Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 40

Staff Connectedness to Mission Statements 1

Running head: STAFF CONNECTEDNESS TO MISSION STATEMENTS

Staff Connectedness to Mission Statements:


A Case Study of Facility Services Staff at Wayne State College
Amy Gade
Fort Hays State University

In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for


LDRS 810: Qualitative Research Methods
Dr. Michael DeGrosky

Staff Connectedness to Mission Statements 2


ABSTRACT
The literature regarding higher education mission statements lacked the perspective of
how staff members perceive their own contributions to the institutional mission. The author of
this qualitative, multiple case study used semi-structured interviews of eight staff members of an
internal department at a small, public 4-year College in the Midwest to determine if staff
members (a) demonstrate familiarity with their institutions mission statement components, (b)
see a tie between their daily work and the Colleges mission, and (c) see how their contributions
toward the mission motivate their daily work. The author believes the results of this study
confirm the perception that staff members do individually contribute to the overall institutional
mission and that support of the institutions mission creates an overall more positive campus
community environment and that the feeling of contribution to the mission statement does
motivate individual staff members work. Implications to the fields of higher education and
leadership, limitations to the study, and future research potential are discussed.

Staff Connectedness to Mission Statements 3


TABLE OF CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION OF THE TOPIC AND JUSTIFICATION
Introduction to the problem
Statement of Problem
Purpose of the Study
Rationale
Research Questions
Significance of the Study
Assumptions and Limitations
Organization of the Remainder of the Study

4
4
5
6
6
6
8
9
10

REVIEW OF LITERATURE

11

METHODOLOGY
Methods
Research Questions
Sample, Recruitment, and Informed Consent

14
14
14
16

RESULTS
The Study
The Researcher
Description of the Participants
Research Methodology Applied to Data Analysis
Presentation of Data and Results of the Analysis
Results
Conclusion

19
19
19
20
21
21
22
27

DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS


Introduction
Summary of the Results
Discussion of the Results
Implications of the Study Results
Limitations
Recommendations for Future Research
Conclusion

28
28
28
30
32
32
33
33

REFERENCES

35

APPENDICES
Appendix A
Appendix B
Appendix C

36
36
37
39

Staff Connectedness to Mission Statements 4


INTRODUCTION OF THE TOPIC AND JUSTIFICATION
Introduction to the Problem
It is common for people to want to feel connected to the purpose of any task,
responsibility, job, or career they may interact with throughout the course of their working
lifetime. For institutions of higher learning, a mission statement is often that statement that
defines the purpose of what the institution stands for. A mission statement serves to identify the
objectives, expectations and values of the institution. It is these objectives, expectations, and
values that are often at the front of strategic decision making.
As institutions worldwide are faced with variety of newer challenges like technological
advances, safety concerns, and a changing demographic, mission statements and what they
prioritize for the institution have increasingly been utilized to respond to these challenges. So
while these mission statements are clearly critical in terms of their role in strategic decision
making, the author of this research seeks to determine if mission statements are as critical in
helping staff members find purpose in their daily work. The discovery of staff connectedness to
institutional mission statements attracted this researchers interest due to a personal career within
higher education. An initial review of extant literature on this topic performed by the researcher
proved extremely limited. While research on mission statements in general is prevalent, the
current research focuses primarily on the formation of mission statements. With no consistent
research on how staff might connect their daily work to an institutions mission, it seemed
prudent to add to the body of knowledge on this particular topic of inquiry.
Parties interested in research on staff connectedness to institutional mission statements
include higher education administrators, like college or university Presidents, Vice Presidents,
Deans, Directors, and the like. Because these individuals are often responsible for the
supervision of various departments and staff members, the results of this research pose to help

Staff Connectedness to Mission Statements 5


these individuals connect their staff to the institutional mission through daily work. Furthermore,
this research proves to emphasize to higher education leaders the importance of sharing the
purpose of an institutions mission statement, identifying how staff connect to the mission, tying
tasks to the purpose of the mission, and learning of motivations of their staff members and
departments. The implications to the fields of higher education and leadership include an
understanding that staff connectedness to the institutional mission improves their work
experience, motivates their work, and creates stronger employee satisfaction. The target
audience for this study represents professionals in higher education who desire to improve staff
connectedness to their work.
Statement of Problem
Campus mission statements are a series of statements created by campus leaders to
explain, enhance, and give purpose to an institution of higher learning; however, these
statements, while seemingly fitting to the institution, are often difficult to see in the daily work of
faculty and staff. The purpose of this qualitative, multiple case study is to determine if campus
staff members in an internal department at a small, public four-year College in the Midwest (a)
demonstrate familiarity with their institutions mission statement components, (b) see a tie
between their daily work and the Colleges mission, and (c) see how their contributions toward
the mission motivate their daily work.
A preliminary literature search conducted by the author found little scholarly research
tied directly to the topic; therefore, it is fair to determine the research is quite limited on this
specific topic. Extant literature is tied directly to how institutional mission statements are
formed. What this research related to institutional mission statements lacks is how staff members
feel they contribute to the mission, how their support of the mission contributes to the campus
community, and how their contributions motivate their own work. There is also little literature

Staff Connectedness to Mission Statements 6


evidence of the qualitative, multiple case study research designed proposed herein that has
addressed this topic in the past or has had the input of current higher education employees.
Purpose of the Study
The purpose of this qualitative, multiple case study is to understand the perception of
staff members individual contributions from one internal department to the core mission of a
small, public 4-year College in the Midwest.
Rationale
Newer challenges for higher education institutions have put a renewed focus on
institutional mission statements. While this renewed focus primarily has to do with using the
institutions mission statement for strategic decision making, the author of this study believes
there are other things an institutions mission statement can assist with. Staff connectedness to an
institutions mission creates a stronger link between the purpose of an institution and its
individual departments and staff members daily work. A stronger sense of connection to the
mission can also motivate staff members daily work and contribute more positively to the
overall sense of a campus community.
The extant literature provides little in terms of the above mentioned topics. Likewise,
there is also little literature evidence of the multiple case study research design proposed,
including a diverse sample of current higher education staff members that has addressed this
topic in the past. There is also a lack of input on the perceptions of the connectedness of current
staff members to an institutions mission statement. This research addresses those gaps.
Research Questions
For the purpose of this research, the author created a research question and consequent
sub-questions to address the gaps between the extant research that only focuses on the creation of

Staff Connectedness to Mission Statements 7


mission statements and the application of mission statements to the respective work of each
department and staff member at the institution.
Central Research Question
How do staff members connect their daily work with the central purpose of the College mission?
The sub-questions serve to address additional opportunities for the use of institutional
missions statements, such as tying daily work to the institutions missions, possible barriers to
feeling connected to the mission through daily work, how contributions to the campus mission
contribute to the campus community, and how contributions to the campus mission and campus
community may motivate daily work.
Research Sub-Questions
(a) Are there other opportunities than what is currently being done to directly tie staff work to the
central purpose of the College mission?
The author speaks to the current literatures point of the renewed focus of mission
statements in campus strategic planning through this research question. The researcher aims to
use question 1 in identifying strategic ways to connect staff work directly to the institutions
mission statement.
(b) What barriers can prevent staff members from feeling connected to the mission through their
work?
The author addresses the need to remove barriers from staff members connecting their
work directly to the institutions mission through this question. Research Sub-Question 2 seeks to
discover what barriers may stand in the way of the feeling of connectedness and to understand
how to remove those barriers for a more successful feeling of connectedness.
(c) Does staff buy in to the College mission contribute to the overall campus community? How?

Staff Connectedness to Mission Statements 8


The author speaks to how staff connectedness to the institutional mission may in turn
improve the overall campus community through this research problem. Research Sub-Question
3, therefore, aims to discuss how mission connectedness could engage members and positively
impact the overall campus community.
(d) Do individual contributions to the Colleges mission and/or campus community motivate
their work?
The author speaks to how staff members may be motivated by their works connectedness
to the institutions mission through this research problem. Research Sub-Question 4 seeks to
discover how one may associate their individual work contributions with the institutions
mission, therefore, how this association and contribution may motivate their work.
Significance of the Study
Very little research in general is available regarding staff connectedness to institutional
mission statements, likewise, a qualitative, multiple case study is missing from the current
literature on institutional mission statements and staff connectedness. Data collection methods
common to the qualitative inquiry, such as semi-structured interviews, creates dense data that
aids in validity and reliability (Creswell, 2013). The implications to the fields of higher education
and leadership include an understanding that staff connectedness to the institutional mission
improves their work experience, motivates their work, and creates stronger employee
satisfaction. Transferability, though not always the goal of qualitative inquiry, is enhanced in this
study through a diverse sample and multiple case study design. Higher education leaders looking
to enhance staff connectedness to the mission could find points of application from this study;
therefore, they are the target audience for this study.

Staff Connectedness to Mission Statements 9


Assumptions and Limitations
This study makes several assumptions:
1. This research utilized a qualitative, multiple case study design in order to discover a
deeper understanding of understand the perception of staff members individual
contributions from one internal department to the core mission of a small, public 4-year
College in the Midwest. The case study methodology in qualitative research involves
studying a case within a real-life setting (Creswell, 2013). Because the researcher wanted
to provide several various perspectives, the researcher assumed that qualitative, multiple
case study design provided the best approach to collect data from the lived in experiences
of current higher education employees.
2. The researcher assumed that the sample of current employees could be recruited from
within the Facility Services department at Wayne State College.
3. The researcher assumed that the participants would freely discuss their perceptions of
individual contributions to the core mission of Wayne State College.
4. The researcher assumed that a multiple case study design, the diverse sample, and
triangulation of data would aid in the transferability of the findings to other institutions of
higher learning.
5. The researcher assumed that consistent perceptions will emerge to form ideas of staff
connectedness to institutional mission statements.
There are several limitations to this study:
1. The researcher has worked in higher education for over 7years, so caution was necessary
to remove assumptions (Creswell, 2013).
2. Though the study will cover several months in data collection and analysis, transferability
could be limited as cases change over time.
3. The recruitment of participants could be problematic, as the sample was selected by
Facility Services leaders, which introduces bias.
4. The sample size was small, but sufficiently diverse to allow saturation and triangulation
of data.
In each of the biases mentioned, memoing served as a reminder that these potential areas of
bias must be mitigated for honest reporting. The rigorous data collection and analysis plan serve
as another tool to mitigate both the above mentioned assumptions and limitations to the research.
The multiple case study design also enhanced replication of findings. Member checking or

Staff Connectedness to Mission Statements 10


feedback from participants as to the validity of the findings added to the studys validity,
credibility, and possible transferability.
Organization of the Remainder of the Study
This section of the study posed to provide an introduction to the topic of the study,
statement of the research problem, the purpose of the study, rationale for the research, a
subsequent research question and sub-questions. The next section of this study includes an
extensive review of the current literature on the topic of inquiry in order to provide a background
into previous and potential research regarding institutional mission statements and staff
connectedness. The third section explicates the research design, including methodology, sample,
recruitment, and informed consent. In the fourth section, the author includes a description of (a)
the study and the researcher, (b) description of the participants, (c) research methodology applied
to data analysis, and (d) presentation of data and results of the analysis. In the final section, the
author brings the study together through a discussion of the findings and suggestions for future
research.

Staff Connectedness to Mission Statements 11


REVIEW OF LITERATURE
According to Ferrari and Velcoff (2006), Mission statements are an organizations means
of publicly proclaiming for critical assessment the institutions objectives, expectations, and
values (p. 243). These statements intend to include the viewpoints of all stakeholders at the
institution and are developed to help provide direction for decision making purposes (Legorreta,
Kelley, & Sablynski, 2006). Not only are these statements developed to help with decision
making, but also to define the purpose, individuality, and future direction of the institution, as
well as to create a connection amongst its varying members from students and staff to alumni
and donors (Ferrari & Velcoff, 2006). Wilson, Meyer, and McNeill (2012) claim that it is the
mission statement that most often aligns members of an organization behind those key principles
that will influence strategic decisions.
Because college campuses worldwide are being faced with new pressures to respond to a
variety of challenges, like changing demographics, globalization, technology, accountability,
and new pedagogical approaches, mission statement have been given a renewed focus (Kezar,
Gallant, & Lester, 2011, p. 129). Tightened and even flat resources have required institutions to
become more creative with their decisions about budget uses, campus projects, and the future of
their institutions. Strategic decision making has become one of the most frequently used phrases
in higher education today. Many have been asked to recommit to the democratic philosophies
expressed in original institutional missions (Fear, Adamek, & Imig, 2002). How do the
decisions being made today align with institutional purpose, goals, and direction as noted in the
mission? According to Ferrari, McCarthy, and Milner (2009), Universities utilize mission
statements as a way to maintain focused attention on the priorities and goal. The success of a
mission statement is largely dependent upon the vigor with which it is implemented (p. 387).

Staff Connectedness to Mission Statements 12


How an institution actualizes their mission, meaning how well their mission is represented in
their campus and community activities can factor into the commitment, engagement, and level of
activity seen amongst stakeholders (Ferrari et al., 2009).
Some have even claimed that it is the institutions mission statement that could help one
assess the tone, culture, and goals of an institution (Wilson et al., 2012). The challenge then
comes in developing a mission that not only includes all stakeholders, but also appeases them.
Ferrari and Velcoff (2006) note, Colleges and universities with institutional missions that are
clearly understood and embraced by administrators and faculty report effective strategic
planning, marketing and public dissimilation on the unique characteristics of the institution,
future visions for growth and enhancement, and useful assessments of outcomes and goals (p.
244). While this harmonious outcome is clearly desirable to most institutions of higher learning,
it is not as easily attainable as one may think.
Not every institutions mission statement fulfills the ideals of that particular institution
according to its stakeholders. Wilson et al. (2012) note that mission statements are usually full
of platitudes and generalizations far removed from institutional realities (p. 126). In recent
years, it is mission statements that have been scrutinized by outsiders attempting to pinpoint
missteps by management, overspending, or spending on nonessential items, and a lack of
accountability for those not so strategic decisions made (Wilson et al., 2012). Because mission
statements are often full of ambiguous phrases, it is hard to measure their success. More
specifically, it is challenging to identify how each and every activity held, meeting attending, or
decision made relates back to an institutions mission. Furthermore, because the product of
higher education is not a physical product that one can touch, it is often difficult to measure the

Staff Connectedness to Mission Statements 13


quality of the impact a mission could be making on students, faculty, staff, and other
stakeholders (Michael, Sower, & Motwani, 1997).
While the initial research conducted by the author of this study indicates that
campus mission statements are common and useful for basing decisions on, binding stakeholders
together, and the overall longevity of an institution, it is not clear how those employed by the
institution relate to the institutions mission. More specifically, the research found lacked how
non-faculty staff members feel they contribute to institutions mission, how their support of the
mission contributes to the campus community, and how their contributions motivate their own
daily work. One study noted by Ferrari and Velcoff (2006) proved that employee commitment
was highly related to those work experiences reflective of their institutions mission. They go on
to note that without institution personnel (beyond senior administration) embracing the mission,
frequent episodes of administrative disorder, departmental battles for resources, frustrating
meetings and planning, and dissatisfied staff are known to be found (Ferrari & Velcoff, 2006).
Further research on how non-faculty staff members relate their work to an institutions
mission statement could provide new insight fore senior administrators and strategic planners.
Ferrari and Velcoff (2006) admit that while many previous studies have examined student
perceptions of their institutions mission, there is not research available to examine the
understanding of ones institutional mission by other stakeholders (e.g., non-teaching staff) (p.
255). The impending research could be useful to campus leaders in various ways, like by
enhancing the importance of sharing the purpose of their institutions mission statement,
identifying how staff may or may not connect to the mission, how to tie work in various
departments directly to the institutions mission, and learning what motivates their staff members
or departments.

Staff Connectedness to Mission Statements 14


METHODOLOGY
Methods
The purpose of this qualitative, multiple case study is to understand the perception of
staff members individual contributions from one internal department to the core mission of a
small, public 4-year College in the Midwest. The author of this study also intends to discover
how members contributions motivate their daily work and how this motivation may be spread
throughout the campus.
Campus mission statements are a series of statements created by campus leaders to
explain, enhance, and give purpose to an institution of higher learning; however, these
statements, while seemingly fitting to the institution, are often difficult to see in the daily work of
campus faculty and staff. The purpose of this qualitative, multiple case study is to determine if
campus staff members in an internal department at a small, public 4-year College in the Midwest
(a) demonstrate familiarity with their institutions mission statement components, (b) see a tie
between their daily work and the Colleges mission, and (c) see how their contributions toward
the mission motivate their daily work.
Research Questions
Central Research Question
How do staff members connect their daily work with the central purpose of the College mission?
Research Sub-Questions
(a) Are there other opportunities than what is currently being done to directly tie staff work to the
central purpose of the College mission?
The author speaks to the current literatures point of the renewed focus of mission
statements in campus strategic planning through this research question. The researcher aims to

Staff Connectedness to Mission Statements 15


use question 1 in identifying strategic ways to connect staff work directly to the institutions
mission statement.
(b) What barriers can prevent staff members from feeling connected to the mission through their
work?
The author addresses the need to remove barriers from staff members connecting their
work directly to the institutions mission through this question. Research Sub-Question 2 seeks to
discover what barriers may stand in the way of the feeling of connectedness and to understand
how to remove those barriers for a more successful feeling of connectedness.
(c) Does staff buy in to the College mission contribute to the overall campus community? How?
The author speaks to how staff connectedness to the institutional mission may in turn
improve the overall campus community through this research problem. Research Sub-Question
3, therefore, aims to discuss how mission connectedness could engage members and positively
impact the overall campus community.
(d) Do individual contributions to the Colleges mission and/or campus community motivate
their work?
The author speaks to how staff members may be motivated by their works connectedness
to the institutions mission through this research problem. Research Sub-Question 4 seeks to
discover how one may associate their individual work contributions with the institutions
mission, therefore, how this association and contribution may motivate their work.
Specific examples of how staff in one internal department feel their daily work could be
associated with their institutional mission, what other opportunities may exist to make that
connection, how this association might contribute to the overall campus community, and how
this connectedness may motivate daily work were the expected outcomes of this research. From

Staff Connectedness to Mission Statements 16


the analysis of twelve cases of individual members bound by their shared employment in one
internal department of a small, public four-year College in the Midwest, multiple sources of data
will be utilized through individual qualitative, semi-structured interviews. The twelve members
selected represent each of the five internal departments within the Facility Services Department.
Through use of the research purpose, problem, and questions, the researcher sought data
primarily from the perspectives and experiences of organizational personnel. The qualitative,
instrumental case study method best fits the collection of such data. Because this study desires
personal reflections and insights of current staff members, semi-structured interviews seem to be
the gateway to such data.
Sample, Recruitment, and Informed Consent
This research was a multiple case study design in order to discover a rich, personal
understanding of how staff connect their daily work with the institutions mission and how that
connectedness may also motivate their work. Creswell (2013) defines a collective case study, or
multiple case study, as that of an issue or concern and then utilizing multiple cases to illustrate
the issue. The unit of analysis for this study is that of the organization by which this case is
bound. One single department, Facility Services, at Wayne State College will be used to conduct
this research.
Criteria for the sample included a higher education institute with a working institutional
mission statement. Wayne State College is a public, 4-year College founded in 1910 and is a
member of the Nebraska State College System. Recognized as a degree granting institution,
WSC offers Bachelors and Masters degrees, as well as Educational Specialists degrees.
Located in Wayne, Nebraska, the current total enrollment is nearly 3,600 students. The website,

Staff Connectedness to Mission Statements 17


www.wsc.edu, states the institutions mission as, Wayne State College is a comprehensive
institution of higher education dedicated to freedom of inquiry, excellence in teaching and
learning, and regional service and development. Offering affordable undergraduate and graduate
programs, the College prepares students for careers, advanced study, and civic involvement. The
College is committed to faculty-staff-student interaction, public service, and diversity within a
friendly and collegial campus community. The mission is summarized by the following three
statements, (a) Learning Excellence, (b) Student Success, and (c) Regional Service.
The organization of Facility Services at Wayne State College was purposively recruited
and selected through networking contacts made via work, personal, and educational
relationships, initial organizational contact that included proposed research topics, and final
agreement of the organizational initially contacted
The author selected, for interviews, twelve members from the five internal departments
within the Facility Services Department. Because one internal department has only one staff
member, the researcher opted to interview two members of each of the remaining four internal
departments. The twelve staff members selected were independently interviewed using a semistructured format, lasting approximately thirty minutes each. This format will work best in that
initial direction and questions will have been determined, but the interview will also be allowed
to flow naturally, opening the data to potential new directions based on the direction of
conversations had.
Criteria for the sample included members recognized for their support of the departments
mission and, therefore, assumed support of the institutions mission. The primary organization
contact identified subsequent qualifying members. An email invitation for interview date and
time was sent to sample participants. Immediate supervisors were informed of this study and

Staff Connectedness to Mission Statements 18


included in the initial request for interview. The email included details regarding the nature of
and purpose for this research and an informed consent form for each members initial review (see
Appendix A). The informed consent form was also available for signing at the time of the
interview. All members of the sample agreed to sign the informed consent form. The researcher
used secured storage for the signed consent forms and all other materials related to this study.
The researcher followed many additional steps for the semi-structured interviews with
each participant, which included the pre-interview preparation, initial interview, interview, postinterview, and member-check phases. The pre-interview preparation included selection of the
interview site that was most accommodating to, comfortable, and private for data collection. The
initial interview phase included the initial meeting of each participant, in which the author of this
study explained the purpose of the interview and requested that each participant sign a hard copy
of the informed consent form the participants were provided in the initial interview invitation.
During the interview phase, the researcher worked through each of the interview questions
included in the interview transcript (see Appendix B) while still allowing for probative questions
to explore concepts or ideas introduced by the participants. The post-interview phase included
the researchers closing statement, a review of any concepts discussed, as well as an opportunity
for the participant to ask any final questions about the purpose of the study not previously
addressed. Finally, the member-check phase included the documentation of field notes that were
then shared with the participant for any further clarification.

Staff Connectedness to Mission Statements 19


RESULTS
The Study
The research problem is that campus mission statements are a series of statements created
by campus leaders to explain, enhance, and give purpose to an institution of higher learning;
however, these statements, while seemingly fitting to the institution, are often difficult to see in
the daily work of campus faculty and staff. The purpose of this qualitative, multiple case study is
to determine if campus staff members in an internal department at a small, public four-year
College in the Midwest (a) demonstrate familiarity with their institutions mission statement
components, (b) see a tie between their daily work and the Colleges mission, and (c) see how
their contributions toward the mission motivate their daily work.
Providing the results of the data analysis in response to the research problem, the research
questions, and in the discovery of consistent data regarding the impact of a mission statement on
daily work and individual motivation is the purpose of this section. This section moves beyond
the background and purpose of the study, the extant literature, and methodological approach to
this research to detail the specific results of what the data demonstrates in terms of the familiarity
of the mission statement, how it ties to daily work, and how it might motivate ones work. The
author organized the remainder of this section around the following themes (a) the role of the
researcher, (b) the description of the sample participants, (c) the research methodology applied to
the data analysis, and (d) the presentation of the data and results of the analysis.
The Researcher
The researcher invested interest in the topic of institutional mission statements due to
their personal career, thus far, in one particular aspect of higher education. Because mission
statements have become a renewed topic of interest in all arenas of education as a way of
defining the purpose of that particular educational entity, it too became a common topic of

Staff Connectedness to Mission Statements 20


conversation at many important meetings at the researchers institution of higher education.
Recently, at the researchers institutions all departments were asked by Administration to display
the institutions mission statement in their offices as a way to display it more transparently to
stakeholders and the greater public. The researcher noted, through various conversations with
staff members shortly thereafter, that many staff members had never read the institutions
mission statement prior to its prominent displaying, therefore, probably did not see their daily
worked tied to it. While they were likely already contributing to the mission statement, the
researcher wondered if it might subconsciously motivate their own work. Naturally, this led the
researcher to a desired research problem of interest in institutional mission statements,
specifically, staff familiarity with its components, how it ties to daily work, and if/how it might
motivate staff to complete that work.
Description of the Participants
The author of this study collected and analyzed data from employee semi-structured
interviews using an interview protocol based on the research questions of this study. The sample
participants included eight individual members of one respective department, Facility Services,
at Wayne State College in Wayne, Nebraska. The researcher used multi-case data collection and
analysis methods because the author focused on the individual responses from those eight staff
members to allow for themes and patterns to emerge.
The sample participants included six males and two females with a tenure ranging from
one year to eight years. The median length of employment with the institution was four, while
the average tenure of employment was 3.5 years. Of the employees interviewed, two served
under the Grounds Manager in the Grounds Crew department, two served under the
HVAC/Energy Manager as Engineers, two served under the Physical Plant Manager, one in the

Staff Connectedness to Mission Statements 21


Dorm Maintenance department and one in the Electricians department, and two served under the
Facility Services Manager, one in the Central Supply department, and one in the Custodians
department. Participants were selected based on recommendations from their supervisor and
consensus to participation in the interview process.
Research Methodology Applied to Data Analysis
According to Creswell (2013), data analysis in qualitative research consists of preparing
and organizing the data for analysis, then reducing the data into themes through a process of
coding and condensing the codes, and finally representing the data in figures, tables, or a
discussion (p. 180). The analysis process was much like the making of a spider web in that
several individual strands of information were interweaved by common themes that ultimately
made a large web of data all collected about the same topic. The text of each interview was
coded as themes or patterns were identified to enable the deep detail and synthesis of the data
into an explanatory discussion. This research involved data collected from eight difference
sources or cases bounded by one common department. Triangulation of data through multiple
case study design, clarifying researcher bias, and member checking added to the researchs
validity and credibility (Creswell, 2013).
Presentation of Data and Results of the Analysis
The research problem is that campus mission statements are a series of statements created
by campus leaders to explain, enhance, and give purpose to an institution of higher learning;
however, these statements, while seemingly fitting to the institution, are often difficult to see in
the daily work of campus faculty and staff. The purpose of this qualitative, multiple case study is
to determine if campus staff members in an internal department at a small, public four-year
College in the Midwest (a) demonstrate familiarity with their institutions mission statement

Staff Connectedness to Mission Statements 22


components, (b) see a tie between their daily work and the Colleges mission, and (c) see how
their contributions toward the mission motivate their daily work. Extant literature offers many
reasons why institutional mission statements are important, such as to provide direction for
decision making, define the purpose individuality, and future direction of an institution, as well
as create connection among current members (Legorreta et al., 2006; Ferrari & Velcoff, 2006).
The author of this study sought the confirmation of such ideals from the perspective of those the
mission statement stands to connect. Some researchers also suggested that an institutions
mission statement helped assess the tone, culture, and goals of an institution (Wilson et al.,
2012). Yet others, like Michael, Sower, and Motwani (1997), argue that because mission
statements are often full of ambiguous phrases, it is hard to measure their success in terms of
general understanding of the statement, how it is tied to daily work, and more-so, how it
motivates that work.
Therefore, based on the lack of inherent themes in the extant literature that really
addressed all three aspects of the researchers problem, the data analysis using in vivo coding,
defined as the exact words of the research participants (Creswell, 2013). Creswell (2013) noted
that use of pre-figured categories, known as an a priori code, does serve to limit the analysis to
the prefigured codes rather than opening up the codes to reflect the views of the participants in
a traditional qualitative way (p. 185).
Results
The subsequent results are organized according to the specific question asked of sample
participants during the semi-structured interviews.
Question One: What do you know about Wayne State Colleges mission?

Staff Connectedness to Mission Statements 23


While most participants admitted to having read the institutions mission statement, no
one could readily relay it to the researcher, some werent even sure what it was, and participant
01 even asked for an explanation of what a mission statement is. Because most mission
statements are lengthy in nature, the researcher was not surprised or even looking for a word for
word recounting of the mission. Instead, what the researcher hoped for was some general
knowledge of the components of the mission statement, which are actually displayed all across
campus on the flags adorning light poles. Some gave some generalizations of the purpose of the
institution, with statements like something to do good from participant 01 or providing a safe
atmosphere as participant 02 suggested, while most, roughly 50 percent, at least tied it to the
principle of higher learning. One participant, participant 04, was quite accurate with the
statement of the goal is promote higher learning, interaction between faculty, students, and staff
and I think there is something about cooperation with the community. Although many had good
generalizations of what the mission statement intends to promote, the College has worked quite
diligently to advertise the three pillars of the mission statement as: Learning Excellence, Student
Success, and Regional Service, not one of which was mentioned by the studys participants.
Question Two: How does what you do on a daily basis support or contribute to the Colleges
mission?
With a general idea of the purpose of the College and its mission, participants were able
to tie their specific job duties to something that would either benefit the College as a whole or
specific stakeholders in the institution. Participants from the Grounds Crew department talked in
terms of campus beautification with phrases like keeping the campus clean and groomed, used
by participant 04, or the safety of the constituents using the campus by keeping streets and
sidewalks clear, as suggested by participant 02. Participants from the Custodians and Dorm
Maintenance departments addressed keeping the buildings clean and in the highest working order

Staff Connectedness to Mission Statements 24


so students are able to focus on their studies. Participant 07 took a much more general approach
calling their role on campus, people comfort, in that they are responsible for the comfort of all
stakeholders on campus, such as the students, faculty/staff members, and even visitors. This
participant also addressed the importance of interfacing with the students and staff in an attempt
to get to know them. While outsiders would probably just assume this interaction between
students and staff to be a prominent part of any role on campus, the author of this study wishes to
highlight its significance at an institution of higher education where the population being served,
the students, are most often living away from home and may need this added interaction to feel
tied to the institution.
Question Three: What other opportunities might you have to contribute to the Colleges mission
through your or your departments daily activities?
Many participants seemingly addressed the perception that Facility Services work is often
times the work that no one really sees or thinks about. This is an important factor to the
responses of question three in that most, 75 percent, stressed a possible untapped opportunity to
interact with and get to know the individuals they are serving, whether that be faculty/staff or
students. Participant 04 even suggested looking for opportunities that allow for participation
from the students. Another, participant 08, offered the suggestion of volunteering to be seen more
around campus. Two participants took, participants 02 and 07, an even simpler approach to
solving this issue by stating that they should take the opportunity to be more cordial with
everyone they meet and offer a more positive environment to work in by offering a quick smile
and hello to the many people they pass in their daily work.
Question Four: What barriers might you face in supporting the Colleges mission through your
departments or your own individual work?

Staff Connectedness to Mission Statements 25


To the researchers surprise, only two participants, 02 and 04, mentioned what would
assumingly be a common answer to this such questions, budgets. Wayne State College being a
public institution, resources are limited and budgets are typically stagnant. While none of the
participants specifically manage a budget, participant 02 took the opportunity to praise the
departments budget manager for utilizing those sometimes minimal resources well to keep
equipment and safety maintained, campus facilities neat and orderly, and the Colleges arboretum
retained. Most other responses to this question varied in nature, with things like communication
barriers, time constraints, repetitious tasks that make one lose sight of the purpose of such tasks,
and individuals negative thinking as possible barriers to supporting the mission.
Question Five: How does your support of the Colleges mission contribute to the overall
atmosphere of the campus community?
Participant 07 stated that their specific role in contributing to the campus community may
not be huge, but paraphrased a John Wooden quote to help paint the big picture, Its the little
things that are vital. Little things make big things happen. Others talked about how by
supporting the Colleges mission they were helping to make the campus a more enjoyable or
pleasant place to work and/or go to school. Participant 08 mentioned by tying daily work to the
Colleges mission statement, the overall campus community becomes a more positive
atmosphere. Another, participant 02, stated that it helps them make a better connection with the
students, staff, and faculty on campus. Others stressed the role their support can play in helping
things run smoothly so that others will want to and are able to do their jobs.
Question Six: How does contributing to the Colleges mission and/or campus community
motivate your work?
While each participants answer was unique, many, over 60 percent, addressed the
personal nature of their motivation, whether that be the satisfaction of a job done well, making

Staff Connectedness to Mission Statements 26


others happy, serving people, developing personal relationships with students and staff, or
proving themselves through hard work. Several other participants talked specifically about their
work with students. One participant, 03, said getting to know the students and being known by
them in return is rewarding in that one can be known for more than just the role they serve to the
institution. Another, participant 06, talked about the students and their energy, their desire to try
new things, and specifically their conscientiousness to environmental concerns stating, So they
do motivate you and you kind of think maybe I should be a little more self-conscious of this,
too. An additional participant, 02, talked about a specific project that involved student
participation and how motivating it was to see their genuine interest. This participant was
enthused by the students appreciation of the work put into this particular project and talked
about the various tokens of thanks received after its conclusion. One last response worth noting,
came from participant 07, who shared that contributing to the mission and campus community is
motivating in that, it just makes me feel good. I mean thats the best thing to be able to know
that you can have an impact on somebody else just by doing something little. You know, not
demeaning them, try not to put them down.
Question Seven: What could help promote the campus community to a shared goal of mission
success?
One participant, 04, noted its important to focus energy and priority on those that the
College wishes to serve, in any case that is first and foremost the student. Similarly, a few
participants, roughly 38 percent, suggested additional opportunities for the intentional interaction
between students and employees. Many others, again approximately 38 percent, stressed the role
better communication and teamwork could play in helping to get the entire campus to understand
the mission and determine how mission success could be determined. One participant, 07,
reflected on an early response by stressing the important of looking for candidates with a positive

Staff Connectedness to Mission Statements 27


attitude in employment searches. Lastly, one participant, 06, stressed the Regional Service
component of the mission by suggesting more promotion of activities and services provided by
the College to the surrounding area and opportunities that may invite the immersion of campus
and community individuals.
Conclusion
The author demonstrated in this section the results of this studys purpose and research
questions, which was to discover staff members understanding of the institutional mission, learn
how daily work might be tied to the mission, and how contributions to the mission might
motivate daily work. According to the studys participants, while most could not directly recite
the mission statement or even its core components, a very broad idea of the institutions mission
was understood. Most participants identified a tie between their daily work and elements of the
institutions mission, yet were able to identify additional opportunities to contribute to the
mission through their work. Some barriers in contributions to the mission statement were
identified and explored. Most participants identified with feel directly motivated by their
contributions to the mission and/or campus community and the stakeholders being served. Lastly,
participants suggested opportunities to enhance the campus community to a more shared goal of
mission success, such as better communication, teamwork, and positivity between departments.

DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS


Introduction

Staff Connectedness to Mission Statements 28


The author uses this section to discuss the results of this study in detail. To be discussed
are the perceptions sample participants revealed regarding their individual contributions to the
core mission of Wayne State College. The author also discloses in this section implications of
this study, limitations to the results, and areas of potential future research regarding this topic.
Summary of the Results
The research problem of this study identified that while mission statements are
often quite fitting to the institution they are designed for, they are typically difficult to see in the
work of faculty and staff. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to discover the perception of
staff members individual contributions from one internal department to the core mission of a
small, public 4-year College in the Midwest. The research questions asked about those
perceptions to determine if staff members (a) demonstrate familiarity with their institutions
mission statement components, (b) see a tie between their daily work and the Colleges mission,
and (c) see how their contributions toward the mission motivate their daily work.
The significance of this study is that very little research in general is available regarding
staff connectedness to institutional mission statements, likewise, a qualitative, multiple case
study is missing from the current literature on institutional mission statements and staff
connectedness. Data collection methods common to the qualitative inquiry, such as semistructured interviews, creates dense data that aids in validity and reliability (Creswell, 2013). The
implications to the fields of higher education and leadership include an understanding that staff
connectedness to the institutional mission improves their work experience, motivates their work,
and creates stronger employee satisfaction. Transferability, though not always the goal of
qualitative inquiry, is enhanced in this study through a diverse sample and multiple case study

Staff Connectedness to Mission Statements 29


design. Higher education leaders looking to enhance staff connectedness to the mission could
find points of application from this study; therefore, they are the target audience for this study.
It is common for people to want to feel connected to the purpose of any task,
responsibility, job, or career they may interact with throughout the course of their working
lifetime. For institutions of higher learning, a mission statement is often that statement that
defines the purpose of what the institution stands for. A mission statement serves to identify the
objectives, expectations and values of the institution. It is these objectives, expectations, and
values that are often at the front of strategic decision making.
As institutions worldwide are faced with variety of newer challenges like technological
advances, safety concerns, and a changing demographic, mission statements and what they
prioritize for the institution have increasingly been utilized to respond to these challenges. So
while these mission statements are clearly critical in terms of their role in strategic decision
making, the author of this research seeks to determine if mission statements are as critical in
helping staff members find purpose in their daily work. The discovery of staff connectedness to
institutional mission statements attracted this researchers interest due to a personal career within
higher education. An initial review of extant literature on this topic performed by the researcher
proved extremely limited. While research on mission statements in general is prevalent, the
current research focuses primarily on the formation of mission statements. With no consistent
research on how staff might connect their daily work to an institutions mission, it seemed
prudent to add to the body of knowledge on this particular topic of inquiry.
This study used a qualitative, multiple case study approach that triangulated data through
analysis of semi-structured interviews with a sample of participants that represent eight

Staff Connectedness to Mission Statements 30


individual members of the Facility Services department at Wayne State College in Wayne,
Nebraska. The sample includes staff members with ranging tenure from one to eight years.
The author believes the results of this study confirmed the perception that staff members
do individually contribute to the overall institutional mission, yet there are still additional
opportunities in many cases to further contribute to the mission. Likewise, while staff members
generally have an idea of the purpose of their institutional mission statement, it is important to
further emphasize the various components of the mission statement as often as possible to
provide a stronger connection for all staff members. The author also believes the results
confirmed that support of the institutions mission creates an overall more positive campus
community environment and that the feeling of contribution to the mission statement does
motivate individual staff members work.
Discussion of the Results
General Mission Statement Knowledge
The author of this study believes the results from this research prove that while staff
members have a general idea of the purpose of their institution, they do not always equate that to
their institutions mission statement. Because strategic decision making now requires use of
institutions mission statement priorities, now more than ever, it is important that all staff
members understand what priorities the mission statement outlines.
Daily Contributions to Mission Statement
While staff members do not always know the individual components of an institutions
mission statement, the researcher argues that staff members are able to see how what they do
daily contributes to the purpose of their institution. Whether campus beautification, keeping

Staff Connectedness to Mission Statements 31


buildings in order, people comfort, or interactions with students, every task and responsibility
has purpose which in turn contributes to the mission of the institution.
Other Opportunities to Contribute
While daily activities of staff members contribute to the institutional mission statement,
additional opportunities to further contribute or impact the mission are not far from the sight of
most staff members. If higher education leaders are interested in additional opportunities to serve
their institutional missions, they should look no farther than their own departments or staff for
new ideas.
Barriers in Contributing
Various barriers in terms of contributing to an institutions mission are often
recognizable. Should higher education leaders desire to have further support of staff members,
looking for and attempting to address these barriers are a necessary step.
Mission Contribution and the Campus Community
Staff members recognize that support of the institutions mission will likely improve the
overall atmosphere of a campus community. Helping staff members recognize the role they play
in terms of support of the mission and the overall campus community atmosphere will provide a
more positive working and learning atmosphere for all.
Mission Contribution and Motivation
Serving the mission of the institution, its purpose, and constituent base is highly
motivating for staff members. While much of an individuals motivation for their work is highly
personal in nature, feeling like a contributing factor is also a huge factor in motivation.
Promotion of Mission Success

Staff Connectedness to Mission Statements 32


Keeping focus on the priorities the mission helps outline allows for greater opportunities
in the continuity of the goals and directions for strategic decision making. Likewise, this focus
assists in helping all staff members understand the decisions being made and buy in to and
respect those decisions.
Implications of the Study Results
The implications to the fields of higher education and leadership include an
understanding that staff connectedness to the institutional mission improves their work
experience, motivates their work, and creates stronger employee satisfaction. However, the
results of this study demonstrated another equally as important emergent theme. Not only does
connectedness to the institutional mission improve work experience, motivate work, and create
stronger employee satisfaction, it also seemingly provides purpose to the work of each
institutional department and staff member. Because the literature suggests mission statements are
increasingly being used for strategic decision making, increased employee connectedness to the
mission statement may assist in more support of those strategic decisions.
Each case in this study, individually and collectively, offered compelling implications to
the fields of higher education and leadership, specifically in higher education administration.
Limitations
The author of this research included a sample of eight members of one internal
department at a small, public 4-year College in the Midwest. Participants in the sample
represented the Facility Services department, included two representatives from each of the four
departments within, and ranged in tenure from one to eight years. The sample, however, did not
include anyone in management or supervisory roles. While the sample offered a degree of

Staff Connectedness to Mission Statements 33


diversity in position title and tenure, more research is likely needed from a larger variety of staff
members, with greater range in role type, and of a greater ranger in tenure. Likewise, a greater
number of cases, like duplicating the research throughout other departments or at additional
institutions, would have provided increased transferability. This study was qualitative in nature;
however, a more involved study could have provided a mixed-methods approach to data
collection, therefore, providing a stronger variety of data.
Recommendations for Future Research
Though this study represented a diverse sample in terms of the participant sample, there
are some inherent limitations that spark the need for additional research. Participants included
only one internal department at a small, public 4-year College in the Midwest. The participants,
while ranging in tenure, did not include anyone of supervisory or management positions. Future
research may prove beneficial should it include a larger sample in terms of tenure and position
type, likewise additional components like various internal departments at the same institution,
one internal department at various institution types and sizes, or multiple internal departments at
various institution types and sizes.
Conclusion
The goal of this study was the discovery of the perceptions of individual staff members
contributions to the core mission of a small, public 4-year institution in the Midwest. The author
of this study aimed to find out if campus staff members in an internal department at a small,
public four-year College in the Midwest (a) demonstrate familiarity with their institutions
mission statement components, (b) see a tie between their daily work and the Colleges mission,
and (c) see how their contributions toward the mission motivate their daily work. While a

Staff Connectedness to Mission Statements 34


personal interest of the author due a career in higher education, the researcher also felt this
information could be useful to higher education administrators who desire to connect their staff
to the institutional mission through daily work. Furthermore, this research proves to emphasize
to higher education leaders the importance of sharing the purpose of an institutions mission
statement, identifying how staff connect to the mission, tying tasks to the purpose of the mission,
and learning of motivations of their staff members and departments.

Staff Connectedness to Mission Statements 35


REFERENCES
Creswell, J. W. (2013). QUALITATIVE INQUIRY & RESEARCH DESIGN: Choosing Among
Five Approaches. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications, Inc.
Fear, F., Adamek, M., & Imig, G. (2002). Connecting Philosophic and Scholarly Traditions with
Change in Higher Education. Journal of Leadership Studies, 8(3), 42-52.
Retrieved from
http://search.proquest.com/docview/203143663?accountid=27424
Ferrari, J. R., McCarthy, B. J., & Milner, L. A. (2009). INVOLVED AND FOCUSED?
STUDENTS' PERCEPTIONS OF INSTITUTIONAL IDENTITY, PERSONAL GOAL
ORIENTATION AND LEVELS OF CAMPUS ENGAGEMENT. College Student
Journal, 43(3), 886-896.
Ferrari, J., & Velcoff, J. (2006). Measuring Staff Perceptions of University Identity and
Activities: The Mission and Values Inventory. Christian Higher Education, 5(3),
243- 261. doi:10.1080/15363750600685522
Kezar, A., Bertram Gallant, T., & Lester, J. (2011). Everyday people making a difference on
college campuses: the tempered grassroots leadership tactics of faculty and staff.
Studies
In Higher Education, 36(2), 129-151. doi:10.1080/03075070903532304
Legorreta, L., Kelley, C. A., & Sablynski, C. J. (2006). Linking Faculty Development to the
Business School's Mission. Journal of Education for Business, 82(1), 3-10.
Retrieved
from http://search.proquest.com/docview/202820732?accountid=27424
Michael, R. K., Sower, V. E., & Motwani, J. (1997). A comprehensive model for implementing
total quality management in higher education. Benchmarking for Quality
Management &
Technology, 4(2), 104. Retrieved from
http://search.proquest.com/docview/217356681?accountid=27424
Wilson, J., Meyer, K., & McNeal, L. (2012). Mission and Diversity Statements: What They Do
and Do Not Say. Innovative Higher Education, 37(2), 125-139.
doi:10.1007/s10755-0119194-8

Staff Connectedness to Mission Statements 36


APPENDICES
Appendix A: Informed Consent Form

Consent for Participation in Interview Research


I volunteer to participate in a research project conducted by Amy Gade, student in the Masters in
Organizational Leadership program at Fort Hays State University. I understand that this project is
designed to gather information about feelings of staff connectedness to their institutional mission
and how this may motivate their work. I will be one of eight staff members being interviewed for
this research project.
1. My participation in this project is voluntary. I understand that I will not be paid for my
participation, likewise, my participation in this student is of no cost to me. I may withdraw and
discontinue participation without penalty at any point.
2. I understand my participation in this research in no way involves or impacts my employment
at Wayne State College.
3. Participation in this research will be conducted during the course of normal business hours and
will require no additional time of me outside the working day.
4. I understand that I have the right to decline to answer any question during the interview should
I not feel comfortable answering.
5. Participation involves being interviewed by researcher, Amy Gade, from Fort Hay State
University. The interview will last approximately 20 minutes. Notes will be written during the
interview. An audio recording of the interview and subsequent dialogue will be made.
6. I understand that the researcher will not identify me by name in any reports using information
obtained from this interview and that my confidentiality as a participant in this study will remain
secure.
7. I will be provided with a copy of the interview transcript once completed in order to proof or
provide any changes necessary.
8. I understand there are no known risks associated with participation in this study.
9. I have read and understand the explanation provided to me. I have had any questions about
this study answered to my satisfaction and I voluntarily agree to participate in this study.
10. I have been given a copy of this consent form.

________________________________________

________________________

Signature of the Interviewee

Date

For further information or questions, please contact: Amy Gade, principle researcher at
ajgade@mail.fhsu.edu or amgade1@wsc.edu.

Staff Connectedness to Mission Statements 37


Appendix B. Interview Protocol
Time of Interview:
Date/Time of Interview:
Location of Interview:
Interviewers Name:
Interviewees Name:
Interviewees Title/Department:
Interviewees Years of Service
Opening Statement: Hello, my name is Amy Gade and I am a student at Fort Hays State
University working towards my Masters in Liberal Studies-Organizational Leadership. The
purpose of this research is in partial fulfillment of the requirement for my LDRS810: Qualitative
Research Methods course, in which I am researching the connection staff members feel between
their daily work and the institutional mission or mission statement and how this contribute to the
overall campus community or might motivate daily work.
As a staff member who was recommended, you have been selected for this research and can
provide valuable information to this study to help understand how you are motivated by your
daily work and its relationship to the institutions mission.
Todays interview, in which I will ask for your opinions and perceptions of the connectedness of
your work to the institutions mission, should take no longer than 20 minutes. I will also request
a brief review of the accuracy of my notes, which can be conducted by email and should take no
more than 10 additional minutes. Your responses are confidential and will be combined in with
other responses that will not be matched to individual participants. Your participation is
voluntary and a non-response is an appropriate answer for any questions are not able or willing
to answer. Are you willing to participate and sign the informed consent form sent at the time of
scheduling this interview?
Thank you for your willingness to participate in this research.
Questions:
What can you tell me about the Wayne State College mission statement?
How does what do you do on a daily basis support or contribute to the Colleges mission?

Staff Connectedness to Mission Statements 38

What other opportunities might you have to contribute to the Colleges mission through
you or your departments daily activities?
What barriers do you face in supporting the Colleges mission through your work?
How does your support of the Colleges mission contribute to the overall atmosphere of the
campus community?
How does contributing to the Colleges mission and/or campus community motivate your
work?

What could help promote the campus community to a shared goal of mission success?

Closing Statement: I want to thank you again for participating in this interview. Your time is
valuable as is your input to this study. Your responses will provide a basis for the analysis of staff
connectedness to institutional mission statements and motivation for daily work. Your responses
are kept confidential by coding and secured storage. Do you have any final questions about this
study? Should you think of questions or desire a copy of this final research study, please feel free
to contact me at ajgade@mail.fhsu.edu. Again, thank you for your time.

Staff Connectedness to Mission Statements 39


Appendix C: Database and Keyword Search
Database: ABI/Inform (accessed through FHSUs Forsyth Library)
Keyword Search:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

campus AND mission AND staff


campus mission AND staff
campus mission AND staff involvement
campus mission AND contribution
higher education AND mission
higher education AND mission AND staff
higher education AND mission and staff involvement

Resources Found:
Fear, F., Adamek, M., & Imig, G. (2002). Connecting Philosophic and Scholarly Traditions with
Change in Higher Education. Journal of Leadership Studies, 8(3), 42-52. Retrieved from
http://search.proquest.com/docview/203143663?accountid=27424
Legorreta, L., Kelley, C. A., & Sablynski, C. J. (2006). Linking Faculty Development to the
Business School's Mission. Journal of Education for Business, 82(1), 3-10. Retrieved
from http://search.proquest.com/docview/202820732?accountid=27424
Michael, R. K., Sower, V. E., & Motwani, J. (1997). A comprehensive model for implementing
total quality management in higher education. Benchmarking for Quality
Management &
Technology, 4(2), 104. Retrieved from
http://search.proquest.com/docview/217356681?accountid=27424

Database: Academic Search Premier


Keyword Search:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

campus AND mission AND staff


campus mission AND staff
campus mission AND staff involvement
campus mission AND contribution
higher education AND mission
higher education AND mission AND staff
higher education AND mission and staff involvement

Resources Found:

Staff Connectedness to Mission Statements 40


Ferrari, J. R., McCarthy, B. J., & Milner, L. A. (2009). INVOLVED AND FOCUSED?
STUDENTS' PERCEPTIONS OF INSTITUTIONAL IDENTITY, PERSONAL GOAL
ORIENTATION AND LEVELS OF CAMPUS ENGAGEMENT. College Student
Journal, 43(3), 886-896.
Ferrari, J., & Velcoff, J. (2006). Measuring Staff Perceptions of University Identity and
Activities: The Mission and Values Inventory. Christian Higher Education, 5(3), 243261. doi:10.1080/15363750600685522
Kezar, A., Bertram Gallant, T., & Lester, J. (2011). Everyday people making a difference on
college campuses: the tempered grassroots leadership tactics of faculty and staff.
Studies
In Higher Education, 36(2), 129-151. doi:10.1080/03075070903532304
Wilson, J., Meyer, K., & McNeal, L. (2012). Mission and Diversity Statements: What They Do
and Do Not Say. Innovative Higher Education, 37(2), 125-139.
doi:10.1007/s10755-0119194-8