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Lesson Plan Template

Developed by: Jessica Allen, Carole Bell, Emily Carmichael


Grade level: 5
Lesson Topic: Fractions
Universal Design for Learning
Representation
3.1 Activate or supply background
knowledge. The teacher will ask a
question to begin the lesson aimed at
activating students background
knowledge of fractions.

Outcomes
GCO: Number (N): Develop number sense
SCO: N7: Demonstrate an understanding of fractions by
using concrete and pictorial representations to:
Create sets of equivalent fractions
Compare fractions with like and unlike
denominators.
Objective(s) for this lesson: I will understand that a
3.2 Highlight patterns, critical
fraction can be represented as part of a linear region and
features, big ideas and relationships. describe part of a linear region using fractions.
The purpose of the lesson is for students
to understand the relationship between
certain fractions.
Introduction
5
3.3 Guide information processing, minutes
visualization, and manipulation. The As an APK, ask students to create a list of ways they use
manipulatives used in the lesson will fractions in their daily lives.
allow students to visualize fractions.
After a couple of minutes, engage them in a discussion of
ways they use fractions that they might not expect (such
Action and Expression
as dividing a treat in half to share with a friend, noticing
5.2 Use multiple tools for
that you ate 1/4 of a pizza, time).
construction and composition.
Providing the students with
manipulatives to understand the
During/Learning Activities
15 minutes
relationship between fractions.
To begin the lesson, give students six strips of
construction paper in six different colours. Specify one
Engagement
colour as one whole and have students all write one
7.2 Optimize relevance, value, and whole on the same colour.
authenticity. Fractions are used often inNext, specify a second colour and have students fold it in
every day life, and as such, will be easyhalf and cut the strip where the fold was. Have the
to make relevant for students.
students label the two halves one half or 1/2.
Specify a third colour and have students fold it in half
twice, and again cut where the folds were. This strip will
8.3 Foster collaboration and
community. Having students work in be one fourth or 1/4.
pairs with a common purpose will help Repeat this process of folding, cutting, and labelling strips
for eights, thirds, and sixths.
foster collaboration.
Have students take out their one whole strip. Ask,
Which colour strip is 1/2 of the whole?
Which colour strip is 1/4 of the whole?
As a similar question about 1/8, 1/3, and 1/6. Only once
students are consistently arriving at the correct answer
should the teacher feel comfortable to move on from
clarifying the colours.
Tell students that when fraction strips are the same length,
they represent equivalent fractions.
Have students work in pairs to line up their fraction strips
to find as many equivalent relationships as they can
between their two sets of fraction strips. For example,
they might notice that three of the 1/6 pieces are equal to
four of the 1/2 pieces, or that two of the 1/3 pieces are
equal to four of the 1/6 pieces.
Have students record these relationships on paper. Once
they have finished, have them share the relationships they
discovered with the rest of the class. For example,
students should notice that one whole is the same as 2/2,

Required Materials, Tools and


Technology
Six strips of construction paper in
six different colours for each
student.
Scissors for each student.
Chart paper to record fraction
relationships.
Enough envelops for all students.
Special Concerns
Students must work well together
in pairs. If two students are
known to not work well together,
they must be separated.
The use of manipulatives will
help students to visualize
fractions.
Differentiation
If there are students with
exceptionalities then the plan can
be modified to fit each students
needs, such as facilitating the use
of manipulatives.
Multiple Intelligences:
Verbal/Linguistic: group work,
writing down fraction
relationships.
Interpersonal: group work.
Logical/Mathematical: using
problem-solving skills.
Visual/Spatial: the use of
manipulatives that students can
visualize and handle.
Kinesthetic: being able to get
into pairs and handle the
manipulatives.
In-Class Support
Educational Assistants can help
to monitor the classroom if they
are available.
Cross-curricular Connections
N/A

they have finished, have them share the relationships they


discovered with the rest of the class. For example,
students should notice that one whole is the same as 2/2,
4/4, 8/8, 3/3, or 6/6, or that 1/2, 2/4, 4/8, and 3/6 are
equivalent.
Record relationships on chart paper for future reference.
Reiterate to students that when fraction strips are the same
length, they represent equivalent fractions or, are the
same amount, or, are equal.
Assessment (formative/summative)
10 minutes
Students should be able to manipulate their paper strips as
questions are asked.
When you folded your strip into two
parts, what fraction of the whole strip
did one part represent? (1/2)
When you folded your strip into four
parts, what fraction of the whole strip
did one part represent? (1/4)
What other fractions have the same value
as 1/2? (2/4, 3/6, 4/8)
What other fraction has the same value as
2/3? (4/6)
Depending on students understanding of the material, the
teacher might choose to include the following questions
which would extend student learning:
What do you notice about fractions that
are the equivalent of 1/2? (Prompt
students to examine the relationship
between the numerator and
denominator. Students should notice
that the denominators are always double
the numerators).
Can you identify other fractions for
which there are no fraction strips that
are the same as 1/2 based on this
pattern? (accept any equivalent fraction
such as 6/12, 7/14, 9/18)
For each of the strips (halves, fourths,
sixths, eighths), we show a fraction
equivalent to 1/2. Why do we not
include of our thirds strip? (These
pieces cannot be evenly divided into
1/2)
Closure
Distribute an envelop to each student and have them place
their fraction strips in the envelop and write their names
on it.
Remind them that they will be using them next class.
Lesson Plan Template
Developed by: Jessica Allen, Carole Bell, and Emily Carmichael
Grade level: 5
Lesson Topic: Fractions
Universal Design for Learning
Representation
3.1 Activate or supply background
knowledge. The teacher will begin the
lesson with questions aimed at
activating students background
knowledge.

Outcomes
GCO: Number (N): Develop number sense
SCO: N7: Demonstrate an understanding of fractions by
using concrete and pictorial representations to:
Create sets of equivalent fractions
Compare fractions with like and unlike
denominators.

3.2 Highlight patterns, critical


Objective(s) for this lesson: I will be able to determine if
features, big ideas, and relationships.one fraction is greater than, less than, or equal to another
The focus of the lesson is on the
fraction.

Required Materials, Tools and


Technology
Enough copies of the
Comparing and Ordering
Fractions worksheet for each
student.
Students fraction strips that were
made in the previous lesson that
have been put into envelops.
Special Concerns

3.2 Highlight patterns, critical


Objective(s) for this lesson: I will be able to determine if
features, big ideas, and relationships.one fraction is greater than, less than, or equal to another
The focus of the lesson is on the
fraction.
relationship between factors (equal,
greater than, less than).
5
3.3 Guide information processing, Introduction
visualization, and manipulation. The minutes
manipulatives used in the lesson will As an APK, have students reflect on the previous lesson.
allow students to visualize fractions.
What did you learn from creating
fraction strips?
Action and Expression
How might you use fractions in your
everyday life?
5.2 Use multiple tools for
construction and composition. By
providing students with manipulatives. During/Learning Activities
20 minutes
Distribute students fraction strips from the previous
Engagement
lesson.
7.2 Optimize relevance, value, and
Distribute copies of the Comparing and Ordering
authenticity. Fractions are used often in
Fractions worksheet (Appendix A) to each student.
every day life, and as such, will be easy
Explain the worksheet, and ensure all students understand
to make relevant for students.
the directions. To do so, go over the first problem of the
worksheet as a class:
8.3 Foster collaboration and
Guide students through placing 3/4 next
community. The problem solving
to 2/3 (question 1). Ask them which
worksheet is done in pairs to help foster
fraction strip is longer, or bigger.
collaboration.
Once students are confident with the task, ask them to
complete the first section of the worksheet and check their
responses with a partner.
After all students have completed the worksheet, discuss
answers and have students correct any responses that were
incorrect.
Next, have students order their fraction strips by lining up
one whole, with 1/2 underneath, then 1/3, 1/4, 1/6, and
1/8.
Do you notice any pattern?
Students might express this pattern as: as the fraction gets
smaller, the denominator gets larger.
Do you think that this pattern is always
true?
Have students investigate this by completing the second
section of the Comparing and Ordering Fractions
worksheet. Perhaps you might find it necessary to go over
the first question as a class:
Guide students through placing 4/6, 3/8,
and 1/2 next to each other (question 9).
Ask students to compare the fraction
strips size, and order them from
shortest to longest, or least to greatest.
Allow students to work in pairs for this second section, as
it might be a bit more confusing. After all pairs have
completed the worksheet, students should come to the
conclusion that the aforementioned pattern only occurs
when the numerator is constant for example, 7/8 is
larger than 1/4.
Discuss answers to the worksheet and have students
correct any incorrect responses.
Assessment (formative/summative)
5 minutes
Ask the class a few questions to informally assess their
understanding of the material.
When you order the fraction strips from
largest to smallest, what do you notice
about the relationship between the size
of the fraction and the denominator?

Special Concerns
If two students are not working
well together, they should be
separated and each join another
pair that is working well together
to make a group of three.
Differentiation
If there are any students with
exceptionalities in the classroom,
the lesson can be modified to fit
their needs.
Multiple Intelligences met:
Verbal/linguistic:
communicating with a partner to
solve problems.
Interpersonal: working in pairs.
Logical/Mathematical: problem
solving.
Kinesthetic: handling the
manipulatives.
Visual/spatial: using the
manipulatives to visualize
fractions.
In-Class Support
If Educational Assistants are
available, they can help to
monitor the classroom. The
teacher should also be circulating
while students are working
together on their worksheets.

Cross-curricular Connections
N/A.

largest to smallest, what do you notice


about the relationship between the size
of the fraction and the denominator?
(As the fractions get smaller, the
denominator gets larger. Students
should be reminded that in this case, the
numerator is one).
Do you think this relationship is always
true? (Responses may vary).
Does a similar relationship hold true for fractions where
the denominator is the same constant number? (There is
an opposite relationship. As the numerator increases, so
does the size of the fraction).
Closure
As an informal closing procedure to assess students
understanding of the subject matter, have them give a
thumbs up, thumbs down, or sideways thumb to show
how they felt about the lesson.
Keep in mind that students may give a thumbs up if
everyone else appears to be, even if they were not
comfortable with the material.
Students can keep their fraction strips if they choose to,
but if they do not want to, they can place them in the
recycling bin.

Lesson Plan Template


Developed by: Jessica Allen, Carole Bell, Emily Carmichael
Grade level: 5
Lesson Topic: Fractions

Universal Design for Learning


Outcomes
Representation
GCO: Number (N): Develop number sense
SCO: N7: Demonstrate an understanding of fractions by
1.1Offer ways of customizing the
display of information. By displaying using concrete and pictorial representations to:
Create sets of equivalent fractions
the relationship rods on the ELMO.
Compare fractions with like and unlike
3.1 Activate or supply background
denominators.
knowledge. The teacher will ask a
question to begin the lesson aimed at Objective(s) for this lesson: I will be able to identify
activating students background
equivalent sets of fractions and identify a fraction in
knowledge of fractions.
lowest terms.
3.2 Highlight patterns, critical
features, big ideas and relationships.
5
The purpose of the lesson is for studentsIntroduction
to understand the relationship between minutes
certain fractions.
As an APK, have students use the Turn and Talk
teaching strategy, in which students will turn to a partner
3.3 Guide information processing, and discuss what they already know about a given topic
visualization, and manipulation. The (in this case, what they have learned about fractions so
manipulatives used in the lesson will far).
allow students to visualize fractions. While students are discussing, walk around the classroom

Required Materials, Tools and


Technology
As many sets of relationship rods
(fraction manipulatives) than can
be obtained ideally, one set per
two students.
If no sets can be obtained,
relationship rods can be hand
made using construction paper
before the lesson.
Special Concerns
Students must work well together
in pairs. If two students are
known to not work well together,
they must be separated.
The use of manipulatives will
help students to visualize
fractions.

visualization, and manipulation. The (in this case, what they have learned about fractions so
manipulatives used in the lesson will far).
allow students to visualize fractions. While students are discussing, walk around the classroom
and listen to see what they are talking about.
After after 3 minutes, get the classs attention and get a
Action and Expression
few students to share what they have discusses. As they
5.2 Use multiple tools for
give answers, write key words on the board.
construction and composition.
Providing the students with
During/Learning Activities
manipulatives to understand the
relationship between fractions.
To begin the lesson, distribute sets of relationship rods.
Allow students two or three minutes to play with the
Engagement
manipulatives before beginning instruction.
7.2 Optimize relevance, value, and Get the classs attention and explain the number value
authenticity. Fractions are used often inassigned to each colour of relationship rod, as it will not
every day life, and as such, will be easybe immediately apparent (no markings on them):
to make relevant for students.
orange 10, blue 9, brown 8, black
7, dark green 6, yellow 5, pink 4,
8.3 Foster collaboration and
light green 3, red 2, and white 1.
community. Having students work in Have the relationship rods displayed in order from longest
pairs with a common purpose will help to shortest on the ELMO so that all students are able to
foster collaboration.
see. Mark beside each colour its corresponding number
value and leave this up on the ELMO for the remainder of
the class as a reference point.
Ask students to compare red to brown.
How many red rods does it take to make
up a single brown? (4).
Challenge students by asking:
What is the value of an orange and a
yellow rod together? (15).
What would the value of the other
relationship rods be, expressed in a
fraction, if 15 was considered one
whole? (white 1/15, red 2/15, light
green 3/15, etc.) Note: it may take
some time for students to grasp what the
teacher wants. Guide their responses
into being expressed as fractions.
Next, ask students to take out a brown rod to use as the
whole. Ask students to work in pairs to come up with as
many different combinations of other relationship rods
that would equal one brown rod, not combining any
colours (for example, 8 white, 4 red, 2 pink).
Have students name as many fraction relationships as
possible.
When one brown rod is one whole, what
does one white rod equal? (1/8) Red?
(1/4) Pink? (1/2).
Record these results on the board. Ask students to identify
any other fraction relationships.
For example, prompt students to notice
that 2/8 (two white blocks) is the same
length and is thus equal to 1/4 (one red
rod).
Allow students 3 minutes to come up with any other
relationships that they notice. After they have finished,
ask pairs for relationships that they noticed.
Explain to students that when two fractions are the same
length, they are equivalent. When comparing equivalent
fractions, the group with the smallest number of rods
represents the fraction in lowest terms.
For example, when comparing 2/8 and
1/4, 1/4 uses fewer rods and is the
fraction in lowest terms. When
comparing 6/8 and 3/4, 3/4 is the
fraction in lowest terms.
Once students seem to have grasped this concept, have

fractions.
Differentiation
If there are students with
exceptionalities then the plan can
be modified to fit each students
needs, such as facilitating the use
of manipulatives.
Multiple Intelligences:
Verbal/Linguistic: group work,
writing down fraction
relationships.
Interpersonal: group work.
Logical/Mathematical: using
problem-solving skills.
Visual/Spatial: the use of
manipulatives that students can
visualize and handle.
Kinesthetic: being able to get
into pairs and handle the
manipulatives.

In-Class Support
If Educational Assistants are
available, they can help to
monitor the classroom.
Cross-curricular Connections
N/A.

comparing 6/8 and 3/4, 3/4 is the


fraction in lowest terms.
Once students seem to have grasped this concept, have
them work in pairs with another relationship rod as the
whole (i.e. the orange rod is now the whole).
Have students record as many equivalent fractions as
possible, and the fraction that is in lowest terms from each
of the equivalent fractions.
For example, when comparing 2/10 and 1/5, students will
notice that 1/5 uses fewer rods and is in lowest terms.
Next, have students use the blue rod as the whole to work
with an uneven number as the denominator and instruct
them to do the same as they did with the orange rod (3/9
equals 1/3, 1/3 is in lowest terms, etc.).
Assessment (formative/summative)
While students are exploring relationships with the blue
rod, write equivalent sets of fractions on the board.
2/6 (two whites) = 1/3 (one red),
4/6 (four whites) = 2/3 (two reds),
3/6 (three whites) = 1/2 (one light green),
6/6 (six whites) = 3/3 (three reds) = 2/2
(two light greens) = 1 (one dark green).
Go through each question one by one, and have students
write which fraction is in the lowest terms for each on
their whiteboards. When everyone has written an answer,
have students reveal their whiteboards to you at the same
time.
Closure
Have students write down a word on their whiteboards to
describe how they feel about fractions up until this point
and reveal it to you. Make note of which students have
negative responses.

Appendix A

Comparing and Ordering Fractions


NAME ___________________________
Use your fraction strips to compare the following fractions. Line up each fraction
strip to see which fraction has the greatest length. Use >, <, or = to compare each
pair of fractions. For example, when comparing 1/2 and 2/4, the fractions should be
modeled and lined up as follows:

1. 3/4

2/3

1. 3/4

2/3

2. 6/8

5/6

3. 2/3

3/6

4. 4/8

1/2

5. 7/8

5/6

6. 1/4

2/6

7. 4/6

2/3

8. 3/8

4/6

Use your fraction strips to order the following fractions from least to greatest.
9. 4/6, 3/8, 1/2
10. 4/8, 2/3, 3/4
11. 7/8, 5/6, 2/3
12. 3/4, 5/8, 4/6
13. 6/8, 3/4, 1/2
14. 3/8, 2/4, 2/3
15. 4/8, 3/4, 4/6
October 14, 2015