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Reeths-Puffer

High School
2015-2016
College
Planner

Student Name:
____________________

Table of contents
Contact Information.......p. 1-2
ACT (American College Test)..p. 3
College Representative Visits..p. 4
School-Related Absences for College Visits/Open
Houses............................................................................p. 4
Applications - College...p. 5-11
Online vs. Paper Application Fees...p. 5-7
Fee Waivers............p. 7
The Common Application.p. 8
Essays...p. 9
Letters of Recommendation..p. 10
Sending Transcripts/ACT scores....p. 11
Financial Aid.
FAFSA..
Overview....p. 12-16
Steps.......p. 16-17
After the FAFSA...p. 18-20
Documents Needed.p. 21
Tuition Incentive Program..p. 22-23
Scholarshipsp. 24-27
Enrollment.....p. 27-28
Senior Timeline and Calendar..p. 29-46

What is College?
College is any form of post-high school education
that leads to some type of certification. Examples of
college include:

Apprenticeships
Military Service
Trade Schools
Community Colleges
Public Colleges and Universities
Private Colleges and Universities

This planner focuses primarily on the traditional


types of college. That is not to exclude or minimize
the importance of the other types of college. For the
sake of space, though, not everything potentially
useful could be included here. If you would like
more information about anything discussed (or not
discussed) in this planner, please contact Miss
Little.

Miss Littles Contact


Information
Phone:
(231) 744-1647 x3216
Email:
littleh@reeths-puffer.org
Website:
rpcollegeadviser.weebly.com
Facebook:
College Corner at ReethsPuffer

College Contact Information


College Name: ________________________
Admissions: __________________________
Financial Aid: _________________________
Other Dep.: ___________________________

College Name: ________________________


Admissions: __________________________
Financial Aid: _________________________
Other Dep.: ___________________________

College Name: ________________________


Admissions: __________________________
Financial Aid: _________________________
Other Dep.: ___________________________

College Name: ________________________


Admissions: __________________________
Financial Aid: _________________________
Other Dep.: ___________________________

THE ACT
Registration
In order to retake the ACT, you must register
online. You can register by going to actstudent.org.
Cost and Fee Waivers
As of September 2015, the costs for the ACT are as
follows:
ACT (No Writing)

$39.50

ACT (Plus Writing)

$56.50

If you qualify for free/reduced lunch, you can get a


fee waiver to pay for the ACT. To get a fee waiver,
please come to the Counseling Office.
Test Dates
Test Date
June 13, 2015
Sept 12, 2015
Oct 24, 2015
Dec 12, 2015
Feb 6, 2016
April 9, 2016
June 11, 2016

Registration
Deadline
May 8, 2015
Aug 7, 2015
Sept 18, 2015
Nov 6, 2015
Jan 8, 2016
March 4, 2016
May 6, 2016

(Late Fee
Required)
May 9-22, 2015
Aug 8-21, 2015
Sept 19-Oct 2, 2015
Nov 7-20, 2015
Jan 9-15, 2016
March 5-8, 2016
May 7-20, 2016

Test Preparation
There are many websites that can be used to study
for the ACT. A good place to start is the Library
Media Centers webpage on the high school website.
For more resources, contact Miss Little.

College and Military


Rep Visits
Representatives from many different colleges and
military1 branches visit the high school, primarily
during the fall semester. Students are requested to
sign up in advance for these visits, which will be
broadcast through the announcements. A full
calendar of the college and military rep visits
scheduled can also be found at
rpcollegeadviser.weebly.com.

School-Related Absences
for College Visits and
Open Houses
Students are strongly encouraged to visit the
campuses of any colleges they are interested in
attending. To receive a school-related absence for a
college visit/open house, juniors and seniors must
complete a college visit form which can be picked
up in the Counseling Office or printed from the
Counseling webpage on the high school website.
These forms should be submitted at least a week in
advance of the planned visit. Seniors and juniors
are allowed one college visit per semester.

Military representative visits are restricted to


students in 11th and 12th grade.
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College Applications
Online Vs. Paper
Most colleges have applications that can be turned
in online. Some still use paper applications. Besides
being quicker to process, online applications may
cost less to submit than paper applications. See the
table for information on the application fees for
different colleges in Michigan.
College
Adrian College
Albion College
Alma College

Online
Free
Free
Free

Alpena Community College


Andrews University
Aquinas College
Art Institute of Michigan

Free
$30
Free
$50 +
$100
admin fee
$20
Free
$35
$35
$35
Free
Free
Free
$25
Free
$35
Free
Free
Free
$10
Free

Baker College
Bay College
Calvin College
Central Michigan University
Cleary University
College for Creative Studies
Concordia University
Cornerstone University
Davenport University
Delta College
Eastern Michigan
Ferris State University
Finlandia University
Glen Oaks Community College
Gogebic Community College
Grand Rapids Community
College
Grand Valley State University
Great Lakes Christian College
Henry Ford College
Hillsdale College
Hope College
Jackson College

$30
$30
Free
Free
$35
Free

Paper
Free
Free
$25
waived by
request
Free
$30
Free
$50+$100
admin fee
$20
Free
$35
$35
$35
Free
$25
$25
$25
Free
$35
N/A
Free
Free
$10
N/A
$30
$30
Free
$35
$35
Free

College
Kalamazoo College
Kalamazoo Valley Community
College
Kellogg Community College
Kettering University
Kirtland Community College
Kuyper College
Lake Michigan College
Lake Superior State University
Lansing Community College
Lawrence Technological
University
Macomb Community College
Madonna University
Marygrove College
Michigan Jewish Institute
Michigan State University
Michigan Technological
University
Mid Michigan Community
College
Monroe Community College
Montcalm Community College
Mott Community College
Muskegon Community College
North Central Michigan College
Northern Michigan University
Northwestern Michigan College

Online
$40
Free

Paper
$40
Free

Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
$25
Free
$30

Free
$35
$35
Free
N/A
$35
Free
$30

Free
Free
$25
$50
$50
Free

Free
$25
$25
$50
$50
N/A

Free

Free

Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
$35
$20

Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
$35
N/A

Northwood University
Oakland Community College
Oakland University
Olivet College
Rochester College
Saginaw Chippewa Tribal
College
Saginaw Valley State University
Schoolcraft College
Siena Heights University
Southwestern Michigan College
Spring Arbor University
St. Clair Community College
University of Detroit Mercy
University of Michigan Ann
Arbor
University of Michigan
Dearborn
University of Michigan Flint

Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free

$25
Free
N/A
$25
Free
$25

$30
Free
Free
Free
$30
Free
Free
$75

$30
Free
$25
Free
$30
Free
N/A
Free

Free

$30

Free

$30

Walsh College
Washtenaw Community
College
Wayne County Community
College District
Wayne State University
West Shore Community College
Western Michigan University

$35
Free

$35
Free

Free

Free

$25
$15
$40

N/A
N/A
$40

Application Fee Waivers


Students who qualify for free or reduced lunch can
get waivers to cover the cost of the application fees
charged by a college. To get a fee waiver, please
come to the Counseling Office.

The Common Application


The Common Application is one application that is
accepted by over 500 different colleges and
universities both in the United States and abroad.
Within Michigan, there are 10 colleges that accept
the Common Application. These are:

Albion College
Alma College
Calvin College
Hillsdale College
Hope College
Kalamazoo College
Kettering University
Lawrence Technological University
University of Detroit Mercy
University of Michigan

Some schools that accept the Common App also


have their own applications, so you may not need to
use the Common App even though they will accept
it. It is best to check the webpage of each college you
are interested in to see how they wish you to apply.
For more information, visit www.commonapp.org.

Essays
The essay is an important part of a college
application as it allows colleges to get to know more
about you than just your grades and ACT/SAT
scores. Many scholarship applications also may
require an essay. Here are some essay writing tips:
1.

Be yourself!
Dont lie or exaggerate in your
writing
Express yourselfbut dont get too
personal
2. Be descriptive.
Make your readers feel the
experiences that you write about
3. Be concise.
There is no need to keep writing
just for the sake of having a longer
essay
4. Be grammatical.
Proofread your essay and have at
least one other person proofread it
also
5. Try answering the question why us (when
appropriate).
Why did you pick this college?
What makes it special?
Be sure to give yourself plenty of time to write. If
you need to, break up your essay writing over
multiple days.
Not all colleges and scholarship applications require
an essay. However, many do. So save yourself some
time by trying to recycle your essays by editing,
expanding, refocusing, etc. them so you can use
them for more than one application.

Letters of
Recommendation
You may need a letter of recommendation from a
teacher, counselor, coach, etc. in order to apply to
some colleges or to apply for some scholarships.
Here are some tips:
1. Ask early!
Ask your recommender for a letter at
last 3-4 weeks before the required
deadline so they have plenty of time to
write it.
2. Choose the right people.
It is best to ask people for letters who
have been in some type of authority
over you. So counselors, teachers,
coaches, employers, pastors, etc. can all
write letters.
Do NOT ask friends or relatives for
letters; they are considered biased.
Also, think about who would be most
appropriate to give a recommendation.
For example, if you are applying for a
math scholarship, considering asking a
math teacher for a recommendation. If
you are applying for a sports
scholarship, a coach might be better.
3. Follow up!
Check in with whoever is writing a letter
for you at least a week before you
actually need it. A good way to do this is
to send a Thank you card. This is a
subtle reminder that you need the letter

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written, and it is also the polite thing to


do.

Sending your ACT Scores


and Transcripts
Once you have submitted an application to a
college, you need to send your ACT scores and
transcript to the college. Most colleges will not
make a decision about whether to accept or deny
your application until they have seen the classes you
have taken and the grades you have received in
them. A transcript lists your classes and grades.
Most colleges also want to see how you performed
on a standardized test such as the ACT or SAT.
To send your transcripts electronically to a college,
you can use a free account on www.parchment.com.
All students are encouraged to create Parchment
accounts. Using Parchment, you can not only
request that your transcripts be sent to the colleges
you have applied at, you can also track them to see
when they are sent and whether the university has
received them. If you have issues2 creating a
Parchment account, please contact Miss Little.
You can also ask Mrs. Duplissis to send a paper
copy of your transcript through mail if you are
unable to send it through Parchment.
ACT scores are generally sent along with your
transcript by Mrs. Duplissis. However, a few
colleges may want your official ACT scores sent
from the ACT organization itself. To have your
Never pay to have a transcript sent through
Parchment! If it wants to charge you money, just
ask Mrs. Duplissis to send your transcript instead.
2

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scores sent from the ACT organization, go to


actstudent.org and log in to your account.

The FAFSA
Overview
The FAFSA stands for the Free Application for
Federal Student Aid. It is one of the best ways to get
money for college as it is used by federal and state
governments as well as colleges and universities to
help determine how much money they will give you
to pay for college. The information on the FAFSA
may also be used by colleges or private
organizations to help determine scholarship
eligibility. Now that you know a little more about
what the FAFSA is, here are some other things you
should know3:

Q: Who should fill out the FAFSA?


A: Students who plan to enroll in college
during the following academic year (fall
through summer). This includes high
school seniors as well as current college
students. The new FAFSA must be
submitted EVERY YEAR a student wants
financial aid for college.

Q: Whose information goes on the FAFSA?

For more information about the FAFSA, financial


aid, etc., go to studentaid.ed.gov.

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A: Both the student and their parent(s)


must provide some financial and personal
information to complete the students
FAFSA. Who is considered a parent for
purposes of the FAFSA depends on a few
different factors such as the parents
marital status, where the student is living,
etc. See next page for flow chart.

Q: When should I complete my FAFSA?


A: The FAFSA opens on January 1st for the
following academic year (Fall, Winter, and
Summer). The priority deadline for
completing the FAFSA for Michigan is
March 1st. (See
https://fafsa.ed.gov/deadlines.htm for the
deadlines in other states).
However, some colleges may want you to
complete it sooner, so be sure to check with
the college you are interested in. (For
example, WMU asks that your FAFSA be
done by mid-February on many of their
scholarship applications.)

Q: Where do I fill out the FAFSA?


A: At fafsa.gov. Do not go anywhere else to
fill out the FAFSA! There are scam sites that
will charge you a fee to complete a fake
FAFSA. Remember that the FAFSA is the
FREE Application for Federal Student Aid.

13

14

Q: What type of financial aid (money) can I


get from the FAFSA?
A: There are three main types of aid you
can get from the FAFSA:
-

Grants: Free money that you dont


have to pay back; these typically are
given out based on some type of
financial need.
o Examples: Federal Pell Grant,
Iraq and Afghanistan Service
Grant

Loans: Money that you have to pay


back to the government with interest
(except in the case of the Direct
Subsidized Loan; the government pays
the interest on this while the student is
in school provided they meet certain
criteria)
o Examples: Direct Subsidized
Loan, Direct Unsubsidized
Loan, Direct Plus Loan

Work-Study: Money set aside for the


student to help them find a job while
they are in school. Students work a
regular job (they are NOT paid to study
like the name seems to indicate) which
could potentially be on-campus or offcampus. While working, they receive
wages periodically (weekly, bi-weekly,
etc.). So keep in mind that work-study
funding will not necessarily be available
to pay up-front costs like the students
first bill.

15

Note: The information on the


FAFSA may also be used by
colleges and/or private
companies and organizations to
help determine if a student is
eligible for other scholarships
and grants. So even if you are
not sure if you will get anything
from the government, your
FAFSA may still help you get
money from other sources.

Q: Why should I fill out the FAFSA?


A: MONEY!!! The FAFSA is one of the best
ways to get money for college as it is used
by so many different sources to help
determine how much money you will get.
The state government, federal government,
colleges, private organizations, and
companies all may use information from
the FAFSA.

Steps to Completing the FAFSA


1. Apply for an FSA ID. The FSA ID is used
to electronically sign the FAFSA. Both the
student who the FAFSA is for and one of
their parents are required to sign the
FAFSA to verify the information is correct.
So both the student and one of their parents
need an FSA ID. To apply for an FSA ID, go
to fsaid.ed.gov.
Note: It typically takes 1-3 days for an FSA
ID application to be processed, so its best

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to apply in advance. You can get an FSA ID


at any time.
2. Collect Necessary Financial
Documents. Financial information from
both the student who the FAFSA is for and
their parent(s) is required to complete the
FAFSA. (See checklist on page 21 or go to
www.studentaid.ed.gov.)
One document needed is the previous years
tax information for the student and their
parent(s). If taxes have not been completed
yet, then an estimate can be used instead by
using old tax information. For example,
someone completing the FAFSA for the
2016-2017 academic year would be asked
for 2015s tax information. However, for
purposes of completing the FAFSA sooner,
they could estimate this information using
2014s taxes.
IMPORTANT: In the example, once 2015s
taxes were completed, the FAFSA would
have to be updated with the real
information.
3. Fill out the FAFSA at fafsa.gov. If you
need help, contact Miss Little.
4. Sign the FAFSA Using the FSA IDs
and Then Submit it.
5. Wait for an Email Saying your FAFSA
has been Processed. Please forward this
email to Miss Little when you receive it.

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After the FAFSA What Happens


Next?
1. Receive Your Student Aid Report
(SAR). Within 3-5 days, information about
how to access your Student Aid Report
(SAR) will be delivered to the email address
you provided on your FAFSA. (If you did
not provide an email address, your SAR will
be mailed to you.) The SAR is basically a
summary of all of the answers you provided
on the FAFSA.
2. Review Your SAR. Make sure the
information listed on your SAR is correct.
3. Look at Your Expected Family
Contribution (EFC). The Expected
Family Contribution (EFC) is the amount of
money your family is anticipated to put
toward paying for your education. This
number is used by colleges to help
determine your eligibility for the different
types of financial aid. The EFC is calculated
using a number of different factors
including income, the number of people in
your household, how many people will be in
college, etc.
4. Make Sure Your FAFSA is Complete.
If something is missing from your FAFSA,
there will be no EFC listed on your FAFSA.
Instead, there will be directions as to what
you need to do to complete your FAFSA.
5. Submit Any Documents and/or
Paperwork to complete Verification
(If Applicable). You may be asked to

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provide documentation proving that the


answers you gave on your FAFSA are
accurate. Colleges may request this
information through a student portal,
email, or regular mail, so be sure you are
checking all forms of communication you
have with the college. Documents requested
for verification should be submitted as soon
as possible as you will not be able to receive
an award letter from the college requesting
verification until after they have been
submitted.
Note: If you are asked to go through
verification, this does not mean that you
have done anything wrong or made any
mistakes. Some colleges verify students at
random; some verify all students.
6. Wait for Award Letters from
Colleges. On the FAFSA, you will be able
to choose which colleges receive your
financial information. Every college you list
on the FAFSA then uses this information to
create a list of the different types and
amounts of financial aid they will give you
to attend there. This list is your award
letter. If you file your FAFSA by March 1st,
you can expect an award letter in late
March or April.
7. Compare the Award Letters to See
Which College will be Most
Affordable. Remember that all financial
aid types are not created equal. For
example, grants are free money; you dont
have to pay it back. Loans you have to pay
back, in most cases with interest. This is the

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order in which you should accept financial


aid:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Scholarships and Grants


Work-study
Direct Subsidized Loans
Other Federal Loans
Loans from Your State
Government or College
6. Private Loans
8. Make a Decision and Start the
Enrollment process! (See the section on
Enrollment f0r more information.)

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Documents
needed for
the FAFSA

21

The Tuition Incentive


Program
The Tuition Incentive Program is a financial aid
program administered by the State of Michigan. TIP
provides money to eligible students to help pay for
college.
What TIP Covers
Money from TIP is distributed in two phases with
the amount given varying between the two:

Eligibility Check-list

Received 24 months of Medicaid eligibility


within a 36-consecutive-month period
between age 12 and high school graduation
(Graduation means finishing high school
with a diploma or certificate of completion.)
Completed and returned application form
to Student Scholarships and Grants before4
high school graduation or obtaining a GED.

A student has until August 31 of the academic year


in which his/her class graduates
4

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Graduated from high school or obtained a


GED before age 20.

How to Apply
If you think you may be eligible for TIP, please call
Student Scholarships and Grants at 1-888-4GRANTS (1-888-447-2687). SSG may ask for some
information such as your Social Security Number,
address, etc.
Certification
A College Payment Authorization letter will be
mailed to the address on record with SSG. This
letter is used as proof that a student has TIP funds.
A copy of this letter must be sent to the financial aid
office of the college where the student plans to
enroll in order to receive the money provided by
TIP.

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Scholarships
Scholarships, which are free money generally
earned because of some type of merit, are an
important piece in paying for college. Here are
some tips and resources to help you in your hunt:

1. Start looking NOW!


No matter what age you are or what grade you
are in, there are scholarships available to you!
The earlier you start looking, the better off you
will be as you will be less likely to miss
scholarships you are eligible for or to miss
important scholarship application deadlines.

2. Left-handed? Tall? Have the perfect


plan if zombies attack? Theres a
scholarship for that!
There are scholarships available for pretty
much EVERYTHING. As a first step to looking
for scholarships, write down a list of all of your
personal characteristics, hobbies, areas of
interest, jobs you have had/companies you have
worked for, colleges you are interested in,
future career goals, etc. These can then be used
to help you search for scholarships geared
toward people, like you, with those attributes.

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3. Look online.
There are a lot of online scholarship search
tools you can use. Here are just a few resources
to get you started:

www.collegeboard.org
www.fastweb.com
www.findtuition.com
www.scholarships.com
www.scholarshipexperts.com
www.collegegreenlight.com
www.collegeraptor.com (This website helps
you compare the costs of different colleges.)
www.rpcollegeadviser.weebly.com (This is
Miss Littles website.)
www.cffmc.org/receive (This is for the
Community Foundations scholarship
application.)
Scholly (This is an app for a smart phone.)

4. Look offline.
There are tons of places that give out
scholarships. Some of these may be listed on
the internet, but some may not be. Be sure to
check out these other sources to see if they have
scholarships available.

The Community Foundation for Muskegon


County
Colleges (e.g., Hope College)
Service Clubs (e.g., Optimist Club)
Religious Organizations (e.g., Presbyterian
Church)
Unions (e.g., UAW)
Your or Your Parents Employers

25

Professional Sports Teams (e.g., Detroit


Tigers Foundation)
Sporting Associations (e.g., Michigan State
Youth Soccer Association)
Businesses (Big and Small) (e.g., Nolan)
Professional Associations (e.g., National
Society of Professional Engineers)
Military Associations (e.g., American
Legion)
Politicians
Other
o Counselors/College Adviser
o The Senior Bulletin (This is a
monthly list of scholarships
compiled by Mrs. Duplissis. You
can find an electronic copy of the
Senior Bulletin by going to Mrs.
Earharts blog or Miss Littles
webpage.)
o Old Newspapers
o Scholarship Books

5. Treat your scholarship search like a


part-time job.
There is no denying it; finding and applying for
scholarships is hard work. Imagine, though,
spending 1-2 hours on an application and then
getting a $500 scholarship. That is like getting
paid $250-$500 an hour! Treat your
scholarship search like a part-time job with a
delayed paycheck.

6. Somebody has got to win the


scholarshipit might as well be you!

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The surest way NOT to get a scholarship is by


NOT applying in the first place. Dont sell
yourself short! You will never know if you could
have gotten a scholarship if you dont try.

Bonus: Dont forget the Community


Foundation for Muskegon Countys online
scholarship application! This one application is
used for +200 local scholarships! The
application opens November 1st and closes
March 1st.

Enrolling at a College
So what happens after college applications are done,
the FAFSA has been completed, and you are moving
toward making your final decision? Lots! On the
following page you will find a checklist5 of some of
the things you may need to do to enroll at the
college of your choice.

You can find a copy of this checklist and other


resources for seniors by going to
http://www.itsmilife.com/college-applicationweek/
5

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~ September 2015 ~

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Notes:

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September

November

~ October 2015 ~

Sun
Mon
Tue
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Notes: Try to have all of
1
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your college applications
done by
Halloween/November 1st!

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Michigan

College

Application

Week

Oct. 26-30

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Sun
1 CFFMC

December

~ November 2015 ~

October

Mon

Tue

Wed

Thu

Fri

Sat

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

Notes:

Scholarship
Application
Opens

36


November

Sun

~ December 2015 ~
Mon

Tue

January

Wed Thu
Fri
2
3
4

Sat
5

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

Notes:

37


December

February

~ January 2016 ~

Sun

Mon

Tue

Wed

Thu

Fri

Sat

2016-2017
FAFSA
Opens

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

Notes:

38

~ February 2016 ~

January

Sun

Mon

Tue

Wed

March

Thu

Fri

Sat

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

Notes:

39


February

Sun

~ March 2016 ~
Mon

Tue
1

FAFSA
Priority
Deadline

April

Wed Thu
Fri
2
3
4

Sat
5

CFFMC
Scholarship
Application
Closes

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

Notes:

40

~ April 2016 ~

March

Sun Mon
Notes:

Tue

Wed

May

Thu

Fri

Sat

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

41

~ May 2016 ~

April

Sun

Mon

Tue

Wed

June

Thu

Fri

Sat

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

Notes:

42

~ June 2016 ~

May

Sun
Notes:

Mon

Tue

Wed

July

Thu

Fri

Sat

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

43

~ July 2016 ~

June

Sun

Mon

Tue

Wed

August

Thu

Fri

Sat

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

Notes:

44

September

~ August 2016 ~

July

Sun
1

Mon
2

Tue

Wed Thu
Fri
3
4
5

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

Notes:

45

Sat

Deadlines to Remember:

Acknowledgements: The ideas and information in


this planner come from multiple sources. This
information may be modified or unmodified from
its original source.

46

47

48

49

50

51

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