

193

Wood and

22%

59 Figure. 1935. Bronze,

jo, left
1

7%

high. Page 9/, right

Carved wood, 20/8 inches


37 Woman. 1 93
Page jo, center
38

with Leaves. 1934. Bronze, 15 x

58 Articulated Doll. 1935.

center

inches (28 x

high. Page 91, left

high. Page 7/, second

35 Seated

Woman

57 Articulated Doll. 1935.

jar left

9%

(38 x 20 x 27 cm.). Page 88

high. Page jo, right

33 Seated

1934. Bronze relief, 11 x

25 cm.). Page 86

Caned wood,

1931.

Woman.

55 Face of a

78

inches (84 x 45.5 x

Madame" (La

7x

1 1

inches

17%

40 cm.). Page 104

Taulierc). Paris, 1943- 1944. Bronze, 67


1

72 x 43 x 30 cm.), on stone base. Page 102

Woman in a Long Dress. Paris, 1943-1944. Bronze, 63%


20% x 20% inches (161 x 53 x 53 cm.). Page 105

79 Cat. Paris, 1944. Bronze,


x 17.5 cm.)-

8%
81

82

6%

inches (36 x 55

(Flayed Head). Paris, 1944. Bronze,

Iage

108

Figure. Paris, 1944. Bronze, 60 '/i x 22 x y l/2 inches (153.7 x


56 x 19 cm.), on stone base. Page 99

with Sheep. Paris, 1944. Bronze,

101

Woman.

86^

30%

Numbered

1945. Bronze,

9%

inches (23.2 cm.) high.

87

Thompson,

Pitts-

Woman.

Modern

Numbered

8%

1945. Bronze,

of

Numbered

inches (22.4 cm.) high.

burgh. Page 112,

Thompson,

56%

108

Woman.

1946. Bronze, 11 inches (28 cm.) high,

1947. Bronze,

27%

Modern

Woman

109

Art,

7%

inches (19.4 cm.) high.

version, 41 14

The Museum

of

46%
The Museum

Simon Guggenheim Fund.

York, Mrs.

with Baby Carriage. Vallauris, 1950. Bronze, after


80 x

x 11 cm.). Collection

13%

New

23%

Head

York, Mrs.

Woman.

of a

Numbered

Modern

of

x 57 inches (203 x 60 x 145 cm.).

Vallauris,

195

Bronze, after found

20%

inches (53.4 x 33.2 x 52.7 cm.).

Simon Guggenheim Fund. Page 134

Vallauris, 1951. Bronze, 21 V%

Art,

New

Numbered

x 9 x

4%

no Head of a Woman.
in Goat
after

Vallauris,

95

Bronze,

13

Page 115

found

8%

objects, 31 x

37%

x 21/2 inches (78.8 x 95.6 x

7%

115

io!4 x

98 Glass. Vallauris, 1949. Bronze,

8%

4%

8%

inches (22 x

inches (40 x 27 cm.). Page 118

York, Mrs.

'/

inches (15.6 x 35.3 x 12.9 cm.).

and Mrs. Gerald Gidwitz, Highland Park,

Vallauris,

1953. Bronze, after

io)gx

8%

Bunch

of Flowers. Vallauris, 1953. Bronze,

1 1

found

objects,

inches (27 x 22 x 28 cm.). Page 135

23%

19%

inches (60 x 50 x 39 cm.). Page 137

116 Flowers in a Vase. Vallauris, 1953. Bronze, 2854 x

19% x

\6 /i inches (73 x 49 x 42 cm.). Page 136


x

117 Vase with Flower. Vallauris, 1953. Bronze, 29 x ljY* x 6


inches (74 x 44 x 15 cm.). Page 137

Page 119

Faun. Vallauris, 1949-1950. Bronze, 15% x 10%

New

Page 135

Angry Owl.

15%

inches (96 x 26 x 20 cm.). Page 114

97 Female Form. Vallauris, 1948? Bronze, 50 x 14V2 x 4 inches


(127 x 37 x 10 cm.). Page iij

Art,

Reading. Vallauris, 1952-1953. Painted bronze, after

objects, 6Vs x 14 x 5

Illinois.

114

37%

x 14V2

x 17 inches (75 x 29 x 43 cm.). Page 133

Vi

Collection Mr.

6'/4 inches
95 Centaur. Vallauris, 1948. Bronze, 15V2 x 11% x
(39.4 x 30 x 16 cm.). Dated "8.1.48." Page Jig

96 Vase-Woman. Vallauris, 1948. Bronze,

1 1

Woman
found

19% x8%

S\ull and Bottle. Vallauris, 1951-1952. Painted bronze,

29 Vi x

94 Animal Head. Vallauris, 1948. Bronze, 14^8 x 9 /2 x


inches (36 x 24 x 21 cm.). Page 118

The Mu-

112 Crane. Vallauris, 1952. Painted bronze, after found objects,

Texas. Page 116


93 Vase-Face. Vallauris, 1947. Bronze, 11 x 4 x 5V2 inches (28 x

"2/6."

x 22 x 37 cm.). Page 131

The Museum of Modern


Simon Guggenheim Fund. Page 1 32

inches (7 x 23

Mary and Sylvan Lang, San Antonio,

xyYs x 14%

York, Benjamin Scharps and

54.5 cm.).

2%

Modern

of

David Scharps Fund. Page 130

inches (50.5

with Sleeve. 1947. Bronze,

of a

New

inches (53.6 x 18.8 x 35.7 cm.).

burgh. Page 114

Mas\

"2/6."

inches (118 x 143.2 x 70.5 cm.).

objects,

seum

91
1947. Bronze, 7% inches (19.5 cm.) high. Numbered "1/10." Collection Mrs. G. David Thompson, Pitts-

99

Numbered

first

York, gift of Mrs. Bertram Smith. Page 125

Baboon and Young.

Art,

Woman.

12 x 22 cm.).

inches (37

io'/i

Dated "1951" and numbered "5/6." The Museum

Page 113

Page 112, right

10 x 14 cm.).

inches (33 x

left

Page 113

Hand

13%

Page 129

"1/10." Collection Mrs. G. David Thompson, Pittsburgh.

92

Pitts-

Woman. 1947. Bronze, 4% inches (12 cm.) high.


Numbered "1/10." Collection Mrs. G. David Thompson,
Woman.

12%

Vallauris, 1950. Bronze,

New

Art,

found

Num-

89 Seated

90

and dated

Inscribed

17.5 cm.).

Page I2J, above

Woman.

objects, 21

Pittsburgh.

inches (153 x 65 x 62 cm.).

Page 126
107

1945. Bronze, 5V4 inches (13.3 cm.) high.

base.

24%

106 She-Goat. Vallauris, 1950. Bronze, after found objects,


x

bered "1/10." Collection Mrs. G. David

on wood

Bronze, after

1950.

Vallauris, 1950. Bronze, 10V2 x ii'/4 x

inches (104.8 cm.) high.

1945. Bronze, 9V2 inches (24 cm.) high.

88 Torso of a

25%

60 !4 x

inches (26.5 x 28.5 x

105 Pregnant

left

1 10, left

Woman.

inches (4.5 x 20

x 26 x 26 cm.). Page 12J, below

"1/10." Collection Mrs. G. David Thompson, Pittsburgh.

Page

objects,

32 x 34 cm.).

Page in, right

Woman.

found

Vallauris,

103 Owl. Vallauris, 1950. Bronze, 13 x

Num-

"5/10." Collection Mrs. G. David Thompson, Pittsburgh.

86

7%

104 Owl. Vallauris, 1950. Bronze, i^Yz x 10V4 x

burgh. Page 111,

Woman.

"Vallauris 20.7.50." Page 124

1945. Bronze, 10 inches (25.4 cm.) high.

bered "2/10." Collection Mrs. G. David

85

Girl Shipping Rope.

6%

28%

Page no, right

Woman.

Little

102 Masl{ of a

"1/10." Collection Mrs. G. David Thompson, Pittsburgh.

84

1%

Vallauris, 1950. Bronze,

Page 128

inches (220 x 78 x 72 cm.). Pages 106, 107

83

Hand.

cm.). Page 124

x io'/4 inches (29 x 21.3 x 26 cm.).

Man

100

Page gy

Head

80 Death's

14^ X2i 5/8

118

Woman.

Vallauris, 1953. Painted

x 45 x 17.5 cm.).

Page 146,

wood, 54 x 17% x

6%

(137

left

223

'

mi; Dove. Vallauris, 1953. Bronze, o' 4 x 11 x 4^4 inches (17 x

144

28 x 12 cm.). Dated "29.1.53." Page 145, center

Dove. Vallauris, 1953. Bronze,


x
121

5 V2 x 9 x

4%

Vallauris, 1953. Painted

inches (14 x 23

Woman.

Dated "6.I.53."

Woman
69 x

wood, 55% x 7I4 x i /i


146

and

148

149

Man

126 Bust of Sylvette. Vallauris, 1954. Metal cutout, folded and

150

Man
3%

painted,

17%

24%

17%

inches (69 x 44.2 cm.). Page 149

inches (62 x 44.2 cm.). Page 150

painted, 23

128

Head

Woman. Vallauris,
10% x 10% inches (87 x

of a

34 14 x
129

Head

Woman.

of a

32 x 13 14 x
130

Head
Head

1 1

13%

1954- Metal cutout, painted,


27.5 x 27.5 cm.).

Wood

wood,

cutout, painted,

31 14 x i6'/8 x 9 inches

7%

Head of
x

5'/2

Woman

x 7I4 inches (37 x 20

(43 x

1.5

x 4 14 inches (15 x 25 x 11 cm.).

Mr. and Mrs.

4%
Victor W.

141

8%

inches

Page 165

Figure. 1958.

Wood,

53

14

York. Page 160,

left

x 9 14 inches (135 x 24 cm.).

(51 x 21.5 x 15.5 cm.).

Man.

1958.

cm.). Page 164

224

29^

10%

10%

1 go,

4%

x 74 x 60 cm.).

164

18%

19 x 75 x 30

1961.

14

Metal cutout, folded and

inches (57 x 48 cm.). Page 194,


1961.

left

Metal cutout, folded and

x 19I4 inches (59 x 49 cm.). Page 194, right

Page 194

of a

Bearded Man. Cannes, 1961. Metal cutout, folded


15 x

9%

3%

inches (38 x 24.5 x 8.5 cm.). Page

below

Head

of a

Bearded Man. Cannes, 1961. Metal cutout, folded

Head
Head

1 1

inches (41 x 30 cm.). Page 190, above

Bearded Man. Cannes, 1961. Metal cutout, tolded

of a

of a

14

24%

inches (80 x 62 cm.). Page 189

Man. Cannes,

1961. Metal cutout, tolded

and

painted, 11 x 7I4 inches (28 x 19 cm.). Page 191

(1

8%

x 3 inches (22 x 27 x 7.5 cm.). Page 183

and painted, 31

20x814 xG /s inches

inches

Page 175

inches (31 x 27 x 12 cm.). Page 194

and painted, i61s

166
1 1

(in

Head

Page

Page 166

Wood, 46%

inches

43%

162

165

142 Head. Cannes, 1958. Bronze, after wood,

x 5I4 x

Head. Cannes, 1961. Metal cutout, folded and painted, 1214


x 2 x 2% inches (31 x 5 x 7 cm.). Page ijg

163

163

143

23%

and painted,

New

11%

161

inches (12.1 cm.) long. Collection

Ganz,

i960. Metal cutout,

160 Head. Cannes, 1961. Metal cutout, folded and painted, 6)4 x

139 Bather Playing. 1958. Bronze, after found objects, 44I4 x

140 Bull. 1958. Bronze,

35 x 86 cm.). Page iji

159 Football Player. Cannes,

x 22.3 cm.). Page 162

13 x 25 inches (1 13 x 33 x 63.5 cm.).

45%

Woman. Cannes, 1961. Metal cutout, folded and


12% x 614 inches (32.7 x 16.5 cm.). Page ij8

5 14 inches (17 x 14 cm.).

957- 1 958. Painted bronze, 17 x 4 14 x

Metal cutout, folded and

inches (35 x 25 cm.). Page 203

158 Football Player. Cannes,

Page 161
1

9%

x 18 cm.). Page ijo

x 814 inches (51 x 17.5 x 21 cm.). Page 184

painted, 22 14 x

with Necklace. 1957. Bronze, 14V4 x 3/4

9%

objects,

157 Coclt. Cannes, 1961. Metal cutout, folded and painted,

inches (36 x 9 x 14 cm.). Page 161

138 Little Girl.

6%

painted, 23

137 Pigeon. 1957. Bronze, 6 x

wood and found

156 Clown. Cannes, 1961. Metal cutout, folded and painted, 12I4

x 18 cm.). Page 158


136

2954 x

York. Page 160, right

14%

Collec-

155 Chair. Cannes, 1961. Metal cutout, folded and painted,

134 Bull. 1957. Bronze, 614 inches (16.5 cm.) long. Collection

135 Bull's Head. 1957. Bronze,

13%

33% inches (116 x


Sparrow Haw\. Cannes,

New

H. Hirshhorn

154 Bust of a

cm.). Page 158

Larry Aldrich,

inches (57.8 cm.) high. Signed

with Javelin. Cannes, i960. Bronze, after wood,

painted,

x 26 x 8 V2 inches (40 x 66 x 21.5

15%

inches (82 x 54 x 6 cm.).

153 Bird. Cannes, 1961. Metal cutout, folded and painted, 15 x

(80 x 41 x 23 cm.). Page lyj

133 Bull. 1957. Bronze,

and

i614 inches (38 x 41 cm.). Page 183

Vallauris, 1954. Metal cutout, painted,

1956. Bronze, after

Wood

Running. Cannes, i960. Bronze, 46 x 25 14 x 3 14 inches


(117 x 64 x 8 cm.). Page 172

x 14I4 inches (77 x 26.5 x 36 cm.). Page 755

Young Man.

958-1 959.

152 Bather. Cannes, 1961. Metal cutout, folded and painted, 20 14

Page 153

Vallauris, 1954. Metal cutout, painted,

Vallauris, 1954.

2%

354 inches (29 x 14 x 8 cm.). Page 182

Page 151

inches (80 x 28 x 35 cm.). Page 154

Woman.

10%

151

inches (81 x 34.5 x 32.5 cm.). Page 152

Woman.

of a

30I4 x
132

i2,' 4

of a

31 14 x
131

x 13 inches (59 x 33 cm.).

x 5 14 inches

Page 159

127 Bust of Sylvette. Vallauris, 1954. Metal cutout, folded and

48% x i8J4 X7I4 inches (123 x 47


Head of a Woman. Cannes, i960.

and

14

Bronze, 22*4

1959.

painted,

44 cm.). Page 148

125 Bust of Sylvette. Vallauris, 1954. Metal cutout, folded

painted, 27

with Blonde Hair.

147 Figure. Cannes, i960. Bronze, after

(175 x 52 x 33 cm.). Page 14J

x 17*4 inches (70 x

Woman

of a

Arm.
tion.

124 Bust of Sylvette. Vallauris, 1954. Metal cutout, folded

painted, 27

Head

"Picasso" and dated "1 5.3.59." Joseph

Pi'gc 144

Currying a Child. Vallauris, 1953. Painted wood,

20J/2 x 13 inches

5 14

Page 168

Vallauris, 195$. Bronze, 2o}4 \ 4 x 4V4 inches (52 x

10 x 12 cm.).

123

145

wicker basket, 32I4 x 21

inches (90 \ 18.5 x 0.5 cm.). Page 146, right


122

wood, 22 14 x

1958. Bronze, after

(57 x 13 x 14 cm.). Dated "20.7.58." Page i6y

cm.). Dated "14.10.53." Page 145, above

Woman.

Man.

Head

painted,

below

Woman. Cannes, 1961. Metal cutout, tolded and


8% x 6% X3I4 inches (22 x 17x8 cm.). Page 191,

of a

left

167

Head

Woman. Cannes,

of a

1961. Bronze,

10%

5%

x 9

191

inches (27 x 15 x 23 cm.). Dated "1 9.2.61." Page ijj


168

Head

Woman. Cannes,

of a

painted,

7%

1 1

14

1961. Metal cutout, folded

and

169

170

painted, 15

x 30 cm.).

Head

Woman. Cannes,

1961. Metal cutout, folded

of a

/2
1

painted, 31
171

x 21

Man

6%

4%

Man

inches (80 x 55 cm.). Page 188


1961. Metal

inches (17 x

cutout,

Man

and

folded

1.5 cm.). Page 178

20%

with

x 11 inches (53 x 28 cm.). Page 180

Staff.

Cannes, 1961. Bronze, 15 x 9V2 x 814 inches

17%

4%

x 6 !4 inches

Page 173

(45 x 12 x 16 cm.).

9%

inches (25 x 24.5 cm.). Page 183

6%

180 Small

5 cm.).

182

11x5%
5%

(21 x 15 cm.).

11x5%

cm). Page 169

of a

Head

inches (50 x 30 cm.). Page 200

Woman. Mougins,

19%

of a

1962. Metal cutout, folded

inches (50 x 40 cm.). Page 204

15%

Woman. Mougins,

19%

19%

1 1

1962. Metal cutout, folded

inches (50 x

Woman. Mougins,

of a

10%

and

50 x30

and

cm.). Page 205

1962. Metal cutout, folded,

x 7 inches (52 x 27.7 x 18 cm.). Page 206

and painted, 2o'/2 x

1
1

'/2

inches (52 x 29 cm.).

Man

with Moustache. Mougins, 1962. Metal cutout, folded


11

x 17 inches (30 x 43 cm.). Page 195

Woman. Mougins, 1962. Bronze, 12%


(32.5 x 17x51 cm.). Page 77?

6%

20%

inches

steel, 41 14

x 27V2 x 19 inches (104.8 x 70 x 48 cm.).

The Art

Page 207

1961. Metal cutout, folded

CERAMIC SCULPTURE

1961. Metal cutout, folded

The Spanish Woman. Cannes,


and painted,

x 25.5

and

204 Model for the Chicago Civic Center sculpture. 1965. Welded

2 inches (37 x 37 x

inches (28 x 15 cm.). Page i8j

The Spanish Woman. Cannes,

1962. Metal cutout, folded

Institute of Chicago, gift of Pablo Picasso.

The Spanish Woman. Cannes,

painted, 8 14 x

183

203

Page 192, below

and painted,

19%

and painted,

with Outstretched Arms. Cannes, 1961. Metal

and painted, 14V2 x 14V2 x

cutout, folded

181

202

inches (135 x 52 x 48 cm.). Page 185

Woman

cm.). Page 20/

Page 198

left

179 Pierrot. Cannes, 1961. Metal cutout, folded and painted, 53V&

18%

Metal cutout, folded and

Woman. Mougins, 1962. Metal cutout, folded and


19% x 11^ inches (50 x 30 cm). Page 199
a Woman. Mougins, 1962. Metal cutout, folded and

out, folded

inches (41 x 17 cm.). Page 182, right

x 20V2 x

Head

and

201 Jacqueline with a Green Ribbon. Mougins, 1962. Metal cut-

178 Owl. Cannes, 1961. Metal cutout, folded and painted, i6Vs

of

20 14 x

177 Owl. Cannes, 1961. Metal cutout, folded and painted, 15 x


yYs inches (38 x 18 cm.). Page 182,

Head

Page 202

cm). Page 195

Iks (25 \ iH

Woman. Mougins,
12% x 10 inches (32

and

of a

painted,

200

176 Owl. Cannes, 1961. Metal cutout, folded and painted,

Head

ilM

of a

painted,

199

175 Musician. Cannes, 1961. Bronze,

Woman. Mougins. [96a.


12% x 7% inches (32 t 20

7%

Page 179

1962, Metal cutout, folded

of a

painted,

198

x 1414 inches (45 x j6 cm.).

Head

Head

Metal cutout, folded

[96a. Metal cutout, folded

9%

Head

ro cm.).

painted,

painted,

197

(^x

Woman. Mougins,

of a

painted,

196

inches (44 x 35 cm.). Page 18

13%

Head

painted,

195

(38 x 24 x 21 cm.). Page 77?

9%

194

and

with Sheep. Cannes, 1961. Metal cutout, folded and

painted,

174

and

Page 191, above right

with Sheep. Cannes, 1961. Metal cutout, folded and

painted, 1714 x

173

Monkey. Cannes,

Little

painted,

172

193

1961. Metal cutout, folded

17%

painted,

x 4 inches

Woman. Mougins,

192 Bust of a

inches (28 x 20 x 3 cm.). Page 191,

Woman. Cannes,
x 11% inches (38

of a

with Raised Aim. Cannes, 196]

and painted, 13%

below right

Head

Woman

and

(All

made

in Vallauris, 1948-1963)

205 Seated Bird. 1948. Modeled from clay slabs; slip-painted;

Page 186, right

heightened with enamel (polychrome on white body). 9I4 x

1961. Metal cutout, folded

4 14 x

inches (28 x 15 cm.). Page i8j

15%

inches (23.5 x

x 39 cm.).

Dated "4.2.48." Page

120
184

Woman. Cannes,

8% (43-2 x
Woman and

x
185

Woman and
painted,

187

188

189

17%

Woman and

206

6%

inches (44 x 17.5 cm.). Page 1J4,

left

Child. Cannes, 1961. Metal cutout, folded

6%

Woman

inches (114 x 64 cm.). Page iyy

painted,

44%

Woman

with Open Arms. Cannes, 1961. Metal cutout, folded

with Outstretched Arms. Cannes, 1961. Metal cut-

out, folded

and painted, 72 x 67% x

x 80 cm.). Page 193

3i

/2

inches (183 x 172

15%

x 8!4 inches (43.2 x 40 x 21 cm.).

208 Owl. 1949. Wheel-thrown and modeled; incised and


painted.

7%

slip-

x 814 x 5'4 inches (19.7 x 21 x 13.4 cm.). Dated

underneath "30.12.49." Page 120


209

Woman

with

Hands Hidden.

eled; slip-painted. i8'/2 x

x 7/2 inches (28 x 19 cm.). Page 192, above

York. Page 121

Page 120

inches (129 x 55 cm.). Page ij6

with Bowl. Cannes, 1961. Metal cutout, folded and

11

Wheel-thrown and modeled;

inches (37.8 cm.) high. Galerie Chalette,

partly glazed. 17 x

inches (44 x 17.5 cm.). Page 174, right

!4

14%

drapee). 1948.

207 Condor. 1949. Wheel-thrown and modeled; slip-painted and

Child. Cannes, 1961. Metal cutout, folded and

x 25

New

and

50% x2i 5/8

Woman

Woman (Femme
slip-painted.

Child. Cannes, 1961. Metal cutout, folded and

painted,

and painted,
190

and painted, 17

22 cm.). Page 184

painted, 17 "4 x

186

1961. Metal cutout, folded

5%

1949.

Wheel-thrown and mod-

x 3'/2 inches (47 x 15 x 9 cm.).

Page 122
210

Woman

with Mantilla. 1949. Wheel-thrown and modeled;

slip-painted. i8'/2 x 4J4 x

2%

inches (47 x

1.5x7

cm.). Page

122

225

2ii

Centaur. 1950. Wheel-thrown parts, wax-resist decoration.

u\

1- \

I S

modeled; polychrome slip-painted decoration, glazed. 9V2 x


7% inches (24.2 x 20 cm.). Dated "20.3.54" an d inscribed

Page 123

inches. (4^.2 x 25 x 14 cm.).

9%

amel. 15 x

and modeled;

inches (38 x 25.1 x 29. 8 cm.). Page i2j

Head

213 Large Sculptured

x 9V2 x

14

1 1

and

inches (37 x 24.2 x 30

inches (^^ x 28 cm.). Dated "2.1.50 II." Page

13%

13%

and dated "Picasso

8%

Page

216 Dove. 1953. Modeled from a clay

slab; slip-painted,

4%

217 Dove. 1953. Modeled from clay slabs; slip-painted. 5I4 x

5%

inches (15 x 25 x 13 cm.). Page 142, below,

236 Face. 1963.

8%

219 Dove. 1953. Modeled from a clay


x

io'/4

inches (15 x

5'/8

slab; slip-painted,

26 x

13 cm.).

Page

142, below,

7%

in oxides

1953.

tin glaze.

9%

11%

6%

x5'/8 inches

5%

inches (29 x 16.2 x

(9 x 25 x 13 cm.).

223 Owl. 1953. Slip-painted, unglazed.

13%

(34.7 x 26 x 33 cm.). Signed "Picasso"

Page 145

Owl

13%

13%

Owl

"Picasso 6.2.53."

226

Woman.

Pai e

227

Woman.
glazed.

228

Woman

11%

2%

in a

2%

slip-painted,

Wheel-thrown and modeled;

4%

slip-painted, un-

x 2 14 inches (39 x 10.5 x 5.4 cm.). Page 138

Long

(30 cm.) high, base

226

Woman

Crayon, 22 x 16 inches

(Paris, 1905).

no. 341. Collection Sir Robert

I,

The Museum

gift of

Mrs. Saidie A.

Head

of a

no. 148.

and

24%

18%

of

Modern

Art,

New

York,

May

Woman. (Horta

de Ebro, 1909). Conte crayon,

x 19 inches (63 x 48.3 cm.),

cf.

inches (17.2 x 12.4 cm.). Zervos

New

Modern Art

9V2 x

Zervos

II

1
,

no. 162. Page

II

1
,

no. 296.

6%

The Museum

York, purchase

6%

inches (24.2 x 17.2 cm.). Zervos

II

2
,

no. 501.

Heinz

Berggruen, Paris. Page 211


243 Pipe, Glass, Bottle of Rum. Paris, 1914. Pasted paper, pencil,
gouache, on cardboard, 15% x 20% inches (40 x 52.7 cm.).

The Museum

inches (29 x 7 x 7

Dress,

Her Hair Undone.

1953.

Wheel-

thrown and modeled; slip-painted and glazed. 11% inches

229

Dated "31.7.63." Page igj, right

Modern

of

Art,

New

York, gift of Mr. and

Mrs. Daniel Saidenberg

1953.
x

19% x

242 Glass and Dice. (Paris, 1914). Pasted paper and charcoal,

39

15%

II

of

and dated

!4[

heightened with enamel.


1

Her Hair.

Zervos

4%

x 11 inches (35 x 35 x 28 cm.). Inscribed

Wheel-thrown and modeled;

1953.

cm.). Page

10.J, left

241 Study for a Construction. (Paris, 1912). Pen and ink,

2 14 inches (31 x 33 x 31 cm.). Signed

x 19

211

with Raised Wings. 1953. Slip-painted, unglazed. 12 14

x 13 x

8%

slip-painted, partly glazed.

inches. (50.5 x 22 cm.).

24%

and inscribed under-

"Carnaval" and dated underneath "27.2.53." Page 141


225

240

with Man's Face (Carnaval). 1953. Slip-painted, un-

glazed.

pardy glazed.

239 Head. (Paris, 1909). Gouache, 24 x 18 inches (61 x 45.7 cm.).

x io!4 x 13 inches

neath "5.1.53 Vallauris." Page 140, above

224

inches (22 x 12 x 8.6 cm.).

inches (63 x 48 cm.). Page 211

Wheel-thrown and modeled; painted

222 Little Bull. 1953. Cut out and modeled from a slab of white
clay. 3/4

3%

slip-

Lady Sainsbury, London. Page 211

Page 138

15 cm.).

238 Figure in Profile. (1907). Pastel and watercolor,

Woman.
on

right

slip-painted,

tile,

(56 x 40.7 cm.). Zervos

inches (14 x 22 x 20 cm.). Inscribed "29.1.

53." Page 142

221 Kneeling

cm.).

DRAWINGS AND COLLAGES

220 Dove with Eggs. 1953. Modeled from clay slabs; slip-painted.
x

4%

tile,

Roman

237 Girl Combing

8%

12x8

inches (22 x

unglazed.

left

5/7 x

3%

inches (22 x 48.3 cm.). Dated "31.7.63." Page

right

Roman

235 Face. 1963.

left

9%

4%

of hollow brick, slip-

Dated "17.7.62." Page 196

218 Dove. 1953. Modeled from a clay slab; slip-painted, unglazed.


x

Fragment

1962.

8%

painted, unglazed.

7%

x 3 54 inches (14 x 19.7 x 8.3 cm.). Dated "7.1.53." Page 142,


above,

slip-

234 Face of a Bearded Man. 1962. Fragment of hollow brick,

22 x 13 cm.). Page 143

x s's inches (12 x

hollow brick,

left

Dated "12.7.62." Page 196, below,

8%

of

x 6 14 x 3 14 inches (22 x 16 x 8 cm.).

8%

painted, unglazed.

inches (22 x 13 x 9.5 cm.).

Fragment

1962.

Woman.

233 Face of a

below

140,

3%

Dated "12.7.62." Page 796, above,

inches

ll.11.51."

5%

of hollow brick, slip-

196, below, left

8%

painted, unglazed.

(34 x 35 x 22 cm.). Signed

5%

8%

Woman.

232 Face of a

I23

215 Owl. 1951. Slip-painted, unglazed.

Wheel-thrown; incised

961.

Fragment

1962.

Dated "12.7.62." Page

214 Two-handled Pitcher. 1950. Incised, slip-painted, and partly

5%

Woman.

painted and glazed.

13x11

slip-painted. 23 14 x i6'/s x 17I4 inches (59 x 41 x 43.8

231 Face of a

Page 123

glazed.

Ramie, Vallauris (A/M), France. Page 143

cm.). Dated "14. 2.61." Page 143

and glazed; heightened

Mme Georges

Ramie/Picasso." Collection M.

230 Two-handled Vase (Great Bird).

with a Bow. 1950. Wheel-thrown

incised, slip-painted,

with white enamel. 14


cm.).

and

and glazed; heightened with white en-

incised, slip-painted,

Madame

underneath "Pour

212 Large Sculptured Head. 1050. Wheel-thrown and modeled;

with a

5%

Crown

x 9 inches (15 x 23 cm.).


of Flowers. 1954.

Page 139

Wheel-thrown and

244

Still

Life with a Calling

Paris, 1914. Pasted paper

21 cm.). Zervos

man,

New

II

2
,

Card (Dice and Packet


and crayon,

of Tobacco).

5 14 x 814 inches (14 x

no. 490. Collection Mrs. Gilbert

W. Chap-

York

245 Crucifixion. Boisgeloup, 1932. Pen and ink,


(34.6 x 51.2 cm.).

Page 21

13%

x2o'/8 inches

246 Crucifixion. Boisgeloup, 1932. Pen and ink, 1 3 V2

247

(34-3 x 5 2 -7

cm

Head

Woman

of a

x*o%

inches

(Design for Sculpture). (1932). Charcoal

on canvas, 36^4 x 28% inches (92 x 73 cm.). Galerie Beyeler,


Basel. Page 213

Man

248 Study for

with Sheep. 1942. Pen and ink,

25%

19%

inches (65.1 x 50.2 cm.). Zervos XII, no. 137

249 Study for

Man

with Sheep. 1943. Pen and ink, 26 x 20 inches

250 Child's Head. 1943. Pen and ink, 26 x 20 inches (66 x 50.8

nches (19.4 x 26.7 cm.). B.53

264 March 30,

nches (19.4

266 March 30,

7% x io'/i
1933. 7% x 10V2
1933. 7% x \oVz
1933. 7% x io'/i

Page 1 j
267 March ji,

1933.

265 March 30,

269
270

cm.). Zervos XII, no. 301

Man

Head of a Woman (Study for Sculpture). 1962. Pencil, 16 V2


x 10% inches (42 x 27 cm.). Galerie Louise Leiris, Paris.

273 April

Page 214

The following

prints,

from the

noted,

of

Modern

Fox, Milton

Hans
G.

S.,

Bolliger.

ed. Picasso for Vollard. Introduction by

New York:

Harry N. Abrams,

inches (19.4 x z(>~ cm.). B.56.

/ x

May

1933. 14

ii'lit;

/?

io%

1933.

4,

inches (36.7 x 29.7 cm.). B.68

x u'Vn; inches (36.8 x 29.7 cm.). B.69

7% inches (26.8 x 19.4 cm.). B.70


7% inches (26.8 x 19.4 cm.). B.74.

Page 14

The Minotaur
277

Geiser,

Bernhard. Picasso Peintre-Graveur. Catalogue

illustre

de l'oeuvre grave et lithographie

March

Page 11

7% inches (26.7 x 19.4 cm.). B.46


io'/2 x 7% inches (26.7 x 19.4 cm.). B.48
10V2 x 7% inches (26.7 x 19.4 cm.). B.49.

Page 9

March

u n/i6

May

18, 1933.

14%

inches (29.7 x 36.6 cm.). B.85.

Etching and aquatint,

279

May

23, 1933.

x io^io inches

(194

7%

io%c inches (19.4 x 26.8 cm.). B.87.

7%

io% inches

Page 28
280

May

29, 1933.

(19.4 x 26.8 cm.). B.89.

Page 31

1
281 September 22, 1934. Etching and engraving, 9 Yio x

7%

inches (26.7 x 19.4 cm.). B.50

13%

inches (25.2 x 34.7 cm.). B.94. Page 33

282 Figure.

May

cm.). G.2 4 6,

1929. Lithograph,

M.XXVI.

9%

5%

inches (23.9 x 14.2

Gift of Victor S. Riesenfeld


13,

1946. Lithograph,

12%

17%

inches (32.1 x 44.2 cm.). M.29. Curt Valentin Bequest

284 Goat. (1952). Aquatint, printed

in black, 3

n/i

x 5 inches (9.3

Andre Verdet, La Chevre,


Editions de Beaune, 1952. The Museum of Modern

x 12.8 cm.), for deluxe edition of


Paris:

x
27, 1933. io /i x

7%

Page 27

283 Eight Nudes. January

258 March 25, 1933. 10V2 x

260 March 26, 1933.

18, 1933.

The Blind Minotaur

1933). 10V2 x

259 March 26, 1933.

May

x 26.8 cm.). B.86.

899-1 931.

7% inches (26.7 x 19.4 cm.). B.37


(ca. March 1933). io!/2 x 7% inches (26.7 x 19.4 cm.). B.39
March 21, 1933 10V2 x 7% inches (26.7 x 19.4 cm.). B.42
March 21, 1933. io'/i x 7% inches (26.7 x 19.4 cm.). B.43
March 21, 1933. 10V2 x 7% inches (26.7 x 19.4 cm.). B.44.
(ca.

278

Inc. (1956)

The Sculptor's Studio

261

B.55

Page 22

M. Mourlot, Fernand. Picasso Lithographe. Monte-Carlo:


Andre Sauret (1949)

257

11, 1933. io'/"i x

Art; they are etchings, unless otherwise

Berne: chez l'auteur, 1933

256

1933. 14

275 April

so-called "Vollard Suite," are un-

and were acquired with the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Fund.

B.

255

7,
8,

Reference marks:

254

9.4 x 26.7 cm.).

but are categorized thematically. All are in the collection of

The Museum

253

274 April

276

PRINTS
titled

272

B.54

271

nches

x 26.7 cm.).

y% x io'/2 inches (19.4 x 26.7 cm.). B.57


March 31, 1933. 7% x io'V. inches (19.4 x 26.8 cm). H.58
March 31, 1933. 7% x io9io inches (19.4 x 26.8 cm.). B.59
March 31, 1933. 7% x io'/ inches (19.4 x 26.7 cm.). B.60
April 3, 1933. 7% x io'/ inches (19.4 x 26.7 cm.). B.64
April 4, 1933. 7% x io9ia inches (19.4 x 26.8 cm.). B.65

with Sheep. 1943. Pen and ink, 5 /s x 20


inches (130 x 50.8 cm.). Zervos XII, no. 241. Page 214

251 Study for

nches (26.7 x 19.4 cm.). B.51

263 March 30, 1933.

268

(66 x 50.8 cm.). Zervos XII, no. 297

252

262 March 27, 1933. 10 /2

Art,

New

York, purchase

227

INDEX

Page numbers
All

works

in italics refer to illustrations.

are indexed by

title;

lenders, with

Brassai,

Breton, Andre, 24, 42

the exception of Pablo Picasso, are also in-

Buchholz Gallery,

dexed by name.

Bull 19s;

(cat. 134),
art, 18,

New

York, 45

Cocteau, Jean, 21, 42

(cat. 133), 755,

African

Clown 96 1, 794, 224


Coc\ 1932, 25, 8], 222
Coc^ 96 1, 183, 224

31,214

Condor

224

Cone

160 (right), 224

Head 1943, 43, 109, 222


Bull's Head 1957,755,224
Bull's

Aldrich, Larry, 160, 224

Anatomy 1933, 43, 2/_?


Angry Owl 1953,29, /J5, 223
Animal Head 1948, 118, 223
In

Antilles, 44, 45

Antibes

Museum,

45

Apollinaire, Guillaume, 20, 21, 40-41, 42, 46

Archipenko, Alexander, 21

Arm

of

Bust of a

Flowers 1953, 30,

Woman

222

(cat. 44), 76,

222

Bust of a

Woman
Woman

Art Institute of Chicago, 207, 225


Arte Joven, 40
Articulated Doll 1935

9/ (left), 222

(cat. 58), 9/ (right),

Balzac,
22,

221

1961, 775, 224

1962, 202, 225

Cook

Islands, 10

(cat. 124), 148,

224

(cat. 125), 749,

224

Croisette

(cat. 126), 750,

224

Crucifixion 1932

(cat. 127), 757,

224

29, 7??, 223

promenade, Cannes,

(cat.

245), 27?, 226

(cat.

246), 227

29, 134, 223

of Art, 49, 221

de, Chef d'eeuvre inconnu,

Cummings, Mr. and Mrs. Alan H.,

212

La

Canals, Ricardo, 40, 41

David, Sylvette, 46; see also Bust of Sylvette

Cannes, 32, 43, 46, 224, 225


Car naval; see Owl with Man's Face

Death's

Ramon, 40

Head (The

Flayed Head) 1944

27, 44, 108, 223

Demoiselles d' Avignon 1907, 18,41,2//

Barcelona, 39, 40, 221

Cat 1941,96, 222

Detain, Alice 1905, 17,

5_j,

Barr, Alfred H.,

Cat 1944, 97, 223


Catalan art, 31, 40

Derain, Andre,

42

Centaur 1948, 779, 223


Centaur 1950, 123, 226

Dinard, 42

34

Bateau Lavoir, 40
Bather 1961, 184, 224

Bather Playing 1958, 765, 224

18, 41,

van Dongen, Kees, 40

Dove 1953

Belle Hollandaise, 18

Berggruen, Heinz, 211, 226

Chalette, Galerie, 121, 225

(cat.

Bernard, Claude, Galerie, 208

Chapman, Mrs.

(cat. 216), 143,

Beyeler, Galerie, 213, 227

Chef d'oeuvre inconnu,

Bibliotheque Nationale, Paris, 47


Bird 1 96 1, /S_j, 224

Chec re, La, 227

1 6

Blind Man's Meal 1903, 15


Blind Minotaur 1934, ?_?, 227
Boisgeloup, 12, 13, 25, 43, 44, 222, 226, 227

Bosch, Hieronymus, 29

Gilbert W., 226


22, 24,

212

Chicago, Art Institute

of, 207,

Chicago Civic Center,

24, 33, 34,

Chicago Civic Center, model

225

47

226

142 (above

(cat. 218),

142 (below right), 226

(cat.

left),

219), 142 (below left), 226

Dove with Eggs

1953, 142, 226

for sculpture,

1965.33.47^07.225
Eight Nudes 1946, 227

19, 41,

Child's

42

Head

1943, 227

Civic Center; see Chicago

226

(cat. 217),

Chicago, 75th anniversary exhibition 1957,

Blasco, Jose Ruiz, 39

22S

14$ (center), 224


120), 145 (above), 224

(cat. 119),

Bracelli, 23

Braque, Georges,

221

Diaghilev, Serge, 21, 42

Cezanne, Paul, 41
Chair 1961, 32, 775, 224

Bathers 1956, 46,

57, 221

David, Jacques-Louis, 15

Californie, 46

Casas,

Jr.,

32, 43

21,42

Honore

7-2,

Construction in Wire 1928- 1929, 65, ill

Cahiers d' Art, 212, 213

Baboon and Young 1951,

Museum

Construction with Glove (By the Sea) 1930,

222

Baltimore

Construction with Flower 1938, 9^ (below),


222

Coruna, 39
Crane 1952,

Arts Council of Great Britain, 221

Ballets Russes,

223

1932

(cat. 43), 79,

Bust of a

/ 27,

Bust of Sylvette 1954

1959, 759,224

(cat. 57),

Bunch

Collection, 49, 221

Construction 1938, 95 (above), 222


Construction with Ceramic Tile 1936, 94,
222

Bull 1958, 160 (left), 224

41

1949, 720, 225

Eluard, Paul, 26, 29

Eva (Marcelle Humbert), 42

and Playing Card 914, 60, 221


Goat 1952,227
Goat S{ull and Bottle 95
952, 29, /_?2,
Glass, Pipe,

Face 1963
(cat.
(cat.

235), 797 (left), 226

Face of a
Face of a
(cat.

Woman
Woman

Man

1962

223
196, 226

Julio, 12, 19, 41,

226

/<y/

(cat

/;,'.22s

1'.-).

/<//
I

'ase

Greco, El, 40

cat 17a

had

of a

188, 225

).

Woman

(cat [93), /05.225

Gris, Juan, 41

(cat 194)-

-jo/,

Griinewald, Matthias, 23
Guernica 1937, 44

(cat. 195),

769,225

Fernande 1905-1906, 17,55, 221


Field, Mr. and Mrs. Sampson, 54, 221

Guitar 1912,55,221

(cat

Guitar 1914,6/, 221

(cat. 19^). 204,

Figure 1907, 55, 221

Guitar 1924,64, 221

(cat. 199),

(cat.

196 (above

left),

226

233), 196 (below right), 226

Female Form 1948,

117, 223

Femme drapee 19$; see Woman

1948

Figure, 1929, 227

Figure 1935
(cat. 59), 86,

222

(cat. 61), 90,

222

(cat. 62), 92,

222

F//y?

Hand 1950, 124, 223


Hand with Sleeve 1947,
Head 1909, 226

222

(cat. 60), 89,

(cat. 63),

1944,28,99,223

Figure 1958, /6j, 224

Figure in Profile 1907, 2//, 226

(cat. 160), /94,

224

(cat. 161), 179,

224

Flowering Watering Can 1943-1944, /04,


222
Flowers in a Vase 1953, 30,

(cat. 158),

194

(cat. 159),

194 (right), 224

223

224

Frugal Repast 1904, 16

G
Galerie Beyeler, 213, 227

\\

'oman (Design for Sculpture)

1932,2/?, 227

Head of a Woman (Study for Sculpt u>

1962, 214, 227

Head

Woman

of a

with Blonde Hair

Head of a Woman

with Xec^Jace 1957,

161 224

1961

/90 (below), 224

(cat. 163),

190 (above), 224

Heifer's

Head

1932, 25, 82, 222

Hirshhorn, Joseph H., Collection, 54.

221, 224

Holland, trip

Head of Dora Maar 94 1 46


Head of a fester 1905, 17, 26,41,52, 221
Head of a Woman 1931, 43, 68, 222
Head of a Man 1961, /9/, 224
Head of a Warrior 1933, 26, 87, 222
Head of a Woman (drawing) 1909,2//,
,

to,

18

Hommage a Pablo Picasso, exhibition


1966-1967,34,39,47,221

Horta de Ebro,

40,

226

Horta de San Juan; see Horta de Ebro

Hugue, Manolo,

41

Humbert, Marcelle, 42

226

Head of a Woman 1906, 54, 221


Head of a Woman 1931-1932,43,74

Galerie Claude Bernard, 208


Galerie Chalette, 121, 225
Galeries Georges Petit, exhibition 1932, 43
Galerie Louise Leiris, 214, 227

1932

222

Gargallo, Pablo, 40

(cat. 47), 7?,

222

La

(cat 48), 77, 222

Ganz, Mr. and Mrs. Victor W.,

160, 224

(cat. 49), 74, 75,

Gerson, Otto, Gallery, 47


Gidwitz, Mr. and Mrs. Gerald, 135, 223

Head of a Woman
Head of a Woman
Head of a Woman

Gilot, Francoise, 44, 45, 46

1905, 211 226


,

Gisors, 43

(cat. 109), /jo,


(cat.

Glass

and Dice

Glass

and Dice (drawing)

1914, 6j, 221


1914, 211, 226

Glass of Absinth 1914, frontispiece, 19, 20,

from Osuna, 211

Isenheim Crucifixion, 23

Jacob,

Max,

222
1943, /o/, 222

198,225

(collage) 1943,

Joventut, 40

1951

1954

214

39

Juan-les-Pins, 221

Junyer-Vidal, Sebastian, 40

K
Kahnwcilcr, Daniel-Henri, 32 41,214

(cat. 128), /5J,

224

Kneeling

(cat. 129), /52,

224

Kneeling

(cat. 130), 154,

224
224

17,

Jacqueline with a Green Ribbon 1962,

no), /j/,223

(cat. 131), 155,

Guarda, Corufia, 39

223

Head of a Woman

Glass 1949, 7/9,223

Iberian relief
Instituto da

Head of a Woman
(cat. 46), 75,

Galloise, Antibes, 45

I
Iberian art, 18,41

(above), 222

Galerie Pierre, 42

21,41,221

34,206, 225

Woman; see also

lead of a

Head of a

(cat. 164), / #9,224


/_?6,

96

Combing Her Hair

205, 225

Woman'; I lead
116, 223

(cat. 162),

Girl

225

f/dW 0/ a Bearded Man

Figurine 1907, 55, 221

(left),

200, 225

i'*;).

1958-1959, 168, 224

Figure i960, /70, 224

225

'99.225

9'-).

(cat. 200),
I

Head 1928,2/2
Head 1931, 43, 69, 222
Head 1958, 166, 224
Head 1 96

95,222

Football Player

(cat.

224

above right), 225

Grimaldi Palace, Antibes, 45

(cat. 232),

left),

(below ri^ht), 225

(cat. |68), i<)i

43

below

(cat 166),

Palais, Paris,

47
Great Bird; see Two-handled

1962
left),

Gonzalez,

Grand

1934, 86, 222

231), 196 (below

Head of a Woman 1960,20^,224


Head of a Woman 1961

1 -

236), 197 (right), 226

Face of a Bearded

Human 1953, /_?#, 226


Woman Combing Her Hair

905-1 906, 18, 49,221

Koklova, Olga, 42, 44, 46

229

8 5

Masl( of a Picador with a Broken Nose


1903, 17,40,57,221

Lady

of Elche,

Woman
Woman

Masf{ of a

La Lonja, Barcelona, 39
"Lm Madame" (La Tauliere) 943-1944,

MasJ( of a

Paris,

Hommage a Pablo Picasso, exhibition

1966-1967,34,39,47,221

Georges

1908, 54, 221

Paris, Galeries

1950, 724, 223

Paris, Picasso's studios:

Petit, 1932,

43

28, 102, 111

Langc, Mary and Sylvan,

223

16,

Matisse, Henri, 18,41

May, Mrs. Saidie

23, rue la Boetie, 42

A., 226

Metamorphosis 1928,

Head 1950, 123, 226


Large Sculptured Head with a Bow
Large Sculptured

Minotaur 1933,

Little Bull 1953, 145,

227

226

957-1 958, 162, 224

Shipping Rope 1950, 29, 128,

223

Monkey

Little

1961, ij8, 225

34,

47,221

"Ma

folic,"

& Ploma, 40

Petit,

Picasso, Antibes, 45

Musical Instruments 1914, 63, 221

Georges, Galeries, 43
Petit Palais, Paris, 39, 47, 221

Musician 1961, 775, 225

Philadelphia, 75th anniversary exhibition,

Art, Collection of,

1957,46

An American

56,125,126, 130, 132,134,211,212,

Picasso:

221, 223,226,227

Picasso, Claude, 29

of

Modern

of

Modern

Art,

New

York,

Art,

Roque,

Picasso, Jacqueline

New York,

Pichot,

Ramon,

Green Ribbon

Pierre, Galerie, 42

Pierrot 1961, 185, 225

Pigeon 1957, 767, 224


Pipe Glass, Bottle of

New

Poete Assassine, 21

Rum

An American

191 4, 226

Prado, Madrid, 39

Tribute, 1962, 47

Pregnant

Nonell, Isidro, 40

Woman

1950, 28, 45, 725, 223

Prejger, Lionel, 32, 47

42

32, 46, 47;

40, 41

Nesjar,Carl,33,47,2i4
York, Picasso:

Tribute, 47

see also Jacqueline with a

Madrid, 39, 40
Maison de la Pensee Francaise, Paris, 45, 46

41, 42, 43,

Penrose, Lady, 62, 221

exhibition 1967,34,47

Yallauris, 30, 45

Emile-Goudeau), 40
Paris, works created in, 40,

Musee

Museum

Maar, Dora, 44, 46


Moor, Dora, Head 0/ 194 1, 46

rue des Grands-Augustins, 44


13, rue de Ravignan (Place

Pel

exhibition 1957, 34, 46

Lyon, exhibition 1953,46

Boulevard de Clichy, 41

7,

Mougins, 47, 225


Mourlot, Fernand, 45

Museum

Lopez, Maria Picasso, 39


Louvre, Paris, 18,41,211

44,45,221,222,223,226

Museum of Modern

London, exhibition 1957,46


London, Tate Gallery, exhibition 1967,

La Madoura,

Minotaur

Mmotaure, 213

Leiris, Louise, Galerie, 214,

Little Girl

22, 2j,

28, 31, 227; see also Blind

Leger, Fernand, 41

213

Milan, exhibition 1953,46

1950, 123,226

Little Girl

24, 43,

Malaga, 18,39

Man

"Oiseau de Benin," 21

1958

(cat. 143),

Olivier, Fernande, 41

764,224

(cat. 144), 767,

Owl

224

Man with Javelin i960, 777, 224


Man with Moustache 1962, 795, 225
Man Running i960, 772, 224
Man with Sheep 1944, 23, 26, 44, 706,

Owl
707,

7^7,225

Ramie, Suzanne,

1950

Ramie, Georges,

(cat. 104),

727 (below), 223

Raynal, Maurice, 40

Read, Herbert, 10

1953, 740 (above), 226

Reaper 1943, 700, 222

1961

Reclining

(cat. 178),

752 (right), 225

with Staff

Manager from

(left),

Owl with Man's Face

New

225

(Carnival) 1953,

Owl with

Raised Wings 1953, 141, 226

21,

42

Vie, Mougins, 47

Packet of Tobacco 1921,64, 221


Page from sketchbook, 1924, 272

Roque. Jacqueline,

227

32, 46, 47; see also

Jacqueline with a Green Ribbon

Rousseau, Henri, 41

Academy

of

San Fernando,

Royan, 44
Rusiiiol, Santiago, 40

Page from sketchbook, 1927, 213

Model

Masf{ of a Blind Singer 1903, 16, 40, 57, 221

Painter and His

Mask^of a Faun 1949-1950,775,223

Parade, 21, 42 212

230

S.,

Madrid, 40

1917,272

Mas Notre-Dame-de

1932,57, 222

Rome, exhibition 1953,46

Royal

Yor\ (Parade)

Managers (Parade) 191 7,


Marat, Death of, 1

226

Rotterdam, exhibition 1957,46

747, 226

961, 775, 225

Woman

Riesenfeld, Victor

225

with Sheep, study 1943

250,274, 227

30, 45, 143,

1951, 740 (below), 226

7#2

227

45, 143, 226

727 (above), 223

(cat. 177),

(cat.

Man

with Sheep, study 1942, 227

(cat. 249),

Quatre Gats, Barcelona, 40

1949, 720,225

(cat. 176), 7<5j,

(cat. 173), 7.50,225

Man
Man

Fernande

(cat. 103),

Owl
Owl
Owl

with Sheep 1961

(cat. 172),

see also

Osuna, 211

223

Man

1928, 23, 2/2


Sabartes, Jaime, 40

Saidenberg, Mr. and Mrs. Daniel, 226


Sainsbury, Sir Robert and Lady, 21

1,

226

Saint-Germaine-des-Pres, Paris, 46

Torso of a

Benjamin and David,

1 1

1,

12,

114,223

130, 223

3,

If

Oman

Woman

Three Dancers 1925, 42


Three Musicians 1921,42

Salmon, Andre, 40
Salon d'Automne, 1905, 41
Salon d'Automne, 1944, 45
Scharps,

Thompson, Mrs. G. David,

Woman

1946, 113, 223

Toulouse-Lautrec, Henri de, 40


Trocadero, Paris, 41

Ft

Malaga, 39
Sculptor's Studio 1933,

9, //, 12, 14, 77,

Two-handled Vase (Great Bird) 1961,


745,226

Two

Seated

Women

24,43,227
Seated Bird 1948, 120, 225
Seated

Seated

Seated

Woman
Woman
Woman

1908,41,57,221

(cat. 33),

7/ (far left),

(cat. 34),

7/ (second from

(cat. 35), 7/ (center),

Woman

V
left),

222

222

222
1947, 112 (right), 223

She-Goat 1950, 45, 126, 223


Skidmore, Ovvings and Merrill, 47
Small Woman with Outstretched Arms
96 1, 792 (below), 225

Smith, Mrs. Bertram, 52, 125, 221, 223

(cat. 121

(cat. 182),

186 (right), 225

(cat. 183), 187,

Haw\

(left),

(cat 122), 144, 224


t

21-

1. it.

9 1 4, 62, 22

Life

Still

Life with a Calling

Card (Dice and

Packet of Tobacco) 1914, 226

Study for a Construction 191 2, 226


Study for
Study for

Man
Man

with Sheep 1942, 227


with Sheep 1943

(cat.

249), 227

(cat.

251), 2/4, 227

Study for a

Monument

1927, 2/5

Study for Space Construction 1928, 212


Surrealist exhibition, Paris, 1925, 42

T
Tate Gallery,
Tatlin,

London,

Vladimir, 21

47, 221

[961, 1X4, 225


[963, 173, 225

with Apple 194}, 28, 103,222


with Baby Carriage 1950, 45. 729,

Woman with Bowl 1961, 777, 225


Woman Carrying a Bowl 195s. 92, 222
Woman Carrying a Child 1953, 147, 224
Woman and Child

Vase-Face 1947, 7/5, 223

(cat. 187),

776,225

Vase with Flower 1953, 757, 224

Vase-Woman

1948, 7/4, 223

Vlaminck, Maurice de,

18, 41

Violin 1913,59, 221


Violin 1913-1914,55,221

and

Crown

with a

of

Flowers 1954,

143, 226
in the

Garden 1929-1930,25, 34.4?.

67,221

Verdet, Andre, 227

Violin

Woman
Woman

Velazquez, 40

Bottle on a Table 191 5-1 91 6,

w
Walter, Marie-Therese, 25, 43

Woman
Woman

Still

138,226

174 (right), 225

Weill, Berthe, 40

Stein, Leo, 41

Woman
Woman
Woman
Woman

).

(cat. 186),

225

Stein, Gertrude, 41

226

cat. 2i<>). /_?9,

Vallauris, 29, 30, 45, 223, 224, 226

225

i960, 182, 224

146 (right), 204

).

1-4 (left). 225

Vollard Suite, 227

186

223

(cat. 185).

Vollard, Ambroise, 22, 40, 41

(cat. 181),

left),

<

65, 221

Spanish Civil War, 44


Spanish Woman 1961

,146

Valentin, Curt, 45

Soirees de Paris, 20, 21

Sparrow

40

222

Shchukine, Serge, 41

UNESCO building, Paris, 46


Utrillo, Miguel,

223

1931

70 (right), 222

Seated

1901, 16,40,50,221

(cat. 32),

(cat. 40), So,

1920,2/2

121 225

195}

San Telmo School of Arts and Industry,

mme draper

Woman
Woman

with

Hands Hidden

with Hat

Woman's Head

1949, 722, 225

963, 208

1909, 19, 20, 23, 41, 56, 221

Woman

Leaning on Her Elbow 1943,


95,222

Woman
Woman
Woman

with Leaves 1934,55, 222


in a
in a

Long Dress 1943-1944, 10^, 222


Long Dress, Her Hair Undone

1953' 'i9< 226

Woman
Woman

with Mantilla 1949, 722, 225

with

Open Arms

1961,

792 (above), 225

1930-1932,66,221

Woman

with Outstretched

Arms

1961,

Arms

1962,

1931

222

(cat. 36),

jo

(cat. 37),

70 (center), 222

(cat. 38),

77 (second from right), 222

(cat. 39),

77 (far right), 222

(left),

^.47,795,225

Woman

with Outstretched

by Nesjar, 47. 214

Woman with Raised Irm 1961, 779, 225


Woman with Raised Arms 1932, 55, 222
Woman Reading 952-1 953, 29, 755, 223
Woman Running 1933,55, 222
Woman Running 1940, 97, 222
.

Woman
Woman
Woman

1931-1932,54,222

1943, 700, 222

1945

(cat. 83),

770 (right), 223

(cat. 84), 777 (left),

223

(cat. 85),

777 (right), 223

(cat. 86),

770

(left),

223

(cat. 87), 772

(left),

223

Woman

1947

(cat. 90),

775,223

(cat. 91),

114,221

World's Fair, Paris 1937, 44

Young Man

1956, 757, 224

z
Zurbaran, Francisco de, 40

231

I'llDTiM.KAPII CREDI

An

Institute ol

40.

Anthony Bregman:

right.
flap.

de

Rolxrt

Chicago: 207. Baltimore

C.ip.i. 1.1

Museum ot

Eugene Brcnwasser: 54
Magazine
Time Inc.: jacket

54 left

'

Chevojon, Paris: 78; 101; 108; 136; 137

)(>.

Art:

left.

Service

ununt.ition Photographique, Reunion des Musees

Nationaux, Versailles: 140 below; 150; 156; 176; 185;


188; 105
left.

left,

1^7 right. Courtauld Institute: 118

right;

Galerie G. Claude Bernard: 208. Galerie Louise

Leiris: 160 right.

John Hedgecoe: 50; 58

66; 67; 68; 69; 70; 71

73; 74; 76; 77; 81

left;

64 below;

82; 84; 85 below

right; 86 left; 87; 88; 89; 97 above; 99; 100 left; 102; 103;

105; 106; 107;

19 below; 128; 129; 133; 158 below; 165;

174; 175; 177; 178 left; 183 below; 184; 187; 193; 194

Bryan Heseltine: 53 above.


H. Mardyks: 51 below; 55; 60; 61; 63 below right; 90;
91 right; 93; 94; 95; 97 below; 120 above left, above right;
above

left,

below

left;

203.

122; 138; 139; 140 above; 142; 143 above, below

left;

145

center, below; 154; 164; 169; 178 above; 190 below; 192;

196; 197 left; 198; 199; 202.

O. E. Nelson:

Petersen: trontis. Walter Rosenblum:

m;

no;

Studly: 52;

112; 113

left;

Sunami: 56; 125; 126; 130; 132;

121. Rolf

159.

Adolph

114 above. Soichi

134. Tate Gallery: 83.

John Webb: 51 above; 53 below; 58 right; 59; 62; 63


left, below left; 64 above; 65; 72; 75; 79; 80; 85 below
left;

86 above; 91

113 right; 114


left;

53'

left;

92; 96; 98; 100 right; 104; 109;

115;

17;

18 right;

19 above; 120

123; 124; 127; 131; 135; 137 right; 141; 143 below

right;
x

left;

145 above; 146; 147;

144;
J

55!

57".

158 above;

161;

148;

149;

151;

152

162;

166;

167;

168

170; 171; 172; 173; 179; 180; 181; 182; 183; 186; 189

190 above; 191; 194 above right, below right; 200; 204
205; 206.

DESIGNED BY JOSEPH BOURKE DEL VALLE. TITLE CALLIGRAPHY BY MORRIS ZASLAVSKY. TYPE SET
IN LINOTYPE

GRANJON BY THE COMPOSING ROOM, AND PRINTED ON MOHAWK SUPERFINE PAPER

BY PHOTOGRAVURE AND COLOR COMPANY AND CRAFTON GRAPHIC COMPANY. COLOR FRONTISPIECE

PRINTED BY LEBANON VALLEY OFFSET COMPANY. BOUND BY

SEPTEMBER, I967, 78,000 COPIES.

J. F.

TAPLEY COMPANY. FIRST EDITION,

ROBERT CAPA, LIFE MAGAZINE

(continued from front (lap;

closer to the primitive


art

than

any

in

emotional significance of

mediums, including

ot the other

painting, that he has used."


Picasso's

work may

modeled sculpture which

five categories: early


relies

he divided roughly into

on volume and surface tensions; cuhist

bas-relief constructions;

tions

and modeled

wrought-iron construc-

plasters of the late twenties

and

early thirties; sculpture ot the

war

years,

war and

which emphasize found

objects

post-

com-

bined with plaster and cast in bronze; and sheetiron

and monumental sculptures with which

Picasso

is still

occupied. Ceramics, again a

man's primitive desire

flection of

to

mold

re-

clay

with the hand, have been an important accom-

paniment

to Picasso's sculpture

during the past

twenty years.

A chronology, a selected bibliography both


concerned

with Picasso as sculptor

specifically

and ceramist and

a catalogue of the exhibi-

tion complete the text.

Roland Penrose

is

Chairman

Contemporary Arts

of

painter, poet, essayist,

modern

of
for

many

art.

An

years, he

in

of the Institute

London and

and adventurous

is

collector

intimate friend of the artist


is

the author of the standard

biography Picasso: His Life and ]Vor\.

MODERN ART

THE MUS'

53 Street
,

New

York 10019