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Running head: LDRS890-FINAL INTERNSHIP REPORT

Acting Assistant Director of Admissions at Wayne State College:


LDRS 890-Final Internship Report
Amy Gade
Fort Hays State University

In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for


LDRS 890: Internship
Dr. Brent Goertzen

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Abstract

This paper serves as an internship report for an acting Assistant Director of Admissions at Wayne
State College in Wayne, Nebraska. The paper provides background on the organization of Wayne
State College, more specifically the organization of the Office of Admissions, in which the
internship took place. The author describes the needs within the Office, which lead to the defined
problem of which the internship helped to fulfill. The literature review aims to present the
existing information on the topics of leading and implementing change within an organization, as
well as the idea of individual and organizational readiness for change. Overarching objectives
were determined, along with multiple action steps, to help meet the predetermined needs of the
organization. A detailed report of the accomplishments throughout the project help share the
successes achieved toward the overall project vision. The author details project and learning
outcomes from the internship project, which enhanced both the organization and authors gain
from the internship process.

LDRS 890-FINAL INTERNSHIP REPORT

Acknowledgements
Pursuing a Masters degree begins with a spark for wanting something more. That spark
develops into a burning desire that can only be satisfied by being courageous enough to go after
that something more. For me, that something more was new knowledge, experience, and
education within my favorite subject of all time, leadership. My love for leadership began in high
school, when a FCS teacher saw something in me as a freshman and gave me the opportunity to
take on a leadership role within a student organization. To that FCS teacher, thank you for seeing
in me what I did not yet see in myself. My undergraduate career studying Speech
Communications at Wayne State College reinforced my love for leadership. To the
Communication faculty at WSC, thank you for introducing me to the idea that leadership is
something that can be learned, studied, and improved upon. By pushing and challenging me, they
lead me to believe a Masters degree would be an inevitable part of my future. Next, I want to
thank my colleagues at Wayne State College, specifically my Director, whom have been
wonderfully encouraging and supportive in listening to my joys and stresses during my graduate
degree pursuit. Without them, this project and many others would not have been possible. Lastly,
I need to acknowledge my FHSU advisor, Dr. Brent Goertzen. While our conversations have
been minimal throughout the pursuit of my degree, they have been lengthy, encouraging, and
motivating. I sincerely appreciate his support in offering me the ability to independently pursue
projects that fit my interests, feed into my strengths, and challenge my weaknesses. To these
people and others, such as my family, friends, and husband, I am forever grateful for whatever it
is they see in me and my leadership potential. My only hope is that I always make them proud.

LDRS 890-FINAL INTERNSHIP REPORT

Table of Contents
Introduction of the Topic and Justification.5
Statement of the Problem....6
Review of Literature....7
Vision.....13
Methodology......13
Project15
Project Outcomes and Measurement.25
Learning Outcomes28
References......31
Appendices.33

LDRS 890-FINAL INTERNSHIP REPORT

Introduction of Topic and Justification


Wayne State College is a 4-year public institution of higher learning. Located in Wayne,
Nebraska, Wayne State College has an enrollment of approximately 3,500 students and offers
both undergraduate and graduate degree programs. The mission of Wayne State College is threefold with a focus on: Learning Excellence, Student Success, and Regional Service. The College
has a 5-member executive administration team, which includes the President, Vice President of
Administration and Finance, Vice President of Academic Affairs, Vice President and Dean of
Students, and Vice President of Development.
The Office of Admissions at Wayne State College is responsible for the recruitment and
admission of undergraduate and graduate students. The Office employs 11 full time staff,
including the Director of Admissions, two Coordinator of Admissions Services, two Office
Assistants, and six Admissions Representatives, as well as one part time Office Assistant. The
Office also staffs several student workers, including a 32-member campus tour guide team, 9member telecounselor team, and several work-study students.
The Director of Admissions at Wayne State College reports directly to the College
President. In reporting to the College President, the Director of Admissions is responsible for
lead generation, inquiry, applicant, and enrollment numbers, communication plans, recruitment
and yield events, outreach and marketing efforts, communication to the campus community and
other constituents, new initiatives and efforts, and direct supervision of all office staff. The
Director of Admissions is frequently involved in bigger picture conversations and meetings
related to recruitment and retention efforts of the College. Meetings and time away from the
office are commonplace for the Director of Admissions.

LDRS 890-FINAL INTERNSHIP REPORT

In July of 2015, Wayne State College named a new President, Dr. Marysz Rames. Dr.
Rames brings many years of higher education experience and leadership to Wayne State College.
Having served in a comprehensive Vice President role at another institution prior to being named
to her role at WSC, Dr. Rames oversaw numerous divisions and initiatives, including, but not
limited to, enrollment management, student success, strategic planning, fundraising/fiscal
management, diversity and inclusion, collaborative partnerships, leadership development, and
increasing efficiency and effectiveness for students (Rames Named, 2015). Her experience
with enrollment management gives her added insight into recruitment and admissions functions.
Dr. Rames brings energy, drive, dedication, and high expectations. Her leadership is
capable of taking Wayne State College to a new level. With her involvement in recruitment,
admissions, and enrollment, comes questions, ideas, needs, and expectations. The Director of
Admissions is responsible for working with, for, and through Dr. Rames on such things. At the
same time, the Director of Admissions is working on additional projects to maximize recruitment
and retention efforts, as well as to serve as the sole budgetary manager, full-time staff supervisor,
and leader within the Office of Admissions.
Statement of Problem
To allow for the necessary time and attention the Director of Admissions expects to need,
assistance in other areas could be of benefit to Wayne State College and the Office of
Admissions. Oversight of the daily operations, coordination of visit events, supervision of
recruitment staff, and other responsibilities are often the charge of an Assistant Director of
Admissions. Wayne State College does not currently have an Assistant Director of Admissions
position within the structure of the Office of Admission.

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The addition of such position would also help create an additional rung on the
advancement ladder in Office of Admissions at Wayne State College. Currently, the structure
consists of Office Assistant, Admissions Representative, Coordinator of Admissions Services,
and Director of Admission roles. The restructuring of a current position to equate for an Assistant
Director of Admissions role would not only address current office needs by allowing the
delegation of particular responsibilities, but also potential future office needs by developing an
additional advancement rung for future generations of staff.
Review of Literature
Implementing the role of an Assistant Director in the Office of Admissions at Wayne
State College poses some challenge. First, this specific Assistant Director role at Wayne State
College would be somewhat new. While other offices on campus have had Assistant Directors
for quite some time, the Office of Admissions has been without since 2008. At that time, the role
was not structured to provide the degree of leadership and responsibilities that would likely be
necessary today. Because Wayne State College is a part of three college system, the Nebraska
State College System, it was decided at the system level to edit this position to a lesser title of
Coordinator of Admissions Services. For consistency purposes, this title was more uniform
across all three institutions within the system and was more reflective of the responsibilities of
the role at that time. The process of re-implementing this revised role means change within the
system and change within the office. One institution within the system has already implemented
the Assistant Director of Admissions role within the past year, so consistency appears to not be
an issue any longer. The bigger change would likely be within the Wayne State College Office of
Admissions, implementing a position many are not familiar with as they were not on staff the last

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time it existed. Change to certain processes, reporting, and leadership could all be caused by the
implementation of an Assistant Director role.
Change is difficult in any regard. Change is often resisted. One way change is looked
upon more favorably is when it is talked about openly allowing those affected by it the
opportunity to participate in it. As Weisbord (2012) suggests, Lewin had found the core
principle of participation: we are more likely to carry out decisions we have helped make (p.
98). Lewin seemed to understand that elements of change cannot be implemented by managers
alone or resistance is likely to meet them at the door. Instead, he believed the tension of
organizational change could be reduced simply by involving those the change was most likely to
affect. By the author involving other Admissions staff in the development of the Assistant
Director of Admissions position, resistance to the change should diminish.
It is through Lewins idea on participation as an element to reducing resistance to change
and many practical studies on this idea that he developed his famous three-phase process:
unfreezing, moving, and refreezing. Unfreezing is the process in which new information is
provided as a way to reduce the negativity toward proposed changes, while moving is the idea of
pushing along changes in attitude, values, structure, feelings, behavior, and refreezing is the
process of reaching a new norm that includes support for this new desired behavior (Weisbord,
2012, p. 101). Lewins process is the exact opposite of forcing change on people, because it a)
provides information which will help everyone see the reason for or benefit in the proposed
change, b) introduces the change in a way that allows it to be accepted in all regards, and c)
works through the acceptance of the changed situation offering support to enhance the changes
made. Changes proposed in this way should gain basic support of even those most resistant to
change.

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Senge (2011) also believes that participation can reduce the tension of organizational
change. He supports participation at an even more crucial level: learning. He argues that the most
successful organizations will be those that encourage learning at all levels, instead of from the
ultra-traditional top-down. For Senge (2011), learning organizations take a systems approach to
thinking. This very holistic approach toward thinking allows for variety of ideas to come
forward, which in turn can help organizations avoid traditional learning or changes traps. As
suggested by Bapuji and Crossan (2004), traps include defaulting to whats familiar, only whats
known to have worked in the past, or more relative to whats already know, these traps can
diminish the success of the imposed change.
By involving additional office staff in the development of the Assistant Director job
description and responsibilities, they will not only be able to provide their perspective, but
perhaps will also see benefit in the role being added to the office structure. Admissions
Representatives could provide the perspective of what added leadership they may need or desire.
Likewise, Office Assistants may be able to provide the perspective of the need for oversight of
daily operations. Including office staff in the generation of the job description and
responsibilities of an Assistant Director of Admissions allows for multiple perspectives,
justification of the need, and added buy in for this position.
Because change is such an inevitable part of the working world today, another
opportunity for helping reduce resistance to change is to promote readiness for change amongst
staff members. There are two levels in readiness for change, in that it needs to be there on an
individual and organizational level (Smith, 2005). By investing some energy into this
preparedness, perhaps by conducting a readiness assessment, a leader is less likely to need to
management resistance once changes are underway (Holt, Armenakis, Field, & Harris, 2007).

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The leader would likely first begin with an organizational readiness assessment, which would
assess if the organization has the capacity to accept and support the proposed change at the
current time. Palmer (2015) suggests a 4-step process for conducting this type of assessment,
List all of the major ongoing activities that will compete for manpower, money, and attention.
Estimate the level of effort that each project will take (small, medium, or large). Then, estimate
the level of effort required by this current project. Finally, consider the current load of the
organization (p. 8). Involving your team in this assessment will allow for multiple perspectives,
but might also offer up a degree of understanding as to if the change is or is not pursued.
Organizational readiness should also consider the organizations ability to commit to the change
at hand (Mangundjaya & Gandakusuma, 2013). Should it appear as though things look positive
and the time may be right for the proposed change, individual readiness is the final step to
consider before implementing.
Lizar, Mangundjaya, and Rachmawan (2015) defined individual readiness for change as,
the comprehensive attitude that simultaneously was influenced by the content (what has been
changed), process (how is going to change), context (in what situation that change is done), and
characteristics of the individual who is involved in the change (p. 344). Variables that may
influence an individuals readiness for change include job demand, confidence in job knowledge
and skills, relationships in the workplace, including those with the management or leadership
team, and the culture of the organization (Hanpachern, Morgan, & Griego, 1998). Keeping a
close watch on these things not only around the time of change implementation, but also as often
as possible helps created connected, committed, and adaptable employees who are better more
successful in a change heavy working world. To influence an individuals readiness for change, it
is important the change message address three important factors, which include a strong and

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demonstrable need for change, the self-efficacy to accomplish the change, and, again, the
opportunity to participate in the change (Lizar et al., 2015). By conducting an organizational and
individual readiness assessment, leadership is better positioned to initiate at an appropriate time
and implement through effective leadership and communication successful change processes.
To create a smooth and successful change within an organizational system, such as within
the Office of Admissions, strong leadership is necessary throughout the course of change
implementation. Weisbord (2012) said that he really admired those leaders who were willing to
put themselves on the line taking risks, too. This type of leader is completely committed to the
changes and by willing to be on the front line of those changes just as they are asking their team
to be, this kind of leader is more successful in gaining buy in. Likewise, by being on the front
line of those changes with their team, they may better be able to identify potential conflicts and
diffuse those situations before they even happen.
Another key leadership requirement is someone who can read the rest of their team,
especially as it relates to their thoughts or opinions regarding the potential change. Weisbord
(2012) discussed a leaders ability to view each team member, department, or company as living
in a four-room apartment of contentment, denial, confusion, and renewal as it relates to change
(p. 326). A good leader recognizes the various stages in their team and is equipped to help team
members through those various phases to a place that will be most effective for the
implementation of productive change. Likewise, a strong leader would have likely already
thought of what things about this proposed change might cause hang-ups and how they might
better explain the purpose of those changes to reduce the tension surrounding it.
Likewise, a key leadership requirement for supporting organizational change would be
someone willing to be inclusive. This type of leader is not necessarily concerned with being

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right, or instructing people through a change, as much as their goal is helping others learn
(Weisbord, 2012, p. 329). To define leadership from a systems thinking and/or organizational
learning perspective, one would need to look at the leader from more of an encourager or
influencer role. Yukl (2009) states, Leaders can directly encourage and facilitate collective
learning by what they say and do, and they can indirectly influence it by implementing or
modifying relevant programs, systems, and structures (p. 50). Because this person actively
engages himself or herself in the system, they should be viewed as an active member of potential
change, not just the person facilitating it. This type of leader is willing to think broadly about the
work of their organization, while still taking a critical look at each component, and is not afraid
to ask tough questions. Likewise, a leader who encourages their staff to take a more broad view
of their daily work, its interconnection to the larger goal, and the function or purpose of their
work would likely be quite successful in a systems thinking and/or organizational learning type
of leadership.
Lastly, changes implemented today should have a vision of tomorrow in mind.
Continuity, as discussed in Darl Kolbs (2003) article entitled, Seeking Continuity Amidst
Organizational Change, is defined as, the connectedness over time among organizational efforts
and a sense or experience of ongoingness that links the past to the present and the present to
future hopes and ideas (p. 180). The idea of continuity seems like an important aspect to
remember when proposing any organizational change, but likely one that is often overlooked.
The restructuring of a current position, such as a Coordinator of Admissions Services in the
Office of Admissions at Wayne State College, into a new position, like an Assistant Director of
Admissions, not only addresses current and past issues, but also aims to present a solution that
works for the current time and hopefully into the future.

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Vision

The vision for this project is a revised leadership structure within the Office of
Admissions at Wayne State College to include an Assistant Director of Admissions. Throughout
the internship phase, the author worked to clarify the more specific needs of the organization and
how the restructuring of the Office to include the Assistant Director position could help address
those needs. The author identified the specific responsibilities of this position and created a
sample job description. By fulfilling the identified needs and accepting the identified
responsibilities, it is the authors hope that the need for and benefits from this position have been
validated. Ultimately, the authors vision is to have proved the value of an Assistant Director of
Admissions role, in hopes of a future promotion.
Methodology
In order to address the needs of the Wayne State College Office of Admissions, the
creation of an Assistant Director of Admissions position could help to alleviate some of the
duties and responsibilities the Director of Admissions currently holds. Identified objectives that
fit into the scope of an internship project include management of the travel and recruitment
budgets and partial supervision of the Admissions Representatives, as well as the creation of an
Assistant Director of Admissions job description specific to the Wayne State College Office of
Admission. Additional action steps were identified to help reach the larger objectives of the
internship project. These objectives and action items were generated at the point of the internship
proposal, so have since received some revisions, which are noted in the Project section of the
report. While the scope of the internship is intended to fit within the course of a semester, due to
the added benefit the internship project provided, it is likely the objectives and action steps will
carry on throughout the course of the academic year or fiscal year.

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Objective 01: Create an Assistant Director of Admissions job description


Action Step
(What):
Review national job
descriptions
Review state job
descriptions
Review WSC Assistant
Director job descriptions
Get insight on specific
responsibilities of
Assistant Director

How:
Search higheredjobs.com

Person Responsible
(Who):
Author

Date to be
Complete
d (When):
9/20/15

Contact other institutions

Author/Colleagues

10/1/15

Contact Human Resources

Author/Human Resources

10/1/15

Poll Admissions
Representatives/Director

Author/Admissions
Representatives/Director

10/1/15

Resources:
Higheredjobs.com
Colleagues at
other institutions
WSC Human
Resources
Admissions
Office staff

Communication:
Website
Email
Personal contact
Email/personal
contact

Objective 02: Manage travel/recruitment budget


Action Step
(What):

How:

Review current budget

Gain access from Director

Determine travel and


recruitment expenses

Breakdown expenses into


varying categories
Average current/past years
ordering expenses
Calculate hotel, gas, food,
and comp time expenses
Calculate recruitment
expenses for current class

Determine order budget


Determine travel cost per
Admissions Rep
Determine recruitment
cost per enrolled student

Person Responsible
(Who):

Date to be
Completed
(When):

Author/Director

10/1/15

Author/Director

10/1/15

Author

11/1/15

Author

12/1/15

Author

On-going

Resources:
Internal budget
documents
Internal budget
documents
Internal budget
documents
Internal budget
documents
Internal budget
documents

Communication:
Personal contact
Personal contact
Report to Director
Report to Director
Report to Director

Objective 03: Partially supervise Admissions Representatives


Action Step
(What):
Train new Admissions
Representatives
Shadow new Admissions
Representatives
Assist with travel
planning decisions
Learn comp time
regulations
Manage Admissions Reps
comp time

How:
Work with Director to
determine training topics
Sit in on daily and high
school visit presentations
Talk about travel schedules
Work with Director to
learn WSC/HR practices
Review Admissions Reps
monthly leave report

Person Responsible
(Who):

Date to be
Completed
(When):

Author/Director

On-going

Author/other veteran
Admissions staff

10/1/15

Author

On-going

Author/Director

10/1/15

Author/Director

On-going

Resources:
Internal training
materials
N/A
Internal territory
reports
Internal HR
documents
WSC monthly
leave report

Communication:
Personal contact
N/A
Report to Director
Personal contact
Personal contact with
Director

The method for my internship project began with a meeting with the Director of
Admissions at Wayne State College to discuss my ideas for the project. We worked together to
identify realistic objectives I could work on throughout the internship process. These objectives
would coincide with the job responsibilities of the Assistant Director of Admissions job
description for the project and moving forward after the project. Once the objectives of creating

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an Assistant Director of Admissions job description, managing the travel and recruitment budget,
and partially supervise the Admissions Representatives were determined, a majority of the action
steps involved independent research and work. My Director and I met at several occasions
throughout the project to discuss the progress and direction of the project. My Director was
extremely helpful in ensuring access to the various items I needed for the project, such as
monthly budget reports and non-exempt professional staff leave reports.
The ability to work with my Director, but also to work independently throughout this
project seemed extremely appropriate. The nature of work in Admissions is very team oriented,
but also at times very independent of the group. I believe the methods and processes used for this
project align with the way the Assistant Director of Admissions role would function. I assume I
would be given new tasks or assignments and left to work on these items independently. My
Director would surely be open to questions or requests for more direction, but it would likely be
up to me to determine what help or clarification I may need for various tasks. To me, this seems
very reflective of a middle management type of leadership role, like the one an Assistant Director
plays.
Project
The project began with Objective 01 to create an Assistant Director of Admissions job
description. This process began with the review of national job descriptions for Assistant
Directors of Admission through the website www.higherdjobs.com. Higheredjobs.com is a job
search website specifically for employment opportunities within the higher education field. On
this site, a job seeker can narrow their search by job category, like administrative, faculty, or
executive, by location, by school type, or by job type, such as online/remote, dual career, todays
jobs, or adjunct/part-time. Individuals looking to advance their career or relocate to larger

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institutions or other regions of the country often use this website. I began my search on
higheredjobs.com with a keyword search of positions with the phrasing Assistant Director of
Admissions. At any point in time, this search revealed around 500 openings across the United
States, many of which were not specific to Admissions but more so just Assistant Director roles
in various departments.
By narrowing the job type to Admin-Admissions and Enrollment, the position type to
Full-time only, and the institution type to Four-Year/Advanced Degree to match my current
position, I was able to narrow my search results to just over 150 positions available. In an
attempt to find job descriptions more relevant to my institution and my perceived ideas of what
our job description would entail, I still had to rule out many positions found in my search. While
the keyword search specifically asked to look for jobs with the title Assistant Director of
Admissions, the search still revealed opportunities for Vice Provost, Director, Coordinator, and
even Admissions Counselor roles. Likewise, the search revealed varying opportunities like
positions specific to transfer, multicultural, or graduate departments or shared positions like
Admissions and Financial Aid or Admissions and International Recruitment.
After reviewing relevant positions titles and types from around the United States, I felt it
would be more beneficial to look at opportunities relevant to our region, so I narrowed the search
by looking for opportunities within Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas, and South Dakota. At the time of
my search, two openings were found within the states previously identified. An Assistant
Director of Recruitment position at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, which can be found in
Appendix A, is quite relevant as they are another 4-year institution within the state of Nebraska
and, while significantly different in terms of size, happen to be our biggest competitor at Wayne
State College. The second position found was an Assistant Director of Admissions position at

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Upper Iowa University, available in Appendix B. This position is equally as relevant, as Upper
Iowa University is more similar to WSC in terms its campus size and its rural location. Likewise,
Upper Iowa University shares an athletic conference, the Northern Sun Intercollegiate
Conference, with WSC.
While reviewing job descriptions on both a national and regional level proved beneficial
in some regard, it failed to reveal the more specific job details I was looking for in order to create
the WSC Assistant Director of Admissions job description. Therefore, a SurveyMonkey poll was
created in order to survey Admissions leaders, Directors, Deans or Vice Presidents, regarding the
role of Assistant Directors on their staff. The survey asked questions regarding the specific title
used for this role, the number of Assistant Directors on staff, job requirements, salary range, and
responsibilities of the position. The survey was originally sent via email to Admissions leaders at
20 different 4-year institutions in Nebraska. At the direction of Dr. Brent Goertzen, my graduate
program and internship advisor, the survey was sent to a second group of Admissions leaders at
eight different 4-year institutions, which have been identified as Wayne State Colleges peer
institutions by the Nebraska Coordinating Commission. These institutions are located five
different states and have been deemed as comparable in terms of size, scope, and mission and are
used for assessment and institutional data reporting purposes.
Out of the 28 Admissions leaders invited to complete the survey, eight participated,
which signifies a 29 percent completion rate; the full survey and responses can be found in
Appendix C. 50 percent of the respondents work at 4-year private colleges or universities, 25
percent at 4-year public universities, and 25 percent at 4-year public colleges. A majority, or 88
percent, reported that they were responding from the Director level perspective. About 57
percent reported having only one Assistant Director on staff, while the remaining 43 percent

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reported having more than four Assistant Directors on staff. The job requirements mentioned by
most included Bachelors degree required and 3-5 years of related experience required or
preferred, many also noted that a Masters degree is preferred. All respondents noted the salary
range for their Assistant Directors as between $35,000-$50,000, with $45,000-$50,000 as the
salary noted by about 50 percent of the respondents.
More revealing was to learn of the job responsibilities of the individual/s with this
position. The most commonly noted responsibility, with an eighty-eight percent response rate, is
to serve as the acting leader in the absence of the senior leader. Seventy-five percent of
respondents noted the following as job responsibilities, supervision of student staff and
management of a recruitment territory. Sixty-three percent acknowledged data management,
development of recruitment materials, training of professional or student staff, and liaison to
other campus departments as other significant job responsibilities. Other important job
responsibilities were also mentioned, just not at as consistent volume as the previously discussed;
those can be reviewed in Appendix C. Lastly, Admissions leaders were asked to address the
value added as a result of an Assistant Director role. One respondent identified this role as a
must in todays world. Another mentioned the value of this role taking on some of the day-today operations, which eliminates things from the Directors plate, allowing him/her to focus on
the bigger picture. A final Admissions leader talked about the added leadership role within the
office as beneficial to the senior leader, having someone to voice concerns to, discuss
confidential manners, or provide leadership support for difficult issues or situations.
As Coordinator of Admissions Services, I am often times acting much like an Assistant
Director of Admissions in terms of my current job responsibilities. However, utilizing both the
national job descriptions for Assistant Directors of Admission found on higheredjobs.com and

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the results of my administered SurveyMonkey poll, I was able to identify a few additional job
requirements and responsibilities necessary in an Assistant Director of Admissions job
description at Wayne State College. The most prominent additions to this job description would
include a more formalized role of that next leader in the absence of my Director and the
responsibility of assisting in the training and supervision of our professional recruitment staff.
Another significant addition to the Assistant Director of Admissions job description is the idea
that a Masters degree is preferred.
Fortunately, I had access to the job description format accepted by WSCs Human
Resources in my own job description as Coordinator of Admissions Services. I did not gain
access to other Assistant Director job descriptions at Wayne State College, as Human Resources
does not make these public unless the position is currently open and accepting applicants. The
above-mentioned additions were made to create a full job description for an Assistant Director of
Admissions at Wayne State College, which is available in Appendix D. This description was
shared with the Director of Admissions at Wayne State College and agreed upon for the terms of
this internship project. Should this internship prove this role as beneficial to our office, it is
possible the job description would remain as is or may receive some additional minor edits.
The second part of the internship project was Objective 02 to manage travel/recruitment
budget. This process began by gaining access to the Office of Admissions monthly budget
report. In working with the Director of Admissions, I was able to gain access to monthly budget
reports once available. Not having seen the budget report before, there were many aspects I was
unaware of and unfamiliar with. First, the budget report is made available at the end of each
month for the previous months expenses. For example, the report made available on September
30, 2015 was for the month of Augusts expenses. Likewise, the report made available on

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October 31, 2015 was for the month of Septembers expenses. Due to the timeline of this
internship project, I am unable to review any additional budget reports before the projects
culmination. Post-internship, I am hopeful to continue budget report reviews through the
remainder of the fiscal year to fully meet my outlined Objective.
Because I am only able to review two months of Office of Admissions expenditures at
this point, I decided to focus on categorizing those expenditures into four categories: a) staff
expenses, which includes full-time staff salaries/benefits and student worker payroll, b) travel
expenses, which includes hotel, meal, and motor pool expenses, c) recruitment materials, which
includes printing, postage, and giveaway order charges, and d) other, which includes office
phone, cell phone, and office printer expenditures. Month-to-month these categories should
cover the majority of expenditures the Office of Admissions is responsible for. This will also
allow for an easy month-to-month comparison of expenditures per category.
In looking at the months of August and September, I created a pie chart to help determine
which categories of expenditures took the highest percentage of our budget for that particular
month, the pie charts and a breakdown of the category expenditures can be found in Appendix G.
I felt that a pie chart visual of each months expenditures and what percentage of the monthly
budget each category is using would be both interesting and helpful. The month of August is one
of our larger months in terms of recruitment material orders, so it was no surprise to see that
percentage almost double the subsequent month. The month of September begins heavy travel
season, so again seeing that percentage almost double the previous month was of no surprise to
me. Proceeding months should show additional growth in certain categories, while other
categories will likely drop.

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With my newfound knowledge on our budget reporting, some action steps for Objective
02 had to be adjusted or extended. As mentioned earlier, post-internship, I intend to continue my
budget reviews in hopes of completing a full fiscal year report on our expenditures. I intend to
use this full fiscal year report and understanding to determine an annual ordering budget for
giveaway items such as pens, lanyards, pennants, t-shirts, folders, counselor gifts, etc. Likewise,
after a full fiscal year report, I will better be able to gauge our full recruitment and travel
expenses that can help me gauge our cost to recruit and enroll a new student. Unfortunately, due
to the way our budget is reported, I am not sure I will be able to determine the travel expenses
for each individual Admissions Representative. Hotel and meal expenses are separated per
Admissions Representative, but mileage charged per motor pool vehicle is not separated out, nor
is it attributed to an individual Admissions Representative. I will, however, be able to determine
our travel expenditures for a recruitment year, which is something we have not known up to this
point. Understanding our monthly and yearly expenditures will be extremely beneficial in
helping us make smarter and more cost effective decisions from month to month or year to year.
Objective 03 to partially supervise Admissions Representatives was the final portion of
the internship project. This process began with the training of new Admissions Representatives
in August. The Wayne State College Office of Admissions faced an extreme rarity this summer
with the hiring of four new Admissions Representatives, all of whom started between June and
August. While turnover in the Admissions field in general is fairly common, it has been quite
infrequent at WSC in the past. Training these individuals in a timely manner was essential to
ensure they were prepared for travel beginning in September. Due to various commitments of the
Director of Admissions, training of new staff was defaulted to my responsibility.

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In advance of training, I worked with the Director of Admissions to identify necessary


training topics and items. Such topics included general items like introductions to other offices,
gaining a staff ID, checking email and voicemail, and a summary of the various roles in the
office, travel training, scholarships overview, campus visit programs breakdown, time off
procedures, and miscellaneous topics such as our use of social media, the communication plan,
admissions process for varying applicant types, organizations we belong to, and appropriate
office attire. I met with two Admissions Representatives at the same time for training and the two
other new Admissions Representatives individually based on their varying start dates. The
majority of training spanned over the course of about two weeks, with continuous training
happening through the entire fall semester. As we completed the various training topics, I
reported back to my Director on our progress. I continued to follow up with the Admissions
Representatives on their progress and understanding of the various aspects of their position
throughout the course of the semester. I also expressed my availability for any questions that may
come up while in the office or out on the road.
As the Admissions Representatives were trained and prepared for various aspects of their
role, such as hosting transfer students during their course registration appointments, hosting daily
campus visitors, and hosting prospective students at high school visits, I was responsible for
shadowing them. In these moments, I was looking for consistency in our messaging and
opportunities to provide constructive feedback on talking points, customer service, and
presentation style. In my evaluation, I attempted to lead with positive reinforcement before
offering criticism. I wanted to be sure the areas for improvement were balanced with strengths
each staff member displayed. Each Admissions Representative seemed very open, appreciative,
and responsive to this feedback.

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As the fall semester began and we moved into the thick of travel planning for fall
semester high school visits, I worked with the Admissions Representatives and the Director of
Admissions on travel decisions. Helping new staff members understand the balance of days on
and off the road, the on campus responsibilities during travel season, work to be done from the
road, and the effective use of travel time and budget were top priorities. Likewise, I assisted new
staff members with calendar scheduling, travel paperwork, and student contact for initial visits.
As Admissions Representatives are invited to events not originally on their calendars, I hope to
serve as the primary contact in helping them decide which events can and should be built into
their schedules.
The last action within the Objective of assisting in the supervision of the Admissions
Representatives was to expand my own understanding of the compensatory time benefit
available to the Admissions Representatives, in an attempt to be able to assist in the management
of their compensatory time. As Coordinator of Admissions Services, I supervise our 31-member
student tour guide team. Because of the supervisory nature of my position, I am currently of
exempt status, meaning I do not qualify for compensatory time. Therefore, I have never been
introduced to our compensatory time policies or procedures.
In attempting to further understand our compensatory policy and procedure, I first met
with the Director of Admissions to discuss. Surprisingly, I learned that when compensatory time
originated within our department, roughly 3 years ago, Human Resources provided no
documentation to support the institutions compensatory policy or procedure. Consequently, I
turned to Nebraska State College System Board Policy in hopes of more information. Policy
5032 on Overtime for State College Employees, available in Appendix E, gives a general outline

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of compensatory time. While some explanation of what compensatory time is, Board Policy
gave little in terms of actual policies and procedures departments and employees are to follow.
The lack of information available lead me to create a Compensatory Time Procedures
document for use within the Office of Admissions. This document, available in Appendix F, aims
to inform non-exempt staff, especially those newly hired, of what compensatory time is, what
constitutes as compensatory time, how much can be accrued, how it should be documented, what
inter-office procedures exists regarding compensatory time, and when compensatory time should
be used. It is my hope that this document can help lay out compensatory time and our internal
office procedures for compensatory time in a clear and concise manner for those to whom it
applies. For someone new to the Office of Admissions and/or with little understanding of
compensatory time, this document seems to answer the most basic questions, while providing
guidance on accruing and using this time.
I met with the Director of Admissions to share the Compensatory Time Procedures
document I have created as a part of this project. He approved this document for the purpose of
this internship project, but added that it will provide value in the hiring and training of new nonexempt staff members going forward. We also discussed the management of the Admissions
Representatives compensatory time. Like the approval of any leave time, he explained that
approving the use of compensatory time is a matter of reviewing the calendar for other
previously scheduled leave and any events or other things that may affect a particular day
requested. Likewise, having access to each non-exempt employees compensatory time balance
is helpful in understanding the need for its use before it becomes a volume that is costly of our
offices resources or ability to get the necessary work completed. Training and shadowing the
Admissions Representatives, as well as learning and creating some compensatory time

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procedures not only provides assistance to the Director of Admissions by removing some things
from his place, but also helps this position claim a space on the leadership hierarchy within the
WSC Office of Admissions.

Project Outcomes and Measurements


One of the greatest outcomes of this internship project includes a greater understanding
of an Assistant Director of Admissions role not only on my behalf, but also on behalf of the
Director of Admissions and the entire Office of Admissions staff. This internship project helped
determine what responsibilities an Assistant Director would have, how having someone
responsible for those respective things adds value, and the benefit of an added level of leadership
within the Office of Admissions. I believe these items alone have created validation of the need
for such role at Wayne State College. Post-internship, it is my hope and understanding that my
Director will pursue the creation of such position.
Objective 01 was to create an Assistant Director of Admissions job description. By
researching Assistant Director of Admissions roles on the national levels, I gained understanding
of the various types of Assistant Director roles within Admissions Departments. Some larger
institutions have multiple Assistant Directors, so it was interesting to consider how that might
impact their leadership hierarchy. At a smaller institution like Wayne State College, I believe one
Assistant Director of Admissions is likely sufficient. By polling various Admissions leaders
within the state of Nebraska, as well as within our Nebraska Coordinating Commission peer
institution group, I was able to attain a much greater understanding of the specific duties and
responsibilities of someone in this position. Likewise, I learned more about the job requirements
of applicants for this type of role, the appropriate pay range, as well as the added value this

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position brings to Admissions departments. Gaining the input of Admissions leaders directly was
invaluable to this project and the creation of a job description for the Assistant Director of
Admissions at Wayne State College. I measure the results of Objective 01 by a successful search
of national Assistant Director of Admissions roles, the successful creation of an Assistant
Director of Admissions survey sent to 28 Admissions leaders from various Nebraska institutions
or designated peer group institution, a 29 percent completion of the survey sent to Admissions
leaders, and a completed job description for an Assistant Director of Admissions at Wayne State
College.
Objective 02 was to manage the travel and recruitment budget, specifically to determine
travel and recruitment expenses, determine a yearly ordering budget for miscellaneous
recruitment and giveaway items, determine the travel costs per Admissions Representative, and
determine the recruitment cost per enrolled student. The action steps for this particular Objective
had to be altered once I gained access to our monthly budget report, gained a better
understanding of what was and was not reported, and saw how expenditures were noted. After
some reconsideration, I determined what would be most helpful at this point is to understand our
monthly expenditures by breaking them into four separate categories: a) staff, b) travel, c)
recruitment materials, and d) other expenditures. By continuing my budget reviews through the
remainder of the fiscal year, I will be able to use these four categories to help meet my predetermined action steps. While this particular Objective of the internship project was not
completely successful, I still believe it has been useful to our office in helping gain a better
understanding of our expenditures on a month-to-month basis. Having a full fiscal years
breakdown of our monthly expenditures will help us make smarter fiscal decisions on a monthto-month and year-to-year basis. I measure this Objectives success by the fact that we now have

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budgetary information at our fingertips we had not ever had before. Likewise, in extending this
review, I will be able to determine an order budget, travel costs for our recruitment staff, and the
cost to recruit and enroll a new student.
Objective 03 was to partially supervise Admissions Representatives. This Objective
involved the action steps of training and shadowing new Admissions Representatives, assisting
with travel planning decisions, learning compensatory time regulations, and helping manage
Admissions Representatives compensatory time. It was my first attempt to solely train newly
hired Admissions Representatives, which meant I first needed to work with the Director of
Admissions to determine training topics. Once those topics were determined, I need to work with
the new hires to schedule the appropriate time to complete the training. Once training was
conducted, I also wanted to shadow the Admissions Representatives as they conducted transfer
student registration appointments, daily campus visit presentations, and high school visit
presentations. Shadowing these appointments and presentations provided my first opportunity to
give constructive feedback on information presented, customer service, and presentation style. It
was through these shadowing experiences that I was able to measure the success of our initial
training efforts. Each Admissions Representative was prepared, well trained, accurate in their
presentation of information, and successful in their presentation style. Due to the lack of
available resources on compensatory time procedures, I worked to create a procedures document
for the Office of Admissions. This document is meant to be used for explanatory purposes upon
the hiring of new non-exempt professional staff and for the first time, allows our office to have
some documented procedures regarding compensatory time. I measure the success of Objective
03 by the completion of new Admissions Representatives training within the appropriate time

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frame, successful shadowing experiences complete with constructive feedback, and the creation
of a working Compensatory Time Procedures document for the Office of Admissions.

Learning Outcomes
There have been many learning outcomes from this internship project, one of the biggest
being increased knowledge on initiating and implementing change within an organizational
setting. Change is difficult and often resisted, but involving those to be affected by the change in
its implementation can be extremely beneficial in reducing the resistance to change. Lewins
three-phase process of unfreezing, moving, and refreezing allows individuals to see the benefit of
the change and accept the change by providing the necessary support (Weisbord, 2012). Another
key aspect of initiating and implementing change is to create readiness for change on both an
individual and organizational level. An organizational readiness assessment can be utilized to
determine if the organization has the capacity to accept and support the proposed change at the
current time (Palmer, 2015).
One of the greatest benefits of this internship project was its timing. The internship
project began at a time of great change within our office with the hiring of four new Admissions
Representatives. While this posed the challenge of seemingly too much change at one time, it
also brought an opportunity to make a change when those most impacted by a new leadership
hierarchy would not know any different. The removal of previous staff who knew me in my role
of Coordinator of Admissions Services provided a natural opportunity for change to my
responsibilities and how my position is utilized within the office. Because a large portion of our
staff is new, they were seemingly more open and less resistant to these changes.

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I also learned about the type of leadership needed to help sustain the implemented
changes. I attempted to be an encouraging and influential type of leader. I genuinely want to help
the new Admissions Representatives learn, foster, grow, and develop in their role. I want to help
them see how their individual work is interconnected to the larger recruitment and enrollment
goal of our Office and the College as a whole. I want to be viewed as a participative leader, who
is not afraid to jump right in and help wherever needed. While I want to be seen as a leader on
the team, I also very much want to still be seen as a member of the team.
I used this internship project to learn about taking initiative to look for opportunities
previously unseen within my organization. For example, I saw benefit in better understanding
our monthly budgetary breakdown so that we could not only anticipate certain expenses, but also
potentially make smarter budgetary decisions in the future. Likewise, I took the initiative to
develop a compensatory time procedures document for the Office of Admissions after struggling
to locate any such document. I felt this document would be beneficial to new hires in helping
them understand compensatory time and related procedures. Taking initiative with or without
direction is a huge part of being a leader, so this internship project provided great opportunity to
do just that.
Lastly, I believe I learned more about myself and my leadership style preferences
throughout the course of this internship project. Organizing budgets with extreme attention to
detail fit my perceived strength of being detail oriented. Developing training topics and sharing
knowledge and experiences through the training of new Admissions Representatives fit my
perceived strengths of being driven and self-motivated, as well as a strong teacher. This project
challenged my perceived weaknesses of offering criticism and delegating tasks and
responsibilities. However, throughout the course of the internship, I was required to provide

LDRS 890-FINAL INTERNSHIP REPORT


constructive feedback to new Admissions Representatives and to delegate tasks to allow for
focus on other responsibilities. I was surprised by the response to these things from the
Admissions Representatives. The staff appeared open and appreciative of the feedback and
genuinely excited about the opportunities to take on more responsibilities themselves. While I
still do not enjoy criticizing or delegating, I believe I am only improving on my abilities to do
these things respectfully and successfully.

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References
Bapuji, H., & Crossan, M. (2004). From questions to answers: Reviewing organizational learning
research. Management Learning, 35(4), 397-417. Retrieved from
http://search.proquest.com/docview/209873445?accountid=27424
Hanpachern, C., Morgan, G. A., & Griego, O. V. (1998). An extension of the theory of margin: A
framework for assessing readiness for change. Human Resource Development
Quarterly, 9(4), 339-350. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/234904311?
accountid=27424
Holt, D. T., Armenakis, A. A., Feild, H. S., & Harris, S. G. (2007). Readiness for organizational
change: The systematic development of a scale. The Journal of Applied Behavioral
Science, 43(2), 232-241,244-245,247-249,251-255. Retrieved from
http://search.proquest.com/docview/236254304?accountid=27424
https://www.wsc.edu/news/article/105/rames_named_president_of_wayne_state_college
Kolb, D. G. (2003). Seeking Continuity Amidst Organizational Change: A Storytelling
Approach. Journal of Management Inquiry, 12(2), 180. Retrieved from
http://search.proquest.com/docview/203315238?accountid=27424
Lizar, A. A., Mangundjaya, W. L. H., & Rachmawan, A. (2015). THE ROLE OF
PSYCHOLOGICAL CAPITAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL EMPOWERMENT ON
INDIVIDUAL READINESS FOR CHANGE. The Journal of Developing Areas, 49(5), 343352. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/1707487930?accountid=27424
Mangundjaya, W. H., & Gandakusuma, I. (2013). THE ROLE OF LEADERSHIP &
READINESS FOR CHANGE TO COMMITMENT TO CHANGE. Romanian Economic
and Business Review, 192-197. Retrieved from
http://search.proquest.com/docview/1672598975?accountid=27424
Palmer, B. (2015). Measure your organization's readiness for change. The Journal for Quality
and Participation, 37(4), 8-10. Retrieved from
http://search.proquest.com/docview/1652619474?accountid=27424
Rames Named President of Wayne State College. (2015, July 20). Retrieved from
https://www.wsc.edu/news/article/105/rames_named_president_of_wayne_state_college

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Senge, P. M. (2011). Executive book summaries: The fifth discipline. Bristol, VT: Soundview.
Retrieved from
http://s3images.coroflot.com/user_files/individual_files/151185_Xna4lAblaAP5dGikJUR
gL5stL.pdf
Smith, I. (2005). Achieving readiness for organisational change. Library Management, 26(6),
408-412. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/198801718?accountid=27424
Weisbord, M. R. (2012). Productive Workplaces: Dignity, Meaning, and Community in the 21st
Century. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
Yukl, G. (2009). Leading organizational learning: Reflections on theory and research.
Leadership Quarterly, 20(1), 49-53. doi:10.1016/j.leadqua.2008.11.006.

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Appendix A
Assistant Director of Recruitment
Position Deleted on 9/29/2015. This position is no longer an active posting on HigherEdJobs.
Institution:
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Location:
Lincoln, NE
Category:
Admin - Admissions and Enrollment
Posted:
08/18/2015
Type:
Full Time
The Assistant Director of Recruitment is responsible for the undergraduate recruitment initiatives
in the Hixson-Lied College of Fine and Performing Arts and provides regular recruitment reports
to the College. Responsibilities include coordinating college marketing initiatives, assisting
faculty to design recruitment strategies, developing and implementing a data-driven strategic
plan for the college, and representing the college at all recruitment events. Initiate and maintain
positive relationships with personnel at secondary schools, community colleges, four-year
institutions, community agencies, faculty, alumni, and others involved in student recruitment.
Additionally, the Assistant Director will hire, train, manage, and deploy enthusiastic current
student ambassadors to assist at recruitment events. This position will represent FPA at the Office
of Admissions daily campus visits program, Red Letter Days, honors and diversity events, and
other recruitment activities across the state or country.
Bachelor's degree in marketing, public relations, or a related field of study plus two years of
relevant experience required. Must have excellent communication and organizational skills.
Public speaking experience in both small and large forums required. Ability to relate to people of

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all age groups, academic abilities and cultures necessary. Experience with MS Office software
essential. Some experience creating, implementing, and/or monitoring strategic marketing or
recruitment plans or marketing data analysis experience necessary. Experience working in higher
education preferred. Experience working with student information systems desirable. Event
planning experience helpful. Experience supervising staff helpful. Knowledge and/or experience
with branding and marketing to youth desirable. Experience with fine and performing arts
preferred.
Excellent benefits including staff/dependent scholarship program. Criminal background check
will be conducted. Applicant review begins September 8. View Requisition S_150681
at https://employment.unl.edu for additional info and to apply. UNL is committed to a pluralistic
campus community through affirmative action, equal opportunity, work-life balance, and dual
careers. The University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL) is committed to creating a diverse and
inclusive work and learning environment free from discrimination and harassment. UNL is
dedicated to creating an environment where everyone feels valued, respected and included. UNL
does not discriminate on the basis of race, ethnicity, color, national origin, sex (including
pregnancy), religion, age, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity, genetic information,
veteran status, marital status, and/or political affiliation in its programs, activities and
employment. UNL complies with all local, state and federal laws prohibiting discrimination,
including Title IX, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex.

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Appendix B
Assistant Director of Admissions
Institution:
Upper Iowa University
Location:
Fayette, IA
Category:
Admin - Admissions and Enrollment
Posted:
11/18/2015
Application Due:
Open Until Filled
Type:
Full Time
Upper Iowa University is conducting a search for an individual to assume the position of
Assistant Director of Admissions on the Fayette, IA campus.
The Assistant Director of Admissions position requires a high energy, goal-oriented individual
with strong interpersonal skills to help develop and implement a plan to manage recruitment
efforts for the Fayette campus. The ideal candidate must have 2-5 years of progressive and
successful admissions and/or sales/marketing experience. The candidate will be responsible for
achieving annual enrollment goals for students from an assigned geographic territory. It is
essential that the candidate have knowledge of the higher education market. A bachelor's degree
is required, master's preferred. Travel, night and weekend work are required.
Interested applicants should submit a cover letter, resume, and names and telephone numbers of
three professional references toemployment@uiu.edu. Review of applications will begin
immediately and continue until the position is filled. Upper Iowa University is an Equal
Opportunity Employer.

LDRS 890-FINAL INTERNSHIP REPORT


APPLICATION INFORMATION
Contact:
Human Resources
Upper Iowa University
Email Address:
employment@uiu.edu

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Appendix C

LDRS890: Assistant/Associate Director of


Admissions role
Q1

Please identify the option that best describes your role.

Answered: 8
Skipped: 0

Answer Choices

Responses

Director level

87.50%
7

Dean level

12.50%
1

Vice President level

0.00%
0

Total

Comments(0)

Q2

Please identify your institution type.

Community
College
4-year Public
College
4-year Public

Answered: 8
Skipped: 0

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University
4-year Private
College/Univ...
0%10%20%30%40%50%60%70%80%90%100%
Answer Choices

Responses

Community College

0.00%
0

4-year Public College

25.00%
2

4-year Public University

25.00%
2

4-year Private College/University

50.00%
4

Total

Comments(0)

Q3

Please select the title that most accurately describes your


Assistant/Associate Director of Admissions role.

Answered: 6
Skipped: 2

Assistant
Director of...
Associate
Director of...
Senior
Assistant...
0%10%20%30%40%50%60%70%80%90%100%
Answer Choices
Assistant Director of Admissions/Recruitment

Responses
0.00%
0

LDRS 890-FINAL INTERNSHIP REPORT

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Answer Choices

Responses

Associate Director of Admissions/Recruitment

100.00%
6

Senior Assistant Director of Admissions/Recruitment

0.00%
0

Total

Comments(1)

Q4

Please identify the number of Assistant/Associate Director/s of


Admissions on your staff.

Answer Choices

Answered: 7
Skipped: 1
Responses

57.14%
4

0.00%
0

0.00%
0

4 or more

42.86%
3

Total

Q5

Please select any requirements of an Assistant/Associate Director of


Admissions at your institution.

Answer Choices
Bachelor's degree required

Answered: 8
Skipped: 0
Responses
62.50%

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Answer Choices

Responses

5
Master's degree required

12.50%
1

Master's degree preferred

37.50%
3

1-3 years related experience required/preferred

12.50%
1

3-5 years related experience required/preferred

62.50%
5

5 or more years related experience required/preferred

12.50%
1

Total Respondents: 8
Comments(0)

Q6

Please identify the salary range of your Assistant/Associate Director/s


of Admission.

Answer Choices
below $35,000

Answered: 8
Skipped: 0
Responses
0.00%
0

$35,000-$38,000

12.50%
1

$38,000-$42,000

25.00%
2

$42,000-$45,000

12.50%

LDRS 890-FINAL INTERNSHIP REPORT

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Answer Choices

Responses
1

$45,000-$50,000

50.00%
4

$50,000 and above

0.00%
0

Total

Q7

Please identify all those that your Assistant/Associate Director of


Admissions is responsible for.

Answer Choices
Supervision of professional staf

Answered: 8
Skipped: 0
Responses
50.00%
4

Supervision of student staf

75.00%
6

Management of budget

12.50%
1

Data management

62.50%
5

Administration of communication flow

50.00%
4

Recruitment territory

75.00%
6

Development of recruitment materials

62.50%
5

Training of professional/student staf

62.50%

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Answer Choices

Responses
5

Liaison to other campus departments

62.50%
5

Acting leader in your absence

87.50%
7

Total Respondents: 8
Comments(1)

Q8

In your opinion, what are the values added from an


Assistant/Associate Director role on your staff?

Answered: 7
Skipped: 1

Works well on our campus. A must in todays world. Good luck.


10/8/2015 10:45 AM

I feel it helps with the structure of the office. It also helps the director focus on other things and not every single
position is reporting to one person.
10/8/2015 10:39 AM

The position allows for the head of the department to provide leadership opportunities to them. This is a way to assist
in training the Assoc. Director for upper management positions.
10/8/2015 7:00 AM

Tremendous value! We would not know what to do without them. Loyal, trustworthy, competent, friendly,
10/7/2015 2:12 PM

I wish like crazy I could hire an assistant/associate director. I think the biggest value is having someone in your
department that is involved in the daily grind to bounce ideas and visit about confidential matters if needed. I think
having someone to help voice concerns during full department leadership meetings would provide huge value. Often
those sitting on those meetings don't understand Enrollment Management/Admissions. They don't understand the
cycles, branding, data management, relational building and communication management. The list goes on. Bottom
line there is huge value.
10/7/2015 11:58 AM

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First, I want to say that this is not a role at my current institution but I have served in both assistant and associate
director roles in the past. I feel that they are very important in that it creates a hierarchy if the director position is
vacant. Also, in just in absence situations, it give others on campus a contact for questions. Training is specifically
important. I feel it should be earned and not simply given after someone has been an admissions counselor for a
certain amount of time. This gives the opportunity for an admissions counselor to "move up" and not have to leave
their institution. I think that it is also good for Admissions Counselors to have someone to go to for concerns or
questions. It also allows for some supervising experience even if it is with students only. I am a proponent of this type
of position in that I believe it is good for the institution, individuals in the admissions field, and the field itself. When I
was in this role, I had a territory that travelled less frequently so that I would be available but still recruited, made
phone calls, etc. Good luck w your research, Amy.
10/7/2015 11:23 AM

Our search responsibilities fall into his purview as well as assisting with mail flow and other reporting duties.
10/7/2015 11:17 AM

Appendix D

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Appendix

44

LDRS 890-FINAL INTERNSHIP REPORT

Appendix F

Office of Admissions
Compensatory Time Procedures
What is compensatory time?
Compensatory time includes:
Time off with pay in lieu of overtime pay for irregular or occasional overtime work
Available to those staff deemed non-exempt
What constitutes as compensatory time?
Compensatory time includes:
Any work time outside the standard 8-hour work day
This includes travel, evening/weekend events, work after hours from the office or hotel
Missed lunch hours due to miscellaneous visit program or group events
How much compensatory time can be accrued?
Compensatory time can be accrued up to:
280 hours
Compensatory time cannot be accrued beyond 280 hours
How is compensatory time documented?
Compensatory time shall be documented as follows:
Monthly Professional Staff Non-Exempt Attendance Report (see attached)
What type of inter-office procedures exist regarding compensatory time?
The following exists for inter-office compensatory time processes:
Email the Director of Admissions upon reaching 40 hour work week
This will cue approval to extend work week or the opportunity use available
compensatory time
When should compensatory time be used?
Compensatory time should be used:
With approval from the Director of Admission
When it does not impact the needs of the job or the office
For questions on compensatory time, please contact:
Kevin Halle, Director of Admissions, kehalle1@wsc.edu or 402.375.7237 or
WSC Human Resources, hr@wsc.edu or 402.375.7403

45

LDRS 890-FINAL INTERNSHIP REPORT

46

Appendix G
Travel
$5,858.8
3
Travel
$10,989.5
7

Recruitment
Materials
$21,619.59
Recruitment
Materials
$10,749.78

Staff

Other

$44,877.9
4

$1,131.8
3

Staff

Other

$50,386.1 $724.06
9