Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 20

Jayde Brownhill 17994157

EDU3DMT: Assessment Task Two


Student name: Zee

Date of birth: Not required

Year level: 4

Date: 12th May, 2015

Collection and analysis of data

Zee was a new student at CLTC in 2015, because of this no data had been
collected from the previous years.

At CLTC students are not required to undertake the Interview past Year 2, unless
theyre at risk. This meant I was unable to compare Zees results with the data
from all Year 4 students.

However, Zee did undertake a Maths On-demand Number test scoring 2.7 and a
pre-test on Place Value scoring 3.5. This was beneficial as it gave an indication of
his overall Maths ability.

Having not taught Zee before, the class teacher was unable to implement
teacher judgment to adjust and modify Zees level for Maths groups, which she
would normally do if she felt the pre-testing didnt reflect the childs capability.

With this in mind, the Maths Interview was helpful for the class teacher as it
provided detailed evidence of Zees abilities in relation to specific number
concepts, namely multiplication and division.

Having been Zees PST since January, we have maintained a positive


relationship up until this point. I believe this benefited me as I told him that by
completing a series of questions he would really be helping me with my Uni work
and he willingly accepted.

Prior to the test he seemed comfortable and relaxed. I had told him that it was
my first time undertaking the test and apologised if the process was a little slow.

Throughout the test, Zee attempted every question he was asked to the best of
his ability. Zee completed sections C (Addition and Subtraction) and D
(Multiplication and Division). These two areas were chosen as the class had just
completed Addition and Subtraction strategies and were beginning Multiplication
strategies, a convenient and applicable situation.

This test would allow me to identify the remaining gaps in Zees Addition and
Subtraction knowledge and target possible areas of weakness for future
teachings on Multiplication and Division.

Zee is a visual and tactile learner in regards to his learning styles/needs.

Individual Learning Plan

Jayde Brownhill 17994157

Addition and Subtraction Results


Strengths

Zee was confident when adding simple numbers together. For example in
Q18, Q21 (d) and Q23 (b) when the question required Zee to add any 1 digit
number to a 2-digit number ending in 8 or 9, he was able to round to ten and
add the remainder every time.

Zee was able to draw on knowledge of doubles for simple addition and
subtraction problems as evident in Q21 (a) and Q22. Similarly in Q22 (b) he
used known doubles to add 8 + 7, e.g. double 7 add 1.

Zee can correctly read number sentences aloud and was able to work out
addition and subtraction problems (Q24 & Q25) by using the formal
algorithms.

Weaknesses

Zee relies heavily on grouping numbers by visualizing the formal algorithm


(e.g. adding hundreds, then tens and ones) when mentally adding or
subtracting numbers. Whilst he was successful in completing Q21 (d) this
way, applying this mental strategy to multi-digit numbers results in
confusion.

Zee struggles with the relationship/connection between addition and


subtraction of larger numbers (Q23).

Zee lacks the ability to effectively utilise mental strategies when estimating
answers to solve large subtraction problems (Q25).

Learning improvement goals for Addition and Subtraction


1. Understand how the operations of addition and subtraction behave and how
they relate to one another.
2. Strengthen and explore mental computation strategies for addition and
subtraction, applying this to multi-digit numbers (thinking flexibly with
numbers).
3. Use and develop mental strategies to improve estimations.

Learning outcomes
1. Level 3 - Recognise and explain the connection between addition and

Jayde Brownhill 17994157


subtraction (ACMNA054)
2. Level 3 - Recall addition facts for single-digit numbers and related
subtraction facts to develop

increasingly efficient mental

strategies for computation (ACMNA055)


3. Level 5 - Use estimation and rounding to check the reasonableness of
answers to calculations. (ACMNA099)

Multiplication & Division Results


Strengths

Zee is able to effectively skip count by 2s, 3s, 4s and 5s.


Zee is able to solve simple multiplication problems when multiplying

single digit numbers or two-digit numbers ending in zero.


He uses basic facts to solve more complex problems (Q32 d & e)
Zee can solve simple division problems when dividing two-digit numbers
by 2, 3, 5 and 10.

Weaknesses

Zee struggled with Q31 and asked for materials to solve the problem. He
was unable to visualise what the question was asking. I continued to
prompt him by rewording/paraphrasing the question differently,

eventually helping him come to right answer.


Zee lacks the ability to recall facts up to 10 x 10. He uses skip counting

on his fingers to solve larger multiplication problems, e.g. 5 x 7.


Zee doesnt recognise the commutative relationship between division
and multiplication. E.g. Q33 e) 355 , f) 357 . He relied on trying to skip

count by 7s.

Zee struggles to solve worded multiplication and division problems


He lacks a strong grounding in mental computation strategies (e.g.
finding a known fact, doubling) to solve unknown multiplication and
division facts.

Learning Improvement Goals


1. Build on and extend basic multiplication facts up to 10 x 10
2. Explore and develop strategies to work out unknown multiplication facts,
namely 6s, 7s, 8s, 9s
3. Develop efficient mental strategies for solving multiplication problems

4. Solve simple division worded problems

Jayde Brownhill 17994157


5. Use known multiplication facts to solve related division problems
(commutative law).

Learning Outcomes

1. Level 4 - Apply place value to partition, rearrange and regroup numbers to at


least tens of thousands to assist calculations and solve problems (ACMNA073)
2. Level 4 - Recall multiplication facts up to 10 10 and related division
facts (ACMNA075)
3. Level 4 - Develop efficient mental and written strategies and use appropriate
digital technologies for multiplication and for division where there is
no remainder (ACMNA076)

School and classroom strategies


Week 1
Overview: Zee shows a clear understanding of known facts and fact families
when dealing with most numbers less than 20. However, with numbers greater
than 20, Zee was unable to recognise the relationship between 100, 68, and 32.
The focus of the first two lessons will be exploring the relationship between
addition and subtraction, with single digit and multi-digit numbers respectively.
The focus for the rest of the week will be developing and extending Zees
repertoire of mental computation strategies for addition and subtraction, with a
strong focus on fluency and reasoning.
Monday - Fact Families
Learning Intention:
- Recognise three single digit numbers that are related through the operations of
addition and subtraction.
- Recognise that there are two related addition and two related subtraction
equations in a family of facts
Success Criteria:
-Write and read sets of related addition and subtraction equations
Activity
In small groups students explore the sets of numbers that are fact families. In
pairs students select a set of 3 numbers to investigate. Students take digit cards
(representing their chosen numbers), and cards with addition, subtraction and
equals symbols. Ask What questions can you make with your numbers?

Jayde Brownhill 17994157

Prompting questions: What do you notice? What operations have we used?


Why couldnt some sets be used?
Extension Activities:

Black out numbers of fact families equations.


- 16 9 = ; 16 = + 7; 7 + = 16, 9 = 16 -

Problem Solving; Complete the set by finding the missing number from
16, 9

Resources: Digit cards, symbol cards.


Reference: http://nzmaths.co.nz/resource/number-families-and-relationships

Tuesday - Extending Fact Families


Learning Intention:
- Recognise three multi-digit numbers that are related through the operations of
addition and subtraction.
- Recognise that there are two related addition and two related subtraction
equations in a family of facts
Success Criteria:
-Write and read sets of related addition and subtraction equations
-Explain, in their own words, the inverse relationship between addition and
subtraction
Activity
This activity builds on from the previous lesson but requires Zee to apply the
strategy to multi-digit numbers. E.g. 65, 35, 100; 20, 7, 13; 22, 88, 100. In pairs
students investigate the relationship between the numbers, using the symbol
and digit cards. They should be able to create four equations. Students discuss
and share their investigations
Extension Activity

Fluency game; http://www.aaamath.com/add34ax1.htm

Resources: Digit cards, symbol cards.


Reference: http://nzmaths.co.nz/resource/number-families-and-relationships

Jayde Brownhill 17994157

Wednesday Mental Computation


Partitioning and Jump Strategy
Learning Intention: To use a range of mental computation strategies to solve
addition and subtraction problems.
Success Criteria: Combine knowledge of partitioning with the jump strategy to
aid computation
Activity
In pairs students are given a list of addition and subtraction problems. One
person mentally and orally completes the sum using partitioning and jumping,
whilst the other person follows the thinking on the hundreds chart. Students
alternate between roles after each question.
Resources: Hundreds Chart
Reference: Bobis, J., Mulligan, J. & Lowrie, T. (2004) Mathematics for Children,
Frenchs Forest, NSW: Pearson Education
Thursday Mental Computation
Making Compatibles/Making Tens
Learning Intention: To recognise that compatible numbers help mental
calculations
Success Criteria: Find and recognise that compatible numbers vary and include
combinations of up to 10, 20, 50.
Activity
Students are to find two or more adjacent numbers in a row or column with a
sum of 10 on a specific number chart. This is repeated to find compatible
combinations of 20 and 50 on separate number charts. Apply this strategy to
solve addition problems.
Resources: Number Charts
Reference: Reys, R., Lindquist, M., Lambin, D. & Smith, N. (2012) Helping
Children Learn Mathematics, New York City, New York: John Wiley & Sons.

Friday Mental Computation


Compensation

Jayde Brownhill 17994157

Learning Intention: To solve subtraction problems using mental computation


strategies
Success Criteria: Use the compensation strategy to mentally solve subtraction
problems.
Activity
In pairs, students solve a range of subtraction problems, up to 100, using the
compensation strategy. One person mentally and orally completes the problem
whilst the other person creates and follows their partners thinking on a number
line. Students alternate between roles after each question
Resources: Blank, laminates number lines
Reference:
https://hildroadss.eq.edu.au/Supportandresources/Formsanddocuments/Docume
nts/Parent%20Information/Math-mental-strategies-addition-and-subtraction.pdf
http://www.education.vic.gov.au/school/teachers/teachingresources/discipline/m
aths/continuum/Pages/mentaladdsub325.aspx
Week 2
Overview: This week starts by concluding mental computation strategies for
addition and subtraction through estimation; something that Zee was unable to
do successfully. The rest of the week is focusing on building up a strong
foundation of multiplication facts up to 10 x 10, using a range of written and
mental strategies to increase recall and fluency for working flexibly with
numbers.
Monday Estimation
Learning Intention: Use mental strategies to estimate answers when adding and
subtracting.
Success Criteria: Utilise rounding to estimate addition and subtraction
problems, exploring its application in real life situations.
Activity
Students explore the strategy of rounding to the closest 10, 100 or 1000 to
solve worded problems. Students apply this strategy to estimate the result of
calculations, such as estimating the cost of a supermarket trolley load, or
estimating the costs of going to the movies. Students calculate actual costs and

Jayde Brownhill 17994157


compare this to their estimations.
Resources: Word problems.
References:
http://ausvels.vcaa.vic.edu.au/Curriculum/ContentDescription/ACMNA099
Tuesday Doubling
Learning Intention: Use the strategy of doubling to solve unknown multiplication
facts
Success Criteria: To use doubling of 3 times tables to work out the 6 times
tables;
To use doubling of 4 times tables to work out the 8 times tables.
Activity
Zee lists the 3 times tables down one column. Along side this Zee writes the 6
times tables by doubling the complimentary 3 times tables. For example
3x2=6

6 x 2 = 12

3x3=9

6 x 3 = 18

3 x 4 = 12

6 x 4 = 24

This can be completed for the 4 times tables to work out the 8 times tables.
Allow time for Zee to practice using this strategy mentally.

Wednesday Patterns in Nine


Learning Intention: Use effective strategies to solve unknown multiplication
facts.
Success Criteria: Use thinking strategies to solve nine multiplication facts.
Activity
Students explore the thinking strategies used to solve nine times tables. They
explore the two patterns exhibited in multiplication facts of 9. First, the pattern
for the ten digits (distributive law) and secondly, the pattern for the one digits,
then combine the two patterns to solve all nine facts. Model this aloud on the
board and have students complete all nine times tables.
Reference: Zevenbergen, R., Dole, S. & Wright, R. (2004) Teaching
Mathematics in Primary Schools, Crows Nest, NSW: Allen & Unwin.

Jayde Brownhill 17994157

Extension: Teach Zee the 9 method using fingers. See:


http://www.bbc.co.uk/skillswise/factsheet/ma13tabl-e3-f-9x-table-tips
Thursday Solving Sevens
Learning Intention: To use effective strategies to solve unknown multiplication
facts
Success Criteria: Using known facts to solve 7 times tables and any difficult
unknown multiplication facts.
Activity
Using known facts, modeled with arrays, students explore the ways 7 times
tables can be created. E.g. 7 x 7, known fact of 2 x 7 = 14, 5 x 7 = 35, add them
together = 49, model using arrays.
Resources: Counters for making arrays
Reference: Booker, G., Bond, D., Sparrow, L. & Swan, P. (2010) Teaching
Primary Mathematics, Frenchs Forest, NSW: Pearson.
Friday - Commutative Law
Learning Intention: Explore the commutative law of multiplication facts to build
up multiplicative thinking
Success Criteria: Using arrays students explain the commutative properties of
multiplication facts.
Activity
Students explore the commutative property of multiplication to solve unknown
facts by manipulating arrays to find its partnered equation. E.g. Students draw
an array to model 7 4. Ask them to explain why 4 7 produces the same
product. Show and explain how a multiplication chart represents this. Students
complete the two same activities to solve unknown multiplication facts.
Resources: Hundreds chart, counters
Week 3
Overview: This week will focus on strengthening and developing efficient
mental strategies for solving multiplication problems that require manipulating
single and multi-digit numbers. Zee will apply knowledge of multiplication to
worded problems. Zee will also start to look at the notion of division through

Jayde Brownhill 17994157

sharing by exploring simple worded problems.


Monday Mental Multiplication
Extending Distributive Law
Learning Intention: Use mental strategies to solve multiplication problems with
multi-digit numbers.
Success Criteria: Use the knowledge of the distributive law to find and use
patterns to when mentally multiplying larger numbers.
Activity
Students write down their answers to 100 1, 100 2, 100 3 100 10,
and noting that this is easy. Then they write down their answers to the rows
involving 99, 101, 98 and 102 using a calculator to help. Many patterns are
evident. Students should work in groups to write some of these down.
Emphasise those patterns that assist with mental multiplication.
Resource: Paper, pens
Reference:
http://www.education.vic.gov.au/school/teachers/teachingresources/discipline/m
aths/continuum/pages/multistrat35.aspx#a1
Tuesday Mental Multiplication
Using Factors
Learning Intention: To extend the use of factors to multiply larger numbers
Success Criteria: Using factor knowledge to manipulate larger numbers when
multiplying using a calculator
Activity
Students use a calculator to work out a range of calculations without using the
1 digit, addition and subtractions keys. Students must use find alternative
calculations using factor knowledge to solve the multiplication problems. E.g.

10

Jayde Brownhill 17994157

Resources: Calculators
Reference:
http://www.education.vic.gov.au/school/teachers/teachingresources/discipline/m
aths/continuum/pages/multistrat35.aspx#a1

Wednesday Multiplication Fluency


Learning Intention: To practice and develop fluency in multiplication times tables
Success Criteria: Choose multiplication facts to develop winning Multo-grids.
Multo is like Bingo. The teacher uses 100 cards marked from 0x0 to 9x9. The
students draw up a 4row/4column grid and enter 16 numbers that would be
answers to these cards. No repeats. The teacher draws cards one at a time and
at a regular pace announces each random times table in turn. If they have the
answer on their grid, students mark it off. Multo is either:

4 in a row horizontally
4 in a row vertically
4 in a row diagonally
All four corners

Resources:
Multo Cards: 0 x 0 through 9 x 9; Multo grids (4 x 4)

Reference: http://www.maths300.esa.edu.au/index.php?
option=com_content&view=article&id=184
Thursday Worded Problems
Addition/Subtraction/Multiplication

11

Jayde Brownhill 17994157


Learning Intention: To solve worded problems.
Success Criteria: Use a range of strategies to solve worded problems.
Activity
Zee is given a range of worded problems that require using addition, subtraction
and multiplication mental and written strategies to solve them (N.B.
multiplication algorithm is not required.)
E.g. Each 3/4 student has 40 pencils. If there are 4 students, how many pencils
are there in total?
Brayden went to the pet shop 80 times last month. He buys 4 cats each time he
goes to the store. How many cats did Brayden buy last month?
Resources: Worded Problems
Friday Estimating & Multiplication
Learning Intention: To use estimation strategies in multiplication to check
reliability of answers
Success Criteria: Use front-end estimation strategy in multiplication problems.
Activity
Students practice the front-end estimation strategy to solve a range of single
and multi-digit multiplication problems. Students work with a partner, both
students mentally estimate the answer to a question. Together they solve the
problem using previous learnt strategies. The person closest to the real answer
receives a point. The first person to 10 points wins.
(N.B. Teacher needs to create pre-determined estimation range for each
question that is acceptable).
Resources: Multiplication Problems
Week 4
Overview: This weeks focus is primarily devoted to building a strong foundation
of division skills introduced by the notion of sharing through partition. This will
be introduced through worded problems and using models/arrays to aid
development. Zee will then explore the relationship between division and
multiplication to strengthen his concept of division.

12

Jayde Brownhill 17994157

Monday Sharing
Learning Intention: To explore the concept of division through equal sharing.
Success Criteria: Use and visually represent the partition strategy to solve
worded division problems
Activity
Students are given simple stories to practice sharing. In pairs students read the
story and share counters onto a division mat to form an array that answers the
question. E.g.

Resources: Division boards, counters, stories, Number cards


Reference: Booker, G., Bond, D., Sparrow, L. & Swan, P. (2010) Teaching
Primary Mathematics, Frenchs Forest, NSW: Pearson (Page 316)

Tuesday - Stories.
Learning Intention: To explore the concept of division through sharing
Success Criteria: Create worded division problems that require using the sharing
strategy.
Activity
Students are given division equations (e.g. 42 shared among 7 equals 6) and
create their own stories, similar to the ones used in the previous activity. In pairs
students swap stories and solve them using arrays on the division mat.
Resources: Division boards, counters, stories.

13

Jayde Brownhill 17994157


Reference: Booker, G., Bond, D., Sparrow, L. & Swan, P. (2010) Teaching
Primary Mathematics, Frenchs Forest, NSW: Pearson (Page 316)
Wednesday - Fact families
Commutative Law
Learning Intention: Explore the commutative relationship between multiplication
and division facts.
Success Criteria: To identify fact families within a set of numbers.
Activity
Working with partners, students are given a set of numbers (e.g. 3, 4, 5, 12, 15,
20) and asked to write as many different multiplication or division number
sentences as they can using only numbers from the set (e.g. 3 4 = 12 and 12
4 = 3, 5 x 3 = 15, 20 4 = 5). Students group all the numbers from the same
family together. Students can use arrays to prove their findings.
Resources: Number cards, symbol cards (, = , x), counters for arrays.
Reference:
http://www.education.vic.gov.au/school/teachers/teachingresources/discipline/m
aths/continuum/Pages/factfamilies275.aspx
Extension: Provide students with blacked out fact family combinations. E.g. 63
=7, 9 x 7=
Thursday Finding Factors
Learning Intention: To apply knowledge of factors to solve problems
Success Criteria: Find sets of factors for a number.
Activity
On a computer Zee can access the Pobble arrays: find two factors interactive
game. This game help consolidate the knowledge of multiplicative thinking and
commutative property of multiplication.
Resources: Computer; Pobble Arrays: find two factors interactive game
Reference: Fuse Education (2013)
https://fuse.education.vic.gov.au/pages/View.aspx?id=bd224643-33e3-4db2add7-f6db6b6c89e5&Source=%252fpages%252fResults.aspx%253fs
%253ddivision%2526y%253d16

14

Jayde Brownhill 17994157

Processes for Assessment/Collection of Data


Integrating a wide range of strategies to foster development and build
proficiency within his Maths ability supports Zees progress throughout the unit.
Each activity has a learning intention and success criteria that is directly linked
with his learning goals as dictated by AusVELS, and seels to strength both
content knowledge and mathematical thinking skills. Zees progress will be
measured predominately through means of anecdotal observations during small
group work, collection of written work samples will be collected as means of
formally assessing understanding.
Seeing as mental computation strategies are a key component within the ILP, a
simple checklist of strategies used will be created linking Zees learning goals
with AusVELS. E.g. Makes compatibles Uses partitioning to add and subtract
etc. Asking for verbal explanations and/or reasoning can assess such strategies.
Timeline for Review and Revision
Reviewing Zees progress throughout the duration of the unit is vital to ensure
learning is paced and altered to suit his needs. At the end of the four weeks
Zees collected data will need to be reviewed against his learning goals, finding
gaps, if any, in understanding. Zees data will also need to be compared against
the progression of the entire class to identify whether he remains at risk and if
necessary prompting further development of his ILP. As the Interview is only
administered every 6 months, a full review of his ILP can be completed in 6
months time as reliable means of post-assessment.

Assignment References
Bobis, J., Mulligan, J. & Lowrie, T. (2004) Mathematics for Children. Frenchs
Forest, NSW: Pearson Education

Booker, G., Bond, D., Sparrow, L. & Swan, P. (2010) Teaching Primary
Mathematics. Frenchs Forest, NSW: Pearson

Department of Education and Training. (2013). FUSE. (Learning Object: C7Y8P6)


Retrieved from:
https://fuse.education.vic.gov.au/pages/View.aspx?id=bd224643-33e3-4db2add7-f6db6b6c89e5&Source=%252fpages%252fResults.aspx%253fs
%253ddivision%2526y%253d16

15

Jayde Brownhill 17994157

Department of Education and Early Childhood Development. (2014). Maths


Continuum: Number and Algebra. Retrieved from:
http://www.education.vic.gov.au/school/teachers/teachingresources/discipline/m
aths/continuum/Pages/continnumber.aspx

Maths 300. (2010). Multo: Lesson 52. Retrieved from:


http://www.maths300.esa.edu.au/index.php?
option=com_content&view=article&id=184

New Zealand Maths. (2010). Retrieved from:


http://nzmaths.co.nz/resource/number-families-and-relationships

Reys, R., Lindquist, M., Lambin, D. & Smith, N. (2012) Helping Children Learn
Mathematics. New York City, New York: John Wiley & Sons.

State of Queensland: Department of Education, Training and Employment.


(2015). Mental strategies Addition and subtraction. Retrieved From:
https://hildroadss.eq.edu.au/Supportandresources/Formsanddocuments/Docume
nts/Parent%20Information/Math-mental-strategies-addition-and-subtraction.pdf

Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority. (2013). Australian Curriculum in


Victoria
Retrieved from:
http://ausvels.vcaa.vic.edu.au/Mathematics/Overview/Content-structure

Zevenbergen, R., Dole, S. & Wright, R. (2004) Teaching Mathematics in Primary


Schools. Crows Nest, NSW: Allen & Unwin.

16

Jayde Brownhill 17994157

17

Jayde Brownhill 17994157

La Trobe University
Bachelor of Teaching (Primary)
LESSON PLAN FORMAT
Name: Jayde Brownhill
School: Charles Latrobe Teaching College

Date: 21-05-2015

Topic: Maths

Year Level: 4

Learning Area: Number & Algebra

Duration: 50-60 minutes

Learning Purpose:
The lesson helps to strength the understanding of the inverse relationship between addition and
subtraction. This is an important precursor to developing efficient mental computation strategies when
dealing with the addition and subtraction of larger numbers.
AusVELS reference:
Level 3 - Recognise and explain the connection between addition and subtraction (ACMNA054)

Learning Intention:
- Recognise three single digit numbers that are related through the operations of addition and
subtraction.

- Recognise that there are two related addition and two related subtraction equations in a fami
of facts
Success Criteria:
-Write and read sets of related addition and subtraction equations
Time

Teacher & Learner

Group set up

Materials

Activities
Sizzling Starter:
5 mIns

Fluency: Write the number 10 on the board. Ask students to


create equations that equal to ten.
(Students can you use + & -)
Ask students to offer their equations.

5 mins

All

Whiteboar

students

d/ Markers

on the
floor

Engagement:
Ask students to think of three numbers they like between 1-10.
Accept all groups of 3 numbers and write them on the board.
E.g. 1, 2, 3; 4, 6, 8; 1, 5, 4 etc. Write up to 10.
Explain to the students that there are some sets that make fact
families. In pairs, students select a set of three numbers to
investigate. Pose the question What equations can you make
with your numbers?

25 mins

18

Jayde Brownhill 17994157


Procedure:

Digit

Students take the digit cards for each of their chosen

cards,

numbers, symbol cards (+ , - , =), an empty tens frame and

Small

symbol

counters of two colours. Students create as many equations as

groups &

cards,

they can using their numbers only once. They model this on

working in

empty

their tens frame, and create displays with matching algorithm.

pairs

tens
frame,

N.B. (The students with an unrelated set of numbers, for

counters

example 3, 4, 5 will quickly discover that no equations can be


made using all three digits at the same time.)
The teacher should roam from group to group,
prompting them to illicit observations; Explain to me what
youre doing. What equations have you made? What sets of
numbers couldnt you use? Why?
Extension Groups:
Allow students to investigate the Fact Families of
combinations of up to 100 (both correct and incorrect) E.g.
56, 44, 100; 72, 22, 96; 21, 7, 14 etc.
OR
Problem Solving; Complete the set by finding the
missing number from 16, 9

. 42, 50, .

Students can use number lines to represent their


investigations.
Pulling it together:

All

Have students return to floor with their displays, sitting in

students

their pairs.

gathered

Ask students:
- What equations did you create?

on the
floor

- What were the most equations you could create? Why?


- What sets of numbers couldnt you make equations with?
Maths

Why?

Journal &
Reflection:

Reflection

Have students reflect on their learning by choosing one

Starters.

reflection sentence starter:


- Something new I learnt today was
- The thing that challenged me the most was because

19

Jayde Brownhill 17994157


The student should write their responses into the class maths
journal.
If time permits, ask if Family Facts is a good name and
why. Record student ideas, highlighting that fact that these
numbers are related through the operations of addition and
subtraction. Just like families are related.

Assessment / Observations of students learning:


Anecdotal observations will be used as a means of assessing student understanding
in relation to the learning intention and success criteria. This is further developed when
teachers roam from group to group, prompting the students for further explanations.
e can be used as a
formal means of assessing understanding in relation fact families.
Resources:
Teacher: Markers, white board
Students: Digit cards, symbol cards (+, -, =), empty tens frame, counters, pencils, paper
Catering for inclusion:
This lesson draws upon the principles of Multiple Intelligences:
Kinaesthetic learners, such as Zee, are catered to in this lesson as the activity is
tactile requiring them to manipulate objects to explore the concept of fact families.
The counters and ten frames used within this task cater to and support visual/spatial
learners. Creating displays allows students to visually represent their understanding.
This lesson is created around social collaboration to achieve learning goals, as it
supports students to work within their ZPD, whilst directly catering to those students who
respond well in interpersonal activities.
Fast finishers:
Students can access the following interactive game to build fluency:

http://www.aaamath.com/add34ax1.htm

Learning Space Set-up:


Students to work in small groups of 4-5. Tables are set up so that students can work
effectively side by side with a partner to complete the activity.
Reflection

Did the students achieve the learning outcome? Why/ Why not?
Was I clear in my instructions?
Did I provide effective opportunities to extend students?

20