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Diff 598

Amy Danler
9/30/15
2nd Grade Co-Integrated Classroom
Module 2 Lesson 9:
Concrete to Abstract: Measure Lengths of String Using Measurement Tools; Represent
Length with Tape Diagrams to Represent and Compare the Lengths
Unit essential questions:
How does a tape diagram help compare lengths?
Why are tape diagrams good for comparing lengths?
How does a tape diagram help represent lengths?
How does measuring length of an object in both nonstandard and standard units relate to
the size of the length unit?
Lesson questions:
How do we use both standard and nonstandard units and relate to length?
How do we use tape diagrams to represent and compare lengths?
NYS Learning Standards Lesson objective:

Assessment:

2.MD.5: Use addition and


subtraction within 100 to
solve word problems
involving lengths that are
given in the same unit,
e.g., by using drawings
(tape diagrams) and
equations with a symbol
for the unknown number
to represent the problem
2. MD.6: Represent whole
numbers as lengths from 0
on number line diagram
with equally spaced points
corresponding to the
numbers, 0, 1, 2, and
represent whole-number
sums and differences
within 100 on a number
line diagram.

Measure objects lengths with


string (nonstandard unit) and
relate to meter tape (standard
unit)

Exit Ticket (see attached)

Use tape diagrams to represent


and compare lengths

Exit Ticket (see attached)

Foundations:
I have considered the needs of gifted learners in the development of this lesson plan by
tiering the daily problem sets that they complete in working with the 2nd grade Common Core
Math Curriculum. In completing Problem Set 3, gifted learners will be measuring both with
nonstandard and standard units and creating tape diagrams to compare lengths of line drawn,
however they will be asked to also create and solve comparison problems based on their
measurements made. Gifted students will also be asked to determine how a tape diagram can
help compare lengths.
Two of the four students who will be receiving Problem Set 3 are students who are
ranked in the 88%ile and 95%ile on the Aims Web Math Computation beginning of school
benchmark and also scored 14 and 15 out of 16 on first End of Module Assessment for 2nd Grade
Common Core Math Module 1. The remaining two students scored in the 77%ile on the Aims
Web Math Computation beginning of the school year benchmark and received 13 and 14 out of
16 on first End of Module Assessment for 2nd Grade Common Core Math Module 1. All of these
students demonstrate advanced vocabulary, recall facts easily, very well informed about topics
being discussed, have exceptional ability to solve problems independently, and demonstrates
high levels of self-assurance when making decisions.
In designing this lesson, it was essential to make sure that gifted students are to be
challenged at their current ability, but also be pushed into new realms of understanding. Beyond
this lesson and through enrichment it is hoped that gifted students can be continued to be
challenged in the areas of creative and productive thinking by studying techniques that help in
the search for innovative solutions. They will also develop unique and refined conceptualized
ideas. Students will continue to problem solve by learning strategies for rational decision making
and apply them to problems and issues in todays world. Lastly students will be challenged in the
area of thinking skills by making connections between present knowledge and new information
derived from varied materials, media, and environments. They will identify premises, analyze
relationships, and validate conclusions. As the co-teacher in the classroom, I will continue to
show empathy, tolerate ambiguity, be open, flexible and innovative, and lastly provide
encouragement at all time to all students I teach.
Lesson Introduction (anticipatory set):
Students will gather as group on the rug in the front of the classroom to begin todays
lesson.
Students will participate in warm-up fluency practice of Meter Strip Addition: Adding
Multiples of 10 to Numbers and Happy Counting my Centimeters (General Ed. Teacher)
Displayed on poster paper in front of the room will be todays application problem which
is finding an unknown length and modeling problem solving using a tape diagram.
(General Ed. Teacher)
Problem is as described:
Aerins frog leaped several centimeters. Then it leaped 34
centimeters. In all, it leaped 50 centimeters. How far did Aerins frog
leap at first? Draw a picture and write a number sentence to explain
your thinking.
Students will participate in Talk-n-Turn activity with a partner sitting next to them to
discuss how and what strategies they will use to help them solve this word problem.

Students will be invited up to the poster board in front of the room to demonstrate their
strategies.
Students will return to their seats to continue with lesson.

Procedure:
On Smart Board will be displayed both a drawn zigzag line and a squiggly line. As a
review, students will be asked how to make an estimate how long each line is and will be
asked which line do they think is longer?
Teacher will then ask students how can we find the actual length of each line to check the
estimates that were made? (While measuring each part of zigzag line with a cm ruler will
give actual measurement, this cannot be done for squiggly line).
Teacher will display to whole class a piece of string and will ask students how this string
could help me to measure both lines.
Teacher will lay the string down on line and then ask students how can I compare the
lengths of the lines? (measure the strings)
Teachers will ask students what standard measurement tool could we use to check the
estimate we made using the string? (a meter tape, centimeter ruler, meter stick)
Teacher will invite students to come up to front of the room to make measurement of
string used to estimate length of zigzag and squiggly lines.
Once actual lengths have been measured, teacher will ask students what should we do
with the information found to compare lengths? (draw a picture, write the numbers)
Teacher will draw first tape diagram to represent the length of shorter string and label
with measurement. Teacher will then begin to draw second tape diagram, but ask students
to tell when to stop to shop the longer string. Students will be asked why I should stop?
(second tape diagram bar should be longer than the first because the first string was
shorter than the second).
Teacher will then invite students to share number sentences to describe the total length of
the two strings and to describe the difference in length between the two strings.
Teacher will repeat procedure comparing length around wrist compared to length around
head using string, measuring each string and asking students to draw along on personal
whiteboards the process of drawing a tape diagram to compare lengths. Teacher will ask
comparison questions and students will create number sentences to answer questions.
Differentiation
Tiered by: Challenge (Lesson Problem Set)
Tier 1 Comprehension Level: Students will measure 2 lines (Template 1) using both string to
estimate and centimeter rulers for actual measurement. Students will label each line with actual
measurements. Students will then rewrite measurements into already drawn tape diagrams to
answer comparison questions (Which line is longer? Which line is shorter?)
Tier 2 Analysis Level: Students will measure 2 lines (Template 2) using both string to estimate
and centimeter ruler for actual measurement. Students will label each line with actual
measurements. Students will draw tape diagrams then rewrite measurements into tape diagrams

to solve comparison questions using number sentences (Which line is longer? How much longer
is line 1 than line 2? Which line is shortest? How much shorter is line 1 than line 2?) .
Tier 3 Evaluation Level: Students will measure 2 lines (Template 3) using both string to
estimate and centimeter ruler for actual measurement. Students will label each line with actual
measurements. Students will first draw and label tape diagrams. Students will then create and
answer 2 comparison questions and determine how a tape diagram can help compare lengths?
This lesson is part of the daily Common Core 2nd Grade Math Curriculum and will be taught to
whole classroom as written. Differentiation occurs when students are required to independently
complete daily Problem Sets to demonstrate understanding of todays lesson. While Tier 2s
Problem Set looks very similar to the actual Problem Set scripted on Engage NY website, Tier 1
and Tier have been modified to meet the student needs. Many students who will be completing
Tier 1 Problem Set receive OT services and have difficulty with handwriting, therefore tape
diagrams have been already been drawn and students need only label diagrams. Students at this
level also will only be answering lower level comparison questions without solving equations to
find the difference or total. Tier 3 Problem Set students (Gifted) will in addition to measuring
and drawing and labeling tape diagrams, will be participating in higher thinking level of
questions and also creating their own comparison questions. Tier 3 problem set will also discuss
how a tape diagram can help compare lengths.
Acceleration or enrichment for gifted learners:
http://www.k-5mathteachingresources.com/2nd-grade-measurement-and-data.html
https://www.splashmath.com/skills/measure-length-customary-units/attempts/f60cb80f-cdb24c87-87d1-50fe9310f1e6
http://www.adaptedmind.com/gradelist.php?grade=2
http://www.education.com/activity/article/Measurement_Scavenger_Hunt/
http://www.education.com/activity/article/architectural-school-model/
Technology used: N/A
Closure: Student debrief to invite students to review their solutions for the Problem Set. Teacher
will look for misconceptions or misunderstandings and guide students in a conversation to
process the lesson. Teacher may at this time continue to work with any students who need
additional support.
Materials:
Smart board/Elmo/Projection Screen
Poster Board
Colored Markers
Dry Erase Markers
Personal White Boards

Lesson 9 Template 1, 2, and 3 (Problem Sets)


Lesson 9 Exit Ticket
Module 2 Lesson 2 Problem Set 1

Name:

Date:

Use a string to measure both lines to find estimate. Then measure each string
using centimeter rule to find actual measurement. Label each line.
1. Line 1:

Line 2:

Label tape diagram to compare the length of Line 1 and Line 2.

Which line is longer?

2. Line 1:

Line 2:

Line 3:

Label tape diagram to compare the length of Line 1, Line 2 and Line 3.

Which line is shortest?


Which line is the longest?
3. Line 1:

Line 2:

Line 3:

Label tape diagram to compare the length of Line 1, Line 2 and Line 3.

Which line is shortest?


Which line is the longest?

Module 2 Lesson 2 Problem Set 2


Name:

Date:

Use a string to measure both lines to find estimate. Then measure each string
using centimeter rule to find actual measurement. Label each line.
1. Line 1:

Line 2:

Draw a tape diagram to compare the length of Line 1 and Line 2.

Which line is longer?


Much longer is Line 1 than Line 2?

2. Line 1:

Line 2:

Line 3:

Draw a tape diagram to compare the length of Line 1, Line 2 and Line 3.

Which line is shortest?


Which line is the longest?
How much shorter is Line 2 than Line 3?
3. Line 1:

Line 2:

Line 3:

Draw a tape diagram to compare the length of Line 1, Line 2 and Line 3.

Which line is shortest?


Which line is the longest?
What is the difference between Line 1 and Line 3?

Module 2 Lesson 2 Problem Set 3


Name:

Date:

Use a string to measure both lines to find estimate. Then measure each string
using centimeter rule to find actual measurement. Label each line.
1. Line 1:

Line 2:

Draw a tape diagram to compare the length of Line 1 and Line 2.

Which line is longer?


Much longer is Line 1 than Line 2?

2. Line 1:

Line 2:

Line 3:

Draw a tape diagram to compare the length of Line 1, Line 2 and Line 3.

Which line is shortest?


Which line is the longest?
How much shorter is Line 2 than Line 3?
Write your own comparison question.

3. Line 1:

Line 2:

Line 3:

Draw a tape diagram to compare the length of Line 1, Line 2 and Line 3.

Which line is shortest?

Which line is the longest?


What is the difference between Line 1 and Line 3?
Write your own comparison question.

How does a tape diagram help you compare lengths?

Module 2 Lesson 9 Exit Ticket


Name:

Date:

1. Measure the two lines by using your string. Write the length in centimeters.

Line 1:
Line 2:

Line 1 is

cm long.

Line 2 is

cm long.

2. Mason measured the lines and said both lines are the same length. Is
Masons answer correct? Yes or no.

3. Draw a tape diagram to compare the two lengths.