Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 14

CIRCE and PENELOPE

Look very closely at the paintings:
Circe offering a cup to Ulysees John William Waterhouse 1849 ‐ 1917
and
Penelope with the suitors, Pintoricchio

Annotate them with your ideas about the story they tell.

1
In Homer’s Odyssey, Penelope was the wife of Odysseus, who took 
ten years to return home after the Trojan wars.  She was besieged 
by suitors wanting her to marry them, who insisted on living in the 
palace and helping themselves to anything they wanted.  She stayed 
faithful to her husband by pretending that she would make a decision 
when she had finished the tapestry she was working on.  She worked 
on it every day, but secretly unpicked it every night.  At last her 
deception was discovered and she then said she would marry 
whoever could string Odysseus’s great bow and shoot an arrow 
through twelve axes.  By this time Odysseus himself had returned to 
his court disguised as a beggar.  He won the challenge and then 
killed all the suitors who had pestered Penelope.

In this poem, Duffy creates a Penelope who is quite happy being on 
her own and doesn’t want either the suitors or Odysseus particularly.  
It begins at the point where Penelope might reasonably expect 
Odysseus’s return after the ten years of the wars.

2
CIRCE

Circe is one of the many characters in Homer’s ‘Odyssey’.  This tells the story 
of Odysseus who had offended the sea­god, Poseidon.  When he tried to 
return to his native island of Ithaca after the Trojan wars, Odysseus found 
himself constantly being driven further from home by the sea and the waves.  It 
took him ten years to return home and he had many adventures.  The island on 
which the enchantress, Circe, lived was very beautiful but all the men who 
were tempted to land there were given magic potions by Circe which turned 
them into swine.  They were then served as dinner for Circe and her 
attendants.  With the help of the god Hermes and a magical plant, Odysseus 
managed to defeat Circe and rescue his men.  They spent some time on the 
island and Odysseus fathered two sons by Circe

The poem is written from Circe’s point of view which sees all men as pigs.  
There is also an implicit reference to the cannibals of the South Seas islands 
who referred to human flesh as ‘long pig’.

3
4
CIRCE and PENELOPE

Work in two groups. One on 'Circe' and one on 'Penelope'

These poems give a voice to two women who appeared in Homer's epic poem The 
Odyssey, an account of Odysseus' journey home from the Trojan war.

As you read, make notes on any ideas or questions you have about your poem or any 
similarities you notice with other poems in the collection.

Re‐read the poem, this time aloud. What is your overall impression of the speaker? How 
would you sum up the woman speaking> Is there any change or development in the 
poem?

5
CIRCE and PENELOPE
Now use the notes below to develop your analysis of the poem you have worked on so far:
TONE OF VOICE ADDRESS
How would you describe the  The poems are both dramatic 
speaker's tone of voice (for  monologues. Is there an 
example, assertive, timid,  assumed listener (as in 
contented, agitated,  Eurydice) or is the poem 
mocking, sincere, private,  spoken to a general listener?
public and son on?)
Is the whole poem delivered 
in the same tone of voice or  STYLE, LANGUAGE, POETIC TECHNIQUES
are there variations? How would you describe the style of the poem? 
For example is it serious, light‐hearted, prosaic 
STRUCTURE or lyrical? Do you notice any patterns or 
Add a title for each stanza or section to  particular word groups being used? If so, do 
summarise what happens. Is there a  these seem appropriate for the story and 
story or obvious progression in the tale  context of the poem, or do they strike you as 
told by the wife? Is this progress (or lack  incongruous? Are there any examples of Duffy's 
characteristic techniques, for example, 
of progress) reflected in the language 
repetition, internal rhymes, punning, lists of 
used? Write out the opening and 
synonyms, metaphors (especially those 
concluding lines and write down any 
concerned with language and communication?
connections you notice to do with style 
or structure.

6
CIRCE and PENELOPE
Read the summary of The Odyssey. Highlight words or phrases connected to the poem 
you have been studying.

In your groups compare the way these words and phrases have been used in the poem you 
have studied.

What role do Penelope and Circe play in The Odyssey? How does this compare with the 
characterisation and role they have been given by Carol Ann Duffy?

Now read the poem you have not studied. As a group, jot down four or five questions to ask 
the other group.

Swap questions, so that you now have a set of questions on the poem you have been 
focusing on. Try to answer the questions you have been given.

Find a partner from the other group and take it in turns to feed back your answers. Talk 
about any areas of disagreement.

Now write your responses on the comparison grid.

7
CIRCE and PENELOPE
THE MADONNA/WHORE DICHOTOMY

Throughout literary and social history, women have


often been grouped under one of two headings: the
whore figure and the Madonna figure. Christians
often refer to Eve (the temptress) and Mary the
mother of Christ as the types of womanhood.

While the Madonna is idealised as pure and


untainted, the whore is an object of fear and
desire. Wives, mothers and daughters are assumed
to be in the first group, while mistresses,
prostitutes (and in some cultures any unmarried,
independent women, particularly if sexually active)
are placed in the dangerous desirable category.
When the Madonna group fail - or refuse- to live up
to the idealised version of the female, they
immediately fall from grace into the category of
whore.

8
CIRCE and PENELOPE
Does the Whore/Madonna dichotomy still exist? If so, where is it seen?

Is it challenged or undermined and if so, how and by whom?

Is there any evidence that where it is still being seen it is being parodied?

Is there a similar dichotomy for men?

Think about 'Penelope' and 'Circe' in the light of the glamorisation and
sexualisation of areas previously safe in the domain of the 'Madonna/goddess':
domestic activities such as cookery, child rearing and so on.

Readings of Homer's The Odyssey frequently categorise Circe as the


archetypal dangerous temptress while Penelope is the archetype of the pure and
faithful wife, fending off suitors for 20 years - even as her husband is waylaid
by the temptress.

9
CIRCE and PENELOPE

Reread the poems and make two headings:

CONFORMS TO SUBVERTS

Explore how Duffy uses both a conventional reading of Homer's women and challenges or 
develops it.

Think beyond the characterisation of the women and the role they play, to consider the 
language they use. For example, Circe's language is far more physically sensual and 
sexualised than is Penelope's, foregrounding her role as the tempting whore. Penelope's 
poem focuses on her sewing, and archetypal feminine 'domestic goddess' activity.

Write a paragraph outlining your view of what Duffy is trying to do in these poems and 
how successful you think she is.

10
CIRCE and PENELOPE

Circe is one of the many characters in Homer’s ‘Odyssey’.  This tells the story of Odysseus 
who had offended the sea‐god, Poseidon.  When he tried to return to his native island of 
Ithaca after the Trojan wars, Odysseus found himself constantly being driven further from 
home by the sea and the waves.  It took him ten years to return home and he had many 
adventures.  The island on which the enchantress, Circe, lived was very beautiful but all the 
men who were tempted to land there were given magic potions by Circe which turned 
them into swine.  They were then served as dinner for Circe and her attendants.  With the 
help of the god Hermes and a magical plant, Odysseus managed to defeat Circe and 
rescue his men.  They spent some time on the island and Odysseus fathered two sons by 
Circe

The poem is written from Circe’s point of view which sees all men as pigs.  There is also an 
implicit reference to the cannibals of the South Seas islands who referred to human flesh 
as ‘long pig’.

11
CIRCE and PENELOPE

Background:

In Homer’s Odyssey, Penelope was the wife of Odysseus, who took ten years to return 
home after the Trojan wars.  She was besieged by suitors wanting her to marry them, 
who insisted on living in the palace and helping themselves to anything they wanted.  
She stayed faithful to her husband by pretending that she would make a decision when 
she had finished the tapestry she was working on.  She worked on it every day, but 
secretly unpicked it every night.  At last her deception was discovered and she then 
said she would marry whoever could string Odysseus’s great bow and shoot an arrow 
through twelve axes.  By this time Odysseus himself had returned to his court disguised 
as a beggar.  He won the challenge and then killed all the suitors who had pestered 
Penelope.

In this poem, Duffy creates a Penelope who is quite happy being on her own and 
doesn’t want either the suitors or Odysseus particularly.  It begins at the point where 
Penelope might reasonably expect Odysseus’s return after the ten years of the wars.

12
13
Attachments

Comparison grid circe and penelope.doc

Оценить