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Table of contents
Introduction

..p. 1-3
Section 1: Mission

.p. 4-5
Section 2: Needs statement
p. 6-11
Section 3: Definition, Model, and Measure
.p. 12-16
Section 4: Identification and Implementation Plan for an Evidence-Based Program
p. 17-26
Section 5: Evaluation Model and Internal Validity
.p. 27-28
Section 6: Compressed Program Plan and Evaluation Model
p. 29-32
Section 7: Marketing and Communication
.p.33-34
Section 8: Grants

p. 35
Section 9: Reflection

p. 36-38
Section 10: Presentation
p. 39
Section 11: Webliography
p. 4042
Section 12: Weebly Pages
p. 43

HL 367 Major Project Fall 2015


Mission: To increase knowledge of complementary therapies for
mental disorders in Indian Country.

Mackenzie Carlson

Peyton Teeple

http://wernative.org/SubTopicDetails.aspx?id=299&type=MyCulture

Introduction

My name is Mackenzie Carlson, I am a


senior at Northern Michigan University
majoring in Community Health
Education. Growing up in a military
family, I have lived in six different
states all over the United States but
most of my extended family is from
Minnesota. I attended Northern
Michigan University because of its
location and programs offered. I have

always been passionate about the


medical field in all target populations,
but I have become most recently
interested in mechanisms of the brain
and brain functioning. I have worked
and volunteered in nursing homes,
clinics and other locations and find
how the brain function and how people
make decisions is interesting. I am
interested in our dyads mission
because I think this will open a new
opportunity to understand a different
culture that I might one day encounter
in the medical profession. In addition,
learning other complementary
therapies when it comes to mental
disorders will be unique because it
might create an opening for new
research or studies dealing with this
specific problem. I am optimistic in the
knowledge I will gain through program
planning of helping people with mental
disorders so they can live a better
lifestyle.

My name is Peyton Teeple, and I am a


senior in the Community Health
Education program at Northern
Michigan University. I was born and
raised in Traverse City and lived there
until coming to Marquette in 2012.
Being in Marquette has given me great
insight into how to develop my own
healthy lifestyle choices because there
are so many advocates for health who
live here. My interest within the health
field is nutrition, and I am currently

working at the Marquette Food Co-op


in the grocery department. Being in
that environment has re-affirmed and
broadened my knowledge on how
important food choices are for overall
well-being. This is knowledge that I am
passionate about sharing with others
because I believe food is an underutilized tool for health in our society. I
am also interested in alternative
medicines and therapies for all health
conditions. Our dyads mission is to
increase knowledge of complementary
therapies for mental disorders in
Indian country. I am very interested in
our mission because of the above
average prevalence of mental
disorders that Native American
populations face, and also the fact
that traditional Native American
healing methods are holistic. I am also
Native American and have been aware
of the problems that Indian country
faces in terms of health.

Section 1: Mission
1. What is our mission?
Our mission is to Increase knowledge of complementary therapies for mental
disorders in Indian Country through a program.
2. What are the variables in our mission?
The variables are:
Dependent variable: knowledge of complementary
therapies for mental
disorders
Target population: Indian Country
Independent variable: program
3. What is an agency in which we could realize our mission?

We could realize our mission of increasing


knowledge of complementary therapies for mental
disorders in Indian Country through the Indian
Health Service, whose mission is to raise the
physical, mental, social, and spiritual health of
American Indians and Alaskan Natives to the
highest level.
Link to website: http://www.ihs.gov/
Link to mission: http://www.ihs.gov/aboutihs/overview/
4. What job could we have in the Indian Health Service and what is
the job description for that job?
Job: Mental Health Counselor
Description:
The primary responsibility of this position is to provide clinical mental health
substance abuse services in a culturally congruent fashion for patients at
Gookomis Endaad Residential Treatment Center. This position will provide
counseling services including initial assessments, treatment plans, and
ongoing psychotherapy for individuals, groups, couples and families.
Link to job posting: http://www.ihs.gov/Jobs/index.cfm?
module=getJobDetails&postType=t&positionProfile=Mental%20Health
%20Substance%20Abuse%20Co%20Occurring%20Counsel

4.b What is our job for this particular project?


Our job is to develop a program plan and evaluation plan to meet our mission
of increasing knowledge of complementary therapies for mental disorders in
Indian Country .As such, we shall:
-Assess the need to increase the knowledge of complementary therapies for
mental disorders in Indian country.
-Identify measurable objectives designed to reflect an increase in the
knowledge of complementary therapies for mental disorders in Indian
country.
-Plan an evidence-based program that has shown to increase the knowledge
of complementary therapies for mental disorders in Indian country.
-Implement the program shown to increase the knowledge of complementary
therapies for mental disorders in Indian country
-Evaluate to see if the program increases the knowledge of complementary
therapies for mental disorders in Indian country. If it does, we shall have met
our mission.

Mackenzie Carlson
Peyton Teeple
Mission: To increase the knowledge of complementary
therapies for mental disorders in Indian country.

Section 2: Needs Assessment:


General need to increase knowledge of complementary therapies for mental disorders in
Indian country.
5. What is the general need to increase knowledge of complementary therapies for mental
disorders in Indian country?
Evidence from the literature/ content sites that indicates that there is a general need to increase
knowledge of complementary therapies for mental disorders in Indian country BECAUSE:

American Indians/ Alaskan Natives experience severe psychological distress 1.5 times
more than the general population (National Center for Health Statistics, Department of
Health and Human Services, 2007).
http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/hus/hus07.pdf
In 2014, 8.8% of American Indians and Alaska Natives ages 18 and up had cooccurring, past-year mental and substance use disorders, while the national average was
3.3% (Racial and Ethnic Minority Populations, 2015).
http://www.samhsa.gov/specific-populations/racial-ethnic-minority
According to the National Institute for Mental Health (NIMH), 90 percent of people who
die by suicide have depression or other mental disorders, or substance-abuse disorders in
conjunction with other mental disorders (Ha, 2013).
[http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20975864]
Suicide is the second leading cause of death (behind unintentional injuries) for Indian
youth ages 15-24 residing in IHS service areas and is 3.5 times higher than the national
average (U.S Department of Health and Human Services, 2013).
http://www.hhs.gov/asl/testify/2010/03/t20100325a.html#4
There is a treatment gap that exists for those with mental disorders. The treatment gap
exceeds 50% in all countries of the world, approaching astonishingly high rates of 90%
in the least resourced countries (Patel, Maj, De Silva, M.J., Koschorke, & Prince, 2010)
[http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20975864]
There is a lack of mental health resources in American Indian/ Alaskan Native
communities due to their rural and remote locations. Additionally, 20% of American
Indian/ Alaskan Natives do not have health insurance, compared to 14% of whites
(Department of Health and Human Services, U.S Public Health Service, 2001)
[http://www.ct.gov/dmhas/lib/dmhas/publications/mhethnicity.pdf]
Alcohol-use disorders were more likely among American Indian youths than other racial
groups. In 2007, 8.5% of all AI/AN youth were struggling with an alcohol use disorder

compared to 5.8% of the general use population (American Indian Children and Families,
2015).
http://www.nicwa.org/children_families/

Heavy alcohol use directly affects brain function and alters various brain chemical (i.e.,
neurotransmitter) and hormonal systems known to be involved in the development of
many common mental disorders (e.g., mood and anxiety disorders) (Koob 2000). Thus, it
is not surprising that alcoholism can manifest itself in a broad range of psychiatric
symptoms and signs (Shivani, Goldsmith, Anthenelli, & R.M, 2002)
http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/arh26-2/90-98.htm
Indian/Native communities historic negative experiences have contributed to a sentiment
of suspicion towards the federal government and the health care system, effectively
further limiting access to mental health care for many Indians/Natives regardless of their
geographic location (American Psychiatric Association, 2009)
https://www.cpp.edu/~healthcounseling/Documents/apa_american-indians.pdf
Seventy percent of urban AI/AN patients in primary care often used traditional health practices;
use was strongly associated with cultural affiliation (Buchwald, Beals, & Manson, 2000)

http://journals.lww.com/lwwmedicalcare/Abstract/2000/12000/Use_of_Traditional_Healt
h_Practices_Among_Native.6.aspx
American Indian Service utilization provided estimates of the prevalence of DSMIII-R
disorders and utilization of services for help with those disorders in American Indian
population. A total of 3,084 tribal members age 15-54 years living on or near their home
reservations were interviewed with an adaptation of the University of Michigan
Composite International Diagnostic Interview. The most common lifetime diagnoses in
the American Indian populations were alcohol dependence, posttraumatic stress disorder
(PTSD), and major depressive episode. Help-seeking from traditional healers was
common in both American Indian populations (Beals, Novins, Whitesell, Spicer,
Mitchell, & Manson, 2000).
Prevalence of Mental Disorders and Utilization of Mental Health Services in Two
American Indian Reservation Populations: Mental Health Disparities in a National
Context.
Counseling attitudes were assessed for American Indian college students rating
themselves as either strongly or weakly committed to both Tribal and Anglo cultures.
Participants strongly committed only to Tribal culture displayed more negative attitudes
toward seeking counseling, recognizing a personal need for counseling, having
confidence in mental health professionals, and interpersonal openness than those strongly
committed only to the Anglo culture or to both cultures (Price, Brian, McNeill, & Brian
W, 1992).
http://psycnet.apa.org/journals/pro/23/5/376/
Dominant western biomedicine is based on the premise that some afflictions are purely
physical in nature (the domain of the body) and others are purely psychological (the
domain of the mind). This separation between mind and body is not
true for many other medical systems that approach health and healing in a more holistic
way (Honwana, 1998).

http://www.forcedmigration.org/rfgexp/pdfs/1_6.pdf
For patients and their caregivers, there are several potential advantages of collaboration
between TCM (Traditional and Complementary Medicine) and conventional mental
health service. Cultural acceptability, accessibility, perceived holistic approach to care
and less stigma may lead to better utilization of a collaborative service by patients and
their caregivers. Other advantages might include the involvement of family and
community as well as the patient, manipulation of the environment to achieve therapeutic
goals, and cost effectiveness. (Gureje, Nortje, Majanjuola, Oladeji, Seedat, & Jenkins,
2015)
The biomedical understandings of the mind and body stand in sharp contrast to
Aboriginal understandings that value the balance of physical, emotional, mental, and
spiritual well being of an individual and his or her interconnectivity to family,
community, and the land (Vucik, Martin-Misener, & Etowa, 2011).
http://www.pimatisiwin.com/online/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/04VukicGregory.pdf

Images depicting the problem and their links include:

Link :http://www.papermasters.com/herbal-medicine.html

Link: https://readtiger.com/wkp/en/Traditional_medicine

Link: http://kff.org/report-section/health-coverage-and-care-for-american-indians-and-alaskanatives-issue-brief/

Webliography
American Indian Children and Families. (2015). National Indian Child Welfare Association.
Retrieved from: http://www.nicwa.org/children_families/
Beals, J., Novins, D., Whitesell, N., Spicer, P., Mitchell, C., & Manson, S. (2000). Prevalence of
Mental Disorders and Utilization of Mental Health Services in Two American Indian
Reservation Populations: Mental Health Disparities in a National Context. American
Journal of Psychiatry,162(9), 1723-1732.
Buchwald, D., Beals, J., & Manson, S. (2000). Use Of Traditional Health Practices Among
Native Americans In A Primary Care Setting. Medical Care, 38(12), 1191-1199.
Definition of Indian Country. (2015, September 20). Retrieved from:
http://www2.epa.gov/pesticide-applicator-certification-indian-country/definition-indiancountry

Department of Health and Human Services (n.d.)Mental Health: A Report of the Surgeon
General. U.S. Public Health Service. Retrieved
from:http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/library/reports/
Grinnel, R. (2010). The preventable epidemic: youth and the urgent need for mental health care
resources in indian country. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Retrieved
from: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CHRG-111shrg58331/html/CHRG111shrg58331.htm
Gureje, O., Nortje, G., Makanjuola, V., Oladeji, B., Seedat, S., & Jenkins, R. (2015). The role of
global traditional and complementary systems of medicine in treating mental health
problems. The Lancet. Psychiatry, 2(2), 168177. http://doi.org/10.1016/S22150366(15)00013-9
Ha, T. (2013, December 18). How should we talk about mental health? Retrieved
from:http://ideas.ted.com/how-should-we-talk-about-mental-health/
Honwana, A. (1998). Discussion Guide 4: Non-western concepts of mental health. Retrieved
from: http://mhpss.net/resource/discussion-guide-4-non-western-concepts-of-mentalhealth/
Kohn, R., Saxena, S., Levav, I., & Saraceno, B. (2003, November 21). The treatment gap in
mental health care. Retrieved from: http://www.scielosp.org/scielo.php?pid=S004296862004001100011&script=sci_arttext
National Center for Health Statistics, DHHS. (2007) Health, United States, 2007, with
Chartbook on Trends in the Health of Americans (Table 61).
Retrieved from: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/hus/hus07.pdf
Patel, V., Maj, M., De Silva, M.J., Koschorke, M., Prince, M., (2010). Reducing the treatment
gap for mental disorders: a WPA survey. US National Library of Medicine National
Institutes of Health. 9(3): 169-76
Price, Brian K.; McNeill, Brian W. Cultural commitment and attitudes toward seeking counseling
services in American Indian college students. Professional Psychology: Research and
Practice, Vol 23(5), Oct 1992, 376-381
Racial and Ethnic Minority Populations. (15, November 2).
Retrieved from: http://www.samhsa.gov/specific-populations/racial-ethnic-minority
Shivani, S., Goldsmith, J., Anthenelli, R.M. (2002). Alcoholism and psychiatric disorders.
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.
Retrieved from: http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/arh26-2/90-98.htm

Vukic, A., Martin- Misener, R., & Etowa, J. (2011). Aboriginal and Western Conceptions of
Mental Health and Illness. Pimatisiwin: A Journal of Aboriginal and Indigenous
Community Health, 9(1).
5b. How can you depict the relationship among tp Need, your agencys mission, and your
mission?

Our Mission: To increase the


knowledge of complementary
therapies for mental disorders in
the Indian country population.
Our agencys mission:
To raise the physical mental social and
spiritual health of American Indian and
Alaskan Natives to the highest level.
General need:
Due to the high rates of mental
disorders in Indian country, there
is a need to increase awareness
that there are complementary
methods of treatment for the
Native American populations.
This will make treatment more
efficient and accessible to the
target population and in turn
increase their overall health.

Peyton Teeple
Mackenzie Carlson
Mission: To increase knowledge of complementary therapies for mental disorders in Indian
country.

Section 3:
Defining, Modeling and Measuring knowledge of complementary therapies for
mental disorders, and finding the SPECIFIC NEED.
6. How does the literature theoretically define knowledge of complementary therapies for
mental disorders, and what are the component parts of complementary therapies for
mental disorders?
The literature doesnt theoretically define knowledge of complementary therapies for mental
disorders. So, we shall craft a definition by defining complementary therapy, mental disorders
and knowledge. Then, we shall integrate these into definitions.

The Oxford Dictionary defines knowledge as awareness or familiarity gained by


experience of a fact or situation.
According to the World Health Organization, the terms "complementary medicine" or
"alternative medicine" are used interchangeably with traditional medicine in some
countries. They refer to a broad set of health care practices that are not part of that
country's own tradition and are not integrated into the dominant health care system.
According to the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (2008),
complementary medicine is when a non-mainstream practice is used together with
conventional medicine. Some of the most common complementary health practices
among adults as of 2012 was natural products, deep breathing, yoga, meditation,
massage, special diets, and Homeopathy. Traditional healers, Ayurvedic medicine,
traditional Chinese medicine, and naturopathy are other complementary health practices.
According to the DSM-IV (2010), each of the mental disorders is conceptualized as a
clinically significant behavioral or psychological syndrome or pattern that occurs in an
individual and that is associated with present distress (e.g., a painful symptom) or
disability (i.e., impairment in one or more important areas of functioning) or with a
significantly increased risk of suffering death, pain, disability, or an important loss of
freedom. In addition, this syndrome or pattern must not be merely an expectable and
culturally sanctioned response to a particular event, for example, the death of a loved one.
Whatever its original cause, it must currently be considered a manifestation of a
behavioral, psychological, or biological dysfunction in the individual. Neither deviant
behavior (e.g., political, religious, or sexual) nor conflicts that are primarily between the
individual and society are mental disorders unless the deviance or conflict is a symptom
of a dysfunction in the individual, as described above.
For our purposes we shall integrate and expand upon the previous model as:

Knowledge of complementary therapies for mental disorders is


being aware of the non-mainstream practices can that can be
used together with conventional medicine for treatment for
clinically significant behavior or psychological syndrome or
pattern that occurs in an individual and that is associated with
present distress or disability or with a significantly increased risk
of suffering, death, pain, disability, or an important loss of
freedom
Bibliotherapy
Being aware of the following complementary therapies and
how to access them.
Koko iPhone
application

Exercise

Nutrition

Yoga

Meditation

Relaxation
therapy

Massage

Traditional
healing

6b. How does the literature say we can measure knowledge of complementary therapies for
mental disorders?
The literature does not say how we can measure knowledge of complementary therapies for
mental disorders, but for our purposes we have created our own questionnaire, named PeyMac
that does measure of knowledge of complementary therapies for mental disorders.
6c. When is a test valid? What is logical validity? Content validity? Which tests/measures
are logically/content valid? Why?
Test validity is when the test effectively measures what it is supposed to
measure, and all other extraneous variables are controlled by the researcher.
When all other extraneous variables are controlled, we are able to draw more
reliable conclusions. Logical validity is when a test measures what it says it
will measure, meaning the dependent variable and its component parts.
Content validity means the test contains all the component parts of the
dependent variable. Our test is logically and content valid because our test is
measuring all of the component parts of the dependent variable, and
therefore measuring what it purports to measure, which is knowledge of
complementary therapies for mental disorders.

6d. What is test reliability? Do the test/ measure appear reliable? Explain
Test reliability means test consistency it should give the same or similar scores when administered to
the same population when there is no intervention. We would insure that the PeyMac questionnaire is
reliable by administering it to representatives from a different Indian community on a Monday and then
again on Wednesday (test-retest reliability). If results were similar, we would consider the test reliable and
then go on to use it with our target population.

An example of this test would be:

Response:

Explanation:

Yes, and explain or No


PeyMac questionnaire

Complimentary therapies

1. Are you aware that exercise can be used as a


complimentary therapy for mental disorders?
2. Are you aware that nutrition can be used as a
complimentary therapy for mental disorders?
3. Are you aware that yoga can be used as a
complimentary therapy for mental disorders?
4. Are you aware that meditation can be used as
a complimentary therapy for mental disorders?
5. Are you aware that relaxation therapy can be
used as a complimentary therapy for mental
disorders?
6. Are you aware that massage can be used as a
complimentary for mental disorders.
7. Are you aware that traditional healing can be

Exaplantion

Yes, and explain how


the complimentary
therapy can be used for
mental disorders or No

Explanation:

used as a complimentary therapy for mental


disorders?
8. Are you aware that the Koko iPhone app can
be used as a complimentary therapy for mental
disorders?
9. Are you aware that bibliotherapy can be used
as a complimentary therapy for mental
disorders?
Accessibility

Yes, and explain how


Explanation:
to access at least five of
the complimentary
therapies or No

10. Are you aware of how to access at least five


of these complimentary therapies in your area?
Major mental disorders

Yes, and explain


what the four
most common
major mental
disorders are or
No

Explanation:

11. Are you aware of the four most common


major mental disorders?

6e. Give an example of an operational definition for knowledge of complementary therapies


for mental disorders based on the test you think is most valid of the tests you reviewed.
CHANGE
Our operational definition would be defined as being able to identify and explain nine
complementary therapies that can be used for mental disorders: exercise, nutrition, yoga,
meditation, relaxation therapy, massage, traditional healing, Koko app and bibliotherapy and
how to access them in your local community, an explanation of how those therapies apply to the
treatment for mental disorders, and being aware of the four most common mental disorders.

6f. Give an example of a MEASURABLE OBJECTIVE for the test selected in 6e: Our
target group will increase from a pretest score

The program group will increase score on PeyMac questionnaire from a 3/11 to a 9/11 after
our two month Complementary Minds Campaign program.

Peyton Teeple
Mackenzie Carlson

Mission: To increase knowledge of complementary therapies for mental disorders in Indian


country.

HL 367 Section 4:
Identification and Implementation Plan for an Evidence-Based Program
7. What program models or interventions have you found in your web searches that have
shown to be effective in changing your dv (in a tp)?
Please list 5-8 interventions related to a search indicating effective programs (or
interventions) for changing dv in a tp . For example: effective programs for increasing
self-esteem in women. Or effective ways to increase awareness on health issues, etc.
Program Model with Source, Link and a brief Evidence of its Effectiveness- please write a
explanation of the model. What is it called,
paragraph (with quotes and ref/links) giving
what is involved with it, and how is it used in evidence of effectiveness
general
1. Folic Acid Campaign

2. Program was shown to be effective per:

Broome, K. (2001). Folic Acid Campaign


and Awareness--Southwest Virginia, 19971999. Retrieved October 22, 2015.

Based on the increase in correct responses to


the five question post-campaign survey
regarding folic acid and the sustainability
survey conducted in the same way, the
campaign does to seem to have had an effect
on the knowledge and awareness of folic acid
in women, aged 18-25, that the campaign was
targeting. The evidence of its effectiveness is
shown, pre and post- campaign, by the
increase in awareness of the benefits of folic
acid (31% to 54%), the increase in knowledge
that one benefit of folic acid is to prevent
certain birth defects (77%-81%), and
knowledge about ways to increase folic acid
consumption (55% -73%).
However, there were some variables that could
have contributed to this increase in knowledge
besides the campaign itself. The changes in
awareness and knowledge of folic acid among
the women could have resulted from other
national media campaigns. The questions in
the pre and post-campaign did not take into
account age or pregnancy intention, so those
who who were intending to get pregnant may
have had increased knowledge and awareness
due to that fact.

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrht
ml/mm4840a2.htm
The mission of this awareness campaign was
to increase the awareness and knowledge of
folic acid among women of childbearing age.
The campaign decided to target women of
childbearing age in a four county southwest
Virginia area because there was a needs
assessment conducted in rural southwest
Virginia that indicated that this area had
higher birth defect rate than anywhere else in
the state. A pre-campaign survey consisted
of 5 questions conducted over random
sample telephone surveys that assessed folic
acid awareness and knowledge. It was only
women that were called, aged 18-45, and the
numbers were called based on systematic
random sampling of listed phone number.
The campaign was one year long (between
1997-1998) and consisted of television and
radio public service announcements (PSAs),
a news conference, newspaper
advertisements, and billboards. A grocery

Broome, K. (2001). Folic Acid Campaign and

store chain was also used to promote folic


acid and local school board members and
teachers developed a folic acid packet to
deliver to local schools of grades 5-12. A
post-campaign survey was conducted in the
same way as the pre-campaign survey. There
was also a sustainability survey done one
year after the campaign was over, in 1999.

Awareness--Southwest Virginia, 1997-1999.


Retrieved October 22, 2015.

2. Name: A comprehensive information


resource on traditional, complementary, and
alternative medicine: Toward an international
collaboration

The effectiveness of the database has not yet


been reviewed by other sources. The article
states that the prototypes were presented at
two separate workshops and the second
prototype, which allowed users to search
Kronenberg, F., Molholt, P., Zeng, M., &
across multiple databases related to TCAM
Eskinazi, D. (2001). A comprehensive
(Traditional, Complementary, and Alternative
information resource on traditional,
Medicine), was a functional system, but no
complementary, and alternative medicine:
other information was given. The
Toward an international
representatives of the nine international
collaboration.Journal of Alternative and
databases formed themselves as the
Complementary Medicine, 6, 123-129.
International Collaboration on
Retrieved October 18, 2015
Complementary and Traditional Medicine, and
the goal was to realize the full potential of the
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/118226 project.
21
Kronenberg, F., Molholt, P., Zeng, M., &
Eskinazi, D. (2001). A comprehensive
The goal of this project was to create a
information resource on traditional,
database for TCAM (Traditional,
complementary, and alternative medicine:
Complementary, and Alternative Medicine)
Toward an international collaboration.Journal
information because of the increase in
of Alternative and Complementary Medicine,
worldwide need for this type of information. 6, 123-129. Retrieved October 18, 2015
The authors created a prototype of a database
named the Complementary and Alternative
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1182262
Medicine Digital Library (CAMed). There
1
was also a second prototype that was created
to show how someone could search across all
of the collaborating databases (related to
TCAM). These two prototypes were
presented in two workshops to
representatives of international databases that
contain information on various aspects of
complementary medicine.
3. Mental Health First Aid
"Mental Health First Aid." National Registry

The Mental Health First Aid course improved


recognition of a mental disorder in the the
descriptions that were provided in the course,

of Evidence-based Programs and Practices.


28 Jan. 14. Web. 20 Oct. 2015.
http://nrepp.samhsa.gov/ViewIntervention.as
px?id=321#std694
Mental Health First Aid

it changed the beliefs that the participants had


about treatment options, it decreased the social
stigma of mental disorders in participants, it
increased the confidence of the participants
that they could help someone with a mental
disorder, and it increased the amount of help
that was provided to others.

A Mental Health First Aid Course was


developed in order to improve mental health
literacy in the public. The course was taught
by a train certified instructor and it was
developed as an interactive 12 hour course.
The course could be delivered in two-six
hour sessions or 3- four hour sessions. The
sessions covered helping someone in a
mental health crisis and/ or in the early stages
of a mental health problem. The mental
health problems covered in the course are
depression, anxiety, and psychotic disorders.
Participants in the course learned symptoms
of the disorder, risk factors, and where and
how to get help that is evidence-based. A five
step action plan was also taught in the course.
The five step action plan was termed
ALGEE. ALGEE stands for: A- Assess for
suicide risk or harm; L- listen non
judgmentally; G-Give reassurance and
information; E- Encourage appropriate
professional help; E-Encourage self-help and
other support strategies.

Kitchener, B. A., & Jorm, A. F. (2002). Mental


health first aid training for the public:
evaluation of effects on knowledge, attitudes
and helping behavior.BMC Psychiatry, 2, 10.

4. Reducing Tobacco Use and Secondhand


Smoke Exposure: Comprehensive Tobacco
Control Programs

In the systematic Review 56 studies evaluated


program impact on cigarette use only and it
was conducted by a team of specialists in
systematic review methods, and in research,
practice and policy related to reducing tobacco
use and secondhand smoke exposure. Some
program implemented policies directly by
restrictions on tobacco product through
marketing and availability and smoke-free
policies.
A country with a national comprehensive
program saw an increased quit rate following
program implementation.

Reducing Tobacco Use and Secondhand


Smoke Exposure: Comprehensive Tobacco
Control Programs. (2014). The Guide to
Community Preventive Services. The
Community Guide: What works to Promote
Health. Retrieved on: 25 Oct., 2015
http://www.thecommunityguide.org/tobacco/
comprehensive.html
This program used combined programs on a
national level to implement population-level

The Mental Health First Aid training produces


greater recognition of mental disorders,
increased agreement about interventions that
are helpful with health professionals,
decreased social distance from those with
mental disorders, increased feeling of ability
of being able to help others, and an increase of
help provided. Knowledge, attitude, and
behavior is increased through the Mental
Health First Aid training.
Jorm, A. F., Kitchener, B. A., OKearney, R.,
& Dear, K. B. (2004). Mental health first aid
training of the public in a rural area: a cluster
randomized trial [ISRCTN53887541]. BMC
Psychiatry, 4, 33.

interventions to reduce the appeal and


A U.S. state with a comprehensive tobacco
acceptability of tobacco use, increase tobacco control program had similar cessation rates as
use cessation, reduce secondhand smoke
the rest of the country.
exposure and prevent initiation of tobacco
use among young people. Through state
funded support, surveillance, evaluation, and
program monitoring reduced tobacco use
among adults and young people.
5. Preventing Skin Cancer: Mass Media
"Preventing Skin Cancer." The Guide to
Community Preventive Services. The
Community Guide: What works to Promote
Health. Retrieved on: 25 Oct. 2015
http://www.thecommunityguide.org/cancer/s
kin/community-wide/rrmassmedia.html
This program defined a mass media
intervention to prevent skin cancer by
reducing individual's exposure to ultraviolet
(UV) radiation use communication channels
such as print media, broadcast media,
billboards, or the internet to disseminate
information, behavioral guidance, or a
combination of these to a large audience. The
target population wasnt specific , though the
interventions typically rely on broad
distribution channels on updated information
on UV radiation.
6. National Eye Health Education Program
for Diabetic Eye Disease

Two studies showed interventions generally


led to improved sun protection behaviors
among children and adults. Another
intervention used both traditional mass media
and social media to reduce tanning bed use led
to a decrease in overall incidence of tanning
bed use. Although it is hard to evaluate a mass
media improvement of behavioral change,
most studies included in this review used
designs, such as simple pre-post assessments,
that offer limited protection against potential
sources of bias.
Providing information about UV radiation
intensity in weather reports may prompt
immediate sun-protection behavior and
increase awareness of risks of UV radiation.

Though I could not find any direct links citing


the effectiveness of the program, there is a
general overview of effectiveness of health
Diabetic Eye Disease. (n.d.). Retrieved
communication programs, which the National
October 26, 2015,
Eye Health Education Program for Diabetic
https://nei.nih.gov/nehep/programs/diabetice Eye Disease would be considered. In order for
yedisease
a campaign to be effective, there must be
multiple channels for the target audience/
The programs mission is to increase
teachers of the target audience to access the
awareness about diabetic eye disease and the information. This is definitely the case in this
need for people with diabetes to have a
program, shown by the various channels the
comprehensive dilated eye exam at least once program created for its target audience.
a year to help prevent vision loss and
Another factor in determining campaign
blindness(Diabetic Eye Disease) The
effectiveness is that the distribution of the

program created tip sheets for health and


community professionals, infographics. a
vodcast that can be linked out from others
websites, an animation, a toolkit for
community health workers and health
promoters, an educators guide to diabetic
eye disease, an education website, posters,
and public service announcements, and many
more resources. All of these resources can be
ordered on their website for widespread
access. The programs target audience was
for all with diabetes, especially higher risk
populations, such as: African Americans,
Hispanics/ Latinos, and Native Americans/
Alaskan Natives.
Diabetic Eye Disease. (n.d.). Retrieved
October 26, 2015, from
https://nei.nih.gov/nehep/programs/diabetice
yedisease

health-related materials should be free or at a


reduced cost for those accessing them.
Virtually all of the materials that the program
provides, including the tip sheets,
infographics, vodcasts, animations, toolkit,
posters, and PSAs, are able to be downloaded
free of charge to those wanting to access them.
Another criteria for an effective campaign are
that the health-related products that the
campaign provides are tangible, which many
of the products that this specific program
provides are, such as the posters and tip sheets.
Effectiveness of Health Communication
Campaigns That Include Mass Media and HealthRelated Product Distribution. (2014, August 15).
Retrieved October 26, 2015, from
http://www.thecommunityguide.org/healthcommuni
cation/campaigns.html

7b. Select the model from above that appears to be the best fit for your accomplishing your
mission. Please outline it in detail on the left side of the grid below. Then please show how
you will adapt it for your circumstances.

Program Model Name/Reference/Link:

Adapted Program Model.


What will you name it?

Folic Acid Campaign


Complementary Minds Campaign
Broome, K. (2001). Folic Acid Campaign and
Awareness--Southwest Virginia, 1997-1999.
Retrieved October 22, 2015.
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm
4840a2.htm

How the Program Was Implemented. Who does


what, and when and how
The mission of this awareness campaign was to
increase the awareness and knowledge of folic acid
among women of childbearing age. The campaign
decided to target women of childbearing age in a
four county southwest Virginia area because there
was a needs assessment conducted in rural southwest
Virginia that indicated that this area had higher birth
defect rates than anywhere else in the state. A precampaign survey was conducted in January of 2007,
and consisted of random sample telephone surveys
that assessed folic acid awareness and knowledge
through five questions. 412 women were called,
aged 18-45, and the numbers were called based on
systematic random sampling of listed phone
numbers. During the year of 1997, a health
communication campaign designed to increase the
awareness and knowledge of folic acid among
women of childbearing age was launched. The
campaign consisted of television and radio public
service announcements (PSAs), a news conference,
newspaper advertisements, and billboards. A grocery
store chain was also used to promote folic acid and
local school board members and teachers developed
a folic acid packet to deliver to local schools of
grades 5-12. During January of 1998, a postcampaign survey was conducted in the same way as
the pre-campaign survey, with an additional question

Show how you adapt the model on the


left to fit your circumstances or to try
to make it more effective:

We want to adapt this model because of


its proven effectiveness in increasing
awareness and knowledge, but to fit it to
our mission by changing the dependent
variable to knowledge of complementary
therapies for mental disorders in Indian
Country, rather than increasing
knowledge of folic acid targeting women
of childbearing age in southwest Virginia.
Our needs assessment is that there is a
higher rate of mental disorders in
American Indian/ Alaskan Native
populations than seen in the general
population, there is a mental health
treatment gap seen in American Indian/
Alaskan Native populations, and
complementary therapies are a way to fill
that treatment gap. First, we will conduct
random sample telephone surveys using
our PeyMac questionnaire. For our
program group, we will call 250
individuals, aged 18 and older, on a
reservation near an urban area. For our

about the source of the folic acid information. There


was also a sustainability survey conducted in 1999
that included the five original questions from the
pre-test survey as well as the additional question
from the post-test survey about the source of the
folic acid information. The evidence of the
effectiveness of the campaign is shown, pre and
post- campaign, by the increase in awareness of the
benefits of folic acid (31% to 54%), the increase in
knowledge that one benefit of folic acid is to prevent
certain birth defects (77%-81%), and knowledge
about ways to increase folic acid consumption (55%
-73%). There were limitations to the conclusions
made from the pre and post campaign surveys. One
of the limitations was that the changes made might
have come from other national media efforts rather
than solely from the campaign. The questions in the
pre and post-campaign survey did not take into
account age or pregnancy intention, so those who
were intending to get pregnant may have had
increased knowledge and awareness due to that fact.
The women that were questioned in the surveys may
not have been representative of women of
childbearing age in the state of Virginia or of women
of that age in the U.S. These limitations should be
taken into account when reviewing the increase in
scores on each survey question from the pre and post
campaign surveys.

control group, we will also conduct


random sample telephone surveys, using
our PeyMac questionnaire, to 250
individuals aged 18 or older, on a
reservation area that is in the same state
as our program group. Our health
communication campaign, the
Complementary Minds Campaign, will
be implemented on a reservation area that
is near an urban area so that the target
population would have greater access to
the complementary therapies. Our
campaign would be promoting. The
Complementary Minds Campaign would
be a 2-month health communications
campaign designed to raise awareness of
complementary therapies for mental
disorders which would include PSAs
through the radio, newspaper articles,
brochures, Facebook page, website, and a
television broadcasting. We would
measure effectiveness of our program by
seeing an increase in our program groups
PeyMac questionnaire pre-test score
from a 3/11 to a post-test score of 9/11
after our program is implemented. Our
control groups score should remain 3/11
on the pre and post-test PeyMac
questionnaire after the two month time
period.

A detailed outline of our Complementary Minds Campaign is shown on the next page.

Complementary Minds Campaign Program


CMC Facebook and website marketed throughout program through our radio ads and
brochures.
Each radio ad will be aired on the local radio station only for the week specified.
Week 1

Week 2

Week 3

Week 4

Week 5

Week
6

Week 7

Introducing
initial radio
ad, and
introduction
of our
program.
Describing
where
brochures
will be and
objectives for
program.

Brochures
will be
handed out at
the public
library,
restaurants,
health
clinics, and
tribal
doctor
offices. The
second
radio ad will
be aired with
information
on exercise
and how this
is a
complementa
-ry treatment
for mental
disorders.

Brochures
will be
passed out
at schools,
grocery
stores,
tribal
offices, and
any Indian
center. The
third radio
ad will be
aired, with
information
on
nutrition
and how it
is a
complement
-ary
treatment
for mental
disorders

Radio ad
with
information
on yoga
and
meditation
and how
they are
complemen
-tary
therapies
for mental
disorders.
Newspaper
article
written
about
resources
and
businesses
that involve
exercise,
nutrition,
yoga, and
meditation
in the area.

Radio ad
with
information on
relaxation
therapy
and
massage
will be
aired and
how they
are
complementary
treatments
for mental
disorders.

Radio ad
with
informati
on on
traditional healing
and Koko
iPhone
app and
how they
are
compleme
ntary
therapies
for mental
disorders.

Radio ad on
bibliotherapy.
Newspaper ad
with overview
of resources
and businesses
that involve
relaxation
therapy,
massages,
traditional
healing, Koko
iPhone app,
and
bibliotherapy
in the area.

7c. Identify 1-3 apps that you could utilize with your program plan. Identify them, briefly
describe them, put a picture of them, and display the link to them. How could you use
each?

Week 8
Television
broadcasting
interviewing
the leaders of
CMC on local
news station.
Interview will
involve the
program
highlights and
a thank you to
the
community
for
participating.
A final radio
ad will be
covering the
same
material.

Emotion Sense:

Users of the app record their feelings on a chart that was developed by psychologists. There is
then more surveying done by the app itself so that it can assess the mood of the user more
clearly. This app basically tracks users moods and helps the user figure out what might be
causing that mood. This app could be used in our program by having participants who are able,
download the app, and then use it for the duration of the program. We could discuss how the
participants are liking the app and if they feel like it does help them cope with their moods easier.
The app could be thought of as a complementary method to mental health care.
Link to app: http://emotionsense.org/
Link to picture:http://emotionsense.org/images/img-phone.png
Koko:
Koko is an iPhone app
that aims to help with
depression. Its model
is similar to that of
facebook, except users
post about whatever is
going wrong with
them, such as a life
circumstance. Others
can then reply to their
post, giving them
helpful perspectives on
the situation and ways to cope. The idea is that the difference between someone feeling better or
worse about their circumstance is the way in which they are seeing that circumstance. The people

replying to the post are interpreting the circumstance from a more productive perspective, and
their answers are rewarded by an upvoting system. The app coaches the users to answer to the
posts based on guidelines of cognitive therapy techniques that have been proven to work. This
app would be an example of an online complementary therapy that participants in the program
could use. The app is set to be available in the fall, however a direct link for the app could not be
found as of now.
Link to picture and description of app: http://www.fastcodesign.com/3044578/mit-studentdevelops-a-facebook-for-depression
7d. How would you insure that you accommodate for a behavior change model? For
example, for the Social Cognitive Theory Light model how could you be sure that you know
the tp knows what to do, how to do it, wants to do it (motivation), believes they can do it
(self-efficacy), and has a supportive environment?
Social Cognitive Theory Light
A person is more likely to change behavior if
They know what to do:
The individuals in our program group will know what to do, which is to increase their awareness
of complementary therapies for mental disorders, because we will include our groups mission on
our brochures, our facebook page, and other communication materials through our program.
They know how to do it:
The individuals in our program group will know how to increase their awareness of
complementary therapies for mental disorders because we will use communication via our
facebook page and radio ads to let the participants know where and when to be looking out for
our communication tools that give them information on complementary therapies for mental
disorders.
They want to do it (motivation):
The individuals in our program group will want to increase their knowledge of complementary
therapies for mental disorders because our program will provide information on how the
complementary therapies in our program are accessible, acceptable, and cost effective to those
suffering from mental disorders, as compared to being treated solely with conventional medicine,
and how this impacts their community.
They believe they can do it (Self-efficacy):
The individuals in our program group will have self-efficacy based on the relevancy of the
information that our program will provide in their own life. This will hopefully empower
participants and make them believe in their capabilities of learning about and applying the
information that our program will offer about complementary therapies for mental disorders.
They have a supportive environment:
The individuals in our program group will have a supportive environment because our program
is bringing awareness to a community wide need. The whole community is involved in our
program, gaining knowledge with each other on complementary therapies for mental disorders.

Peyton Teeple
Mackenzie Carlson
Mission: to increase the knowledge of complementary therapies for mental disorder in
Indian country.

Section 5: Evaluation Models & Internal Validity


8. What is internal validity? Cite your source and link to it.
Internal validity occurs when a researcher controls all extraneous variables and the only
variable influencing the results of a study is the one being manipulated by the researcher. This
means that the variable the researcher intended to study is indeed the one affecting the results
and not some other, unwanted variables (Internal Validity, 2015). As such, we want to say that
our program caused the increase in post test scores, not something else.
Internal Validity. (2015). Adler University. Retrieved from:
http://www.alleydog.com/glossary/definition.php?term=Internal%20Validity
9. What evaluation design will you use and why? Graphically depict and label the design in
0s and Xs and indicate what each 0 and X means relative to your specific project.
The Evaluation Design we chose is the Pre/Post Test Control Group Design. We will be
using one group for observing (O) and pretesting them on their knowledge of complementary
therapies for mental disorders in the Indian country, then we will intervene (X) with that group
by having them go through the program (2 months), and finally observe them through posttesting their knowledge of complementary therapies for mental disorders in the Indian country.
The second group will be our control group used to compare how effective the intervention was
after two months for knowledge of complementary therapies for mental disorders in the Indian
country. We chose the Pre/Post Test Control Group Design because the use of control group to
support internal validity.

10. Restate your mission. What is the Mission Fit Question? Evaluation is about mission
fit how will you know if your mission was accomplished? Explain.
Our mission is to increase the knowledge of complementary therapies for mental disorders in
the Indian country. Our mission fit question is: Did we increase the knowledge of
complementary therapies for mental disorders in Indian country? The program group will
increase score on PeyMac questionnaire from a 3/11 to a 9/11 after our two month
Complementary Minds Campaign program.

Peyton Teeple
Mackenzie Carlson
Mission: To increase knowledge of complementary therapies for mental disorders in Indian
country.

Section 6: Compressed Program Plan/Eval Plan Model.


In one page show the following:
10b. How can we compress the project into the program plan/eval plan model? We can do it as:
Assess Need to change the dv in the tp (put in your variables): give the three major reasons why
there is a general need to change the dv in the tp and document your sources
American Indians/ Alaskan Natives experience severe psychological distress 1.5
times more than the general population. (National Center for Health Statistics,
Department of Health and Human Services, 2007)
There is a lack of mental health resources in American Indian/ Alaskan Native
communities due to their rural and remote locations. Additionally, 20% of American
Indian/ Alaskan Natives do not have health insurance, compared to 14% of whites.
(Department of Health and Human Services U.S. Public Health Service, 2001)
For patients and their caregivers, there are several potential advantages of
collaboration between TCM (Traditional and Complementary Medicine) and
conventional mental health service. Cultural acceptability, accessibility, perceived
holistic approach to care and less stigma may lead to better utilization of a
collaborative service by patients and their caregivers. Other advantages might
include the involvement of family and community as well as the patient,
manipulation of the environment to achieve therapeutic goals, and cost
effectiveness. (Gureje, Nortje, Majanjuola, Oladeji, Seedat, & Jenkins, 2015)

Identify Measurable Objectives: identify the test (document) you used to measure the dv in the
tp and give at least three measurable objectives based on the test results.
PeyMac questionnaire

Response:
Yes, and explain or NO

Explanation:

Complementary therapies

Yes, and explain how the


complementary therapy can be used for
mental disorders or No

Explanation:

1. Are you aware that


exercise can be used as a
complementary therapy for
mental disorders?
2. Are you aware that
nutrition can be used as a
complementary therapy for
mental disorders?
3. Are you aware that yoga
can be used as a
complementary therapy for
mental disorders?
4. Are you aware that
meditation can be used as a
complementary therapy for
mental disorders?
5. Are you aware that
relaxation therapy can be
used as a complementary
therapy for mental
disorders?
6. Are you aware that
massage can be used as a
complementary for mental
disorders?
7. Are you aware that
traditional healing can be
used as a complementary
therapy for mental
disorders?
8. Are you aware that the
Koko iPhone app can be
used as a complementary
therapy for mental
disorders?
9. Are you aware that
bibliotherapy can be used
as a complementary

therapy for mental


disorders?
Accessibility

Yes, and explain how to access at least five


of the complementary therapies or No

Explanation:

Yes, and explain what the four most


common major mental disorders are or
No

Explanation:

10. Are you aware of how


to access at least five of
these complementary
therapies in your area?
Major mental disorders

11. Are you aware of the


four most common major
mental disorders?
Objective:
The program group will increase score on PeyMac questionnaire from a 3/11 to a 9/11 after
our two month Complementary Minds Campaign program.
Plan an evidence-based program (iv): identify the program you used (document where you
modeled it from)
The Complementary Minds Campaign is our program.
We modeled the program we will be using after the Folic Acid Campaign.
Broome, K. (2001). Folic Acid Campaign and Awareness--Southwest Virginia, 1997-1999.
Retrieved October 22, 2015.
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm4840a2.htm
Implement the program (briefly summarize how you would implement it e.g., the program
will be implemented over 2 months meeting three times per week at the YMCA). Briefly say
what behavior change model you would use to identify barriers/facilitators in your tp to
increase likelihood running the program would be successful.
Our program is 2-month health communication campaign designed to raise awareness of
complementary therapies for mental disorders. The health communication channels would

include PSAs through the radio, newspaper articles, brochures, a Facebook page, website, and a
television broadcasting. Our program would be implemented on an Indian reservation near an
urban area.
To identify barriers/ facilitators in our target population, we will be using the Social Cognitive
Theory Light model as our behavior change model to increase the likelihood of our program
being successful.
Evaluate. Identify the the mission fit question and say what evaluation design you will use to
determine if you changed the dv in the tp through the iv.
Mission fit question: Have we increased the knowledge of complementary therapies for mental
disorders in Indian country?
Our evaluation design is a Pre/ Post-test Control Group Design.

Peyton Teeple
Mackenzie Carlson
Mission: to increase the knowledge of complementary therapies for mental disorder in
Indian country.

Section 7: Marketing & Communication & Social Media Models


11. Using INNOVATIVE and contemporary techniques/methods/artifacts, please create a
Marketing tool (to advertise and sell your program) as well as a Communication tool or
means to communicate to participants in your program about your program. Please make
sure you put your agency logo on all tools.
Marketing and Communication tools: brochures, newspaper ad, and radio ad, facebook page and
Complementary Minds Campaign website.
Sample Radio Ads
Initial radio ad:
Hi, we are a group called Complementary Minds, and the mission of our group is to increase knowledge
of complementary therapies for mental disorders in Indian country. In trying to do this, we will have a
two-month Complementary Minds Campaign, which will feature information nine different types of
complementary therapies for mental disorders through weekly radio ads, brochures, two newspaper
articles in your local newspaper, a facebook page, website, and a final television broadcast.
What are complementary therapies? Complimentary therapies are a broad set of health care practices that
are not part of the dominant health care system. They are healthcare practices that do not involve some
common types of western medicine involving psychotherapy or prescription medications, but can be
accompanied with those practices in order to increase the effectiveness of treatment in mental health.
Stay tuned for our next radio ad that will be aired all next week that will give specific information on
exercise and how it can be a complimentary therapy for mental disorders. In the mean-time, we will have
brochures being handed out detailing our program, relevant rates and statistics related to our program, and
the complementary therapies that that our program will be focusing on.
3rd radio ad on nutrition:
Nutrition for mental health
This radio ad is brought to you by the Complementary Minds Campaign, and this week we will be
discussing nutrition and how it can be a complementary therapy for mental disorders.
Many are aware of the connection been nutrition and physical health, but the same connection is not made
for nutrition and mental health. Nutrition can play a large part in the onset and treatment of mental
disorders.

The four most common mental disorders experienced in countries around the world are major depression,
bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and obsessive compulsive disorder.
Essential vitamins, minerals, omega-3 fatty acids, amino acids, and magnesium are often deficient in the
general American population. Research has shown that this lack of certain dietary nutrients contribute to
the development of mental disorders.
Diets low in carbohydrates can affect mood, because carbohydrates, which contain naturally occurring
polysaccharides, trigger brain chemicals tryptophan and serotonin that promote feeling of well-being.
Proteins are made up of amino acids and many of the neurotransmitters of the brain are made up of amino
acids. Protein intake and individual amino acid consumption can affect brain functioning and mental
health.
The brain is one of the organs with the highest level of lipids (fats), and to ensure its health, it must be
supplied with fats, and the right ratio of fats. If the two essential fatty acids omega-6 and omega-3 are out
of balance, this can lead to mood imbalances and symptoms of depression. A deficiency in omega-3 fatty
acids can have the same effect.
Researchers have observed that the prevalence of mental disorders has increased in developing countries
in correlation with the deterioration of the western diet.
By improving overall nutrition by consuming your personal required amounts of essential vitamins and
minerals, magnesium, omega 3 fatty acids, carbohydrates, and proteins, you are helping to prevent the
onset of mental disorders, as well as aiding in the treatment of any that you are currently suffering from.
This message has been brought to you by the Complementary Minds Campaign. Stay tuned for next
weeks radio ads, which will be giving information on yoga and relaxation therapy as complementary
therapies for mental disorders.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1146104662083683/
Peyton Teeple
Mackenzie Carlson
Mission: To increase knowledge of complementary therapies for mental disorders in Indian
country.

Section 8: Grants
12. What is a foundation/granting agency whose mission is to support missions like yours?
Identify the foundation, and hot link to it. Defend the compatibility of its mission/purpose
with yours. How much money would it grant for projects like yours?
Agency: National Institutes of Health
http://www.nih.gov/
NIH Mission: To seek fundamental knowledge about the nature and behavior of living systems
and the application of that knowledge to enhance health, lengthen life, and reduce illness and
disability.
In comparing the NIH mission with our dyad groups mission, which is, to increase knowledge
of complementary therapies for mental disorders in Indian country, it can be noted that both of
our missions are in line with enhancing the health and reducing illness and disability among
people. Our dyads mission is focused on a specific population of people, American Indians/
Alaskan Natives, but as can be seen in the following grant, the National Institute of Health places
specific attention on the Native American/ Alaskan Native population.

Grant: Interventions for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention in Native American
Populations
Link:http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/search-grants.html?keywords=american%20indian
This grant posting did not provide expected amount of funding.
Do a search for grants to support your changing your dv in your tp.
Grant: Healthy Living Grant Program
Over $1.2 million in grants have been awarded to non-profit health education programs since
2002. This grant program supports health education programs to develop solutions that are
community-based in order to solve behavioral health challenges.
Link:http://www.ama-assn.org/ama/pub/about-ama/ama-foundation/our-programs/publichealth/healthy-living-grants.page?

Grant: Aboriginal Health Project Grants


These grants are under the Health Promotion Project Grants funded by Healthway. The grants are
offered to community groups to run innovative health programs with aboriginal populations. The
groups can apply for up to $10,000 in funding.
Link:https://www.healthway.wa.gov.au/application-forms/health-promotion-projectgrants/

Peyton Teeple
Mackenzie Carlson
Mission: to increase the knowledge of complementary therapies for mental disorder in
Indian country.

Section 9: Reflection
Please write a combined 1 - 2 page reflection piece on how this project helped your
professional growth relative to the program plan/eval process, independent/self-directed
learning, critical thinking, and collaborative learning.
This project was challenging and rewarding on several levels because it increased our
abilities to critically think about specific information we were looking for, analyze relevant

questions related to our target population and effectively question how impacting our program
will be in order to meet our mission and improve the methods used for mental disorders.
When assessing the need, we thought that the information would be limiting and difficult
because our mission was specific. It was through some difficulty that we found several programs
and government websites that are looking to help with mental disorders. The reason we wanted
to research the possible complementary or alternative therapies for mental disorders is because
with the diagnosis of mental disorders patients are normally treated with drugs that have severe
adverse effects, drug interaction with other drugs if they are taking them, and it takes months for
some medications to work, delaying whether or not that medication actually treats the condition.
As health educators we should not only be informed of the primary therapies used, but possible
other holistic options available. Also, since target populations in rural areas might be limited to
certain care facilities we wanted to increase these other therapies for individuals limited to this
care such as people in Indian country.
One of the few struggles of developing the project was creating and critically thinking
about different sections of the programs evaluation, questionnaire and terminology used. We
realized that there were limited program questionnaires that we could find that specifically
models our program and mission statement. In some parts of the literature review we could not
find a questionnaire that could effectively test our theoretical definition and its component parts,
so we developed our own. There were several sites that are starting to realize the issue of mental
disorders and trying to create newer process of treating these disorders, but when researching the
problems for the Indian country we found more major problems of alcohol and drugs issues. The
specific terminology used for this program was unique and absolutely a necessity for program
planning because through these sections and different steps we can specifically stay on our object

to complete our mission. Defining these terms was a simple task that still required evidence and
reasoning for our purpose. In creating our test we developed an understanding of how to organize
our component parts into questions that would be testing the knowledge of these complementary
therapies that through the literature we found would be most effective for mental disorders. For
the Pre and Post testing in the questionnaire we struggled with how to objectively measure the
data and how our intervention/program would help increase the awareness for mental disorders
in the Indian country, but we soon found that by asking yes/ no responses and giving an example
is allowing for qualitative and quantitative data from our target population. This will prove to be
more effective and allow us to maintain internal validity in our evaluation design.
The possibilities for this program to reach our target population we feel could actually
become a reality in helping some of these target populations. It would require more research on
methods of the different therapies, professionals trained in those areas and conducting phone
interviews to gather the data for different locations, but overall could be implemented by anyone.
We feel as though we have effectively outlined our program that anyone could implement it,
because of the review of literature we have done, the organization of our program, the resources
and questionnaire that we developed and even what places in Michigan this program could be
tested with. The other positive objective of our program is organization in measuring the
increased knowledge.
It was through increasing and expanding our research abilities in finding specific
programs, and analyzing their information for developing our own questionnaire and programs,
that we were able to fully understand what questions to ask and how to effectively run a
program if we ever wanted to implement or improve a program in our future careers. A unique
compromise for this project was our abilities to research something we both were passionate

about. This is a positive outcome that in our career will be beneficial in considering other
people's opinions to create a new programs that could impact peoples behaviors and their lives.

Peyton Teeple
Mackenzie Carlson
Mission: To increase knowledge of complementary therapies for mental disorders in Indian
country.

Section 10:Powerpoint Link


https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1ATrJnrdaQk6wLHewp7swsmYhtbVsk32fptF4UpoTdM/edit#slide=id.gd441a64ed_0_0

Peyton Teeple
Mackenzie Carlson
Mission: To increase knowledge of complementary therapies for mental disorders in Indian
country.

Section 11: References/Webliography


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Peyton Teeple
Mackenzie Carlson
Mission: To increase knowledge of complementary therapies for mental disorders in Indian
country.

Section 12: Weebly Website

http://indianmentalhealthnmu.weebly.com/