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Design for Learning

Instructor: Kaylee Neubacher


Grade Level/Cooperating Teacher: 3rd
Lesson Title: Being a Good Word Detective
Date: October 22, 2015
Curriculum Area: Language Arts
Estimated Time: 45 Minutes
Standards Connection:
40.) Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and
phrases based on Grade 3 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of
strategies. [L.3.4]
a. Use sentence-level context as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
[L.3.4a]
Learning Objective(s): Students will demonstrate their ability to use context clues by
writing a sentence that contains one nonsense word and one type of context clue to define
the nonsense word.
Learning Objective(s) stated in kid-friendly language:
Today we are going to be word detectives! We are going to learn about how to find and
use clues in a sentence to help you define a word that you dont know. When we finish
our lesson, you are going to write a sentence using one nonsense word and one type of
context clue to help the reader find the meaning of the nonsense word in your sentence.
Evaluation of Learning Objective(s): Students will come up with one more reason to
explain Henrys tardiness. They will use a nonsense word in their sentence along with one
type of context clue to help the reader define their nonsense word. This will demonstrate
what they have learned about using context clues to decipher unknown words.
Engagement:
*Before the lesson, the teacher should make a three column chart on the board. The
first column is for the Alien Wordsthe nonsense words. In this column the teacher
should list the 20 alien words in the book. List them in this order: zimulus, deski,
torakku, szkola, razzo, pordo, buttuna, astrosus, piksas, giadrams, cucalations, kuningas,
blassa, twrf, sighing flosser, fracasse. uyarak, zerplatzen, speelplaats, and aamu. (This is
the order in which they appear in the book.) The second column is for the clues. The
third column is for the English Wordswhat the nonsense words mean.
Teacher will have students sit crisscross applesauce around the board and reading chair.
She asks students, What do you do when you dont know the meaning of a word in a
sentence? She asks this to access students background knowledge of dealing with
unknown words. She writes one response on the board. Thats good! We can use
pictures to figure out the meaning of an unknown word. Does anyone have another way
to find out the meaning of a word? She takes some more answers. Awesome! You can
also find out the meaning of a word by its context, which means looking at the words
around it. Then she says, Those are all great ways to find the meaning of a word that
you dont know! By using these strategies, you are all word detectives! This means that
you look for clues to help you find the meaning of words you dont know. Today, we are
going to be using our word detective skills! Our goal is to find clues to help us define a
word we dont know. We are going to read, Baloney (Henry P.) by John Scieszka and
Lane Smith. But before we do that, look at the alien words I have listed up on the
board. Do we know any of these words? Of course not! Alien words are words we dont
understand. Its our job as detectives to figure out what each of these words mean. Then

she tells the students, While we read, I want you to raise your hand for every alien
word you see and hear. Read the book. (Transition into teaching)
Learning Design:
I. Teaching: The teacher finishes reading the book. There should be 20 words on the
board. Then, she says to the students, Alright detectives, lets look at our alien words.
First, is Zimulus. Go to the first page where zimulus is used in a sentence. Who can tell
me by raising their hands, what they think Zimulus means? Choose one student to give
you their answer. Thats right! Zimulus means pencil! The teacher writes the definition
of zimulus in the corresponding space underneath the third category, English Words. .
Then she asks the student, What clues did you use to find out the meaning of the word?
She writes the clues next to the alien word, in the second column. The teacher repeats
this for each word, going back to the page where that word is highlighted in the book, in
this order: zimulus, deski, torakku, szkola, razzo, pordo, buttuna, astrosus, piksas,
giadrams, cucalations, kuningas, blassa, twrf, sighing flosser, fracasse. uyarak,
zerplatzen, speelplaats, and aamu. Once the final word, aamu is defined and discussed,
the teacher says, Now, lets try reading the story replacing the alien words with the
English words. The teacher re-reads the book, but this time replaces the alien words
with the English words. After the second reading, the teacher asks, What do you notice
about the way we read the story this time? Did you understand it better the second time
we read it when we used the English words instead of the alien words? Then, the teacher
asks students, Why do you think it is important that we know how to use clues to
discover the meaning of words we dont know? Teacher takes a few answers. Exactly!
It is important to know how to use clues to get the meaning of an unknown word because
we have to understand what the words in a sentence mean for it to make sense. Lets
review the types of clues we can use to help us figure out the meaning an alien, or
unknown, word. Write the word Antonym on the board. One of the clues we can look
for in a sentence to find out the meaning of an unknown word is by looking for an
antonym. Can someone tell me by raising their hand, what an antonym is? Take an
answer from a student. Thats right! An antonym is a word that means the opposite of
another word. Write this sentence on the board: The huge spaceship was more expensive
than the tiny car. Then ask, Who would like to circle the antonyms in the sentence?
Raise your hand so I know to call on you. Teacher choses one student to come to the
board and circle the antonyms. Great job! Huge and tiny are antonyms. If you did not
know what huge means could you use the antonym in the sentence to figure out what it
means? Absolutely! The teacher writes the word Synonym on the board. By raising
your hand, can someone tell me what a synonym is? Chose a student. Thats right! A
synonym is two words that mean the same thing. This is another type of clue that may be
in a sentence to help you understand the meaning of an unknown word. Write these two
sentences on the board: The teacher was angry that Henry was late for school. Even
though the teacher was mad, she did not give Henry detention. Can I get another
detective to circle the two synonyms in the sentences? Select a student. Thats great!
Angry and mad are synonyms and mean the same thing. If you didnt know what angry
meant, you could have used your word detective skills to find the synonym clue of mad
in the two sentences. Boys and girls I want you to look closely at this example. Do you
see how we would have to use both sentences to find the meaning of the word angry?
Well, sometimes you have to use more than one sentence to find the meaning of an
unknown word. Teacher writes the word Example on the board. Another type of clue is
an example. Write on the board: Henry uses many excuses to explain why he was late,
like flying off in a rocket. By raising your hand, can someone tell me where the example
is in this sentence? Take an answer. Good! The example is flying off in a rocket,
which is a type of excuse. Many times, you can find examples easily because they are
behind either of these 3 words: like, such as, or for example. Examples give you an idea

of what an unknown word is and makes it easier to define it. Write the word Definition.
The last type of clue we can use to define an unknown word is a definition. Sometimes
the author is nice enough to give us the definition of an unknown word in a sentence. In
that case, we can easily figure out what a word means! Hand students the Using
Context Clues to Solve the Riddles! worksheet. Now that we know what kind of clues
to look for to help us define an unknown word, we are going to practice being good word
detectives! I want you to work in small groups to figure out what these 4 silly words
mean. The directions say to not only circle what the word means, but also circle two clues
that helped you figure out what that word means. Remember to read the sentence
carefully and to look for the types of clues we talked about! Now, I want you to get into a
small group, having no more than 3 people in your group. I am going to give you five
minutes to figure out the 4 silly words. Alright, get started!
II. Opportunity for Practice:
Students will work together to decode the nonsense words in each of the four sentences
of the worksheet: Using Context Clues to Solve the Riddles. As they are working, the
teacher should be listening for students thinking processes. Whenever five minutes are
up, call students back to the board. You all were being great word detectives! Would
someone like to tell me, by raising their hand, their answer for number 1? Teacher takes
an answer. Great! The word apploga means ball. What two clues did you find to help
you? Student gives you two clues. You circled Bounce and Threw? Awesome! Teacher
asks the whole class, What type of clues are these? Teacher takes a few answers.
Thats right! These are examples of things you do with a ball! Go to number 2. Would
someone raise their hand and tell me their answer for number 2? Takes an answer.
Thats great! Camonga does mean bike! How did you figure that out? Student gives
you two clues. Awesome! So, you saw the word rode and training wheels and figured
out that the word meant bike! Asks the whole class. What types of clues did we use to
figure out what camonga meant? Take a few answers. Correct! We used examples of
things that a bike has or what you do with it! Teacher moves on to number 3. What did
we get for number 3? Takes an answer. Thats right! Sneitoo means pizza! What clues
did you find that told you what the word meant? Take an answer. Good work! We saw
the words cheese and sausage and pepperoni and decided that sneitoo means pizza! Can
someone tell me what types of clues these are? Takes a few answers. Thats right! The
clues are both examples of pizza! Teacher moves on to the last problem, number 4. Can
someone raise their hand and give me an answer for number 4? Takes an answer.
Great! Dibek does mean uncle! How did you know? Student answers, gives clues.
Awesome! You saw the words Dads brother and favorite nephew and decided that dibek
meant uncle! Teacher addresses entire class, In this sentence, there are two types of
clues! Who can tell me what type of clue Dads brother is? take an answer. Thats
right! It is a definition! Now, who can tell me what type of clue nephew is? take an
answer. Thats right! Nephew is an antonym of uncle! Collects worksheets. Great job
detectives!
III. Assessment:
Pass out the next worksheet, the one with the alien on it. Now, we are going to use the
knowledge we have of using clues. Look at the paper in your hands. Underneath the
alien, you will see several lines. I want you to come up with one more reason to explain
why Henry was late to school. Just like we saw in the book and on our practice problems,
you must use an alien word in your sentence and use at least one type of the context clues
we talked about today to help the reader understand your alien word. Write your
sentences on the lines below the alien. Then, you get to design your very own alien! You
can use crayons, markers, and pencils to illustrate what your alien looks like. Remember
to put your name at the top! I am going to give you 10 minutes to do this. When I tell you

that the 10 minutes is up, hand me your work. Then, have a seat in front of the board.
Teacher keeps an eye on the time, gives students 10 minutes, make sure the students do
the sentence first before designing their alien.
IV. Closure: Once all students have given the teacher their work and have sat in front of
the board, the teacher says, We have learned so much today! Can someone tell me an
important idea that we have talked about? Take a few answers, list them on the board.
These ideas are all important in thinking about using clues to help us find the meaning
of an unknown word! In the future when you dont know a word, what will you do?
Take a few answers. Thats right! We will use context clues like antonyms, synonyms,
definitions, or examples to help us find the meaning of an unknown word! You all were
great word detectives today! Keep up the good work!
Materials and Resources:
Board- either dry erase or a notepad/easel board
Markers
Book- Baloney (Henry P.) by John Scieski and Lane Smith
Pencils
Worksheet- Using Context Clues to Solve the Riddles
Worksheet that has a blank alien for students to design and a place to write a sentence.
Crayons
Colored Pencils
Differentiation Strategies (including plans for individual learners):
If students are struggling, take them time to explain what context clues are again. Ask
struggling students, How do you usually find the meaning of a word you dont know?
Additionally, the teacher may give the student a nonsense word to prompt the struggling
student. If need be, the teacher can review the different types of context clues with the
student. Then, ask them, How could you use one of these context clues in your sentence
to explain your alien word? For students who are grasping the material, you could
further challenge them by having them write a paragraph using a nonsense word and
context clue in every sentence.
Data Analysis:

Reflection:

Samford University
Design for Learning

Name:_________________

Write your sentence here:

Name ___________________________
____________________

Date

Using Context Clues to Solve the Riddles!


When you read, you can use context clues to help you figure out words
that you do not know. You can use the word clues that
you read to help you find the meaning of a new word.
What is the meaning of the crazy, make-believe word that is underlined
in each sentence? Circle the correct meaning. Then circle at least two
clue words that helped you to figure out the meaning of the word.
1. The apploga bounced really high when Jimmy threw it on the ground.
Then, Cathy threw the apploga through the net and scored two
points. We like playing with the apploga during recess.
What is an apploga?
table
ball
orange
2. Mary rode her camonga to school yesterday. She could not ride it
today though because it was raining. Her little sister Alice also has a
camonga, but it still has training wheels on it because Alice is not old
enough yet to ride without them.
What is a camonga?
car
boat
bike
3. Tommy likes to eat cheese sneitoo for lunch. His brother prefers his
sneitoo to have sausage and pepperoni on it. For dinner, their mom
took a frozen sneitoo out of the freezer and cooked it for dinner. It
was yummy!
What is a sneitoo?
milk
pizza
apple
4. My dibek is living with us in the spare bedroom. He just moved back
to town. He is my dads brother and sometimes teases him. When
my brother is not there, he says that I am his favorite nephew.
What is a dibek?
uncle
grandpa
mom
Challenge: Write your own riddle with a made-up word. Give clues so
that your friends can figure it out.

This worksheet is from www.teach-nology.com

Name ___________________________

Date ____________________

ANSWER KEY
When you read, you can use context clues to help you figure out words that
you do not know. You can use the word clues that you read to help you find
the meaning of a new word.

What is the meaning of the crazy, make-believe word that is underlined in eac
sentence? Circle the correct meaning. Then circle at least two clue words th
helped you to figure out the meaning of the word.
1. The apploga bounced really high when Jimmy threw it on the ground.
Then, Cathy threw the apploga through the net and scored two points. We
like playing with the apploga during recess.
What is an apploga?
table
ball
orange
2. Mary rode her camonga to school yesterday. She could not ride it today
though because it was raining. Her little sister Alice also has a camonga,
but it still has training wheels on it because Alice is not old enough yet to
ride without them.
What is a camonga?
car
boat
bike
3. Tommy likes to eat cheese sneitoo for lunch. His brother prefers his sneitoo
to have sausage and pepperoni on it. For dinner, their mom took a frozen
sneitoo out of the freezer and cooked it for dinner. It was yummy!
What is a sneitoo?
milk
pizza
apple
4. My dibek is living with us in the spare bedroom. He just moved back to
town. He is my dads brother and sometimes teases him. When my
brother is not there, he says that I am his favorite nephew.
What is a dibek?
uncle
grandpa
mom

Challenge: Write your own riddle with a made-up word. Give clues so that y
friends can figure it out.

This worksheet is from www.teach-nology.com

Design for Learning


Instructor: Kaylee Neubacher
Grade Level/Cooperating Teacher: 3rd, Myrex
Lesson Title: Thanksgiving Fractions
Date: November 19th, 2015
Curriculum Area: Mathematics
Estimated Time: 35 minutes
Standards Connection: 13.) Understand a fraction 1/b as the quantity formed by 1 part when a
whole is partitioned into b equal parts; understand a fraction a/b as the quantity formed by a parts
and size 1/b. [3-NF1]

Learning Objective(s): Students will solve fraction problems in a thanksgiving themed Scoot!
game, answering at least 90 % of the 20 questions correctly (getting an 18/20).
Learning Objective(s) stated in kid-friendly language: Today we are going to be playing the
game: Thanksgiving Fraction Scoot! You will be solving Thanksgiving fraction problems dealing
with pies and turkeys!
Evaluation of Learning Objective(s):
Students will complete 20 fraction problems, getting at least 18 out of 20, or 90%, correct.
Engagement:
Okay boys and girls, I need you to put away what you are working on and move to the carpet!
Now, that you are seated, can someone raise their hand and tell me what holiday is coming up
next week? Teacher calls on student. Thats right! Thanksgiving is next week! What do people
usually do during Thanksgiving? Teacher calls on student. Thats right! We eat! What kinds of
things do you like to eat on Thanksgiving? Teacher calls on student. Wow! That sounds like a lot
of delicious food! My favorite thing to eat on thanksgiving is pie! By raising your hand, how
many of you like pie? Students raise their hands. Well, today we are going to use pies to help us
learn about fractions!
Learning Design:

I. Teaching:
We have been talking about fractions this week already. Remember, that a fraction
is equal parts of a whole. Teacher writes this definition on board. We write fractions
like this: part/whole. These are some common fractions: (Teacher writes this on
board). Lets say each of these fractions together: one-half, one-fourth, one-third. Now,
lets take and model it. If I draw a circle, (Teacher draws a circle.) what could we do
to this circle to make it represent, or show, 1/2? Think about how many parts and wholes
there are in the fraction . I am going to give you time to think. Raise your hand when
you have an answer. Teacher calls on a student. Awesome! We have to cut the circle in
half. Then we have to shade 1 part of the circle. Notice, we shaded 1 part of 2 wholes. In
other words, we now have a model that represents the fraction . This is not the only
way we can represent . Can someone give me another way to show ? Teacher calls
on a student. Teacher writes students thinking on board. Great job! This is another
way to represent . Now, we are going to take a look at 3 fraction problems. Teacher
brings up the first fraction problem (apple pie) on the board. Look at this problem.
Lets read it together: What fraction is each piece of Apple Pie? I want you to turn and
talk to 1 neighbor. Discuss this question. Students turn and talk for 10 seconds. Who
can tell me their answer for this question? Teacher calls on a student. How did you get
your answer? Student answers. Great! So, you saw that the question was asking about 1

part of the pie and that there were 4 equal parts that make a whole, and you got for
your answer. That is a great way to think about this problem! Did someone see it another
way? Teacher calls on student. Teacher discusses this students alternative way to see
the problem. Lets look at problem 2. Teacher switches slides. Look at this delicious
Pumpkin Pie! Lets read the problem together: What fraction of this pumpkin pie is
missing? How would you solve this problem? Turn and talk with 1 neighbor. Discuss this
question. Students turn and talk for 10 seconds. Who wants to share their answer for
this question? Teacher calls on a student. How did you get your answer? Student
explains answer. So, first you found that there were 6 equal parts of a whole. Then, you
saw that every 1 piece of the pie represents 1/6 of the whole pie. And that 1 piece was
missing, so that means 1/6 of the pie is missing. Great job! Did anyone see it another
way? Teacher calls on student. Teacher discusses this students alternative way to see
the problem. Now, lets look at the last problem! Teacher switches slides. Yummy! Its a
Pecan Pie. Lets read the problem together: If you ate 2 pieces of this Pecan Pie (Teacher
shades in 2 pieces of the pie), what fraction of the pie did you eat? Turn and talk with 1
neighbor and discuss this question. Students turn and talk for 10 seconds. Who would
like to share their answer? Teacher calls on student. How did you get that answer?
Student explains answer. You saw that the pie was split into 8 equal slices. This means
that the pie was spilt into 8 equal parts of a whole pie. Then, you ate 2 slices, so you ate
2 equal parts of the pie. You can say that you ate 2 parts of the 8 wholes, or 2/8 of the
pie. You all did a wonderful job at identifying fractions, or parts of wholes! Now, we are
going to play a fractions game! You want to use what we learned today to solve the
problems in the game. I need everyone to go back to their seats, quietly, and wait for
instructions on how to play the game.
II. Opportunity for Practice:
Teacher passes out the answer sheet to each student. Teacher switches to the last
slide (has directions on it). Okay, look at the board. Read the directions. Students read
directions. So, what did Turkey eat? Students say pies! Thats right! Our Turkey friend
has eaten a bunch of pies. Its going to be our job to solve the fraction problems that the
Turkey gives us! These fraction problems are similar to the ones we solved with the
apple, pumpkin, and pecan pies. Today, we are going to play a game called Scoot! Has
anyone ever played the game, Scoot? Students may raise their hands. Great! So, at
your seat you will see a card that has a Thanksgiving fraction problem on it. Now, look at
the paper I just passed out to you. Each box has a number in it. Look back to the card on
your desk. It has a number on it, too. The number on the card tells you what box on your
paper to put your answer in. For example, if your card has a 1 on it, then you are going
to put your answer to the fraction problem in the box numbered 1. Now, I need you to
listen closely. I am going to give you the directions for Scoot! You are going to have 1
minute to solve the fraction problem on your card. Remember to put your answer in the
box with the same number as your card. When 1 minute is up, I am going to say,
Scoot! And you are going to move to the next chair and card. We are going to do this
for every card. For example, if I have card number 5, then I am going to move to the
chair where card number 6 is when the teacher says, Scoot!. Also, if you have card
number 20, then you are going to move to card number 1, because there are only 20
cards. When we are finished, leave your answer sheet at your desk. Are we ready to play?
Okay! Look at you card. When I say go, you can start. Ready. Set. Go! Teacher watches
the clock, when 1 minute is up (or whenever the students look finished), she says,
Scoot! And all the students should be moving to the next card. While the game is
being played, the teacher can walk around and facilitate any student who may be
having trouble.
III. Assessment
Student will be assessed based on the score they receive on their answer key. If they
get at least 18 out of 20 problems correct, or 90%, then they are considered

proficient. Students who do not meet this criteria, need to be retaught using a
different strategy. The teacher may also pull these students out into smaller groups
and re-teach them.
IV. Closure:
That was a great game of Scoot! Today, we learned about fractions. Can someone remind
me, by raising their hand, what a fraction is. Teacher calls on a student. Thats right!
Fractions are equal parts of a whole. Can someone give me some examples of fractions?
Teacher calls on a student. Great! Some examples of fractions are 1/2, 2/3, etc.
Remember that fractions are all around us. This is especially true during Thanksgiving.
There are many foods, like pies, that have to be split into equal, smaller, parts to feed all
of the family members or friends visiting. So, on Thursday when youre eating all those
yummy foods for Thanksgiving, think about the fractions that you see! I think everyone
did a wonderful job today! Teacher collects the answer keys from the students. Last,
she collects the cards.
Materials and Resources:
- White Board
- Marker
- Computer
- Projector
- Pie Eatin Turkeys! game (attached)
- Power point/ pictures of the 3 pie problems (attached)
Differentiation Strategies (including plans for individual learners):
As a differentiation strategy, the teacher can eliminate a time limit during the game. That
way students can solve the problems at their own pace. Instead of the students moving from
chair to chair, the teacher can have the students pass their card to another student. Also, the
teacher could change the game to where a group of students work together to solve each
problem. The teacher could even include manipulatives to help students visualize fractions.
Data Analysis:
The data shows that most of the students did not meet the goal of 90%. While students
performed well during the number talks type problems, they did not understand the
game or how to find the fractions using pictures of pie and their missing pieces. They
performed this way because they did not have enough concrete materials to make the
concept of fractions into a concrete concept, instead of an abstract concept. If I had to teach
this lesson again, I would definitely use manipulatives (such as pie pieces) to teach fractions.
Reflection:
I will definitely change the way I present fractions to students next time. I would use
concrete manipulatives such as pie pieces. The students were engaged and loved the SCOOT
game, however, they did not understand how to find the answer to many of the fraction
problems on card. Many of the misconceptions they had were concerning the amount of pie
missing. I think using manipulatives will help to clear up some of these misconceptions.

Samford University
Design for Learning

What fraction of this


Pumpkin Pie is missing?

What fraction is each


piece of Apple Pie?

If you ate 2 pieces of this


Pecan Pie, what fraction of
the pie did you eat?

Design for Learning


Instructor: Kaylee Neubacher
Lesson Title: Multiplying by Grouping
Curriculum Area: Mathematics

Cooperating Teacher/Grade Level: 3rd Myrex


Date: November 5th, 2015
Estimated Time: 45 minutes

Standards Connection:
1.) Interpret products of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 5 x 7 as the total number of objects in 5
groups of 7 objects each. [3-OA1]

Learning Objective(s): Students will determine the correct multiplication equation being
represented by the groups shown on the worksheet, scoring at least an 8 out of 9.
Learning Objective(s) stated in kid-friendly language: Today boys and girls, we are going
to use groups of things to multiply.
Evaluation of Learning Objective(s):
The worksheet we are using is a 3OA worksheet. This worksheet has 9 problems. On the left side
it gives a picture of groups and a number of things in each group. On the right side there are
corresponding lines on which to put the equation that is being modeled in each picture of groups.
Engagement:
Call students to the rug by color of their tables (red, green, yellow, blue). When every student is
seated and quiet say to them, Today boys and girls we are going to be learning about
multiplication! We have learned about it somewhat. So, lets review what strategy we have
already learned. Write 3x2 on the board. Okay, by raising your hands quietly, who can tell me a
way to solve this problem? Choose a student who is quietly raising their hand. Student answers.
So you said to do 3+3, which equals 6, correct? Good job! That is a strategy we have already
learned! It is called repeated addition. Repeated addition is a great multiplication strategy!
Sometimes though, the multiplication problem may be too large to do repeated addition. For
example, the problem 8x9. Write 8x9 on the board. Then write 8+8+8+8+8+8+8+8+8
underneath it. In this problem, does using the repeated addition strategy get a little confusing? It
can be! So, today, we are going to learn another way to multiply. We are going to sing a song
about this new strategy! Everyone get ready. Follow along with the words.

Learning Design:

I. Teaching:
Before playing the music video/song, the teacher says to the students, Alright! Get ready to sing!
Follow along with the words on the screen. Pay attention to the words and the pictures. I will be
asking you questions about the song and video when were done. If you want to dance, you can,
but you must do it in your spot, without touching another person. Teacher plays the Uptown
Funk Parody: Multiplication Song. The teacher models participation by singing along. When
the song is done, tell students, Okay Im going to play it one more time. Remember to pay
attention to the words and pictures! When the song is finished for the second time tell students,
Alright sit in your spot, crisscross applesauce. Turn off the projector so your students can see
the board. Ask, Alright who can tell me, by raising their hand quietly, what way of solving a
multiplication problem did we sing about? Chose one student who has their hand up quietly.

Student answers and you say, Great listening! We can multiply by using groups of equal things!
Write 8x9 on the board. Lets try our new strategy! Who can tell me by raising their hand, what I
do first? Choose student. Student answers. Right! As the song and video said, we draw 8
circles/groups. Draw 8 circles, large enough to put 9 tallies in. What do we do next? Raise your
hand. Choose a student. Student answers. Teacher says, Great! We put 9 tallies in each of the
circles/groups. This means that we have 8 groups of 9. It can also by represented by the equation
8x9 Draw 9 tallies in each circle/group. Then say to students, Now, we have just used the
grouping strategy! Awesome job! Can someone tell me what the answer is to the equation 8x9?
Choose a student. Student answers. Right! It is 72! How did you figure it out? Student answers.
So, you counted the tallies in each group, right? Thats great! Erase the board. Write 5x2 on the
board. Who can do this problem by using the new strategy we just learned? Choose a student
to come to the board. Have the student solve the equation using the grouping method. If they need
assistance, do not give them the answer. Instead ask the class, Students, how can we help ____
solve this problem? Raise your hand. Have the students classmates help him and her instead, as
it promotes cooperative learning. Repeat having students solve a multiplication problem using the
grouping strategy at least 1 more time. If the teacher thinks the students need more practice, have
them solve a couple more multiplication problems using the grouping strategy.

II. Opportunity for Practice:


Students have an opportunity to practice during the teaching part, when they
complete example problems, using the information they learned from the song and from
instruction.
III. Assessment
Look at the directions carefully, it says, Determine how you would express the
groups shown as a multiplication problem, this means to look at the groups on the left
and write a multiplication problem for it on the line to the right. Do your best! If you
struggle, remember the song we sang and the problems we just practiced! Also, put your
name on the very top before you begin. You have ten minutes to complete this worksheet.
You may start now. Set timer for 10 minutes. During this assessment, walk around and
observe. If a student needs help, instead of giving them the answer, give them a question.
For example, if a student says, I dont know what to do, the teacher can respond by
saying, Think about the practice problems we did on the board. What was the first step
we did? Student answers. Right, we drew the circles/groups first. That should help you
on what to do next. Timer goes off at 10 minutes. Tell students, Alright when I call your
table color, I want you to put your worksheet in the green bin. Then, quietly sit at your
spot on the carpet. Call each table color. Students should be quietly sitting at their spot
on the carpet.
IV. Closure:
Who can tell me what we have learned about today? What was our song about? Choose a few
students. Students answer, then say, Great! You have all done a great job at listening today!
Today, our song was about another multiplication strategy: grouping. It is important to know how
a multiplication problem looks when it is modeled. It helps us when we have a multiplication
problem we are struggling with. Turn on the projector, then tell students, We are going to sing
the song one more time to review! Get ready! Play the song. After the song, tell students, You
were all awesome today! You are great mathematicians! Now, I am going to call you by table
color to line up for PE. Show me a 3rd grade line! Call each table color to line up. Dont take the
students to PE until they are in a straight, orderly, and quiet line.
Materials and Resources:
Computer
Projector- Or a chart board if doing with a small group
Internet- the song Uptown Funk Parody: Multiplication Song on YouTube:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KrVGCYBROeU

Pencils
Worksheet: Rewriting Multiplication Problems (attached)

Differentiation Strategies (including plans for individual learners):


For students who do not score at least an 8 out of 9 on the assessment, give them access to
manipulatives and reteach using the manipulatives.
For students who did make at least an 8 out of 9, they would be given more challenging
multiplication problems.
Data Analysis:
2 out of 3 students that I taught this lesson met the 8 out of 9 criteria for the assessment. With
these 2 students I would give them more challenging multiplication problems. I think they
performed this way because they are familiar with the multiplication concept, as they have been
working on it. The 3rd student scored a 7 out of 9. I think this student understands the concept,
however they may need more practice with it.
Reflection:
The students responded well to the song. They were engaged. I think they liked it. I think they
understood what was being taught. However, I definitely would give them more challenging
multiplication problems. The multiplication problems on this worksheet seemed easy for most of
the students.

Samford University
Design for Learning