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Annaliz Panida ITE 324

Case Studies: Developing an Instructional Plan


Work Sample

Strengths

Areas of Need

Instructional Plan

In her written narrative, the topic is


focused. She gives two details of how
her community job helps people. She
also provides some sense of closure.
Uses appropriate upper- and lower case
letters (e.g., I).
Uses singular nouns with matching
verbs in sentences (e.g., I help ).
Uses personal pronouns (e.g., I).
Produces complete simple declarative
sentences.

Narrative needs to include more details


regarding what happened. It also needs
to have a sense of flow within
sentences.
Using end punctuations for sentences
like a period.
Expanding declarative sentences.
Spelling untaught words phonetically.

Teacher will choose narrative books to


read aloud so that the student/s will
learn more about how stories are
organized and how they include a lot of
details.
Student will draw and write complete
retellings of familiar stories with a
beginning, middle, and end to
understand organization.
Student will compose an original story
with a beginning, middle, and end. She
will use a graphic organizer to help lay
out her ideas.
Teacher will monitor students work
and remind her to add details in writing
(e.g., using descriptive words).
Teacher will read the story, Dont Let
the Pigeon Drive the Bus by Mo
Willems to familiarize student with the
different uses of end punctuation.
Have student write sentences and
highlight the punctuation used or have
student do a punctuation worksheet and
fill in the correct punctuation to each
sentence.
Practice saying phonic sounds orally
with student one on one using
flashcards and visual images to help
with students inventive spelling in
sentences.

Student 1

CCSS alignment:
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.1.3
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.1.1.A
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.1.1.D
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.1.1.J

CCSS alignment:
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.1.3
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.1.1.J
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.1.2.B
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.1.2.E

Annaliz Panida ITE 324


Spells untaught words phonetically,
Written narrative is not clear. The
drawing on awareness and spelling
sequence of events does not flow and
conventions.
the topic is not focused. The written
Prints all upper- and lowercase letters.
narrative is supposed to be related to
Uses common nouns and personal
their imaginary job in their groups
community using the given word bank.
pronouns more than once. (e.g, I)
Lowercasing common nouns.
Uses articles as determiners (e.g, a).
Producing declarative sentences
Uses end punctuations in sentences.
Uses frequently occurring conjunctions
because sentences lack focus and
fluency.
(e.g, and).
Organizing ideas and details in
narrative.

Student 2

CCSS alignment:
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.1.2.E
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.1.1.A
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.1.1.B
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.1.1.D
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.1.1.H
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.1.2.B

CCSS alignment:
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.1.3
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.1.1.J

Teacher will choose narrative books to


read aloud so that the student/s will
learn more about how stories are
organized and how they include a lot of
details.
Before doing a written narrative, have
student begin with a circle map. This
will help to lay out all of his ideas
pertaining to a specific topic/idea.
Help student narrow down his ideas by
introducing and creating a graphic
organizer. Have him visually see a
beginning, middle, and end to his story
since he is ELL.
Next, have student verbally say what he
wrote on his graphic organizer out loud
and say how he would restate it as a
complete sentence to a peer/teacher.
Remind student to use the graphic
organizer to guide him while doing the
written narrative piece.
Review common, proper, and
possessive nouns with student so that
he will know when to capitalize
specific words.
Read the story, Pete the Cat and have
student list all of the proper nouns and
common nouns from the book on a
chart.
Using those words, have student
practice writing declarative sentences
as well as interrogative and
exclamatory.

Annaliz Panida ITE 324

Student 3

Very good lead, engages the reader.


Written narrative is not clear. The
Prints all upper- and lowercase letters
sequence of events does not flow and
appropriately in sentences.
the topic is not focused after the second
Uses common and possessive nouns.
sentence.
Uses frequently occurring adjectives
Organizing ideas and details in
(e.g, slippery).
narrative.
Uses frequently occurring conjunctions
(e.g and, because).
Uses determiners (e.g, a, there, the)
Demonstrates compound declarative
sentences. Has many details and voice
in written piece.
Ends sentences with correct
punctuation.
Spells untaught words phonetically.
Uses sentence-level context as a clue to
the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g,
Always walk because the sidewalk
might be slippery and you could slip).

CCSS alignment:
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.1.1.A
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.1.1.B
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.1.1.F
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.1.1.G
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.1.1.H
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.1.1.J
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.1.2.B
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.1.2.E
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.1.4.A

CCSS alignment:
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.1.3

Teacher will choose narrative books to


read aloud so that the student will learn
more about how stories are organized
and how they include a lot of details.
Student will draw and write complete
retellings of familiar stories with a
beginning, middle, and end to
understand organization and flow.
Student will then compose an original
story with a beginning, middle, and
end; but before doing that, teacher will
have student begin with a circle map to
help the student lay out all of his ideas
pertaining to a specific topic/idea.
Next, help student to narrow down his
ideas by introducing and creating a
graphic organizer. This will help to
make his sentences/story flow better.
When finished, have student use the
graphic organizer to guide him in the
final written piece.
Student will then read his written piece
aloud and discuss with teacher how he
could make his narrative better.
Teacher will emphasize on adding more
details to engage the reader in wanting
to read more.
As an example, the teacher will read a
story that creates lasting visual images
for the reader of how details help to
develop character and a focus.
(e.g, The Empty Pot by Demi)