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Benjamin Dillon

30306599
LESSON PLAN Rotation and Revolution
KEY POINTS
STAGE
INTEREST

INSTRUCTOR NOTES
INTRODUCTION
Question students.
Have you ever wondered why things turn and spin
around?
Show video of the earth in rotation and revolution

AIDS / TIMING
5 Minutes
Have YouTube clip
up on Smartboard

How does this relate to circular motion?


Uniform circular motion is when an object moves
along a circular path in which there is no change
in speed, only a change in direction. (Tippens, P.
E.)
What scientific principles have you heard about
that describe how things move?
Sir Isaac Newtons three laws explain the
principles of circular motion. They are, in order:
An object at rest will remain at rest unless acted
on by an unbalanced force. An object in motion
continues in motion with the same speed and in
the same direction unless acted upon by an
unbalanced force. This law is often called the
law of inertia.
Acceleration is produced when a force acts on a
mass. The greater the mass (of the object being
accelerated) the greater the amount of force
needed (to accelerate the object).
For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction.

NEED

TOPIC
LINK TO
PREVIOUS

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Explain how these laws also apply when objects


move in circles.
To know the application of science to things in the
world and in space that are seen or experienced,
students must first understand what they see and
be able to describe it. Next they need to be aware
of laws of science, and lastly, these laws need to
explain in simple terms what they understand
Rotation and Revolution
Other topics that have already been taught in the
past. These include:
A push or a pull affects how an object moves
or changes shape (ACSSU033)

Write topic on
board / on
PowerPoint
Make connection
verbally

Benjamin Dillon
30306599

LESSON
OBJECTIVES
FOCUS

SOURCE
CHECK IF
UNDERSTOOD

KEY POINTS
STAGE
ESTABLISH
(Point 1)

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Use of apparatus including machines, tools


and primitive weapons
The earth in space
Planets and satellites in orbit
1. Define rotation and revolution
2. Give examples of rotation and revolution
3. Conduct activities that show these forces in
action
The lesson will be conducted in a classroom with
a short activity to demonstrate the effect of
circular motion forces on objects. Student
participation will be encouraged. Questions will
be asked to test understanding and any references
to individual values will be treated with
sensitivity.
Give book reference or website if applicable
I.e. The reference for this lesson is AusVELS
Ask: Are there Any Questions before I continue?

INSTRUCTOR NOTES
DEVELOPMENT / BODY

Write on
Whiteboard

Online

AIDS / TIMING
30 Minutes

What is rotation?
10 Minutes
- Ask students for their explanation
- See if they can give an example of this
happening
- Ask them why they think it is rotation
- Tell students that in this lesson, they will learn
how forces cause this effect and how we can see
when it is happening
Definition: rotation is the forces that act on any
object as it spins around an axis.
Things to know:
What is an axis?
An axis is an imaginary line through the
centre of an object, from end to end, about
which the object turns around. This turning
can be in either direction. We normally
refer to the direction as clockwise or
anticlockwise (ask if any students have an
analogue watch with hands).
What is a force?
A force is the energy that can be measured,
that causes any object to move. Not all
movement is in a straight line, nor is it
always uniform.

Benjamin Dillon
30306599

CHECK
SUMMARY
ESTABLISH
(Point 2)

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What types of objects can rotate?


Normally, objects that are spherical or
round in at least one plane (even a pole),
however, other objects can also rotate, i.e.
a pendulums swing is an example of a
partial rotation. There is no size limitation,
i.e. the sun, moon and earth.
What signs can we see?
The object goes round its axis. Note it may
also be moving in another manner as well.
How can we measure it?
Rotation is usually measured by a
complete 360 turn to its original place.
Ask why the axis is important to a rotating object.
Provide correct answer if required and get
students to take notes. Draw a ball on the board,
clearly showing axis and direction of spin.
What is revolution?
- Ask students for their explanation
- See if they can give an example of revolution
and how it is different from rotation
- Tell students that in this lesson, they will also
learn how forces cause this effect and how we
can see when it is happening
Definition: revolution is the force that acts on an
object to cause it to travel around another object
that is outside of its own dimensions. We refer to
the path as its orbit.
Things to know:
What is an orbit?
An orbit is an imaginary line around a
position which may or may not be visible.
An example of an invisible point is the
place we call the south celestial pole about
which all of the stars travel in the southern
sky (we cant see it but know its there).
These orbits are normally in one plane
(like the edge of a plate) but can be in any
direction.
What types of objects can revolve?
Any object can revolve around another,
and in our previous example, the pendulum
head rotates around the fixed point known
as a fulcrum. Again, there are no size
limitations, i.e. the moon revolves around
the earth.
What signs can we see?
The moon goes around the earth and we
see it rise in the east and set in the west.
How can we measure it?

2 Minutes
Picture and notes
on whiteboard
10 Minutes

Benjamin Dillon
30306599

CHECK
SUMMARY

ESTABLISH
(Point 3)

CHECK
SUMMARY

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One revolution is a complete circuit


measuring 360 back to its original place.
Ask how a revolution is different to a rotation.
Provide correct answer if required and get
students to take notes. Add to the drawing on the
board, clearly showing another object and show
its pathway with a line, around the rotating ball.
Tell the students that we are going to explore some
practical examples of rotation and revolution, and
then they are going to record their findings.
1. Rotation
Get students to hang an object from a piece
of string and connect the string to a swivel
(use a fishing swivel).
Ask the students to rub their hands on the
string and record the effect of the object
(note that they should see it spin).
This experiment could be demonstrated
from the front using a hand drill so that
students can see the movement in either
direction.
Explain that the force in rotation is known
as centripetal.
2. Revolution
Get the students to swing the object from a
piece of string but this time, in the air
around in a circle. Advise that it does not
need to be parallel with the floor.
Demonstrate to the class using a container
with water to show that this force can be
applied to all sorts of objects including
different states of matter. The water should
be seen to move to the furthest point.
Explain that the force in revolution is
known as centrifugal.
Ask students what they noted to be the difference
between the object suspended on the string and
when it was whirled around in a circle.
Explanation of these forces can include such
topics as: objects in space, machines such as drills
and saws, parts of vehicles including the wheels
and even the engine, and household appliances
such as washing machines or kitchen tools. These
forces have been used and understood long before
our present civilisation, i.e. the wheel in the stone
age, a bullroarer (rock on string) used by many
ancient cultures including Aborigines.

2 Minutes
Picture and notes
on whiteboard
10 Minutes

Hand out
equipment

Show class

Students record
notes
Hand out
equipment
Show class

Students record
notes
5 Minutes
Tell

Benjamin Dillon
30306599
KEY POINTS
STAGE
LESSON
OBJECTIVES
REVIEWED
FOCUS
REVIEWED

LINK TO
NEXT
CHECK IF
UNDERSTOOD

INSTRUCTOR NOTES
CONCLUSION
1. Define rotation and revolution
2. Give examples of rotation and revolution
3. Conduct activities that show these forces in
action
The lesson taught principles of circular motion
and students were able to observe the differences
through practical activity. Questions tested
understanding. Student participation encouraged.
Test of understanding. Any references to
individual values were treated with sensitivity.
Forces of rotation and revolution will be continued
in the next science lesson, focusing on inertia.
Ask: Does anyone have any last questions?

AIDS / TIMING
5 Minutes
Write on board

Results will be
collected at the end
of the lesson by the
teacher.

Reference list
- Earth Rotation & Revolution around a moving Sun, Kurdistan Planetarium (Uploaded on
2 Dec 2008) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lkWyM-M8o0c
- http://teachertech.rice.edu/Participants/louviere/Newton/law3.html
- http://www.physicsclassroom.com/mmedia/circmot/ucm.cfm
- https://www.stcharlesprep.org/01_parents/vandermeer_s/Useful%20Links/Honors
%20Physics/pdf%20lectures/Circular%20Motion.pdf

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