Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 52

COMM 2232

Communication for Career


Development
Week 7

Portfolios

A Portfolio contains samples of your finest work


from school, work or other projects
Resume
tells employers what you have done/can do
Portfolio
shows them

Supplies
Hard Copy

Electronic

3 ringed binder

Computer

clear plastic sheet


protectors

Scanner

Website Platform

tab dividers

PLANNING THE
PORTFOLIO

Primary Skill Areas

choose 3-5 skill areas you want your portfolio


to demonstrate

include both technical and transferable skills

use these as a guide in selecting artifacts

Primary Skill Areas

Problem-solving

Leadership

Communication

Drive

Resource Allocation

Imagination

Technical Information

Flexibility

Self-Confidence

Conflict Management

Initiative

Goal Achievement

Teamwork

Other

Your Portfolios
Message

What does your Portfolio say about you?

This doesnt go in your Portfolio

Use it to help you build your Portfolio

Your Portfolios
Message
Example:

My portfolio demonstrates that I can develop


and implement networked computer systems
that contribute to workplace efficiency. It proves
that I am a good business communicator,
effective problem solver, and valuable team
member.

What to Include?
(Artifacts)

Important!
Dont use original
documents in your
portfolio, use copies

4 Categories of
Artifacts

Introduction

Employment

Education

Other Items Unique To You

Introduction

Introduction Artifacts

Statement of Originality/Confidentiality

Career & Professional Development Goals

Work Philosophy or Ethics Statement

Confidentiality
Statement

"This portfolio is the work of ________. Please do


not copy without permission. Some of the
exhibits, work samples, and/or service samples
are the property of the organization whose
name appears on the document. Each has
granted permission for this product to be used
as a demonstration of my work.
http://www.ryerson.ca/career/students/createyourportfolio/buil
dingaportfolio/

See also, Career Services Portfolio booklet for


example.

Goal Statements

include 3-5 goal statements in your portfolio

shows employer what you want in a career,


how you would be a good employee and
that you are goal oriented

Goal Statements
Guidelines for writing Goal Statements

Focus on the professional skills, knowledge, and


achievements you want to pursue over the next 2-5
years

Ask yourself where you see yourself professionally


4-5 years from now. What do you want your
accomplishments to be?

Make your goals specific, focusing on specific


accomplishments whenever possible. These goals
should be measurable so you can tell when you
have accomplished them.

Goal Statements
Suggestions for writing Goal Statements

Think about what you want your career path


to look like

Look at job ads for positions you are not


qualified for yet to get an idea of where you
could go beyond an entry level position

Goal Statements
Sample Goal Statements

To hold a team or leadership role in IT projects.

To develop project management skills by working


with project managers and project personnel and by
successfully using project management software
tools.

To earn outstanding performance reviews and


receive promotions

To mentor new employees or trainees in the IT


department.

My Goal Statements

To teach a new course each semester to reach


a flu course load

To revise an existing course

To create a new General Education course

To create a faculty professional development


workshop

To share my resources with new and existing


faculty

Work Philosophy
Questions to consider:
What does it mean to be a good employee?
What does it mean to be a good employer?
What makes a good work environment?
How is success measured?
How does one become part of a community?
??????

Employment

Employment Artifacts

Cover Letter & Resume

Letters of Recommendation

Work Samples

Evaluations/Performance Reviews

????

Education

Education Artifacts

Certificates, Diplomas, Degrees

Academic Awards

Transcripts

Professor Accolades

Education Artifacts

Learning Samples

Program Learning Outcomes Information

Course Learning Outlines

Technical & Other Writing Samples

Photographs

Other

Other Artifacts

Professional Memberships

Newspaper Clippings

Letters of Appreciation

Recent Media (photos, video, audio)

Community Service/Volunteer Work

Labelling Artifacts

Labelling Samples

For each artifact, include a Title and a short


written description that explains:

What the sample is.

What it is for, why it was done.

When it was done.

Who else was involved.

What skill it demonstrates.

Titles, Headings,
and Captions

Use them to demonstrate a skill, show an


action, or clarify something

Be consistent with Title format

ORGANIZATION

Organizational
Structure

No one right way to structure your portfolio

Order and present your artifacts in the way


you think will have the most impact on the
audience you are showing it to

Organizational
Techniques
Table of Contents

Gives reader an overview. Name contents. Include


page numbers.

Annotated Table of Contents

Includes a brief description of contents under the


name.

Cover Pages

Introduce each portfolio section. Can be tabbed


sheets.

Introduction
Statement of Confidentiality

p. #

Career and Professional Development Goals


Work Philosophy

p. #
p. #

Employment
Cover Letter

p. #

Resume

p. #

Letters of Recommendation
Work Samples:
Example 1
Example 2

Education
Certificates, Diplomas, Degrees

p. #

Academic Awards

p. #

Transcripts

p. #

Accolades from professors


Learning Samples:
Example 1
Example 2
Other
Professional Memberships
Volunteer Work/Community Service
Example
Media

NEATNESS &
LAYOUT

Visual Perception

when people read in our culture, eyes move from upper


left to lower right on a page

people tend to start reading where the strongest visual


element exists on the page

people notice illustrations before they notice text

people perceive larger items as more important than


smaller ones. The same is true for larger headings as
opposed to smaller ones.

people pay attention to colour more than any other


visual feature

Typography
Guidelines:

Body text is commonly a serif font in 10, 11, or


12 point size

Titles and headings are usually in 16-18 pt size

Decorative fonts should be used sparingly, if at


all. They tend to be difficult to read.

Two fonts are the maximum for one page - one


for text and one for headings

Typography
Two main font categories
Serif: accentuated with ornamental lines at end,
easier to read in large blocks of type
ex. Times, Century Schoolbook, Garamond
Sans Serif: straight, no ornamentation, often
used as headings and display type
ex. Arial, Helvetica, Optima

Graphic Images

ex. photos, illustrations, maps, charts, etc

use to break up text and provide variety on


page

make sure the message they convey is easy


to understand

use high-quality images

consider putting a border around images

Placement of
Elements
readers attention can be directed by placing

objects or visual cues in a sequence ex. left to


right, top to bottom

Place most important info near the top of the


page

Visual hotspot - eye at rest tends to move to


bottom left section of a page - place important
messages there for extra attention

border or frame around title or cover pages give


more professional look

Colour

creates immediate impressions

use to accentuate or differentiate elements

ex. colour coding sections of portfolio or


highlighting important elements or information
in the same colour

However you use it, be consistent

Choose colours that are easy on the eye

Dont overuse colour

White Space

the blank area around text and graphics

affects readability

too little = page looks cramped and uninviting

too much = page looks unimportant

Advice for
Presenting Samples
Paper

Use same kind of high-quality paper throughout.


Cropping*
If you only want to show part of a sample, crop electronically or
cover sections you want to hide and photocopy
CDs, DVDs, etc
make sure they are labelled appropriately and explains how to use
them
Clip Art
Use only if it enhances your message and looks professional.

Tips for Increasing


Impact
Increase Visual Content

Create a Visual Identity

Symbols, logos, lines, or other visual elements


repeated through a document or entire portfolio

Keep Formatting Consistent

Remember that Less is More

too many samples, too much text on a page, too


many photos, etc., clutters your presentation and
message

ELECTRONIC
PORTFOLIOS

WEEBLY
http://laraloze.weebly.com/
WORDPRESS
http://katharinehansenphd.com/

Should not take the place of hard copy portfolios, offers


another place to self-market, contents can be similar to
hard copy
Advantages

Allows employers to look at your material at their


convenience

Allows employers to spend more time reviewing your


qualifications outside the interview setting.

Allows employers to conveniently share your portfolio


with others

Easy to update

Shows you have computer skills

Steps to Create EPortfolio


1) Collect samples and convert to digital format
2) Organize

Websites are not read linearly

start with your homepage and create tabs & drop down menus with internal links to
your content

3) Create your website

maintain consistent look across all pages

use short paragraphs

Use a font that is easy to read

Avoid patterned backgrounds that make text hard to read

Dont overload the pages with graphics

Keep it simple - easy to navigate and read

Using your Portfolio


in an Interview

Mention early on in the interview that you


have brought a portfolio

The interviewer may or may not want to look


at it - dont worry if they dont - you can still
refer to it in your answers

After you answer a question you can refer


them to the specific artifact that is related to
your story or demonstrates the skill you
talked about

If the employer wants to keep your portfolio


to look at it after the interview, set a time to
pick it up (24 hours)