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SCE 550

METHOD OF TEACHING SCIENCE

TEACHING SCIENCE USING ENTERTAINMENT AIDS


PREPARED BY:

PREPARED FOR: MR MOHAMAD HISYAM BIN ISMAIL

CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION
CONCLUSION

DEFINITION
TARGET GROUP
REFERENCES

PURPOSE

INTRODUCTION

INTRODUCTION

TEACHING SCIENCE
USING
ENTERTAINMENT AIDS

DEFINITION

DEFINITION
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ENTERTAINMENT

AID

EDUTAINMENT

ENTE
RTAI
NME
NT
Entertainment is a form of activity that holds the attention and interest of an
audience, or gives pleasure and delight.
The action of providing or being provided with amusement or enjoyment.
the act of entertaining
amusement or diversion provided especially by performers
something diverting or engaging as
(i) a public performance
(ii) a usually light comic or adventure novel.

AID
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help or support or assistance.
person or thing that helps or assists
you in doing something. (helper)

EDUT
AINM
ENT
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It is the combination of education and entertainment.
EDUCATION + ENTERTAINMENT =

EDUTAINMENT

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Edutainment is a hybrid genre


that relies heavily on visual
material, on narrative or gamelike formats, and on informal,
less didactic styles of address
(Buckingham and Scanlon
(2000).

Edutainment can be defined as a


combination of education and
entertainment,
which
is
implemented via software and
delivered by a cable network or
the Internet (Harnani Mat Zin &
Nor Zuhaidah Mohd Zain, (2010).

PURPOSE

PURPOSE
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To promote student learning through exploration,
interactivity, trial and error, and repetition in such
a way that students get so lost in the fun, that
they do not realize they are learning at the same
time. ( Harnani Mat Zain & Nor Zuhaidah Mohd
Zain)
To promote learning by merging educational
contents and entertainment activities that
increase engagement, emotion, and motivation.
(Keyur Sorathiaa and Rocco Servidiob, 2012)

as a motivational facilitator to
process educational information
(motivation paradigm)
To promote student learning.

TARGET GROUP

TARGET GROUP
STUDENTS

AUDITORY

VISUAL

KINESTHETIC

AUDITORY LEARNERS
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Auditory learners would rather listen to
things being explained than read about
them. Reciting information out loud and
having music in the background may be a
common study method. Other noises may
become a distraction resulting in a need for
a relatively quiet place.

In auditory learning, students


learn through hearing. They tend
to prefer verbal and written
materials (Mills et al., 2010).

GeneralClick
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The auditory learner MUST HEAR
things for them to have the best
chance of learning.
Only 30% of the general schoolage population is auditory.
Generally, the auditory learner will
remember 75% of what they hear
in a lecture.
Using the auditory modality is the
most difficult way to learn new
material.

Strengths
Remembers what they hear and say.
Enjoys classroom and small-group
discussion.
Can remember oral instructions well.
Understands information best when they
HEAR it.

CHARACTERISTICS
Major Traits of the Auditory Learner
Remembers what they say and what others say
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very well.
Remembers best through verbal repetition and
by saying things aloud.
Prefers to discuss ideas they do not immediately
understand.
Remembers verbal instructions well.
Enjoys the opportunities to present dramatically,
including the use of music.
Finds it difficult to work quietly for long periods of
time.
Easily distracted by noise, but also easily
distracted by silence.
Verbally expresses interest and enthusiasm.
Enjoys class and group discussions.

Like listening
Enjoy music
Like to talk
Talk to himself or herself
Prefer lecture and discussion
Prefer spoken directions over written
directions
Cannot concentrate when noisy

TEACHING STRATEGIES

Teaching Strategies for the Auditory Learner


Re-phrase points, questions. Vary speed, volume, pitch,
as appropriate, to help create interesting aural textures.
Write down key points or key words to help avoid
confusion due to pronunciation.
During lessons, ensure auditory learners are in a position
to hear well.
Incorporate multimedia applications utilizing sounds,
music, or speech (use tape recorders, computer sound
cards/recording applications, musical instruments, etc.).

SUITABLE ACTIVITIES
Activity Suggestions for the Auditory Learner

Oral report or presentation

Show and tell/current events

Musical performance

Songs

Teach the class or a group

Peer tutoring

Puppet show

Raps

Panel discussion

Oral presentations

TV/radio show

Poems

Debate

Demonstrations

Verbal games

Oral recitation

Tape recordings

Songs or music
Poems
Poetry
Forum
debate

ACTIVITY 1
~Singing A Song

VISUAL LEARNERS
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Visual learners learn best by looking at


graphics, watching a demonstration, or
reading. For them, its easy to look at
charts and graphs, but they may have
difficulty focusing while listening to an
explanation.

The visual learning style is a way


of learning in which information is
associated with images.

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General Facts
The visual learner remembers 75% of what they
read or see.
Demonstrations from the blackboard, diagrams,
graphs and charts are all valuable tools for the
visual learner.
Generally, analytic visual learners will process the
printed word before iconic (pictorial) information.
Generally, global visual learners will process iconic
(pictorial) information before reading the printed
text.

Strengths of the Visual Learner


Remembers what they read and write.
Enjoys visual projects and presentations.
Can remember diagrams, charts, maps
well.
Understands information best when they
SEE it.

CHARACTERISTICS
Major Traits of the Visual Learner

Prefers to see words written down


When something is being described, the visual learner
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also prefers to
haveicon
a picture
to picture
view.
Prefers a time-line or some other similar diagram to
remember historical events.
Prefers written instructions rather than verbal instructions.
Observes all the physical elements in a classroom.
Carefully organizes their learning materials.
Enjoys decorating their learning areas.
Prefers photographs and illustrations with printed content.
Remembers and understands through the use of
diagrams, charts and maps.
Appreciates presentations using OHP transparencies or
handouts.
Studies materials by reading notes and organizing it in
outline form.
Enjoys visual art activities.

Uses visual objects such as graphs,


charts, pictures, and seeing
information.
Remember diagrams and pictures.
Learns better in lectures by watching
them.
Remembers faces.

TEACHING STRATEGIES

Teaching Strategies for the Visual Learner


Provide lots of interesting visual material in a variety of
formats.
Make sure visual presentations are well-organized.
During lessons, ensure auditory learners are in a position
to hear well.
Make handouts and all other written work as visually
appealing as possible, and easily read.
Make full use of a variety of technologies: computer, OHP,
video camera, live video feeds/close circuit TV,
photography, internet, etc.

SUITABLE ACTIVITIES
Activity Suggestions for the Visual Learner
Diagrams

Written reports

Illustrations

Games

Graphs

Flash cards

Displays

Writing

Photographs

Crossword & word find puzzles

Cartoons

Newspapers

Coloring books

Letters

Slide Shows/Power Point

Recipes

Posters

Bulletin boards

Movies

Magazines

Collages

Workbooks

OHP transparencies

Reading

TV shows

Comic
Video
Theatre
Power Point slide
Tv shows

ACTIVITY 2
~Comics Review

EXERCISES
Based on the following Figure 1 and Figure 2, give your comments and opinions correlate
with the environment awareness.

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KINESTHETIC LEARNERS
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icon toare
add
picture strategy for use in
The concept
cartoons
a practical
the science classroom. They need little introduction, they
keep children on task, they can stimulate high level
discussion, they help to minimize classroom
management problems and they can stimulate children
to collect evidence by designing experiments (Naylor &
Kaeogh, 2012)
Kinesthetic learners learn best when they are moving. If
they are using their hands and bodies in learning, their
attention will be focused right on the learning they are
doing(Major, 2014).

Kinesthetic learners process


information best through a
hands-on experience. Actually
doing an activity can be the
easiest way for them to learn.
Sitting still while studying may be
difficult, but writing things down
makes it easier to understand.

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General Facts
The tactile-kinesthetic learner must DO things for
them to have the best chance of learning.
he tactile-kinesthetic learner remembers best the
things they experience.
Kinesthetic learning involves use of the whole body
rather than just hands-on.
Getting information from written materials or by
listening is not as easy as aforementioned
methods.

Strengths of the Tactil-Kinesthetic Learner


Remembers what they DO, what they experience
with their hands or bodies (movement and touch).
Enjoys using tools or lessons which involve
active/practical participation.
Can remember how to do things after they've
done them once (motor memory).
Have good motor coordination.

CHARACTERISTICS
Major Traits of the Kinesthetic Learner
Remembers what
DO
Clickthey
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picture
Remembers best through getting physically involved in
whatever is being learned.
Enjoys acting out a situation relevant to the study topic.
Enjoys making and creating.
Enjoys the opportunities to build and physically handle
learning materials.
Will take notes to keep busy but will not often use them.
Enjoys using computers.
Physically expresses interest and enthusiasm by getting
active and excited.
Has trouble staying still or in one place for a long time.
Enjoys hands-on activities.
Tends to want to fiddle with small objects while listening or
working.
Tends to want to eat snacks while studying.

Distracted by comfort variations such as


temperature, light or movement
Accesses memories by recreating the
movements associated with those
memories
Enjoy taking things apart and putting them
back together again, working on projects
Dont like to read manuals but rather like
to figure it out
Act out what they are learning

TEACHING STRATEGIES

Teaching Strategies for the Kinesthetic Learner


Allow tactile-kinesthetic students to take breaks during
lessons and move around.
Encourage tactile-kinesthetic students to write down their
own notes.
Encourage tactile-kinesthetic students to stand or move
while reciting information or learning new material.
Incorporate multimedia resources (computer, video
camera, OHP transparencies, photography camera, etc.)
into programmes (teacher presentations and student
presentations).
Provide lots of tactile-kinesthetic activities in the class

SUITABLE ACTIVITIES
Kinesthetic Activities
Surveys

Demonstrations

Dance

Products

Body games

Rocking and reading

Make a video show

Field trips

Dress as characters

Role-play/interviews

Charades

Pantomimes

Plays

Projects

Walking and reading

Puppet shows

Musical performances

Role playing
Building models
Explorace
experiments

ACTIVITY 3
~Role Playing In Dialogue Session

ACTIVITY 4
~Crossword Puzzle

RESEARCH
FINDINGS

Research Findings

PROS & CONS

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CONCLUSION

CONCLUSION
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Games should be fun. When gamers are
enjoying themselves, they are more relaxed,
energetic, alert, responsive, and are less
fearful and more open to learning (Baranich &
Currie, 2004; Klaila, 2001)

REFERENCES

REFERENCES
Sosnowski, J., & Media, D. (n.d.). Advantages & Disadvantages of
Schools Using Multimedia. Retrieved
September 26, 2015, from
Seattle, PI: http://education.seattlepi.com/advantagesdisadvantages-schools-using-multimedia 3099.html
Allam, C. (2006) in Bijnens, M., Vanbuel, M., Verstegen, S.,
Young
C.,Handbook on Digital Video and Audio in Education,
Creating and using audio and video material for educational
purposes, The Videoaktiv Project.
Johnson, Laurence F., et al.The 2010 Horizon Report: The K12
Edition.Austin, TX: The New Media Consortium, 2010.
<http://wp.nmc.org/horizon-k12- 2010/chapters/game-basedlearning/#0>
Galbraith, J., ( 2004), 'Active viewing: and oxymoron in video- based
instruction?', Society for Applied Learning
Technologies
Conference, designer.50g.com/docs/Salt_2004.pdf

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