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Lesson Date: March 4th

Teachers: Braylee Benjamin and Darlene


Larkins

Subject: 10.6 Samples and Populations

Standard:
7.SP.A.1. Understand that statistics can be used to gain information about a population by
examining a sample of the population; generalizations about a population from a sample are
valid only if the sample is representative of that population. Understand that random sampling
tends to produce representative samples and support valid inferences.
7.SP.A.2. Use data from a random sample to draw inferences about a population with an
unknown characteristic of interest. Generate multiple samples (or simulated samples) of the
same size to gauge the variation in estimates or predictions. For example, estimate the mean
word length in a book by randomly sampling words from the book; predict the winner of a
school election based on randomly sampled survey data. Gauge how far off the estimate or
prediction might be.
Objective (Explicit):

Students will be able to distinguish between populations, samples, and valid, or not
valid methods to collect data.

Sub-objectives, SWBAT (Sequenced from basic to complex):

Students will be able to define a sample and a population.

Students will be able to determine which example is the sample and which is
the population.

Students will be able to define the terms biased and unbiased.

Students will be able to determine if the means of collecting data is biased or


unbiased.

Students will be able to explain what makes a conclusion valid or invalid.

Evidence of Mastery (Measurable):

Students will complete an exit ticket answering 4 questions.


100 % = Exceeds Expectations

75% - 99% = Meets Expectations


50% - 74% = Approaching
49% and below = Falls Far Below
Key vocabulary:

Materials:

Population the entire group of people or


objects.
Sample a part of the population.
Biased - unfairly prejudiced for or against
someone or something. Does not accurately
represent the population. The sample has a
distinct opinion of what they are being
surveyed about.
Unbiased - showing no prejudice for or against
something; impartial. Accurately represents the
population. Large enough to have enough data.
Randomly chosen.
Valid based on method to acquire data,
conclusion represents entire population.
Invalid based on method to acquire data,
conclusion does not accurately represent
population.

Notebooks
Notes
Workbook 10.6 Activity
Workbook 10.6 Practice
Exit Ticket: 10.6 Warm-up Lesson (DC)
Independent Work: 10.6 Practice A

Opening
Today we are going to be talking about samples versus populations, and if the methods for
collecting data are biased, unbiased causing the conclusions made to be valid, or invalid. If we
look back at our warm up for today, I asked you the following question: If I survey 20
students in the school about their favorite summer activity, can I make a conclusions about the
population of my school based on the results? What I asked you to look at first was two
things, the population and the sample. We knew we were looking at the whole school as our
population and the sample of 20 kids. We gave our reasons as to why we couldnt make any
conclusions about it. Lets learn why.
Direct Instruction

Teacher Will:

Student Will:

(For each Activity, students will


attempt first, after brief instruction
before taking notes)
First, we have to understand what
a sample is versus the whole
population.
Students will do workbook
activity 1
Students will work silently on

activity 1.
Give students 2 minutes to attempt
activity one silently.
After 2 minutes go over answers.
Then take notes on what a sample
is and what a population is.
Making a T chart with examples.
Same for activity 2.
Give notes.

Students will give answers and


explain why they chose their
answers.
Students will copy notes as I write
them, giving examples to put in T
chart.
Students will complete activity 2
silently.
Will copy notes.

Co-Teaching Strategy/Differentiation
Ethan will have the support of his Aids and his Braille reader. He
will also have a copy of the notes I am giving in Braille. I will
ensure to speak everything I write or draw.
Guided Practice

Teacher Will:
Student Will:
(For each Activity, students will
attempt first, after brief instruction
before taking notes)
First, we have to understand what
a sample is versus the whole
population.
Students will do workbook
activity 1
Students will work silently on
activity 1.
Give students 2 minutes to attempt
activity one silently.
After 2 minutes go over answers.
Then take notes on what a sample
is and what a population is.
Making a T chart with examples.
ACTIVITY BREAK:
Children of all ages can do the

Students will give answers and


explain why they chose their
answers.
Students will copy notes as I write
them, giving examples to put in T
chart.

same movement.
Safety/Management:
Stand up and push in your chairs
quietly.
Spread out in your rows
Make sure you are far enough
away from your neighbor so you
will not bump into them.
And you must stay in the same
spot, you are not allowed to move
around the classroom.
You have to participate the entire
time, acting appropriately, or you
will not have the opportunity to
participate next time.
I am going to show a video. And,
as a class we have to do exactly
what he is doing. If he is jogging
in place, so are we. When he turns
around the roller coaster, we are
going to lean with him.
When video is over, regain
attention, before telling students to
quietly sit back down in their
chairs.
Same as above for activity 2.
Give notes.
Same as above for activity 3
Give notes/Discuss
Students will work with their
partners on 10.6 Practice.
We will discuss answers before
moving on.
ACTIVITY BREAK 2:
Same as above, Outer Space video
instead.
Rules: No Punching each other.
Be far enough away from your
partner you will not hit them.
No screaming or yelling.

Students will complete activity 2


silently.
Will copy notes.
Students will complete activity
silently.
Will copy notes.
Students will work with their
partners on 10.6 Pactice.

No talking at all.
Co-Teaching Strategy/Differentiation
Ethan will have the support of his Aids and his Braille reader. He will
also have a copy of the notes/worksheet in Braille. I will ensure to
speak everything I write or draw. Ethan will work with Jesse and his
aids for assistance during partner work.
Activity Break:
Physical Modification: Ethan, who is visually impaired, will still
participate in the activity. But, he will be told what the roller coaster is
doing. We are going straight so we are jogging in place and turn
left or turn right meaning to lean that direction.
Cognitive Modification: Kalli, who is ED, will stay in the back of the
room, simply move her arms, bounce, or a safe movement of her
choice, as long as she is participating safely. I will stay back with her
to ensure she is participating but doing what she is comfortable with in
terms of movement.
Independent
Practice

Teacher Will:

Student Will:

Students will complete an exit


ticket: 10.6 Warm-Up Lesson.

Students will complete an Exit


Ticket.

I will give Independent work:


10.6 Practice A: for students to
complete for the rest of class.

Students will work on Independent


work until the end of class.

Co-Teaching Strategy/Differentiation
Ethan will have the support of his Aids and his Braille reader. He
will also have a copy of the homework/exit ticket in Braille.
Closing/Student Reflection/Real-life connections:

Link to Youtube Video of my Activity Break:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ur2a9PrtNLg

Reflection:
Some of the highlights for this teachers teaching of the activity break included stating the rules
and expectations for all students very clearly from the beginning. She made sure that all of the
students knew exactly how they should be acting throughout the video, as well as repeated her
expectations. Remember rule number one, no talking. She reminded the students twice
throughout the video, which was a good way to remind them she did state her expectations. As of
the behavior she stated expectations for, her class behaved fairly well according to those
expectations which is something she had planned on.
Something she may change next time, is the way she stops unruly behavior in the moment. Had
she been in the back of the classroom where she could watch all of her students at once, she
could have pulled students out of the activity who were misbehaving. Student X, youre not
following the rules, sit down, would have been a great way to decrease bad behaviors right
away.
Her mentor teacher gave her the same advice about the students. Braylee could have circulated
the room as well to help promote the good behaviors and get rid of bad behaviors quicker. She
instead, was participating in the movement with the kids at the front of the room. This did
encourage the students to keep doing the movement throughout the entire lesson since they
watched her doing it with them. Instead of staying at the front of the classroom, she could have
been doing the movement around the room to keep an eye on the behaviors. This would have
been more beneficial towards her managing of students behavior as well as general teacher
movement to engage most students.

The amount of time it took each student to get started was instantaneous almost. As Braylee
instructed students to stand up and push chairs in, they did. When she instructed them to spread
out, they did. And when the video started, when she told them to start running, a majority of the
students did so. When she started doing the activity with them, repeating what they should be
doing, all students proceeded to do the activity.
Braylee did not acknowledge students throughout the video, which had she done, good behaviors
would have only increased. When students followed the directions correctly, and quickly she
could have said, Thank you Student X, Y, and Z for quickly following directions as I asked.
During the video she could have said, Thank you Student X for continuing to job in place and
not bumping into your partners.

Criteria

Exemplary (5)

Proficient (3)

Unsatisfactory (1)

Integration

Instructional plans

Instructional plans

Instructional plans

of physical

include:

include:

include:

activity
Standards
and
Objectives
(S&O)
Presenting

Instructional
Content
(PIC)
Activities

and
Materials
(A&M)

Teacher
Content
Knowledge
(TCK)

Score: x1

All learning
objectives and
state content
standards are
explicitly
communicated
and not altered
with the
integration of
physical activity.
(S&O-TAP)
Lesson activities
include
integration of
physical activity
component in at
least two parts of
the lesson plan
Integration of the
physical activity
component does
not detract from
the academic
content
Teacher regularly
implements a
variety of
subject-specific
instructional
strategies to
enhance student
content
knowledge.
(TCK-TAP)
Activities and
materials
include: (A&MTAP)
o Sometimes
activities are
game-like,
involve
simulations,
require
creating
products, and
demand selfdirection and
selfmonitoring.

Most learning
objectives and
state content
standards are
communicated
and are only
slightly altered
with the
integration of
physical activity.
(S&O-TAP)
Lesson activities
include
integration of a
physical activity
component in at
least one part of
the lesson plan
Integration of the
physical activity
component
slightly detracts
from the
academic content
Teacher
sometimes
implements
subject-specific
instructional
strategies to
enhance student
content
knowledge.
(TCK-TAP)
Presentation of
content most of
the time includes
(In Video as
well): (PIC-TAP)
o Concise
communicati
on of
expectations
for student
performance
of the
physical
activity
component.
o Modeling by

Few learning
objectives and
state content
standards are
communicated
and are
drastically
altered with the
integration of
physical activity.
(S&O-TAP)
Lesson activities
include
integration of a
physical activity
component in
only one part of
the lesson plan,
nor not at all
Integration of the
physical activity
component
significantly
detracts from the
academic content
Teacher rarely
implements
subject-specific
instructional
strategies to
enhance student
content
knowledge.
(TCK-TAP)
Presentation of
content rarely
includes (In
Video as well):
(PIC-TAP)
o Concise
communicati
on of
expectations
for student
performance
of the
physical
activity.
o Modeling by
the teacher to