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South Coast Water District

Infrastructure Master Plan


November 2008

Prepared For:

South Coast Water District


31592 West Street
Laguna Beach, CA 92651
Prepared By:

1555 Faraday Avenue


Carlsbad, CA 92008

PBS&J Project No.: 620889

______________________________
Gary Eikermann,
Project Director
3/31/10

______________________________
Mark B. Elliott, P.E.
Project Manager

Acknowledgements
PROJECT TEAM

South Coast Water District


Mike Dunbar, P.E.
Joe Sovella, P.E.
Bob Clark, P.E.
Joe McDivitt
John Langill
Mark Mountford, P.E.
Marissa Armijo, P.E.

949-499-4555
General Manager
Director of Property Development
Director of Engineering
Director of Operations
Superintendent of Operations
Senior Engineer
Senior Engineer

PBS&J
Gary Eikermann
Mark B. Elliott, P.E.
Jennifer Duffy, P.E.
Kyle McCarty, P.E.
Jennifer Bileck, P.E., CFM
Leanne Abe, P.E.

760-603-6000
Project Director
Project Manager
Project Engineer
Project Engineer
Project Engineer
Project Engineer

EarthTech
Tom Degen

715-341-8110
Project Engineer

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Acknowledgements

This page is intentionally left blank.

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Table of Contents
ABBREVIATIONS ........................................................................................................................... vii
1.0

INTRODUCTION........................................................................................................................... 1-1
1.1
District Services ............................................................................................................... 1-1
1.2
District Background and Organization ............................................................................. 1-1
1.3
District Planning Efforts .................................................................................................... 1-2
1.4
Master Plan Authorization ................................................................................................ 1-5
1.5
References ....................................................................................................................... 1-5

2.0

STUDY AREA OVERVIEW ........................................................................................................... 2-1


2.1
Local Government Jurisdictions ....................................................................................... 2-1
2.2
Existing Land Use ............................................................................................................ 2-2
2.3
Future Land Use/Population Projections ......................................................................... 2-5

3.0

WATER SUPPLY SOURCES ....................................................................................................... 3-1


3.1
Background ...................................................................................................................... 3-1
3.2
Planning Approach ........................................................................................................... 3-2
3.3
Existing Supply Source Description ................................................................................. 3-3
3.4
Reliability Considerations ................................................................................................. 3-6
3.4.1 Imported Supplies ............................................................................................... 3-6
3.4.2 Regional Import System Reliability ..................................................................... 3-7
3.5
Implications of Proposed Reliability Projects ................................................................... 3-8
3.5.1 Project Categories and Functions ....................................................................... 3-8
3.5.2 Description/Status of Identified Projects ............................................................. 3-9
3.5.3 New Source Augmentation Projects ................................................................. 3-13
3.6
Supply Source Strategies .............................................................................................. 3-15
3.6.1 General Assessment ......................................................................................... 3-16
3.6.2 Specific Project Considerations ........................................................................ 3-16
3.6.3 Comparative Evaluation of Source Enhancement Projects .............................. 3-21
3.6.4 Ultimate Water Source Scenarios ..................................................................... 3-22
3.6.5 Summary Findings ............................................................................................ 3-25
3.7
Summary of Recommended Improvements .................................................................. 3-26

4.0

WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM MASTER PLAN .................................................................... 4-1


4.1
Existing Water System Description .................................................................................. 4-1
4.1.1 Existing System Pressure Zones ........................................................................ 4-2
4.1.2 Water Supply Sources for Distribution System ................................................... 4-8
4.1.3 Pump Stations ................................................................................................... 4-15
4.1.4 Storage .............................................................................................................. 4-16
4.2
Water System Design Criteria ........................................................................................ 4-18

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Table of Contents
4.3

4.4

4.5

Water Demands ............................................................................................................. 4-21


4.3.1 Historic and Existing Demands ......................................................................... 4-21
4.3.2 Peaking Factors ................................................................................................ 4-23
4.3.3 Demand Criteria ................................................................................................ 4-24
4.3.4 Buildout/Ultimate Demands .............................................................................. 4-25
Water System Hydraulic Model ...................................................................................... 4-26
4.4.1 Hydraulic Model Development .......................................................................... 4-27
4.4.2 Model Calibration .............................................................................................. 4-27
Water System Analysis .................................................................................................. 4-32
4.5.1 Existing Water System Analysis ....................................................................... 4-37
4.5.2 Water Storage and Pump Stations Analysis ..................................................... 4-38
4.5.3 Water Quality Considerations ........................................................................... 4-42
4.5.4 Ultimate Water System Considerations ............................................................ 4-47
4.5.5 Summary of Recommended Improvements ..................................................... 4-49

5.0

WASTEWATER MASTER PLAN .................................................................................................. 5-1


5.1
Existing Wastewater Collection System........................................................................... 5-1
5.1.1 Metered Sewer Basins ........................................................................................ 5-7
5.1.2 Wastewater Treatment Facilities......................................................................... 5-8
5.1.3 Interconnections and Intra-Agency Service ........................................................ 5-8
5.1.4 Flow Diversions ................................................................................................... 5-9
5.1.5 Lift Stations ....................................................................................................... 5-13
5.2
Wastewater System Design Criteria .............................................................................. 5-15
5.2.1 District Design Criteria ...................................................................................... 5-15
5.2.2 Return-to-Sewer Capacity Methodology ........................................................... 5-16
5.3
Wastewater Generation Forecasting ............................................................................. 5-17
5.3.1 Historic and Existing Flows ............................................................................... 5-18
5.3.2 Buildout/Ultimate Forecast ................................................................................ 5-18
5.4
Wastewater System Hydraulic Model ............................................................................ 5-18
5.4.1 Hydraulic Model Development .......................................................................... 5-19
5.4.2 Sewer Model Calibration ................................................................................... 5-20
5.5
Wastewater System Analysis ......................................................................................... 5-23
5.5.1 Lift Station Capacity Analysis ............................................................................ 5-23
5.5.2 Sewer Pipeline Capacity Assessment .............................................................. 5-24
5.6
Summary of Recommended Improvements .................................................................. 5-25

6.0

RECYCLED WATER MASTER PLAN .......................................................................................... 6-1


6.1
Recycled Water System Description................................................................................ 6-1
6.1.1 Existing Recycled Water Facilities ...................................................................... 6-1
6.1.2 Proposed Recycled Water Supply Projects ........................................................ 6-6
6.2
Recycled Water System Design Criteria .......................................................................... 6-8

ii

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Table of Contents
6.3

6.4
6.5

6.6

6.7
7.0

Recycled Water Demand Forecast .................................................................................. 6-8


6.3.1 Demand Criteria .................................................................................................. 6-9
6.3.2 Distribution System Peaking Factors ................................................................ 6-10
6.3.3 Historic and Existing Demands ......................................................................... 6-11
6.3.4 Buildout/Ultimate Demands .............................................................................. 6-13
Recycled Water System Hydraulic Model ...................................................................... 6-20
Existing Recycled Water System Analysis .................................................................... 6-21
6.5.1 Existing Storage and Pumping Analysis ........................................................... 6-21
6.5.2 Hydraulic Bottleneck Analysis ........................................................................... 6-22
6.5.3 Existing Operational Analysis ........................................................................... 6-22
Ultimate Recycled Water System Analysis .................................................................... 6-24
6.6.1 AWT Facility Capacity Analysis ........................................................................ 6-24
6.6.2 Ultimate Storage and Pumping Analysis .......................................................... 6-25
6.6.3 Ultimate Operational Analysis ........................................................................... 6-26
Summary of Recommended Improvements .................................................................. 6-27

PROPOSED CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM .................................................................. 7-1


7.1
Development of Unit Costs .............................................................................................. 7-1
7.1.1 Pipelines .............................................................................................................. 7-2
7.1.2 Pump Stations ..................................................................................................... 7-3
7.1.3 Reservoirs ........................................................................................................... 7-3
7.1.4 Recycled Water Retrofits .................................................................................... 7-3
7.2
Recommended CIP Program ........................................................................................... 7-3
7.2.1 Water Supply....................................................................................................... 7-3
7.2.2 Water System...................................................................................................... 7-4
7.2.3 Wastewater System ............................................................................................ 7-4
7.2.4 Recycled Water System ...................................................................................... 7-4

iii

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Table of Contents
Tables
2-1
3-1
3-2
3-3
3-4
3-5
4-1
4-2
4-3
4-4
4-5
4-6
4-7
4-8
4-9
4-10
4-11
4-12
4-13
5-1
5-2
5-3
5-4
5-5
5-6
5-7
6-1
6-2
6-3
6-4
6-5
6-6
6-7
6-8
6-9
6-10
6-11
6-12
7-1
7-2
7-3
7-4
7-5

South Coast Water District Population Projections ....................................................................... 2-5


Current and Planned Water Supply Sources to Meet Demands .................................................. 3-4
Five Year Water Importation History ........................................................................................... 3-17
Potable Water System Requirements ......................................................................................... 3-19
Summary of District Storage Capacity ........................................................................................ 3-20
Estimated Units Costs of Source Augmentation Alternatives ..................................................... 3-21
Interconnections .......................................................................................................................... 4-10
Existing Pump Station Summary ................................................................................................ 4-15
Existing Potable Water Reservoir Summary ............................................................................... 4-16
Water System Criteria ................................................................................................................. 4-19
Percent of Accounts By Land Use .............................................................................................. 4-22
Existing Consumption by Pressure Zone .................................................................................... 4-23
Existing Consumption by Land Use ............................................................................................ 4-25
Unit Demands .......................................................................................................................... 4-25
Buildout/Ultimate Demands ........................................................................................................ 4-26
Fire Flow Improvement Projects ................................................................................................. 4-39
Existing Distribution Storage Analysis ........................................................................................ 4-40
Pump Station Capacities ............................................................................................................. 4-42
Water Quality Test ...................................................................................................................... 4-43
Flow Diversions ............................................................................................................................ 5-9
Hydraulic Sewer Design Criteria ................................................................................................. 5-16
Sewer Unit Generation Rates ..................................................................................................... 5-18
Buildout/Ultimate Sewer Flow Generation .................................................................................. 5-19
Model Calibration Table .............................................................................................................. 5-20
Lift Station Capacity Analysis ...................................................................................................... 5-24
Model Identified Deficiencies ...................................................................................................... 5-25
Existing Recycled Water Pump Station Summary ........................................................................ 6-6
Existing Recycled Water Reservoir Summary .............................................................................. 6-6
Recycled Water Infrastructure Criteria .......................................................................................... 6-8
Existing Recycled Water Customers........................................................................................... 6-12
Tier I Potential Conversion Customers ....................................................................................... 6-17
Tier II Potential Conversion Customers ...................................................................................... 6-18
Tier III Potential Conversion Customers ..................................................................................... 6-18
Existing Recycled Water Reservoir Analysis .............................................................................. 6-21
Existing Recycled Water Pump Station Analysis ........................................................................ 6-22
AWT Production Capacity Analysis ............................................................................................ 6-24
Ultimate Recycled Water Reservoir Analysis.............................................................................. 6-25
Ultimate Recycled Water Pump Station Analysis ....................................................................... 6-26
Pipeline Unit Costs ........................................................................................................................ 7-2
Capital Improvement Program Proposed Water Supply Projects .............................................. 7-5
Capital Improvement Program Proposed Water System Projects ............................................. 7-6
Capital Improvement Program Proposed Wastewater System Projects ................................... 7-8
Capital Improvement Program Proposed Recycled Water System Projects ........................... 7-10

iv

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Table of Contents
Figures
1-1
2-1
3-1
3-2
3-3
3-4
3-5
3-6
4-1
4-2
4-3
4-4
4-5
4-6
4-7
4-8
4-9
4-10
5-1
5-2
5-3
5-4
5-5
5-6
5-7
5-8
5-9
5-10
5-11
5-12
5-13
5-14
5-15
6-1
6-2
6-3
6-4
6-5
6-6
6-7
7-1
7-2
7-3

Vicinity Map ................................................................................................................................... 1-3


Land Use Map ............................................................................................................................... 2-3
Existing Water Importation System Servicing SCWD ................................................................... 3-5
Existing and Future Water Supply Sources .................................................................................. 3-6
Potable Water Deliveries............................................................................................................. 3-18
Emergency Storage Duration Curve ........................................................................................... 3-21
Source Mix Scenarios ................................................................................................................. 3-23
SCWD Water Sources ................................................................................................................ 3-27
Water Pressure Zone Map ............................................................................................................ 4-3
Potable Water System HGL Schematic ........................................................................................ 4-5
Interconnections Map .................................................................................................................. 4-13
Monthly Potable Water Demands (2006) .................................................................................... 4-22
Flow and Pressure Test Locations .............................................................................................. 4-29
Final Calibration Accuracy .......................................................................................................... 4-33
Time of Day Patterns .................................................................................................................. 4-35
Example Calibration Results ....................................................................................................... 4-36
GRF Minimum Day Source Analysis ........................................................................................... 4-45
Potential 390/345 Pressure Zone Conversion ............................................................................ 4-51
Regional Wastewater Collection System ...................................................................................... 5-2
Wastewater Systems Map ............................................................................................................ 5-3
Lift Stations and Temporary Flow Metering Map .......................................................................... 5-5
Flow Diversions .......................................................................................................................... 5-11
Peaking Factor for Wastewater Flows ........................................................................................ 5-17
Meter #1 DP 308 ...................................................................................................................... 5-21
Meter #2 SCS 329.................................................................................................................... 5-21
Meter #3 SCS 1156.................................................................................................................. 5-22
Meter #4 SCS 1344.................................................................................................................. 5-22
Sewer Replacement Project 1 Dana Point Harbor ..................................................................... 5-29
Sewer Replacement Project 2 Del Obispo at Village Road ........................................................ 5-30
Sewer Replacement Project 3 Del Obispo at Stonehill Drive ..................................................... 5-31
Sewer Replacement Project 5 Camino Capistrano .................................................................... 5-32
Sewer Parallel Project 6 Links at Monarch Beach ...................................................................... 5-33
Sewer Replacement Project 7 Monarch Bay Drive ..................................................................... 5-34
Existing Recycled Water System Map .......................................................................................... 6-3
Existing Recycled Water System Schematic ................................................................................ 6-5
Monthly Recycled Water Demand 2005-2007 .............................................................................. 6-9
Recycled Water Monthly Peaking Factors 2005-2007 ................................................................ 6-11
Potential Recycled Water Customers ......................................................................................... 6-15
Existing Hydraulic Grade Line ..................................................................................................... 6-23
Proposed Hydraulic Grade Line .................................................................................................. 6-23
Phases I and II Water System Improvements ............................................................................ 7-15
Phases I and II Sewer Improvements ......................................................................................... 7-16
Phases I and II Recycled Water Improvements .......................................................................... 7-17

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Table of Contents
Appendices
A

Technical Memorandum
A-1
Headlands Development Technical Memorandum Off-Site Sewer System Capacity
Analysis
A-2
St. Catherines Church Development Technical Memorandum Hydraulic Analysis
A-3
Aliso Creek Development Hydraulic Analysis Review and Recommendations

Water System Analysis


B-1
Technical Memorandum Summary of Model Calibration, Assistance with Engineering
Services for Infrastructure Systems for South Coast Water District, California, Prepared
by EarthTech, Inc., April 2008
B-2
Demand Loading for Water Model
B-3
Water Model Input

Wastewater System Analysis


C-1
Temporary Flow Monitoring Study South Coast Water District, Prepared by ADS
Environmental Service, MayJune 3, 2007
C-2
Manhole Loading for Sewer Model
C-3
Sewer Model Input

Comprehensive Analysis of Recycled Water Distribution Piping Network


D-1
Demand Loading for Existing Piping Network
D-2
Demand Loading for Potential Recycled Water Customers
D-3
Piping Network Model Input

vi

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Abbreviations
$/AF
F
AAD
AB
AF
AFY
AMP
ASR
ATM
AWT
Basin
cfs
CIP
CPA
cu
d/D
DPH
EIR
EOCF
EPA
fps
GIS
gpd
gpd/ac
gpd/DU
gpm
GRF
HGL
hp
HP
HWL
ISO
JRWSS
JTM
LAFCO
LRP
MCL
MDD
MG
mg/L
MGD
MND

Dollars per Acre Foot


Degrees Fahrenheit
Annual Average Day Demand
Assembly Bill
Acre-Feet
Acre-Feet per Year
Allen McColloch Pipeline
Aquifer Storage and Recovery
Aufdenkamp Transmission Main
Advanced Water Treatment
Orange County Groundwater Basin
Cubic Feet per Second
Capital Improvement Program
Central Pool Augmentation
Color Units
Depth to Diameter
California Department of Public Health
Environmental Impact Report
East Orange County Feeder
Environmental Protection Agency
Feet per Second
Geographical Information System
Gallons per Day
Gallons per Day per Acre
Gallons per Day per Dwelling Unit
Gallons per Minute
Groundwater Recovery Facility
Hydraulic Grade Line
Horsepower
Hydropneumatic
High Water Levels
Insurance Services Office
Joint Regional Water Supply System
Joint Transmission Main
Local Agency Formation Commission
Local Resources Project
Maximum Contaminant Level
Maximum Day Demands
Million Gallons
Milligrams per Liter
Million Gallons per Day
Mitigated Negative Declaration

vii

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Abbreviations
MNWD
MWD
MWDOC
NPDES
O&M
OCFA
OCWD
PCH
ppb
ppm
PRS
PS
psi
PZs
RO
RTS
SB
SCP
SCWD or District
SDCWA
SJBA
SMWD
SOCWA
SOCWRS
SR
SRF
SWP
TDH
TDS
USBR
UV
UWMP
VFD
WIP
WQCP
WSA

Moulton Niguel Water District


Metropolitan Water District of Southern California
Municipal Water District of Orange County
National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System
operation and maintenance
Orange County Fire Authority
Orange County Water District
Pacific Coast Highway
Parts per billion
Parts per million
Pressure Reducing Station
Pump Stations
Pounds per Square Inch
pressure zones
Reverse Osmosis
Readiness to Serve
Senate Bill
South County Pipeline
South Coast Water District
San Diego County Water Authority
San Juan Basin Authority
Santa Margarita Water District
South Orange County Wastewater Authority
South Orange County Water Reliability Study
State Route
Streamflow Recovery Facilities
State Water Project
Total Dynamic Head
Total Dissolved Solids
U.S. Bureau of Reclamation
ultraviolet [light]
Urban Water Management Plan
Variable Frequency Drive
Water Importation Pipeline
Water Quality Control Plan
Water Supply Assessment

viii

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Chapter 1
Introduction
South Coast Water District (SCWD or District) is an independent public agency organized under
the laws of the State of California to provide water, sewer, and recycled water services to
residents and businesses along an 8.3 square mile stretch of the Pacific Coast in south Orange
County. The District includes the communities of South Laguna, Monarch Beach, Dana Point,
Capistrano Beach, north coastal San Clemente, and southernmost San Juan Capistrano. The
geography of the service area features hilly terrain, valleys, cliffs up to 700 feet along the coast,
and finger-like canyons formed by three regional watersheds that reach the Pacific Ocean:
Aliso Creek, Salt Creek, and San Juan Creek. A map of the District is provided in Figure 1-1.

1.1

District Services

The District serves a total population of more than 40,000 residents, as well as hundreds of
thousands of visitors each year. The District provides the core services of potable water
production and distribution, recycled water distribution, and wastewater collection. In 2006, the
number of active customer accounts was approximately 12,300 for potable water and 17,800 for
sewer service. In addition, the District serves 165 major residential and institutional accounts,
and neighboring Moulton Niguel Water District, with recycled water. The District is dedicated to
providing the highest quality drinking water, recycled water, and sanitary sewer services to its
customers in an efficient, environmentally sensitive, and financially responsible manner.
The District is 90 percent dependent on imported water, and the remaining 10 percent comes
from the 1 MGD Groundwater Recovery Facility (GRF). Since 2000, the District has operated,
maintained, and administered the Joint Regional Water Supply System (JRWSS) that distributes
imported drinking water from Metropolitan Water District of Southern California (MWD)
throughout south Orange County. The system includes 30-miles of transmission mains and two
reservoirs in San Clemente that hold a total of 60 million gallons of water. The JRWSS is jointly
owned by and provides water to South Coast Water District, Irvine Ranch Water District, El Toro
Water District, Moulton Niguel Water District, the City of San Juan Capistrano, the City of San
Clemente and three agencies of the San Diego County Water Authority (SDCWA): San Onofre
Nuclear Generating Station, Camp Pendleton, and San Onofre State Park.
The District also manages a unique sewer tunnel and main in South Laguna, which transports
an average of 850,000 gallons of wastewater a day from Dana Point to the Coastal Treatment
Plant located to the east of Laguna Beach in unincorporated County land (Aliso and Wood
Canyons Wilderness Park).

1.2

District Background and Organization

Formed in 1932 under the County Water District Act, the District originally covered about three
square miles of south Orange County coastline in mostly unincorporated areas. From its
inception, the District was an independent special district, a form of local government created
by the people to provide a specialized service.

1-1

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Introduction
In 1976, consolidation efforts in the south Orange County coastal area began with the merger of
South Laguna Sanitary District into South Coast Water District. In 1996, the former Capistrano
Beach Water District and Capistrano Beach Sanitary District merged to form the Capistrano
Beach Water District. In 1999, South Coast Water District consolidated with Capistrano Beach
Water District and Dana Point Sanitary District to form the new South Coast Water District.
In support of the 1999 consolidation, the Orange County Local Agency Formation Commission
(LAFCO) cited the following in its Reorganization Resolution R097-18:
The South Coast Water District has experience in all aspects of services to be provided by
the consolidated district, including wastewater collection and treatment facilities, recycled
water plants and distribution systems, potable water services and recreation
opportunitiesThe South Coast Water District has an excellent reputation, not only among
its customers, but also within the public water and sanitary service industry. The District is
known for its well run and efficient systems. The District offers leadership in maintenance
excellence supported by a history of operational improvements. This quality of service sets
a high standard that will be incorporated as needed in the consolidated districts
operationThis Commission finds that the District is best informed as to the services to be
brought together.
In 2001, the District joined nine other sewer agencies and cities to form the South Orange
County Wastewater Authority (SOCWA) as a joint power authority to treat wastewater. The
SOCWA is the legal successor to the former Aliso Water Management Agency, South East
Regional Reclamation Authority and South Orange County Reclamation Authority. The
SOCWA owns and operates the 6.7 MGD Coastal Treatment Plant to the east of Laguna Beach
and the 13 MGD J.B. Latham Plant in Dana Point. The District has approximately 6 MGD of
capacity in these facilities. The District uses recycled water produced by SOCWA at an
advanced water treatment (AWT) plant adjacent to the Coastal Treatment Plant.

1.3

District Planning Efforts

The Water and Wastewater Master Plan for the Capistrano Beach area of the District was last
updated in 1997. There are currently no water, recycled water, or wastewater master plans for
the consolidated South Coast Water District. However, the recent Urban Water Management
Plan (UWMP) Update 2005 contains a description of the Districts service area and projected
demands, and an assessment of the reliability of its water supplies as required by the UWMP
Act (AB 797). The District conducted a comprehensive strategic planning process in 2003 to
determine long range priorities and objectives. This effort, which involved workshops with the
Board of Directors, culminated in a Strategic Plan 2003-2008 document adopted by the Board
in November 2003. Also, the District was actively involved, in cooperation with other south
county water providers, in the evaluation of regional water sources and reliability issues a
multi-year effort which led to the South Orange County Water Reliability Study report
published in 2004. Regional planning efforts are continuing and selected measures are being
implemented to improve the reliability situation. The District is continuing its involvement in
these efforts (see Chapter 3 Water Supply Sources).

1-2

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

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SOUTH COAST
WATER DISTRICT

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Figure 1-1
South Coast Water District
VICINITY MAP

Introduction
The purpose of this infrastructure master planning effort is to provide a comprehensive Potable
Water, Recycled Water and Wastewater Master Plan for the District. Since the Districts service
area is generally built out, this Master Plan is intended to focus on meeting projected demands
for redevelopment, resolving facility deficiencies, planning for infrastructure replacement and
expansion, responding to emergency demands, and managing resources. This plan identifies
current and potential system inefficiencies or deficiencies and recommends improvements
necessary to sustain reliability, support ongoing maintenance and provide a basis for future
planning and design of infrastructure over the next 10 years.

1.4

Master Plan Authorization

The preparation of this Infrastructure Master Plan was authorized by the South Coast Water
District Board of Directors on November 14, 2006 in the form of a contract for professional
services entitled, South Coast Water District Infrastructure Master Plans.

1.5

References

The following references were instrumental in developing this document:


Boyle Engineering, Distribution System Analysis South Coast County Water District,
September 1971.
Boyle Engineering Corporation, Capistrano Beach Water System Model, December 1996.
CGvL, Capistrano Beach Water District Water and Wastewater Master Plan, December
1997 and Additional Water System Analyses, March 24, 1998.
http://www.scwd.org/about
Municipal Water District of Orange County, South Orange County Water Reliability Study,
2004
South Coast Water District, Strategic Plan 2003-2008, Adopted by Board of Directors
November 25, 2003.
South Coast Water District, Urban Water Management Plan Update, December 2005.
South Coast Water District, Annual Budget Fiscal Year 2006-2007 Adopted by Board of
Directors June 29, 2006.

1-5

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Introduction

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South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Chapter 2
Study Area Overview
The South Coast Water District is located in Orange County, approximately 60 miles south of
Los Angeles, and encompasses approximately 5,300 acres of land along the Countys southern
coastline. The topography consists of a fertile valley and rolling hills in the southern half of the
District and finger-like canyons in the northeast portion of the District. The Aliso, Salt and San
Juan Creeks divide the District and provide drainage for inland watersheds. Surface elevations
range from sea level to approximately 690 feet above sea level. The climate is mild, with long
term annual minimum temperatures averaging 49.6 degrees Fahrenheit (F) and long term
maximum temperatures averaging 75.6 F. Average annual rainfall is 12.82 inches.
The District is largely built out and the 2005 UWMP reports a service population of 41,600.
Land use within the District is primarily residential with some commercial development
associated with the destination resort communities. A description of the local government
jurisdictions, land use and population projections within the Districts service area are included
in this section.
The District has four separate offices for Districts Water Operation Center; Sewer Operations
Center; support services; and administrative, finance, engineering and information technology
staff. The District plans to consolidate their offices into one central District Headquarters at the
30-Acres site within the next 5 years.

2.1

Local Government Jurisdictions

As shown in Figure 1-1, the District lies within the boundaries of the Cities of Dana Point and
Laguna Beach and encompasses portions of San Clemente and San Juan Capistrano in
Orange County, California.
The District is a member agency of the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California
represented through the Municipal Water District of Orange County (successor to the Coastal
Municipal Water District), through which the District has historically received all of its imported
domestic water supply.
The District is a member agency of the South Orange County Wastewater Authority, a joint
powers authority that treats and disposes of wastewater effluent and biosolids from various
service areas in South Orange County.
Two fire districts overlie the District: The City of Laguna Beach Fire Department provides fire
protection within the City of Laguna Beach. The remainder of the District is served by the
Orange County Fire Authority.

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South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Study Area Overview

2.2

Existing Land Use

The general character of land use within the District is mostly residential. Figure 2-1 shows the
zoned land uses as provided by the City of Dana Point. A similar map of zoned land uses for
Laguna Beach was not available. In the Districts service area, commercial development
consists of hotels and small businesses consistent with a community that is a destination resort
community. The majority of the commercial development is located in the central Dana Point
and Capistrano Beach areas. Hotels range in size from small bed and breakfast and time-share
to large four and five star luxury resorts. With luxury hotels, a championship golf course, and
miles of ocean beaches, the area has become a popular destination with substantial population
variations, especially during the summer months.
Included within the District are two golf courses, four schools, a 170-bed hospital, three small
shopping centers, and four 400-room five star hotel complexes (the Ritz Carlton, Saint Regis,
and Marriott located in Dana Point, and the Montage located in Laguna Beach). There are also
a small number of industrial, agricultural, or manufacturing accounts within the District. Housing
within the service area is primarily single unit dwellings in the middle to upper price range with
several gate-guarded communities. Some of these communities have converted their irrigation
systems to use recycled water within the common areas. The Districts most densely populated
area is within the central portion of the City of Dana Point that consists of multi-unit apartment
and condominium dwellings. Recently completed are the Montage project (a 275 unit hotel) and
Pointe Monarch project (76 single-family residences and condominiums) along with various
smaller projects throughout the District. A public park along the top of the bluff is a popular
community feature.
The Dana Point Harbor is within the Districts service area. It is a 277-acre small craft harbor
owned and operated by the County of Orange. Amenities within the harbor include a 136-room
three star hotel known as the Marina Inn, over 2,400 small-craft slips, as well as 75,000 square
feet of existing restaurant, retail, and other commercial uses. The County is undertaking a
major revitalization of the harbor in the next couple of years that will result in 80,000 square feet
of new restaurants and retail space and renovation of 30,000 square feet of existing restaurant
and retail space.
The Dana Point Headlands property is currently under development. The development will
include 119 residential units and a 90-room resort hotel and restaurant, commercial space, and
a nature interpretive center.
In the Laguna Beach area, it is anticipated that the Aliso Creek Inn and Golf Course will be
redeveloped in the near future. It is estimated that this development will add 40 to 50
condominium units and 90 to 98 hotel rooms, a restaurant, and spa in the place of the existing
64-room inn. The 9-hole golf course will be redesigned but will remain 9 holes. In addition
there could be approximately 11 to 15 single family residences constructed on an adjacent
parcel. It is anticipated this project will be completed by 2010. At the very north end of the
District is an undeveloped parcel of approximately 300 acres. This land is currently designated
as open space and it is likely to remain as such given physical and legal constraints to
development. However, there could be some minor redevelopment on the fringe of this parcel
that could include the building of up to 29 single-family residences.

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4/23/07 KC KM Z:\Projects\IS\SCWD\MXD\ReportFigures\90%Submittal\Fig2-1_LandUse.mxd

SOURCE: Laguna Beach land use coverage is proprietary and unavailable.


Land uses used in hydraulic model are derived from District billing data.

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Figure 2-1
South Coast Water District
LAND USE MAP

Study Area Overview

2.3 Future Land Use/Population Projections


The District is largely built out as evidenced in Table 2-1 below. According to the Districts 2005
UWMP, the projected resident population is anticipated to increase by less than 2000 people by
2030. The transient population influx may, however, increase significantly with the addition of
major destination resort facilities and the conversion of residences to retail properties.
Table 2-1. South Coast Water District Population Projections
Year
Population Projection

2005

2010

2015

2020

2025

2030

41,600

42,000

42,300

42,600

42,800

43,000

As discussed in the previous section, the Aliso Creek Inn and Golf Course is expected to add 26
to 34 hotel rooms, 40 to 50 condominium units, a restaurant, and spa. In addition there could
be approximately 11 to 15 single family residences constructed on an adjacent parcel. The
Dana Point Harbor is within the Districts service area and the County is undertaking a major
revitalization of the harbor which will result in 80,000 square feet of new restaurants and retail
space and renovation of 30,000 square feet of existing restaurant and retail space. The Dana
Point Headlands property is currently under development and will include 119 residential units,
a 90-room resort hotel and restaurant, commercial space, and a nature interpretive center. All
three of these projects are anticipated to be complete by 2010.
The Downtown core area of the City of Dana Point has been identified as a potential area of
revitalization. The Town Center District calls for a mix of retail businesses offering goods and
services for residents and visitors. Businesses will be located on the ground floors of buildings
while upper floors will contain offices and residential units. For this study, it is assumed that any
increase in water or sewer use is within the Districts build-out water and sewer projections, as
no specific development proposals have identified potential building square footage increase or
a planned number of residential units. As development proposals come forward with the Town
Center, the District should consider: (1) strengthening the old small water distribution pipelines
in the area to accommodate required fire flows, which may require off-site pipelines for looping
purposes, (2) update average and peak wastewater flow and review downstream sewer main
and lift station capacities, and (3) opportunities to expand the recycled water system to its max
use, including evaluating potable water supply offsets.
At the north end of the District is an undeveloped parcel of approximately 300 acres. This land,
currently designated open space, is likely to remain as such given physical and legal constraints
to development. However, there could be some minor redevelopment on the fringe of this
parcel that could include the building of up to 29 single-family residences.
Given the nature of these planned developments, the population projections shown in Table 2-1
appear to be reasonable.
As a resort destination, the South Coast Water Districts service area experiences seasonal
increases in water demand and wastewater generation. With the addition of hotel, restaurant
and commercial development, the seasonal influx of tourists is likely to increase. Given
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Study Area Overview


historical trends in water use and wastewater generation, a small percentage increase will be
assumed when forecasting water demands to account for the new development.

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Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Chapter 3
Water Supply Sources
The sources of domestic water available to the South Coast Water District (District) service area
have been limited to imported water through the major conveyance systems serving the south
Orange County region. However, the District has recently put into service its 1 MGD
Groundwater Recovery Facility (GRF) to enhance supply to the District. Recent events and
activities by regional and local water purveyors have prompted an evolution of potential source
scenarios which must be considered in the Districts plan for water supply. This chapter
discusses both historic and potential future water supply strategies.

3.1

Background

Current regional planning and project activities have been directed toward enhancing the
reliability of supplies to the District and other South County agencies. These agencies are at
the extreme downstream end of long conveyance systems and are subject to a number of
potential disruption scenarios. Reliability enhancement activities are taking place at several
levels:

County level, led by the Municipal Water District of Orange County (MWDOC), the
wholesale agency serving Orange County, on behalf of and including South County
agencies.

Subregional level, by the Santa Margarita Water District (SMWD) on behalf of several
neighboring water purveyors, conducting an independent review of alternative projects;
and the San Juan Basin Authority on behalf of member agencies which overlie or
partially overlie the San Juan Creek watershed.

Local level, by the District and contiguous retail agencies: Moulton Niguel Water District
(MNWD), Laguna Beach County Water District, and the cities of San Juan Capistrano
and San Clemente.

A comprehensive investigation of the regional water situation, and an example of ongoing


integrated regional water planning, is the South Orange County Water Reliability Study,
(SOCWRS) prepared by MWDOC in cooperation with South County agencies in 2003 and
2004. A number of the recommendations of that investigation are being implemented, including
strategic interconnects and storage projects. Others are on hold or are still being considered by
the affected agencies.
Confidence that long term supply sources would be adequate in the foreseeable future has
been the premise of regional reliability planning, which has thus focused on the ability to deliver
adequate water in the face of short term outages or interruptions of the delivery system facilities.
Metropolitan Water District of Southern Californias (MWD) long range planning and forecasts
had previously concluded that, at least through year 2025, adequate imported water could be
made available in its Southern California service area even during prolonged dry periods.
However, this presumption is now subject to a high level of uncertainty due to the following
recent challenges:

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Water Supply Sources


1. Escalating concern over climate change and critically dry conditions affecting all of
MWDs supply sources (irrespective of short-term relief from recent storms),
2. An August 2007 Federal Court ruling that severely limits State Water Project (SWP)
pumping exports from the Delta, and
3. MWD being limited to Colorado River Allocation.
Against this backdrop, long term source adequacy becomes a major consideration in addition to
delivery system reliability.

3.2

Planning Approach

The evaluation of water sources presented herein has the objective of summarizing and
reviewing existing and potential future source scenarios and their implications with respect to
the quantity, reliability, quality, and cost of potable water supplies to the District. Any
modifications to the Districts source mix which would have significant impacts on the
distribution system are given special consideration. The evaluation is primarily limited to
reliance on existing information, although new concepts are considered and recommended for
additional study.
The recent Federal Court ruling reducing Delta exports through the SWP means that increased
emphasis will need to be placed on water conservation and development of local supplies. As
of this report, MWD and MWDOC are still evaluating the implications of this ruling and have yet
to update their long range assessment of water availability under various climatic conditions. A
Water Supply Allocation Plan has been enacted by MWD which sets forth formulas for
allocating supplies and shortages to member agencies. Shortage allocation policy is a very
complex and controversial issue which will undoubtedly be debated and negotiated over several
months if not years, as wholesale and retail agencies analyze specific ramifications. Of
particular concern are the implications relative to the SB 610 and 221 mandates requiring that
local agencies provide information on the sufficiency of the projected water supply to serve
proposed new developments in their service areas. For agencies relying primarily on imported
water, these Water Supply Assessment (WSA) reports are now difficult to complete without
updated input from MWD and MWDOC.
As part of this Master Planning effort, the myriad of candidate projects and activities are
subjected to an initial screening process done in concert with District management and staff, to
focus on the most probable water source scenarios to be encountered by the District.
Scenarios that are less likely but which would have a profound effect on District supplies are
also addressed, to assist the District in decisions on positioning or participation in the various
projects.
The evaluation includes specific water source issues that the District has initially directed that
this Water Master Plan address, as follows:

Possible water quality issues as a result of the operations of the Districts new GRF.

Criteria for emergency storage, offsite and onsite, to assist in or validate decisions to
construct or participate in additional storage.
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Water Supply Sources

How to consider the production by the Districts GRF or other local sources in the
reliability equation and assessment of required storage.

Implications of the construction of the proposed Dana Point Ocean Desalination Plant.

Ramifications of other major low probability but high impact projects, such as the Central
Pool Augmentation project.

Since recycled water is a local source that replaces a similar amount of potable water, it is
considered in general fashion in this Chapter. Specific recycled water issues and options are
addressed in detail in Chapter 6.
Several South County agencies have recently petitioned LAFCO to investigate a major
reorganization that could essentially form a separate South County wholesale/planning agency
in place of MWDOC. LAFCO will undertake a governmental study that will review this
alternative along with others. The proposed re-organization could take one of several forms,
ranging from modified status quo to a County Water Agency to a split agency comprised of a
North County Water Agency (integrated with the Orange County Water District) and a separate
South County Water Agency. The primary advantages as stated by proponents are: 1) a
reduction from MWDOCs overhead, and 2) greater MWD representation. Although the subject
agencies were participants in the SOCWRS, there have since emerged differences of opinion
on the actual project pursuits. The SMWD convened a meeting of South County Agencies and
employed a consultant (Stetson Engineers, Inc.) to conduct an independent evaluation to assist
the group in developing a priority ranking of prospective reliability projects. As of the date of this
report, the Stetson Report has not been distributed.

3.3

Existing Supply Source Description

The Districts domestic water supply has historically consisted entirely of imported water from
two sources: Northern California via the State Water Project, and the Colorado River via the
Colorado River Aqueduct. Before the construction of MWD facilities in the 1960s, the
Capistrano Beach Service Area was served by local wells. Source water for the South Coast
service area was fed from the coast supply line from Newport. Currently, MWD is responsible
for delivering the imported water to its 27 member agencies, including MWDOC which is the
wholesale provider to the District and the majority of other Orange County water purveyors. The
District has nominal capacity rights to 13,225 acre-feet per year (AFY) from MWDOC.
Imported water for the region is treated at the MWD Diemer Filtration Plant in Yorba Linda and
conveyed through two major pipeline systems to South Orange County. The East Orange
County Feeder #2 (EOCF 2) system conveys Diemer water to the Aufdenkamp Transmission
Main (ATM) and subsequently to the Joint Transmission Main (JTM) which serves the District
and other coastal agencies. The District has capacity rights of 5 cubic feet per second (cfs) in
the ATM reach from the Coastal Junction to the northerly boundary of El Toro Water District. In
the downstream reach extending to Coast Highway in Laguna Beach, the Districts capacity
increases to 8 cfs due to potential flows from the Coast Supply Line. The Districts capacity is
6.34 cfs in the JTM. The other major conveyance system is the Allen McColloch Pipeline (AMP)
which supplies Diemer water through the South County Pump Station in Lake Forest, to the
South County Pipeline (SCP) through SMWD to San Clemente, from where it is delivered to the
District through the Water Importation Pipeline (WIP) along Coast Highway. The Districts
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Water Supply Sources


capacity right in the AMP is 10.7 cfs shared with the City of San Clemente. Downstream, the
District owns 25 cfs in the South County Pipeline; however, this capacity is limited by District
capacity upstream in the AMP. The future Upper Chiquita Reservoir will provide the District
more reliability via storage to access water from the AMP The District also has emergency
connections with adjacent agencies, the most significant of which is the Coast Line connection
to the County Water Districts Laguna Beach system. In certain situations, this connection could
conceivably supply water from Big Canyon Reservoir in Newport Beach. The major importation
system facilities serving the District are illustrated in Figure 3-1.
With the operation of its new GRF in Capistrano Beach, the District for the first time possesses
a local source of supplythe Lower San Juan Creek Groundwater Basin. The GRF project was
initiated by the Capistrano Beach Water District prior to consolidation with the District in 1999.
The GRF consists of a reverse osmosis treatment plant to convert high-salinity, degraded
groundwater, extracted from the lower San Juan Creek groundwater basin, to potable quality.
Plant production is currently limited by capacity of the existing well and by water rights
limitations imposed by the State Water Resources Control Board. The permit allows the District
to pump up to 976 AFY, and potentially an additional 324 AFY in the future. The District
expects to secure the right to produce up to 2,000 AFY from the Basin, and has designed the
well system and treatment plant accordingly. The 2005 UWMP projects a GRF contribution to
the Districts potable supply of 800 AFY by 2010, increasing to 1,300 AFY in 2015, and 2,000
AFY in 2020 and thereafter.
The other significant local source of water supply to the District is recycled water derived from
the tertiary treatment facility at the Coastal Treatment Plant and delivered through a separate
non-potable distribution system for landscape irrigation. Recycled water is addressed in detail
in Chapter 6 of this report.
The 2005 UWMP listed current and projected future water supply sources required to meet
District demands, as shown in Table 3-1 and illustrated in the pie charts in Figure 3-2.
Table 3-1. Current and Planned Water Supply Sources to Meet Demands (AFY)
Water Supply Sources
(Water Purchased From:)
MWDOC
Groundwater (San Juan Basin)
Recycled Water
Total

2005

2010

2015

2020

2025

2030

7,408

7,262
800
1,000
9,062

6,762
1,300
1,000
9,062

6,192
2,000
1,000
9,196

6,306
2,000
1,000
9,306

6,306
2,000
1,000
9,306

890
8,298

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EXISTING WATER IMPORTATION


SYSTEM SERVICING SCWD
FIGURE 3-1
South Coast Water District Master Plan
October 2008

Water Supply Sources

2005 Water Supply Sources

2030 Water Supply Sources

Recycled Water 11%

Recycled Water 11%


Groundwater
(San Juan Basin)
21%
MWDOC 68%

MWDOC 89%

Figure 3-2. Existing and Future Water Supply Sources


(based on the 2005 Urban Water Management Plan)

3.4

Reliability Considerations

The Districts nominal capacity in the regional importation system is deemed adequate to meet
the ultimate demands of its service area, even without the contributions of the GRF. Thus, the
primary considerations herein are the reliability of the imported water sources and conveyance
systems. This source review renders an independent opinion on the extent to which the District
can count on there consistently being adequate water, of suitable quality and reasonable cost,
delivered through these systems.

3.4.1 Imported Supplies


Evaluation of the long-term adequacy of imported supplies from Northern California and the
Colorado River under various demand, hydrologic and facility/operation scenarios has been
done extensively by MWD using a complex computer simulation model referred to as IRPSIM.
With planned additional infrastructure in place and maximizing conjunctive use groundwater
storage, MWD had anticipated that supplies would be adequate, even under a repeat of the
critical period multi-year drought hydrology, to the year 2025. However, several conditions
and events may invalidate previous assumptions:

Climate change resulting in megadrought in the Feather River (SWP) and Colorado
River watersheds significantly more severe in extent and duration than experienced in
recorded history, but evidenced in the past from the study of tree rings and predicted in
the future due to a global warming trend.

A catastrophic earthquake in the Delta, causing massive failure of the vulnerable levy
system and resulting in a complete and prolonged shutdown of the SWP pumping
system feeding the California Aqueduct.

A court-imposed moratorium or restriction on exports from the Delta in favor of


environmental concerns could trigger a multi-year disruption forcing the construction of

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Water Supply Sources


additional facilities, or result in a permanent reduction in exports from the Delta. (This
event occurred with the Federal Court ruling on August 30, 2007.)

A severe earthquake in Southern California which would cause a long-term shutdown of


the Tehachapi pumping system, the Diemer Filtration Plant, or combinations of critical
import facilities; curtailing or severely reducing the importation of water for a prolonged
period beyond the 31-day scenarios evaluated in the SOCWRS.

Continued cost escalation of imported water. The current (2008) costs are $ 528.50 per
acre foot and are estimated to increase to $ 603.50 per acre foot in January 2009.

Contingency planning for high-impact scenarios such as these are normally beyond the scope
of local agencies, but awareness of the possibility of their occurrence may influence local
decisions and policy in the following ways:

Constituency to be educated to the fact that their primary water sources, imported over
great distances, may be subject to long-term interruption or even permanent reduction,
as well as substantial cost increases.

Additional consideration to be given to expanded development of local sources, such as


brackish surface or groundwater, seawater, and recycled water, even if significantly
more costly than the imported source.

Increased emphasis placed on wise, efficient water use.

The recent court ruling restricting Delta exports drives the need for an expanded and
increasingly relevant discussion of local source options in Section 3.6, as well as in Chapter 6,
addressing the expanded use of recycled water.

3.4.2 Regional Import System Reliability


The vulnerability of South County agencies, due to their almost complete reliance on the Diemer
Filtration Plant and the two lengthy, aging pipeline systems, was the impetus for the recent
SOCWRS. The Phase II System Reliability Plan recommended and prioritized several
projects to reduce the vulnerability of South County agencies to infrastructure disruptions. The
disruption or shutdown scenarios range from earthquakes on the major faults assumed to result
in month-long outages of the Diemer Plant and AMP to 10-day outages of the AMP and
EOCF 2.
The Base Plan and the Contingency Plan include improvements to the regional distribution
system, storage and treatment projects and ocean desalination. The contingency plan adds
regional projects which would be needed if fewer Local Resource Development Projects (LRPs)
are implemented.
Most of the Priority 1 improvements are being implemented and are now, or will be,
operational in the near future. Their status is as follows:

Upper Chiquita Reservoir 799 AF lined and covered reservoir by SMWD with other
local participants (including the District). Under design with construction start scheduled
for summer of 2008, to be operational in 2010.
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Coastal Junction Pump Connection completed.

Irvine Ranch Water District (IRWD) Interconnections PA6 completed, Z1/Z3 pump
station and JTM/ATM design completed.

Second Lower Feeder/EOCF 2 Intertie MWD project to connect the MWD Second
Lower Feeder, which can receive (backfeed) water from the Jensen Filtration Plant to
the EOCF 2 to increase flexibility in the event of a Diemer Filtration Plant outage. This
project was determined to be much costlier than originally estimated, so MWD is
investigating alternative concepts.

Groundwater Emergency Wells (three wells to pump into Second Lower Feeder/EOCF 2
Intertie) MWD is considering, expected to be operational in 2010.

Other projects ranked lower in priority or not addressed in the SOCWRS, that are now receiving
serious attention, are:

Dana Point Ocean Desalination Plant


East Ortega Lined and Covered Reservoir
New Baker Filtration Plant
New Wellfield in Main Basin and South County Groundwater Reserve (37,000 AF)

Also, additional recycled water may be made available to the south coastal portion of the District
from a proposed tertiary treatment facility at the SOCWA J.B. Latham Treatment Plant. An
extensive recycled water system is being considered to supply reclaimed water to the
perspective service area (see Chapter 6).

3.5

Implications of Proposed Reliability Projects

3.5.1 Project Categories and Functions


Projects to improve reliability of the Districts water sources can be divided into three categories,
as follows:
1. Delivery System Enhancement Projects designed to improve the reliability of the
conveyance systems delivering imported supplies to the Districts service area.
Examples include pumping facilities and interconnections of major pipeline systems to
provide flexibility for alternative routing to remedy short term planned or emergency
outages of key facilities.
2. Emergency Storage Projects designed to provide a limited amount of stored water to
satisfy demands during a short or medium term outage or reduction of the imported
supply. Example projects include distribution storage over and above operational and
fire storage requirements, lined and covered regional reservoirs, and designated
groundwater basin storage with appurtenant production wells and connecting pipelines.
3. Source Augmentation Projects designed to produce or make available on a
consistent basis additional quantities of water. Examples include groundwater recovery,
ocean water desalination, streamflow recovery, and recycled water projects. Such
projects can help redress temporary emergency outages of the import system, as well as
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Water Supply Sources


long term shortages brought about by regulatory restrictions, extended drought, natural
disasters or climate change.
Not all reliability projects are directly comparable, since some address short term or temporary
shortages, while others can help remediate long term shortages.

3.5.2 Description/Status of Identified Projects


The SOCWRS Priority 1 projects completed or underway generally improve the reliability of
the sources that the District relies on, as described in the following paragraphs:
Upper Chiquita Reservoir
This reservoir is relatively close to the District service area and can largely mitigate a short-term
outage of the AMP and partially mitigate a similar Diemer outage. The reservoir can deliver
stored water through SCP to the District and coastal entities with no pumping. The cost is
estimated to be about $40,000 per AF, which is less than 20 percent of the cost of tank storage.
The District requested 60 AF (see subsequent discussion) but is now tentatively allocated 49 AF
in the somewhat smaller reservoir. This project is highly desirable for agencies at the extreme
end of the importation pipelines. However, since the 799 AF of capacity is considerably less
than the composite quantities desired by participating agencies, the participating agencies may
need or desire to acquire additional capacity in a future contemplated East Ortega Reservoir.
Additional evaluation of emergency storage benefits is presented in Section 3.6.
IRWD Interconnection Projects
The Coastal Junction Pump Connection (completed) and the IRWD interconnects (underway) to
the JTM/ATM and the SCPS significantly improve the flexibility of supply for short-term outages
of the EOCF 2 or AMP (assuming planned IRWD wells are constructed), but relief from a
Diemer outage would be limited to the amount (if any) of surplus capacity in IRWDs Zone 2 or
Zone 1-3 systems. Without additional wells, the interconnects would have little or no benefit in
the summer months.
Second Lower Feeder / EOCF 2 Intertie
If implemented by MWD, this project would provide, for the first time, the flexibility for South
County Agencies to receive imported water from a source other than the Diemer Filtration Plant.
However, the amount of water actually available to backfeed from the Jensen Plant would be
limited, subject to other demands in central and north Orange County.
The value of this interconnect, originally estimated to cost about $30 million, but now expected
to cost over $85 million, would be greatly increased if coupled with the contemplated
Groundwater Emergency Service wellfield (see subsequent groundwater discussion). As
previously stated, this project is on hold due to the unexpectedly high cost. Alternatives are
being investigated.
Main Basin Groundwater Emergency Supply
The greatest potential for South County agencies to be buffered from longer-term temporary
outages of the importation system, other than the Central Pool Augmentation (CPA) or large
scale seawater desalination, lies with the Main Orange County Groundwater Basin (Main Basin)
which contains over 2 million AF of usable storage. This basin has been extensively developed
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and utilized by the overlying entities, and judiciously guarded against exploitation by outside
(non-overlying) agencies. Although proposals have been floated over the years to allow the
South County agencies at least limited access to the Basin, groundwater pumpers, represented
by the Orange County Water District (OCWD) have adamantly opposed any such use.
However, recent headway has been made, with contemplated measures which would result in
the South County receiving some benefit from the enormous storage capacity of the Basin.
Included are:

IRWD Interconnects as planned would result in some IRWD-produced groundwater


being transported to the South County during emergencies. A proposal to construct
additional wells along Dyer Road to pump into the JTM would greatly expand the
emergency storage benefit of the Basin.

Conjunctive Use Storage Agreement recently consummated among MWD, OCWD, and
MWDOC will result in 63,000 AF of Basin storage reserved to bolster supplies during
imported water shortages. The agreement will result in eight new wells being
constructed and operated by producers to be used in lieu of imported water when a call
is made by MWD. This will in effect free up to 20,000 AFY of imported water for use
elsewhere, but the overlying agencies are the targeted beneficiaries.

Groundwater Emergency Service wellfields would likely be constructed near the


proposed Second Lower Feeder Intertie pipeline which would likely be constructed along
Lincoln Avenue in the City of Orange. The initial phase would be two to three wells to
provide an emergency supply of about 10 cfs. The ultimate wellfield could produce as
great as 50 cfs. A primary issue of concern to MWD has been the water quality
implications of injecting groundwater into the imported water feeders. These concerns
have been largely resolved as of the date of this report.

If all of the above groundwater projects are implemented, the Basin could ultimately provide,
either directly or indirectly, as much as 100 cfs and 80,000 AF to assist in alleviating emergency
water shortages in the South County.
Dana Point Ocean Desalination Plant
Ocean desalination proposals have been elevated in priority mainly because of statewide
recognition that desalted seawater must be a vital component of the States future supply mix to
meet growing demands. MWDOC, MWD, and the United States Bureau of Reclamation
(USBR) have contributed to extensive feasibility investigations to assess the viability of a
desalination plant at the Districts Dana Point property. The studies have concluded that a
desalination plant producing 15 MGD (about 23 cfs) would be technically feasible using a beach
well intake system and the SOCWA outfall for brine disposal. The preliminary concept is to
base load the 15 MGD of product water into a modified local conveyance system to serve the
SCWD and portions of other coastal entities. The SCWD would likely receive between 30 and
40 percent of its potable demands from the desalination plant. This project, if implemented,
would have a profound impact on the District. It could nearly immunize the District from
imported water shortages or system vulnerabilities. However, it might render obsolete the
Districts GRF, and would significantly alter the utility and operation of the JTM and WIP. It
might also reduce the urgency for additional emergency storage. The water quality impacts
would need careful evaluation, but it is likely that the total dissolved solids (TDS) of the product

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water would be less than that of the imported supply, which could result in a positive impact on
recycled water derived from the Coastal Plant.
The primary drawback is cost. Even with known subsidies including the $250/AF MWD LRP
contribution and a reduction in the MWD Readiness to Serve (RTS) charge, the net cost is
estimated at $300 to $500 per AF greater than imported water, which currently (2008) costs
$528.50 per acre foot and is estimated to increase to $ 603.50 per acre foot in January 2009. It
is reported that MWD and others are working to bring the local cost in line with imported
supplies, the premise being that all importers benefit from such local projects, since imported
water is freed for use elsewhere. An area of potential vulnerability is power. Since seawater
desalination requires large amounts of energy, the future availability, reliability and cost of
power is a serious consideration.
An alternative to a land-based desalination plant could potentially be a seawater desalination
vessel which would produce desalinated water on a ship offshore. The water supply would then
be pumped to the shore for distribution. One of its major benefits is the minimal environmental
impact on coastal habitats. Also, a larger project would be feasible not restricted by the
limitations of the beach well intake system.
East Ortega Reservoir
This proposed lined and covered reservoir is similar to Upper Chiquita, but larger and more
remotely located from the District. It is now favored by SMWD second only to the Upper
Chiquita site, for covered emergency storage. Upper Chiquita has inadequate capacity to
satisfy the storage needs and desires of both SMWD and other participants in the vicinity.
Preliminary studies indicate that the East Ortega Reservoir could range in capacity from 1,300
AF to 2,700 AF, and have a cost of $35,000 to $40,000 per AF similar to Upper Chiquita. The
primary drawback for the East Ortega is the need to construct a long pipeline interconnect to the
SCP. The estimated construction cost of this pipeline is about $25 million, which would add
about $10,000 to $20,000 to the per AF cost of storage. However, SMWD management has
indicated that the majority of the cost of this connecting pipeline would likely be borne by
developers who would need a major transmission main to support new development in the
vicinity.
As with Upper Chiquita Reservoir, the cost for this relatively local emergency storage,
amounting to 12 to 15 cents per gallon, make it a bargain compared to tank storage, which
would cost five to ten times as much. According to SMWD, the estimated timeframe for this
project is approximately five years beyond the Upper Chiquita Reservoir project.
New Baker Filtration Plant
Several South County agencies are now proceeding with planning and design of a new
treatment plant at the site of the old Los Alisos Water District Baker Filtration Plant. This plant is
favored in place of the Santiago Regional Treatment Plant described in the SOCWRS. The
plant would receive untreated water from MWD Lake Mathews system via the Santiago
Aqueduct and Baker pipelines, which are old, under-utilized pipelines that once delivered water
for the extensive agriculture in the area, now largely supplanted by urban development. The
untreated water would be conveyed through the Santiago Lateral along Santa Ana Canyon,
possibly supplemented by water from Irvine Lake.

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The tentative capacity of the treatment plant would be 30 cfs. Product water could be conveyed
to the nearby South County Pump Station, so it would be able to provide emergency water to
agencies along the SCP, including the District. The cost had not been estimated at the time of
this report, but is tentatively estimated, based on unit costs estimated for the Santiago Regional
Treatment Plant, to be in the neighborhood of $20 million.
The primary advantage of this facility would be its ability to derive imported water from sources
other than the Diemer Filtration Plant and the AMP. This gives the additional and continuing
flexibility of an alternative source in the event of a Diemer outage. When weighed against the
Dana Point Ocean Desalination Project, it has the advantages of being considerably less costly
and being able to serve the agencies inland at elevations beyond the benefit area of the
desalination plant. However, the seawater desalination plant does in fact produce a new
inexhaustible local source of domestic water, while the Baker Filtration Plant must derive water
primarily from the same over-stressed Colorado River and Northern California sources that all of
Southern California relies on.
Groundwater Recovery Facility
The groundwater treatment facility recently completed by the District represents an independent
local source, which has benefits in terms of enhancing both the reliability and quality of the
Districts potable supply. Although production is currently limited to about 800 AFY by water
rights restrictions and the capacity of the single well, the design rate of production by the plant
and planned wells is over twice that amount. Currently the District has budgeted $2.2 million for
the GRF expansion, transmission main, and the new well. The San Juan Basin Authority (SJBA)
is performing a study to evaluate potential new well sites. Although the second well site has not
been identified yet, the new well will allow the District to draw on the Groundwater basin from a
second location, resulting in a decrease in pump rate from the existing well and a reduced
pumping cone of influence drawdown.
This water, completely independent of the imported source, provides significant backup in case
of conveyance system outages or long-term or permanent imported supply shortfalls. The GRF
is subject to periodic planned or unplanned shutdowns. However, the chances of having a GRF
outage simultaneously with an importation system outage are very remote.
One concern has been that the reverse osmosis (RO) product water, derived from groundwater
containing significant levels of iron and manganese, could still have detectable color which
might result in customer complaints. The recommended solution is to ensure adequate
blending with the imported water by injecting the GRF water into the Zone 2 system 16 inch
pipeline. This pipeline appears to have adequate continuous flow to achieve blending of the
GRF-derived color to below 2 color units (cu) at the nearest customer takeout, which should be
unnoticeable. From the initial operation of the GRF, these concerns appear now to be nonissues.
Perhaps of greater concern is the ability of the groundwater wells (one existing and one
planned) to produce adequate water under certain circumstances. The effective base of the
valley fill alluvium at the location of the existing production well is relatively shallow (about 100
feet deep) with static water level at about 30 feet deep. From the initial pump test, pumping
drawdown at the design rate of 900 gpm was about 32 feet, leaving only 38 feet of saturated
water-bearing materials.
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It is not known what the effect will be of the planned increase in upstream pumping by the City
of San Juan Capistrano GRF project, which is designed to extract over 5,000 AFY but has thus
far produced less than half of that amount. Also, a Dana Point Ocean Desalination Project with
its beach well intake system may protect against seawater intrusion but also may draw some
fresh water from the Lower San Juan Creek alluvial basin, which could further lower
groundwater levels and limit production of the Districts GRF feed wells.
A Lower San Juan Creek Basin Operations Study should be considered to model the
implications of the planned City of San Juan Capistrano pumping, expanded District GRF
pumping, possible Dana Point Ocean Desalination Plant beach wells, and potential upstream
recharge enhancements.
Central Pool Augmentation (CPA) Project
This long-contemplated MWD project, which would greatly improve the flexibility and reliability of
its Southern California conveyance system while providing needed treatment capacity, has once
again been moved further into the future. The SOCWRS indicated a MWD timeframe of 2016 to
2020, with a 10-year implementation schedule. The latest implementation update from
MWDOC now indicates a deferment of this $1.3 billion mega-project to 2049, meaning that it is
more distant from the present than ever. The District and other South County Agencies should
not count on this project ever being implemented. It should be noted however, that MWDs
deferment of the CPA project assumes ambitious implementation of local resource projects,
water use efficiency measures, and other projects including ocean desalination.
Huntington Beach Ocean Desalination Plant
Poseidon Resources has proposed to construct a large ocean desalination facility in the City of
Huntington Beach. This project, in early stages of discussion, would likely supply water to
EOCF 2 and could thus benefit SCWD and other South County agencies.

3.5.3 New Source Augmentation Projects


Previously in this section, project categories and specific identified projects were briefly
discussed. Of the identified projects, three are truly Category 3 Source Augmentation
projects: the District GRF just entering service; the proposed Dana Point Ocean Desalination
Project; and the possible Huntington Beach Ocean Desalination Project. However, the District
has also conducted or sponsored preliminary assessment of two additional local projects that fit
the source augmentation category, as follows:
Recycled Water System Expansion
Extension and modification of the Districts recycled water distribution system would serve new
development and also additional customers by converting from potable to recycled water,
thereby reducing demands on the potable water system. The sources of recycled water would
be surplus Coastal Plant AWT production, or a new regional AWT at the J.B. Latham Treatment
Plant in Dana Point. If only a modest amount of increased recycled water is needed to meet
short term demand peaks in the summer months, a small amount of supplemental water from
the potable system may suffice. As another option, the AWT system at the Coastal Plant could
possibly be upgraded to increase its capacity. These options are evaluated in this Master Plan
and are addressed in detail in Chapter 6. In addition to several new customers, three tiers of

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Infrastructure Master Plan
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Water Supply Sources


expanded recycled water markets are identified.
facilities and costs are estimated for each tier.

Recycled water demands and required

Aliso Creek Water Harvesting Project


Interception and treatment of a portion of the urban runoff in lower Aliso Creek would
supplement the recycled water system. The primary purpose would be to improve the quality of
the recycled water supply so that it is more attractive for irrigation users. Treatment would
include filtration and reverse osmosis (RO) of about 500,000 gpd during non-storm runoff
months. The California Department of Fish and Game reviewed the project concept and has
raised a number of concerns which would need to be addressed for the project to proceed.
As previously discussed, the tenuous nature of the over-stressed imported water supplies
warrants a serious look at previously overlooked project opportunities. In the SCWD region, the
only significant potential source, other than the Pacific Ocean and the treated wastewater
flowing through two ocean outfalls, is urban runoff. Aliso Creek and Salt Creek, once
intermittent stream courses, now generate perennial flows to the ocean deriving from extensive
development in the tributary watersheds. These flows have resulted in establishment of riparian
habitat, but also are a troublesome source of degradation of the downstream tidal zone and
beach environments. The large volume of abandoned urban runoff flowing to the ocean should
be investigated as a potential source of potable supply for the District. This third local source
augmentation project is thus recommended for consideration, as follows:
Aliso Creek Streamflow Recovery Facilities (SRF) Project
Interception and treatment of a portion of the urban runoff flows in Aliso Creek would
supplement the Districts potable water system. The primary advantage of this project is its
potential to provide a significant quantity locally produced potable water that can be delivered to
customers through the existing potable water distribution system. However, since this type of
surface diversion project is unprecedented in Southern California, it would likely face significant
regulatory hurdles. The proposed project, which could be done separately or in conjunction with
the Aliso Creek Water Harvesting Project being considered, would feature the following:

Diversion from Aliso Creek of 2.5 MGD of the approximate 6 MGD of urban runoff
currently flowing into the Creek. This represents about 40 percent of the current flow. If
operated in connection with the 0.5 MGD Water Harvesting Project, about 55 percent of
the urban runoff would be intercepted, with the remaining flows continuing to the ocean.

Treatment likely consisting of a 500 micron strainer to remove solids and debris,
microfiltration to remove suspended solids including larger microorganisms, and reverse
osmosis possibility preceded by nano-filtration to remove oils, grease, pesticides,
herbicides, heavy metals, nutrients, and dissolved solids. The effluent from these
filtration steps would then be subjected to ultraviolet (UV) light and chlorination for
disinfection. The product water would meet stringent EPA and California DPH drinking
water standards, and be considerably lower in TDS than the imported water source.

Disposal of brine from the treatment processes to the land/ocean outfall serving the
Coastal Treatment Plant. The volume of brine, estimated at about 0.5 MGD could
reasonably be accommodated in the surplus capacity of the outfall, and would have no
discernible impacts on quality, as it would represent only about 3 percent of the total
outfall flow volume.
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Pumping of the resulting 2.0 MGD of product water to the Districts potable water
distribution system, from where it can be delivered throughout the system by existing
facilities.

Identified pros and cons of this proposed Aliso Creek SRF are listed below.
Pros:

Up to 2 MGD of low TDS potable supply independent of imported water supplies.

Local control a SCWD-sponsored project to capture free locally generated water now
wasted to the ocean.

Partial solution to downstream pollution problems caused by abandoned urban runoff.

Relatively low energy consumption compared to ocean desalination. Creek flow TDS
(about 1,900 mg/L is only about 5 percent of ocean TDS (about 37,000 mg/L).

Ready means of brine disposal existing outfall.

Ready means of water distribution existing potable water system.

Would likely qualify for grants and low-interest loans pioneering an innovative concept;
much promoted utilization of local resources; pollution mitigation.

Cons:

Would face significant regulatory challenges by California Department of Fish and Game
and possibly U.S. Corps of Engineers, California DPH, and County Environmental
Health Department. May also face environmental challenges. A Mitigated Negative
Declaration (MND) or Environmental Impact Report (EIR) would be required.

Siting issues at Coastal Plant or alternative candidate sites.

Variability in quality of surface flows and potential for introduction of constituents not
anticipated in design of treatment system. Water temperature may also be an issue

Possible water rights challenges (i.e., upstream entities claiming ownership of


abandoned flows).

It is recommended that a feasibility investigation be initiated to include not only treatment


technology/concept definition but also additional stream flow quality monitoring, assessment of
regulatory processing/permitting, and exploration of grant and loan opportunities.

3.6

Supply Source Strategies

The District management and Board of Directors have been diligent and proactive in source and
facility planning, as evidenced by the recent Strategic Plan and Urban Water Management Plan.
Even in the absence of a comprehensive integrated resource plan, the staff and Board have
done what is prudent in joining or preserving the option to participate in beneficial projects and
activities to assure, within reason, adequate sources for the District. Notwithstanding the above,
the reality of the State and regional water situation today is somewhat different than
contemplated even one year ago or at the outset of this master planning process. In general
terms, the following has transpired:
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The regional conveyance system reliability picture, in contemplation of short term (up to
one month) outages, has improved and will be further improved with projects and
activities currently underway.

The Southern California water source adequacy picture has deterioratedseriously


challenged by the Federal Court-mandated Delta export reductions and escalating,
onerous predictions of prolonged or permanent shortages due to climate change.

3.6.1 General Assessment


The overall prospect now seems to be that Southern California agencies may be destined to
share the pain of inadequate and increasingly costly imported water sources. The actual
quantitative impact on SCWD is impossible to predict at this time, but if SWP importation
quantities were to be permanently reduced by 25 to 30 percent, SCWD reductions could be
near 15 percent. While individual retail water purveyors such as the District cannot be expected
to be able to substantially alter or influence the Southern California water picture, it is becoming
increasingly clear that MWD, MWDOC, and other regional agencies are not going to be able to
assure the long term availability of adequate supplies. MWDOC has recently signaled that
MWD is backing away from its previous guideline to member agencies to be able to provide for
only a seven day outage. Agencies are now being encouraged to take all feasible steps to
improve their own situations. This translates into exploring all measures to maximize the
potential of local sources. In summary, the recommended general strategy of the SCWD in its
quest to assure a reliable source for its constituency, is three fold:
1.

Continue to participate in projects and activities to enhance the reliability of the local
conveyance systems to provide for short term reductions or outages.

2.

Aggressively seek innovative ways to maximize all potential local and regional water
sources, including consideration of concepts previously considered technically or fiscally
not viable.

3.

Increase emphasis on water conservation, enlisting the Districts constituency in a


cooperative effort to eliminate unnecessary and inefficient water use.

3.6.2 Specific Project Considerations


Required Source Capacity
The District in recent years has imported or produced between 6,900 and 7,700 AFY of potable
water and an additional 800 to 1,000 AFY of recycled water to meet water demands of its
customers. The annual variations are due primarily to year-to-year fluctuations in temperature,
humidity, and precipitation. The rate of water delivery during the hottest summer months
(maximum month) and highest use day (maximum day) are considerably higher than the
average and become the primary considerations in a source adequacy evaluation. Table 3-2
shows the past five years of potable system water importation on a monthly basis.

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Water Supply Sources


Table 3-2. Five Year Water Importation History
Imported Water (Average MGD per month)
J

Total
(MG)

Avg
(MGD)

2003

5.5

5.2

5.3

5.7

6.7

7.2

8.0

8.1

7.6

7.1

5.8

5.6

2394

6.56

2004

5.5

5.2

5.9

6.8

7.9

8.2

8.5

8.2

8.3

6.2

5.7

5.9

2504

6.86

2005

4.2

4.6

4.4

6.7

7.1

7.5

6.9

7.3

6.9

5.4

6.5

5.9

2234

6.12

8.1

7.8

6.8

6.1

5.2

2325

6.37

Year

2006

5.6

5.9

2.9

4.7

6.4

7.3

9.7

(1)

2007
5.7
5.1
5.8
6.6
7.1
6.9
7.9
8.5
7.7
7.3
6.4
4.6
2420
6.63
(1)
Imported water deliveries abnormally high due to augmentation of recycled water system necessitated by
temporary shutdown of Coastal AWT.

From the table above, a typical year delivery pattern can be established. Using the calendar
year 2004 as a representative year, Figure 3-3 on the following page illustrates the variation in
monthly water demands during a typical year. Daily variation in water demands during typical
maximum month and the hourly variation in water demands during a typical maximum day
are also shown.
The maximum monthly demand normally occurs during July or August. In Figure 3-3 (Typical
Year Hydrograph), the deliveries during July averaged 8.5 MGD, or about 125 percent of the
annual average. The seasonal peaking is due primarily to the increase in irrigation demands.
During the maximum month, there are individual days when the water demands exceed the
maximum month average. The maximum day demand (MDD) will most likely occur during a
hot summer weekend or holiday when there is a large transient population influx concurrent with
high irrigation demands. In Figure 3-3 (Typical Maximum Month Hydrograph), the MDD in the
SCWD is assumed to be approximately 115 percent of the average demand during the
maximum month.
Water demands also fluctuate greatly during the day, and the Districts water system must be
able to deliver water to users at the maximum instantaneous rate (i.e., peak hour demand).
Figure 3-3 (Typical Maximum Day Hydrograph) depicts the actual observed demands in a
portion of the Districts system, illustrative of typical diurnal variation in demands during the day.
It is seen in Figure 3-3 that the peak hour demand rate takes place at about 8:30 a.m. and is
about 1.9 times the average demand during the day. However, diurnal variation in demands is
equalized by operational storage within the various pressure zones, and is thus not a
consideration in the analysis of source adequacy. Diurnal demands are, however, a major
consideration in the evaluation of the adequacy of the Districts internal water storage and
distribution facilities for both the potable and recycled water systems (see Chapters 4 and 6).

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Infrastructure Master Plan
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Max. Month
8.5 MGD

10

Avg 6.9 MGD


7700 AFY
5

J F M A M J J A S O N D
Max. Day
9.8 MGD

TYPICAL YEAR

10

MGD

Avg 8.5 MGD


5

MG

20

Peak Hour
18 MGD Rate

31

Days
TYPICAL MAX. MONTH
Schematic

10

Avg 9.8 MG
From Storage
To Storage

12 AM

12 NOON

12 PM

TYPICAL MAX. DAY


Schematic
POTABLE WATER DELIVERIES
H:wtrres\SCWD\620889 SCWD MPs\Rpt\FnlRpt\FinalFigs\
0620889demandHydro-Comp.cdr October 29, 2008

FIGURE 3-3
South Coast Water District Master Plan
November 2008

Water Supply Sources


Table 3-3 is a summary of the rates of potable water delivery that must be considered in the
evaluation of supply sources and the subsequent distribution system analyses.
Table 3-3. Potable Water System Requirements
Million Gallons per
Day (MGD)

Rate of Delivery
(cfs)

Volume
(AF)

Annual (average)

6.9

10.6

7,700/yr

Maximum Month (1.25 x annual average)

8.5

13.1

800/month

Maximum Day (1.15 x maximum month)

9.8

15.1

30/day

Peak Hour (1.9 x maximum day)

NA

28.6

N/A

Role of Emergency Storage


Water stored within or near the Districts service area serves at least one and often a
combination of the following three purposes:
1. Operational storage Normally provided in steel or concrete reservoirs at an elevation
adequate to serve each pressure zone by gravity. The purpose of operational storage is
to equalize diurnal demand variations. Storage for this purpose usually amounts to
about 25 percent of the maximum day demand for the zone it serves (see Chapter 4).
2. Fire Storage Normally provided for each zone in the same tanks as the operational
storage (see Chapter 4).
3. Emergency Storage Emergency storage is a volume of water held in reserve to
replace or supplement the normal sources during planned or unplanned outages or
interruptions of water deliveries. It can be provided in the same tanks as operational and
fire storage for each zone. It can also be provided in separate reservoirs in the proximity
of the service area.
An analysis of the Districts distribution (zone) storage is presented in Chapter 4. It is concluded
that the District has about 11.9 MG of emergency storage in its zone storage tanks, over and
above the operational and fire storage requirements. In addition, the District owns 12.8 MG of
emergency storage capacity in the nearby Bradt Reservoir. In an emergency, this water can be
delivered to the various subsystems and pressure zones as necessary. Also, as previously
discussed, the District is participating in the Upper Chiquita Reservoir project for an additional
49 AF of storage, of which about 40 AF will be held in reserve as emergency storage.
Table 3-4 summarizes the Districts potable water storage capacity and what it can provide in an
emergency outage of the imported water system.

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Table 3-4. Summary of District Storage Capacity
Total Storage
Location of Storage

Emergency Storage

Million Gallons

Acre Feet

Million Gallons

Acre Feet

Distribution Storage

19.9

61

11.9

37

Bradt Reservoir

12.8

39

12.8

39

Upper Chiquita (Future)

16.0

49

13.0

40

Total

48.7

149

37.7

116

(1)

(1)

A detailed analysis of Distribution Storage is presented in Chapter 4.

From Table 3-4 and the summary of potable water requirements in Table 3-3, the following is
concluded:

The Districts total storage capacity (including the Districts share in future Upper
Chiquita Reservoir) is adequate to supply seven days of average demand, and about 5.7
days of maximum month demand.

The Districts emergency storage, including Upper Chiquita Reservoir, is adequate to


supply about 5.5 days of average demand, and 4.4 days of maximum month demand.

In the event of a complete importation system outage (planned or unplanned) or a temporary


reduction in the rate of delivery of imported water, emergency storage water would be
withdrawn from a combination of the reservoirs.
Any local sources of supply, such as the Districts new GRF, would reduce dependence on
imported water and extend the number of days that emergency storage would meet District
demands in the event of an importation system outage or reduction in delivery rates. The GRF
at its current rate of production (about 0.8 MGD) reduces the Districts average import
requirements to about 6.1 MGD. Therefore, emergency storage can replace about six average
days of the imported supply source.
During a complete but short term importation system outage expected to last several days, the
District would undoubtedly enact emergency water conservation measures to reduce demands.
If average day potable system demands were reduced by 30 percent, the Districts designated
emergency storage could replace the imported water source for nearly nine average days. A
similar demand adjustment would extend the maximum month duration to just over seven days.
Emergency storage thus provides insurance against short term disruptions to the imported
supply, and can also be used to augment supplies in the District in the event of a temporary
reduction in available water. An example would be an outage of the ATM, which normally
delivers about 2.6 cfs to the District through the Canyon 20-inch pipeline in the summer months.
To make up the 2.7 cfs shortfall, about 1.74 MGD would need to be withdrawn from storage.
The Districts emergency storage would be able to provide augmentation water at this rate for
about three weeks. A more serious emergency would be an outage of the JTM, which typically
supplies up to 4.2 cfs during the summer months, and would deplete the Districts emergency
storage in about 13 days.

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Figure 3-4 shows the approximate duration of the Districts designated emergency storage
(including Upper Chiquita Reservoir) under various withdrawal rates.

Figure 3-4. Emergency Storage Duration Curve

3.6.3 Comparative Evaluation of Source Enhancement Projects


As summarized in Table 3-5, preliminary estimates of the costs of the various alternatives are
compiled to assist District management in decisions regarding which source projects, if any, to
pursue. As previously discussed, all reliability projects are not comparable in that they achieve
different objectives. Thus, the source augmentation projects are considered separately. Unit
costs are generally expressed in terms of dollars per acre foot ($/AF), which include amortized
facility costs and ongoing operation and maintenance (O&M) costs apportioned over the per AF
yield of the project.
Table 3-5. Estimated Units Costs of Source Augmentation Alternatives

Project

Yield to SCWD
Annual AF CFS
(1)

Amortized Facility
$/AF

(9)

O&M
$/AF

Subsidy
$/AF

(8)

Net to SCWD
$/AF

(5)

Recycled Water System Expansion


239
0.60
1,015
200
250
965
(2)
(6)
Aliso Creek Water Harvesting
100
0.25
720
450
250
920
(3)
(7)
(7)
(7)
(7)
Dana Point Ocean Desalination
3,500
5.40
552
735
250
1037
(4)
Aliso Creek Streamflow Recovery
1800
3.10
600
350
250
700
(1)
Tier I defined in Chapter 6
(2)
Golf Course (100 AFY) and other salinity sensitive customers added as a result of TDS improvement
(3)
Assume SCWD 3.5 MGD share of 15 MGD capacity. Assume 90% load factor.
(4)
Assume 2 MGD capacity; 80% load factor (i.e., plant not operating during stormwater flow events)
(5)
Averaged cost of Tier I
(6)
Assume that Water Harvesting Plant and appurtenances equal $4.5 million facility cost and that RW contribution is
about 20 percent.
(7)
From MWDOC Report July 2007
(8)
MWDOC 2008 charge for imported water = $528.50/AF is estimated to increase to $603.50/AF in January 2009.
(9)
Maximum sustained rate of delivery
3-21

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Water Supply Sources


Also, as previously noted, the District is already committed to participation in key regional import
system reliability projects underway. The District is a partner in the Upper Chiquita Reservoir
emergency storage project and is proceeding to expand its new GRF project to the extent
feasible.

3.6.4 Ultimate Water Source Scenarios


To assess the Districts ability to provide adequate water to its constituency under various
emergency conditions, several source scenarios are simulated in the following paragraphs and
illustrations shown in Figure 3-5. In this assessment, total water demands include recycled
water demands since the recycled water source is comparable to potable water sources in its
function of satisfying a portion of the Districts demands. The following assumptions are
common to each scenario:
1. Total maximum day water demands in the District at buildout are estimated to be about
12.3 MGD (19 cfs). Maximum month demands are estimated to be about 11 MGD (17
cfs).
2. Assuming that an emergency import system outage or reduction occurs during the peak
summer use period, the District must be able to supply water at the maximum month
demand rate.
3. During a short term emergency (up to 7 days) of a complete outage of the imported
supply, the District could, without serious impact to its constituency, readily reduce
demands by 10 to 15 percent. The maximum month reduced demand would then be
about 15 cfs.
4. Source reliability projects already underway by the District are assumed to be in place in
all of the scenarios. These include:

IRWD interconnect tie to allow flexibility of deliveries between the ARM and AMP
supply lines

Expansion of the Districts GRF to be able to produce about 2 MGD (3 cfs)

Emergency storage in Upper Chiquita Reservoir (40 AF of the Districts 49 AF share,


designated for emergency storage)

5. Contemplated source augmentation projects are assumed to be implemented as


required to meet demands in the various outage and shortage scenarios.
The illustrations in Figure 3-5 depict the Districts current and ultimate supply source mix under
the scenarios described above.

3-22

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

s
cf

AMP
SCP
WIP

UCR
3

BR&ZS

s
cf

GRF

s
cf

s
cf

GRF

AMP
SCP
WIP

cf
s

4 cfs

MDD =
15 cfs

MDD =
19 cfs

EOCF2
JTM

BCR
LB 1 cfs
CL

cf
s

s
cf

6 cf
s

2.5 cfs

RW

0 cf
s

EOCF2
JTM

RW

5
3.

EOCF2
ATM
CP
GW
IRWD
fs
1c

3 cfs

EOCF2
ATM
CP

ULTIMATE SHORT-TERM EMERGENCY


(7 DAY) SCENARIO

ULTIMATE NORMAL SCENARIO

cf

BR&ZS

1 cfs?

3 cfs

EOCF2
JTM

1 cf
s

RW

s
cf

EOCF2
ATM
CP

AMP
SCP
WIP

5.8
cf s

DPOD

s
cf

SRF

s
cf

GRF

ULTIMATE LONG-TERM SHORTAGE SCENARIO

AMP - Allen-McColloch Pipeline


ATM- Aufdenkamp Transmission Main
BCR - Big Canyon Reservoir
BR - Bradt Reservoir
BWTP - Baker Water Treatment Plant
CL - Coast Line
CP - Canyon Pipeline
DPOD - Dana Point Ocean Desalter
EOCF2 - East Orange County Feeder No.2
GRF - Groundwater Recovery Facility

GW - OC Basin Groundwater
IRWD - Irvine Ranch Water District
JTM - Joint Transmission Main
LB - Laguna Beach
RW - Recycled Water
SCP -South County Pipeline
SRF - Streamflow Recovery Facility
UCR - Upper Chiquita Reservoir
WIP - Water Importation Pipeline
ZS - Zone Storage

MDD - Maximum Day Demand


cfs - Cubic Feet/Second

3c
fs?

MDD =
17 cfs

s
cf

s
cf

cf

SRF

SRF
ULTIMATE INTERMEDIATE-TERM EMERGENCY
(31 DAY) SCENARIO

5
2.

3c
fs?

cfs
2.5

GRF

AMP
SCP
WIP

MDD =
17 cfs

MDD = 1.5 cfs


11.5
17 cfs
cfs

3c
fs?

AMP
SCP
WIP

EOCF2
JTM

4 cf
s

UCR

3 cfs

0 cf
s

BWTP

RW

s
cf

3 cfs

EOCF2
JTM

cfs
1.5

s
cf

BCR
LB

GW
IRWD
fs
1c

RW

EOCF2
ATM
CP
5
1.

EOCF2
ATM
CP

cf
s?

GW

GRF

ULTIMATE LONG-TERM SHORTAGE


WITH OCEAN DESALINATION SCENARIO
H:wtrres\SCWD\620889 SCWD MPs\Rpt\FinalRpt\FinalFigs\
0620889supplyComp.cdr October 30, 2008

SOURCE MIX SCENARIOS


FIGURE 3-5
South Coast Water District Master Plan
November 2008

Water Supply Sources


From the illustrations in Figure 3-5, the following can be concluded:
Ultimate Normal Scenario
Assuming the imported water sources and facilities are operating in a normal mode (i.e.,
adequate imported water and ability to deliver at the rated capacities), the District would likely
meet its ultimate maximum demands as shown. The GRF is assumed to have been expanded
to be able to produce at the rated plant capacity of about 2 MGD (3 cfs). The recycled water
system having undergone a modest expansion is delivering about 2.5 cfs. The imported water
system is delivering water through both the EOCF 2 and AMP conveyance systems as follows:

ATM/Canyon Pipeline (EOCF 2) = 3.5 cfs


JTM (EOCF 2) = 6 cfs
SCP/WIP (AMP) = 4 cfs

Ultimate Short Term Emergency (7-day) Scenario


This scenario assumes complete curtailment of the imported supply from the Diemer Plant,
caused by either a planned or unplanned shutdown of the Diemer Plant or its water sources,
with the District having been advised to expect a 7-day outage of the AMP and EOCF 2
supplies. In this short term emergency, the District is assumed to enact measures to reduce
water demands by 10 to 15 percent from the 17 cfs maximum month demand rate, bringing the
demand rate down to about 15 cfs. To replace the imported sources the following is assumed:

The expanded GRF = 3 cfs


The recycled water system, expanded to its maximum reasonable potential = 3 cfs
The IRWD interconnect through the ATM/CP = 1 cfs
Water acquired from the City of Newport Beach; about 14 AF total from Big Canyon
Reservoir delivered from Laguna Beach through the Coast Pipeline interconnect = 1 cfs
Water from emergency storage in the Districts zone reservoirs and the Bradt Reservoir
at a measured rate = 4 cfs
Water from Upper Chiquita Reservoir emergency storage withdrawn at a measured rate
= 3 cfs

Ultimate Intermediate Term Emergency (31-day) Scenario


This scenario assumes that a more severe, but temporary, outage of the imported supply
source occurs, caused by an earthquake or similar event that would shut the system down for a
predictable one-month period. It is assumed that for this longer term outage, the District would
need to be able to provide water at the maximum month demand rate to avoid negative
consequences to its customers. The longer term outage means that the District must withdraw
water from its emergency storage at a much slower rate and would need to have other sources
available. The possible source scenario is shown as follows:

The expanded GRF = 3 cfs


The recycled water system, expanded to its maximum reasonable potential = 3 cfs
The IRWD interconnect through the ATM/CP = 1 cfs
60 AF of water acquired from the City of Newport Beach; about 14 AF from Big Canyon
Reservoir delivered from Laguna Beach through the Coast Pipeline interconnect = 1 cfs
Water from emergency storage in the BCR and zone storage = 1.5 cfs

3-24

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Water Supply Sources

Water from Upper Chiquita Reservoir emergency storage withdrawn at a measured


rate = 1 cfs
New: Baker Water Treatment Plant = 1.5 cfs
New: Streamflow Recovery Facility = 3 cfs
New Groundwater stored in Orange County Basin delivered through EOCF/ATM/CP =
2 cfs

If one or more of the above-assumed projects/sources is not implemented or available, the


District would need to have other alternatives in place, or would not be able to fully satisfy
maximum month demands. Note, however, that if the emergency outage occurred at any time
other than the maximum month, the scenario would be less onerous because the demands
would be less.
Ultimate Long Term Shortage Scenario
It is assumed in this scenario that the Districts imported water sources would be permanently,
or at least for several years, reduced from the normal scenario by about 30 percent from a
maximum month delivery rate of about 16 cfs to 11 cfs. In this case, the District would receive
no benefit from its emergency storage or from IRWD or Orange County Basin groundwater
storage. Other local or regional sources would need to be in place to make up the difference.
In addition to the expanded GRF and recycled water systems, it is assumed that the Aliso Creek
Streamflow Recovery project is able to provide water to the potable system at a rate of 3 cfs.
Thus, the District would be supplying over half of its needed maximum month demands from its
own local sources.
Ultimate Long Term Shortage Scenario with Ocean Desalination
Should the Dana Point Ocean Desalination project become a reality and assuming the District
would be able to secure a one-quarter share (5.4 cfs) of the 15 MGD capacity, dependence on
the imported supply would be greatly reduced. Assuming the Aliso Creek Streamflow Recovery
Project was also implemented, the District could meet about 85 percent of its maximum month
needs from its own local sources. However, it is somewhat unlikely that both the Ocean
Desalination and the Streamflow Recovery projects would be implemented. If the Streamflow
Recovery Project were not in place, the Ocean Desalination Project and other local sources
would still be able to satisfy about two thirds of the Districts maximum month demands.

3.6.5 Summary Findings


From the source mix scenarios described above, which represent a range of possible shortage
and source assumptions, it is generally concluded that:
1. The District, assuming Upper Chiquita Reservoir and expansion of its GRF and recycled
water sources come to fruition, is well positioned to accommodate a short term (7 day)
import system outage.
2. To accommodate an intermediate term (one month) import system outage during the
maximum demand season, the District would need to have additional local sources in
place and/or regional facilities and cooperation. Local sources could include the Dana
Point Ocean Desalination Project or the Aliso Creek SRF Project.
Regional
projects/programs could include withdrawals from Big Canyon Reservoir, stored water
3-25

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Water Supply Sources


extracted from the Main Orange County or Irvine groundwater basins, and production
from the Baker Treatment Plant (derived from Lake Mathews and/or Irvine Lake).
3. The District is vulnerable, as are all of the south county agencies, to long term shortages
of the imported water source. Permanent or multi-year cutbacks, resulting from one or
more of a variety of causes previously discussed, cannot be remedied by emergency
surface or groundwater storage. Local and regional solutions would need to include one
or a combination of ocean desalination or stream flow recovery projects. In the absence
of these new local/regional sources, or radical statewide action such as a peripheral
canal and massive new storage facilities, the District could not provide adequate water
to satisfy current or projected future maximum month demands.

3.7

Summary of Recommended Improvements

The following is a summary of the specific recommended projects and actions, consistent with
the three-fold general water source strategy stated in Section 3.6.1. All recommended projects
and studies have been identified in Phase I. Estimated capital costs are included in Chapter 7.
Recommended District actions are summarized below the summary of the ultimate source mix
scenario (below Figure 3-6).
Phase I 5-Year Supply Capacity CIP (2009-2013)
WS-1 Upper Chiquita Reservoir. Continue participation in the SMWD Upper Chiquita
Reservoir Project. Of its 49 AF share, SCWD intends to utilize approximately 9 AF for
operational storage to stabilize maximum day demands. The remainder (40 AF) will be
reserved as emergency storage.
WS-2 Lower San Juan GW Basin Operations Study. Conduct or sponsor the initiation of
an Operations Study of the Lower San Juan Creek Groundwater Basin to assess the impacts
of the Ocean Desalination project and other activities on the Districts expanded GRF.
WS-3 GRF Expansion. Well, siting study, 2nd well, connecting pipeline, and treatment plant
expansion.
WS-4 IRWD Interconnect. Continue participation in the IRWD Interconnect project, and to
preserve the option for capacity on an emergency basis in the planned new Baker Treatment
Plant, as directed by the Board.
WS-5 Aliso Creek Streamflow Recovery. Initiate a feasibility investigation to assess the
viability of capturing and treating perennial streamflows in Aliso Creek (and possibly Salt Creek)
for injection into the Districts potable system. As discussed in Section 3.6.3, these two stream
courses are consistently discharging a combined total of about 12 to 15 cfs of urban runoff to
the ocean a significant amount of water which needs to be treated to meet urban runoff
regulations.
Treatment processes to produce a potable supply would likely include
microstraining, microfiltration, possibly nano-filtration, RO, and UV or ozonation disinfection.
The product water would be suitable for the potable system or for blending with the recycled
water supply to reduce TDS.

3-26

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Water Supply Sources


WS-6 Dana Point Ocean Desalination. Participate in the continuing investigations and
negotiations regarding the Dana Point Ocean Desalination Plant (or a seawater desalination
vessel if it proves to be a superior alternative). The Districts ongoing share of cost is estimated
by MWDOC to be about $200,000/year for the next three years of pre-design activities,
assuming all five participating agencies continue their support. At the point where costs would
greatly escalate (i.e., the onset of environmental processing and/or design), there should be
sufficient information on ultimate cost sharing, actual costs, and alternative sources to allow the
District to make an informed decision on whether or not to support/participate.
WS-7 Baker Treatment Plant Study. Continue participation in the IRWD Interconnect
project, and to preserve the option for capacity on an emergency basis in the planned new
Baker Treatment Plant, as directed by the Board.
The ultimate source mix scenario for the South Coast Water District will likely bear little
resemblance to the current one, with local sources having a significant impact, as depicted in
Figure 3-6.

Figure 3-6. SCWD Water Sources

Below is a summary of recommended District actions that correspond to the ultimate source mix
scenario.

Ensure that the Districts system is able to transfer adequate water from the south WIPsupplied system to the north system, so that emergency storage in the Upper Chiquita
Reservoir can be delivered to the entire District system in the event of an import system
outage (AMP/JTM; AMP/SCP or both).

Ensure that the emergency delivery system through the Coast Line interconnect to Laguna
Beach is serviceable, to make it physically feasible to receive water from that system,
including Big Canyon Reservoir. Make sure that the Districts system is able to transfer this
water from north to south and visa versa.
3-27

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Water Supply Sources

Expand the Districts recycled water market to include at least the identified Tier I customers.

Encourage MWDOC and fellow South County agencies to continue efforts to secure
significant groundwater storage and extraction facilities in the Main Orange County Basin to
provide local water to bridge short term import system outages or supplement supplies
during seasonal shortfalls.

Stay involved and active in future MWD and statewide efforts to pursue a needed Delta
improvements and major storage facilities to bolster SWP supplies. Monitor and give input
in the continuing MWD deliberations on water shortage allocation policy.

Monitor the potential for actual implementation of the proposed large ocean desalination
plant in Huntington Beach that would inject product water into EOCF 2.

Since the three major new source augmentation projects (i.e., Dana Point Ocean
Desalination, Aliso Creek Stream Flow Recovery, and Huntington Beach Ocean
Desalination) are all very costly projects, unless additional subsidies or broader financial
participation is forthcoming, the District should proceed with caution to avoid paying an
inordinate share to develop alternative sources which have statewide benefit. It is unlikely
that the District could afford capacity in more than one of these major projects, and thus it is
recommended to focus on the most viable, cost effective project when sufficient information
is available to make that determination.

In summary, if the District is able, through one or a combination of local projects, to provide
even a relatively modest additional increment of its needed supply, its constituency would be
much less likely to suffer from outage or reduction in the imported supplies. Also, should new
development or redevelopment proposals arise in the future, the District would likely be able to
avoid the consequences of negative WSA reports based on uncertain imported water picture.
This would allow currently unforeseen development or revitalization in the District to proceed, to
the benefit of the SCWD service area community.
The local source enhancements, along with maximizing the recycled water potential, would also
serve to immunize the District from the consequences of possible mandated restrictions on
landscape irrigation use which, in the event of extreme shortages in the imported sources, is
considered a lower priority use of the potable supply.

3-28

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Chapter 4
Water Distribution System Master Plan
This chapter comprises the master planning element of the potable water distribution system
within the District and includes a detailed description of the operation of the existing system and
an evaluation of potable water storage and pumping capacity. The Districts newly calibrated
hydraulic computer model is presented, as well as the findings of the distribution system
hydraulic analyses. Recommended water distribution system improvements are included and
are based on District design criteria.

4.1

Existing Water System Description

The existing potable water distribution system essentially consists of the former Capistrano
Beach Water District and South Coast distribution systems. These water systems operate as
two separate service areas under two separate State of California drinking water permits. There
are emergency interconnections between the two water systems and with other nearby water
agencies to enhance the Districts water system reliability. In total, the Districts water system
includes 147 miles of water main, nine pressure zones (PZs), nine booster pump stations, and
fourteen water storage reservoirs storing 22 MG of potable water. As discussed in Chapter 3,
an additional 12.8 MG of storage is available in the Bradt Reservoir, located along the WIP at
the south end of the system. The District also maintains 1,500 fire hydrants in its service area.
Figure 4-1 presents the Districts existing water system pressure zones and locates the major
facilities, such as reservoirs and pump stations. The pressure zones generally represent
isolated service areas, usually defined by a reservoir elevation, pump station discharge
pressure, or flow/pressure control facilities. The existing water system hydraulic schematic is
presented in Figure 4-2.
South Coast System
Referring to Figure 4-1, the South Coast water system serves the northern portion of the
District, including portions of the cities of Laguna Beach and Dana Point. The water system
includes the 290, 415, 430, 490, and 690 PZs, and a joint 920 PZ, operated jointly between
SWCD and MNWD and is normally supplied from the Canyon Supply Line from the north and
the WIP Line from the south. The GRF is also able to feed directly into the WIP and to the
South Coast System.
Capistrano Beach System
The Capistrano Beach water system serves the southern portion of the District and consists of
two separate subsystems (serving Dana Point and Capistrano Beach), roughly divided by Lower
San Juan Creek, as shown on Figure 4-1. The Dana Point Subsystem includes the 390, 470,
and 217 PZs and is normally supplied via connections to the Joint Transmission Main (JTM) and
the new Groundwater Recovery Facility (GRF), which became operational in December 2007.
The Capistrano Beach Subsystem consists of only a 345 PZ and is normally supplied by the
Juanita Connection, a pressure reducing station connected to the JTM. Approximately 15
homes are serviced at an HGL of 437 feet from the City of San Clemente.
4-1

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Water Distribution System Master Plan


4.1.1 Existing System Pressure Zones
The following sections describe the individual pressure zones throughout the District, from the
north (South Coast System) to the south (Capistrano Beach System). The major pressure zones
include the 290, 490, 415 in the South Coast System and the 390 and 345 in the Capistrano
Beach System. In the South Coast System, the District utilizes an alpha numeric naming
convention for its pressure zones (Zones A through E) and reservoirs (R-1-A, R-2-A, etc.). In
the Capistrano Beach System, the pressure zones and reservoirs are named by the area they
serve.
South Coast System
290 (Zone A) Pressure Zone. The 290 PZ is generally located along the western boundary of
the District following the Pacific Coast Highway (PCH) corridor in the South Coast System and
is the lowest PZ in the South Coast System. This zone is normally served at the north District
Boundary, from the Canyon Supply Line, which is supplied by the Aufdenkamp Transmission
Main (ATM). Typically, a constant flow is ordered off the ATM. In emergency conditions this
zone can be served from the south by the Water Importation Pipeline (WIP) and JTM via the
415 PZ and from the north by the Coast Supply Line.
Five storage reservoirs (R-1-A, 2-A, 4-A, 5-A, and 5-A1) provide a total of 7.6 MG of operational,
fire, and emergency storage for the zone, as well as forebay storage for pump stations serving
the 490 PZ. This zone, under emergency conditions, can also supply a portion of the City of
Laguna Beach water system (not normally served by the District) through a pressure reducing
station. The 290 PZ supplies water to the upper 490 PZ through Pump Stations (PS) #3 and #4,
and to the closed 430 PZ through PS #2.
430 (Zone B) Pressure Zone. The 430 PZ is generally located to the east of PCH and to the
north of Aliso Creek. The 430 PZ is an isolated (closed) system served by PS #2 from the 290
PZ.
490 (Zone B) Pressure Zone. The 490 PZ is generally located to the east of PCH also in the
northern part of the District in the South Coast System. The zone is normally supplied water
through PSs #3 and #4. Four storage tanks (R-2-B, 3-B, 4-B, and 4-B1) provide a total of 1.7
MG of operational, fire, and emergency storage for this zone. This zone also supplies water
from the 4-B Reservoir to the 690 PZ through PS #5.
690 (Zone C) Pressure Zone. The 690 PZ is located in the bluffs, north of Crown Valley
Parkway, in the South Coast System. This zone is normally supplied through PS #5 from the
490 PZ. Reservoir 2-C provides 0.5 MG of storage. In emergency conditions, this zone can be
supplied from MNWD through Meter Vault #1 and from the 920 PZ through the Sea Island Drive
PRS. This zone can also supply water to MNWD through Meter Vault #1 and the 920 PZ
through PS #7 in emergency conditions. Normally closed valves isolate the 690 PZ from
MNWD supplies and would need to be manually opened during emergencies.

4-2

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Alicia

Antonio

Aliso Viejo
oa
C
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Ma

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ills

R-1A

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74

74

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PS # 1

430 - ZONE B (Closed)

oV

Laguna Beach




k
j


PS # 2

R-1E

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R-2A

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rn

k PS # 7
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La

San Juan Capistrano

k

kj
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De
D e l A v io n

oa

lO

Val

R-5B

st

PS # 6

R-5A






k
j
k
j

R-DP
Stonehill

PS # 8

Ston

ehill Stonehill

el Norte

Dana Point
k




PS # 9
k
j

Portico D

Upper 345 PZ
437 HGL from San Clemente
Serves Approx. 15 Homes

as
t

290 - ZONE A

sM
ar e

tH

217 - (HARBOR)

BRADT

k
j
RESERVOIR

Co

ar b
or

Del Prado

D oh

Pressure Zone + Name

eny

Pa r

Legend

D e Lo

Dana P o i n

345 - Capo Beach

tr e

San Clemente

De

430 - ZONE B (Closed)

Es

PACIFIC
OCEAN

415 - ZONE B-1

lla

390 - Dana Point

470 - Dana Point Boosted (Closed)

P ic

490 - ZONE B
690 - ZONE C

920 - ZONE E




is

Pump Station
Water Reservoir
South Coast Water District Boundary
Municipal Boundary
Freeway

Major Road

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De l C e

U
V
1

El

Feet

Highway

tra
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11/19/08 KM KM Z:\Projects\IS\SCWD\MXD\ReportFigures\FinalReport\WaterPressureZones.mxd

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PS # 5

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PS # 4 R-4A

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PS # 3

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Crown Valley

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m

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o

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al

Figure 4-1
South Coast Water District
WATER PRESSURE ZONE MAP

2.0 MG
OVERFLOW
SCWD 0.98 CAP
MNWD 1.02 CAP

900

LEGEND

920

900

0.5 MG

TO AND FROM MNWD

690

RESERVOIR
PUMP STATION
PRESSURE REDUCING STATION

800
M

700

EMERGENCY INTERCONNECTION

SEA ISLAND DRIVE


2000-2500 GPM
(EMERGENCYMANUAL CONTROL)

(EMERGENCY
CONNECTION
NORMALLY
CLOSED)

METER
(NORMALLY CLOSED VALVE)

0.5 MG

FLOW DIRECTION

690

700

FROM MNWD

METER
VAULT #1
450 GPM

FLOW CONTROL
EMERGENCY

600

600

Capacity:
4 CFS

P1 & P2
375 GPM EA
1.0 MG

490

490

490

490

430 HGL
(GRID)

400

(NORMALLY
CLOSED)

Coast
Supply Line

P1&P2
1500 GPM
EA

PS#1

P1 & P2
550 GPM EA

P1 400 gpm
P2&P3
3300 GPM
0.6 MG
290

290

Canyon
Supply Line
(CONSTANT FLOW
CALLED IN BY SCWD)

2.0 MG

JTM (420)

415

24

290

470 HGL

JTM (420)

2.0 MG
390

JTM (420)

(METER
STONEHILL)

2.4 MG
16
18/16
290

4500 GPM

2.0 MG

(EMERGENCY
CONNECTIONS
FROM SCWD INTO CAPO)

PS#6

P1 & P2
1000 GPM EA
(EMERGENCY)

(UNK HGL)
(EMERGENCY)

SOUTH COAST SYSTEM

(EMERGENCY
CONNECTION
MANUALLY OPENED
SCADA CONTROL METER)

(EMERGENCYNORMALLY
CLOSED)

FROM CITY OF
SAN CLEMENTE

420

PS#8

(PRV-REGULATED
BY PRESSURE
IN 345 PZ)

CAPO
BEACH
345 HGL

PS#9

290

500

400
M

7.8 MG
(7.1 MG SCWD)

(LEVEL CONTROLLED
FROM 4B RESERVOIR)

0.6 MG

415

GOLDEN
LANTERN 900 GPM

P1 & P2
900 GPM EA

(LEVEL CONTROLLED
FROM 2B RESERVOIR)

2.0 MG

FCMV#1

437 HGL

(420)

PS#4

PS#3

PS#2

300

Laguna
Beach

(PRS & PRV FOR


EMERGENCY
INTERCONNECTIONS)

MNWD SYSTEM

Capacity:
8 CFS

P1 750 GPM
P2 750 GPM

BEACH ROAD
INTER-TIE

0.5 MG

JUANITA

0.1 MG

MNWD SYSTEM

0.1 MG
500

WIP (540)

MNWD PID#1

VICTORIA
INTER-TIE

PS#5

ELEVATION IN FEET

PS#7

P1 850 GPM

800

GRF

300
SAN JUAN
CAPISTRANO
250 HGL

DANA POINT
HARBOR
217 HGL

CAPISTRANO BEACH SYSTEM

EXISTING
POTABLE WATER SYSTEM
SCHEMATIC
FIGURE 4-2
H:Waterres\SouthCoastWD\620889SCWD_MPs\Report\FINALrpt\FinalFigs\620889syst-Schem-Exist.cdr

November 19, 2008

South Coast Water District Master Plan


November 2008

Water Distribution System Master Plan


920 (Zone E) Pressure Zone. The 920 PZ is a joint water system between MNWD and SCWD,
normally supplied and operated by MNWD. It is located just north of the 690 PZ. Only a few
SCWD customers are served by this pressure zone, through a water service agreement with
MNWD. The 1-E Reservoir provides 2.0 MG of storage for this zone, to which SCWD holds
capacity rights for 0.98 MG, reserved largely for emergency conditions. This zone can be
supplied water by SCWD 690 PZ through PS #7 in an emergency and can supply water to the
690 PZ via the Sea Island Drive PRS, also in an emergency.
415 (Zone B-1) Pressure Zone. The 415 PZ is located in the bluffs of Dana Point in the South
Coast System and encompasses a large portion of the City of Dana Point. The zone is normally
supplied by the WIP through Flow Control Meter Vault #1 (FCMV #1). Typically, a constant flow
is ordered off the WIP based on the anticipated daily zone demand. In an emergency condition,
this zone can be served by the JTM through the Golden Lantern interconnection. The
emergency connections are normally closed. Two storage tanks (Tanks R-5B and 5B-1) provide
a total of 9.1 MG of operational, fire, and emergency storage for this zone. Tank 5B-1 has a total
capacity of 7.8 MG, of which 7.1 MG is reserved for SCWD and the remaining 0.7 MG is
reserved for Moulton Niguel Water District (MNWD).
The 415 PZ can also be supplied water by the 290 PZ through PS #6. This mode of operation
allows water to be conveyed through the entire length of the 290 PZ during low demand periods
and improves the cycling of the 5A Reservoir and overall water quality in the 290 PZ. In
emergency conditions, the 415 PZ can back feed water to the 290 PZ through a PRS located at
PS #6, or to the Capistrano Beach System 390 PZ through the La Cresta Interconnection
(normally closed valves), located near the Dana Point Reservoir.
Capistrano Beach System
Dana Point Subsystem
390 (Dana Point) Pressure Zone. The 390 PZ is located in the central Dana Point community,
just north of the Dana Point Harbor and was part of the old Capistrano Beach System. This
zone is normally supplied water by the JTM through the Stonehill metered connection, which is
normally an on demand supply through an altitude valve. The Dana Point Reservoir stores 2.0
MG and is the only storage for this zone. The 390 PZ also supplies water to the upper 470 PZ
through PS #8 and PS #9 and the pressure reduced 217 PZ through two pressure reducing
stations (PRSs). In emergency conditions, this zone can be supplied water by the 415 PZ
through the La Cresta Interconnection or through normally closed valves located near the Dana
Point Reservoir. The La Cresta Interconnection is the location where the District can convey
water from the South Coast system to the Capistrano Beach system. The 390 PZ can also
potentially supply water in an emergency to the 345 PZ through normally closed valves located
near San Juan Creek. Currently, another emergency connection is under construction in the
Headlands development and could supply water to the 390 PZ from the 415 PZ through a PRV.
470 (Dana Point Boosted) Pressure Zone. The 470 PZ is located in Dana Point and includes
the highest service elevations situated between the 415 and 390 PZs in the Dana Point
Subsystem. The 470 PZ is supplied water from the 390 PZ under normal operation by PS #8
(Granada) and through PS #9 in emergency condition, such as fire flow demand. The 470 PZ
operates as a closed system with no storage reservoir and relies entirely on the pump station(s)
to supply flow and pressure.

4-7

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Water Distribution System Master Plan


217 (Harbor) Pressure Zone. The 217 PZ is located at the Dana Point Harbor in the
Capistrano Beach System and serves some of the lowest elevations in the District. The 217 PZ
is supplied water from the 390 PZ under normal operations by two PRSs located at Dana Point
Harbor Drive and PCH, and at Dana Point Harbor Drive and Cove Road. This zone also
operates as a closed system, with no zone operational storage and therefore relies entirely on
the pressure reducing station(s) to supply all demand conditions pressure.
Capistrano Subsystem
345 (Capistrano Beach) Pressure Zone. The 345 PZ serves the community of Capistrano
Beach along the coast line and extends inland, and includes a small portion of the City of San
Clemente. This zone operates as a closed system, with no operational storage at the 345
elevation. Its normal operating supply under minimum and maximum demand conditions is from
the Juanita connection off the JTM. Under emergency conditions, such as a fire flow demand,
the 345 PZ can be supplied water from:

The WIP (Beach Road Intertie) by a PRS connection


The JTM through the Victoria Intertie; or
The 390 PZ through normally closed valves located near San Juan Creek.
The WIP at Doheny Park
The City of San Clemente at Juanita
The City of San Clemente at Molino

Storage for the Bradt Reservoir can also be flowed back through the JTM to supply the zone.
This zone can also supply the City of San Juan Capistranos 250 PZ in emergency conditions
through a normally closed valve.
Upper 345 (City of San Clemente) Pressure Zone. The Upper 345 PZ is located on Upper
Calle Juanita. The Upper 345 PZ is an isolated area of approximately 15 homes, served by the
City of San Clementes water system at a 437 foot HGL.

4.1.2 Water Supply Sources for Distribution System


The District receives imported water from several water conveyance systems, including, the
Coast Supply Line, Canyon Supply Line, the JTM, and the South County Water Importation
Pipeline (WIP). These imported water supplies and their reliability were discussed in Chapter 3.
Each of these transmission facilities has important supply connections that are an integral part
of the water distribution system and its daily operation, as shown in Figure 4-2. The following
sections describe in detail these physical connections and their typical mode of operation.
South Coast System Connections
Under normal operations the South Coast System is supplied water by the Canyon Supply
Pipeline (which originates as the ATM) and a flow control connection to the WIP.

4-8

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Water Distribution System Master Plan


Flow Control at PS #1. This flow control facility,
located at the Pump Station #1 site at Cardinal Way
and PCH, is normally connected to the Canyon
Supply Line (ATM) through a metered connection
and pressure reducing station to the South Coast
Systems 290 PZ. No flow is typically taken from the
Coast Supply Line. The flow rate through the
Canyon Supply Line connection is requested on an
as needed basis by the District and supplied by
MWDOC at a constant rate. In an emergency, flow
from the Coast Supply Line can be fed through this
facility. Also in an emergency, Pump Station #1 can
increase supply from both the Canyon and Coast Supply lines to enhance system pressures in
the 290 zones.
FCMV #1. FCMV #1 is located near the intersection of
Stonehill Drive and Del Obispo Street in the City of Dana
Point. The metering facility connects the WIP, which can
operate at a hydraulic grade line (HGL) as high as 540
feet, and provides a controlled rate of flow through a
regulating valve. The hydraulic grade at the flow control
is established based on the quantity of flow ordered, and
the water level in the 5B Reservoir, which serves the
South Coast System 415 PZ. The flow rate through this
connection is requested on an as needed basis by the
District based on anticipated daily demands, and is
supplied by MWDOC at a constant rate. (FCMV #1 valves
are pictured at right.)
Capistrano Beach System Connections
Dana Point Subsystem Connections
Stonehill Flow Control. The Stonehill metered connection is located on Stonehill Drive just
east of Cheltam Way in the City of Dana Point. The metering facility connects the JTM, which
can operate at a HGL as high as 420 feet. The hydraulic grade at the flow control is established
based on the quantity of flow ordered, and the water level in the Dana Point Reservoir, which
serves the Capistrano Beach 390 PZ. Flow through this connection is requested on an as
needed basis by the District and supplied by MWDOC at a constant rate.
Capistrano Beach Subsystem
Juanita Connection. The Juanita is a combination pressure reducing station and metering
facility located at the north end of Calle Juanita. The Juanita Connection operates on demand
and is not flow controlled like the other District supply connections. The PRS includes one 8inch pressure regulating valve set at a downstream pressure of 10 psi, which establishes the
345 PZ, and one 10-inch pressure regulating valve which only opens in emergencies. The flow
rate through this connection fluctuates based on the demand in the 345 PZ. The Juanita/Alta
Vista Subsystem is located in the 345 PZ and serves approximately 15 homes at higher
pressure from San Clemente.
4-9

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Water Distribution System Master Plan


Emergency Interconnections
The District maintains numerous interconnections between systems and pressure zones to
enhance the overall water system reliability. Many of these are maintained as normally closed
connections and some are set to operate based on pressure changes. Table 4-1 includes a
summary of each of these connections and their purpose. Figure 4-3 illustrates the location of
each interconnection with reference number to Table 4-1.
Table 4-1. Interconnections
Number

Description

Category

Location

Type

System /
Pressure Zone

Purpose

PS #1

Primary Supply Cardinal Drive off


South Coast
Highway

Pressure
Reducing
Valve (PRV)

Canyon Supply / Primary Supply


290

PS #1

Supply Intertie
(Emergency)

Cardinal Drive off


South Coast
Highway

Booster
Pump

Coast Supply /
290

Increase supply into 290


PZ under high demand
conditions

Laguna Beach
PRS

Agency Intertie
(Emergency)

Cardinal Way

PRV

290 / Laguna
Beach

Supply Laguna Beach


with flow in emergency
conditions

Victoria Beach
Intertie

Agency Intertie
(Emergency)

Virginia Beach /
Faulkner Drive

Normally
Closed
Valve (NCV)

290 / Laguna
Beach

Supply Laguna Beach


with flow in emergency
conditions

MNWD I

Agency Intertie
(Emergency)

Pacific Island Drive


#1

PRV + Meter MNWD / 690

Meter Vault #1

Agency Intertie
(Emergency)

Sea Island Drive at


PRV + Meter MNWD / 690
Isla Vista, near R-2C

Supply water at High


elevation as an
emergency source to
490 PZ

MNWD II

Out of Service

High Crest at pacific


Island Drive

N/A

N/A

N/A

Azores

Out of Service

Azores at Crete

N/A

N/A

N/A

PS #4

Pressure Zone
Bypass

PS #4

NCV

490 / 290

Pressure Zone Bypass

10

PS #5

Pressure Zone
Bypass

PS #5

NCV

690 / 490

Pressure Zone Bypass

11

Niguel Road

Pressure Zone
Bypass

Niguel Road at St.


Regis

NCVs

490 / 290

Pressure Zone Bypass

12

Cape Cove

Pressure Zone
Bypass

Selva at Cape Cove


Guardhouse

PRV

415 / 290

Pressure Zone Bypass

13

Headlands Upper
Bowl / Lower Bowl
Interconnect

Pressure Zone
Bypass

Selva Road at
Headlands
Guardshack

NCV

415 / 290

Pressure Zone Bypass

14

Niguel Beach
Terrace

Pressure Zone
Bypass

Niguel Beach
Terrace

PRV

415 / 290

Pressure Zone Bypass

15

Headlands to
Scenic Drive

SC / CB
System Intertie

Scenic Drive behind


Hotel Site

PRV

415 / 390

Move water to 390 PZ in


emergency or during fire
flows

16

La Cresta at Chula
Vista

SC / CB
System Intertie

Near RH Dana
Elementary

NCV

415 / 390

Supply 390 PZ with flow


in emergency conditions

4-10

Supply MNWD with flow


in emergency conditions

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Water Distribution System Master Plan

Table 4-1 (continued)

Number

Description

Category

Location

Type

System /
Pressure Zone

Purpose

17

PS #6 Bypass

Pressure Zone
Bypass

PS #6

NCV

415 / 290

Pressure Zone Bypass

18

5-B Reservoir

Agency Intertie
(Emergency)

Tennis Center
5-B Reservoir

NCV

415 / MNWD

Supply MNWD with flow


in emergency conditions

19

Golden Lantern

Supply Intertie
(Emergency)

Street of the Golden


Lantern north of
Jeremiah

NCV

JTM / 415

Redundant connection
to the JTM

20

MNWD III

Agency Intertie
(Emergency)

Mar Luna at Dana


Woods
Dana Palms

NCV

MNWD / 415

Supply 415 PZ with flow


in emergency conditions

21

Stonehill at
Cheltam

SC / CB
System Intertie

Stonehill near Dana


Point Reservoir

NCV

415 / 390

Supply 390 PZ with flow


in emergency conditions

22

Dana Point
Reservoir PRV

Primary Supply Dana Point


Reservoir

PRV

JTM / 390

Primary Supply

23

Palo Alto

Supply Intertie
(Emergency)

Stonehill at Palo Alto PRV

WIP / SJC

Supply SJC with flow in


emergency conditions

24

FCMV

Primary Supply Stonehill and Del


Obispo

PRV

WIP / 415

Primary Supply

25

JRWSS
Interconnect

Supply Intertie
(Emergency)

Near Circle K at
Stonehill and Del
Obispo

NCV

WIP / 390 via


JTM

In the event that the


JTM was out of service,
The District has the
ability to valve off a
section of the JTM
pipeline near the
Stonehill Meter
Connection and transfer
water from the WIP
through the Stonehill
Meter via the JTM and
supply water to the
Dana Point reservoir

26

JRWSS to SJC
Intertie

Supply Intertie
(Emergency)

Stonehill and SCWD


Drive

PRV

WIP / SJC

Supply SJC with flow in


emergency conditions

27

Harbor PRV

Pressure Zone
Bypass
(Active)

Dana Point Harbor


Dr. at Cove Road

PRV

390 / 217

Harbor Supply

28

Harbor PRV

Pressure Zone
Bypass
(Active)

Dana Point Harbor


Dr. at Pacific Coast
Highway

PRV

390 / 217

Harbor Supply

29

Victoria Intertie

Supply Intertie
(Emergency)

Victoria road near


Doheny Road

PRV

JTM / 345

Redundant (second)
source of supply when
localized pressure drops
significantly

30

Victoria at Doheny
Park Road

Supply Intertie
(Emergency)

Victoria at Doheny
Park Road

PRV

WIP / JTM
WIP / 345

Provides flows in an
emergency condition

31

Costco Pressure
Maintenance Valve

Agency Intertie
(Emergency)

Costco Pressure
Maintenance Valve

PRV

345 / SJC

Supply fire flows in


emergency conditions

32

SJC Intertie

Agency Intertie
(Emergency)

Doheny Park Road


at Camino
Capistrano

NCV

345 / SJC

Supply SJC with flow in


emergency conditions

4-11

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Water Distribution System Master Plan

Table 4-1 (continued)

Number

Description

Category

33

Las Ramblas PRV

Agency Intertie
(Emergency)

34

Juanita Vault No. 1

35

Location
Las Ramblas at
Avenida California

Type

System /
Pressure Zone

Purpose

PRV

345 / SJC

Supply SJC with flow in


emergency conditions

Primary Supply Juanita Reservoir


Site

PRV

JTM / 345

Primary supply

Juanita Vault No. 2

Primary Supply Juanita at Alta Vista


(Approx. 15 homes)

PRV

San Clemente
to Upper 345

Separate zone for


approximately 15
homes

36

Alta Vista / El
Molina Vault

Agency Intertie
(Emergency)

Alta Vista at El
Molina

PRV

San Clemente /
345

Serves from SC when


under fire demands

37

Beach Road
Intertie

Supply Intertie
(Emergency)

Beach Road near LS PRV


#13

WIP / 345

Redundant (second)
source of supply when
localized pressure drops
significantly

38

San Clemente
Intertie

Agency Intertie
(Emergency)

Camino Capistrano
near Monte Vista

345 / San
Clemente

Supply San Clemente


with flow in emergency
conditions

4-12

NCV

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Alicia

#2

oa
C

#3

Antonio

#1

Aliso Viejo

st

nch
Ra

Nig
ue
l

aH

ills

U
V
74

74

iejo

ri n
Ma

oV

Laguna Beach

#4

Laguna Niguel
Crown Valley

rn

nt e
La

San Juan Capistrano

De

# 10
D e l A v io n

Cr
n
Sa

Val

el

oa

# 21

st

# 23

# 11




5

Portico D

# 24 & 25
Stonehill

# 12
Legend

# 16

Dana Point
Pa r

as
t

s
lla
tr e

# 28

Es

# 27

# 29
# 30

rr o
De l C e

U
V
1

El

# 38
4,000

tra
n

P ic

# 37

Feet

San Clemente

# 36

is

# 35

D e Lo

# 31

De

PACIFIC
OCEAN

Co

Dana P o i n

# 15

217 - (HARBOR)
290 - ZONE A
345 - Capo Beach
390 - Dana Point
415 - ZONE B-1
470 - Dana Point Boosted
430 - ZONE B (Closed)
490 - ZONE B
690 - ZONE C
920 - ZONE E
Freeway
Highway
Major Road

BRADT
RESERVOIR
sM
ar e

tH

ar b
or

Del Prado

# 13

Pressure Zone + Name

# 34

# 33

# 14

el Norte

# 26
# 32

eny

Primary Supply
Supply Intertie (Emergency)
Agency Intertie (Emergency)
Pressure Zone Bypass
SC / CB System Intertie
Out of Service

ehill Stonehill

D oh

Interconnections

Ston

ap

11/19/08 KM KM Z:\Projects\IS\SCWD\MXD\ReportFigures\FinalReport\Interconnections.mxd

lO

# 22

Nig
u

ua
n

# 20

ee

le

Go

lde

b is
po

# 19
# 17

ci
fic

via

# 18

#8

Pa

No

#7

#9

La

j
Vie
ho
nc
Ra

#6

U
V

n
istra
Cap

#5

Ca
m

in
o

Re
al

Figure 4-3
South Coast Water District
INTERCONNECTIONS MAP

Water Distribution System Master Plan


4.1.3 Pump Stations
The District currently maintains and operates nine water pump stations in the distribution
system. The majority of the pump stations are designed to serve higher pressure zones and
boost water to distribution reservoirs. These pump stations, which serve open systems are
normally operated at a constant flow and controlled by water level in the reservoir. The District
also operates two closed systems, with no reservoir to supplement supply. These pump
stations must meet all demand conditions, including fire flows. The hydraulic profile (Figure 4-2)
shows schematically the location of the pump stations and Table 4-2 summarizes pump station
capacity.
Table 4-2. Existing Pump Station Summary
Pump
Station No.

Date
Constructed

1954

1995

Number Rated Discharge


of Pumps
(gpm)
2

1500

hp

Total Capacity
(gpm)

Discharge
Pressure Zone

Back-up Power

75

1500

290

None

3700

430(1)

On-site Genset

400

25

3300

200

1947

550

50

550

490

Portable Genset

1961

900

75

900

490

Portable Genset

1962

375

375

690

Portable Genset

1968

1000

60

1000

415

Portable Genset

1987

850

75

850

920

Portable Genset

(1)

1965

750

40

535

470

1974

1500

75

1500

470(1)

Portable Genset
None

(1)

Closed system
Source: South Coast Water District, 2007

South Coast System


The South Coast 490 PZ is served by two pump stations, PS#3 and PS #4, which are each
controlled by water level in the R-2B and 4B, respectively. PS #2 operates as a closed system
and includes domestic and fire flow pump capacity to meet all demands conditions. PS #5
provides the only boosted supply to the 690 PZ, supplying water from the 4B Reservoir to the
2C Reservoir.
The South Coast System includes three stand-by pump
stations to provide water supply in the event of an
emergency or need to boost pressures and supply. PS# 1
located at the Coast Supply Line connection is rarely used,
but can boost supply into the 290 PZ. PS #7 provides a
redundant source of water to the 920 PZ should MNWD lose
its supply. Lastly, PS #6 can supply water from the 290 PZ
to the 415 PZ, as a redundant supply or if needed, to
increase water turnover in the 290 PZ. (PS #6 pictured at
right.)

4-15

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Water Distribution System Master Plan


Capistrano Beach System
Dana Point Subsystem. The Dana Point Subsystem is primarily supplied by gravity from the
JTM and from the WIP in an emergency via interconnects. This system includes the 470 PZ, a
closed system supplied by two pump stations, PS# 8 and PS #9. PS #8 provides normal
demand conditions including average day, maximum day, and peak hour conditions. PS #9 is a
single fire pump designed to meet demands when flows exceed PS #8, such as a fire flow
demand.
Capistrano Beach Subsystem. The Capistrano Beach Subsystem has no pump stations.

4.1.4 Storage
There are 14 potable water reservoirs in the Districts water system. The total existing storage
capacity for the potable water system is approximately 22 MG. The storage provides
operational storage, fire flows, and emergency storage. Table 4-3 summarizes the reservoir
information.
Table 4-3. Existing Potable Water Reservoir Summary
Tank ID

Zone

Capacity
(MG)

Year
Installed

Ground Elev.
(ft)

Discharge Size
(in)

Diameter (ft)

Material

South Coast System


1A

290

0.6

1972

267

10

69

Welded Steel

2A

290

2.0

1945

268

16

126

Cast in Place - PCC

4A

290

0.6

1961

269

10

70

Welded Steel

5A

290

2.0

1968

267

14

126

Welded Steel

5A-1

290

2.4

1982

267

14

134

Welded Steel

2B

490

0.1

1946

472

30

Welded Steel

3B

490

0.1

1946

472

30

Welded Steel

4B

490

1.0

1962

469

90

Welded Steel

4B-1

490

0.5

1977

469

10

63

Welded Steel

5B

375

2.0

1968

382

16

126

Welded Steel

5B-1(1)

415

7.8

1978

382

16

187 x 262

Cast in Place - PCC

2C

690

0.5

1972

667

12

63

Welded Steel

1E (1)

920

2.0

1983

890

10

109

Prestressed - PCC

1973

358

16

90

Welded Steel

Subtotal South Coast

19.9

Capistrano Beach System


DP

390

Subtotal Cap. Beach


Total

2.0
2.0
21.9

(1)

District owns 7.1 MG of the 7.8 MG in the 5B-1 Reservoir and 0.98 MG of the 2.0 MG in the 1E Reservoir. Remaining capacity
owned by MNWD.
Source: South Coast Water District, 2007

4-16

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Water Distribution System Master Plan


South Coast System
The South Coast System includes 13 reservoirs located
in four pressure zones. The lower 290 PZ includes five
reservoirs ranging in size from 0.6 MG to 2.4 MG. With
five reservoirs located at the same HGL, the reservoirs
(5A-1 and 5A) furthest from the source of supply
experience the least turnover and cycling. However, the
geographical separation of the five reservoirs in the 290
PZ tends to stabilize pressures and minimizes pressure
swings. (Reservoirs 5A-1 and 5A pictured at right.)
The 490 PZ includes four reservoirs ranging in size from
0.1 MG to 1.0 MG. The smaller reservoirs will cycle due
to their size, and PS #5 takes suction from Reservoir 4B,
allowing turnover of its operating storage. The 690 PZ
includes a single 0.5 MG Reservoir. The 920 PZ
includes a single 2.0 MG Reservoir which is operated by
MNWD in which the District maintains 0.98 MG of
storage.
The 415 PZ serving Dana Point includes two reservoirs
totaling 9.1 gallons of storage. The 5B-1 and 5B
Reservoirs are co-located on a site, with the 5B-1
Reservoir consisting of a 7.8 MG buried concrete
reservoir of which 0.70 MG is owned by MNWD.
(Reservoir 5B is pictured at right.)
Capistrano Beach System
Dana Point Subsystem. The Dana Point Subsystem includes only the 2.0 MG Dana Point
Reservoir, which serves both the 390 PZ and the reduced 217 PZ.
Capistrano Beach Subsystem.
distribution system storage.

The Capistrano Beach Subsystem does not include

Bradt Reservoir
The Bradt Reservoir is a large regulating and terminal storage reservoir, located at the north
end of Calle Agua. The reservoir serves several water purveyors, including the District, MNWD,
and San Juan Capistrano. The JTM is connected to the Bradt Reservoir, and can therefore
supply the District through the Juanita Connection and Stonehill Connection with water stored in
the Bradt Reservoir. The District owns 12.8 mg of capacity in this facility reserved for
emergency purposes.

4-17

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

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4.2

Water System Design Criteria

This section summarizes the water system planning and design criteria used for the hydraulic
capacity evaluation of water distribution facilities, as part of the water master plan.
The Districts water system design criteria are summarized in Table 4-4. The criteria were
updated based on the following:

Review of previous District Planning Studies and Criteria


Current District Standard Specifications
Comparison to other water purveyor criteria
Meetings and discussion with the Districts engineering and operations staff

Pipelines
Pipeline sizing criteria aims to minimize wear on valves and scouring of interior coatings, and to
limit head loss in the distribution system. The design criteria in this Master Plan allow a peak
hour pipeline velocity of 5 fps in distribution lines and 3 fps in transmission lines, which is
consistent with typical criteria used by other agencies. In general, transmission mains are
designed to provide maximum day demands, while distribution piping is sized for providing peak
hour and fire flows. Under maximum day plus fire flows, pipeline velocities should not exceed
12 fps. Exceptions would be considered if sufficient residual pressures are maintained.
Looping is desirable in a distribution system. Long, dead-ended pipelines should be avoided
where possible due to reliability and water quality concerns. The Districts design requirements
limit the minimum pipeline size to 8-inch diameter.
Pressures
The pressure criteria was reviewed and several desirable pressure goals have been established
for system operations. Since the District is mostly built-out and pressure zones established, no
major changes are planned in service pressure criteria, although a few zone re-configurations
were considered. Desired minimum static pressure of 65 psi and maximum static pressure of
120 psi have been assumed, the latter to avoid excessive system pressure at the lower
elevations within each pressure zone. System planning should account for pump operations
such that service pressures do not exceed 150 psi.
Service connections shall have a pressure regulator installed downstream of the meter to
maintain a maximum service pressure of 100 psi to protect typical household plumbing. The
pressure regulator shall comply with the criteria established in the Uniform Plumbing Code and
the Districts design requirements.
Fire Protection
The District water service area includes two fire protection agencies. To the north, the City of
Laguna Beach provides its own fire service within its incorporated boundaries. The remaining
District area, including the City of Dana Point and Capistrano Beach communities, is served by
the Orange County Fire Authority (OCFA). The OCFA is a regional fire agency serving 22 cities
and the unincorporated communities of Orange County. CFA Division III Battalions 6 and 7
serve the cities of Dana Point, Laguna Niguel, San Juan Capistrano and San Clemente. The
OCFA was contacted to develop recommended uniform fire flow criteria for the purposes of
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evaluating the Districts water distribution system and storage to meet planning level fire flow
requirements.
Table 4-4. Water System Criteria
Item
Peaking Factors

Criteria

(1)

Min Day/Avg Day Ratio

0.40

Max Day/Avg Day Ratio

2.0

Peak Hour/Avg Day Ratio

4.0

(2)

Required Fire Flows

Single Family Residential

1,500 gpm, 2 hours

Multi-Family Residential

2,500 gpm, 2 hours

Commercial/Business

3,000 gpm, 3 hours

Industrial

4,000 gpm, 4 hours

Schools

4,000 gpm, 4 hours

Hospitals

4,000 gpm, 4 hours

Storage
Operating Storage

25% MDD

Fire Storage

(Fire flow X duration)

Emergency

50% ADD

Pressure Criteria
(3)

Maximum Desirable

120 psi

Minimum Static

65 psi

Minimum Pressure (Peak Hour)

40 psi

Minimum Pressure (Max Day + Fire)

20 psi

Maximum fluctuation from static

30%

Pumping Criteria
Pumping Period

24 hours

Pumping Capacity

MDD + Fire Recharge over 3 days

Redundancy

1 of largest pump
(4)

Standby Power

Portable generator

Pipe Criteria
Maximum Velocity - Distribution (Peak Hour)
Maximum Velocity - Transmission (Peak Hour)

3 fps

Maximum Velocity (Max Day + Fire)

12 fps

Maximum Dead-end Length of Pipe

TBD

Maximum Headloss per Thousand Feet

10 ft

Minimum Diameter

8 inch

Hazen-Williams C-factor
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)

5 fps

120

SCADA and historical data to be reviewed to verify peaking factors.


Preliminary fire flows based on discussions with Orange County Fire Association.
Pressures above 100 psi will require individual pressure regulators.
Each pump station can be hooked up to a portable generator during power outages.
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In 1993, the Laguna Beach community was hit with a catastrophic wild fire during a dry Santa
Ana weather condition. The Fire Storm claimed 366 homes and 17,000 acres. In response to
this disaster, all new residential construction, including existing home remodels and expansions,
are required to install residential fire sprinkler systems. As result, the District has been providing
large water meter capacity to supply the required fire flow.
Fire flow quantities and durations (the length of the fire event) for master plan purposes are
determined based on the type of land use served. This Master Plan establishes uniform fire flow
criteria for various land uses throughout the District. These requirements are for new
construction and apply to structures with or without fire sprinklers. Fire flows requirements used
for existing developments will not be changed. The minimum fire flows range from 1,500 gpm
for 2 hours for residential areas to 4,000 gpm for 4 hours for schools and industrial areas. A
local fire agency may require higher fire flows under certain circumstances, such as
developments adjacent to open space areas susceptible to wild fires or because of certain
building-type structures.
Where specific building plans are provided, Insurance Services Office (ISO) criteria can be used
to refine fire flow requirements. ISO standards are specific to a particular building and based on
a number of considerations, such as type of occupancy, type of construction and construction
materials, distance from other structures, and other factors. In general, this information is not
available at the development planning stage.
Pump Stations
The pump station criteria was developed to review current pump station capacities within the
District and to establish design requirements for any needed upgrades. In particular, the
number of pumps, redundancy requirements, and backup power as listed in Table 4-2. In
general, for open systems (i.e. with storage), pump stations must deliver the maximum day
demand plus an additional pumping capacity to replenish fire storage over 24-hours. For closed
systems (i.e. no storage), pump stations must deliver the peak hour demand or maximum day
plus fire flow, whichever is larger. For the Districts small closed systems, typically fire flow
capacity controls. The capacity and head requirements for each station will depend on the area
to be served and will be evaluated on a project-by-project basis.
Storage
Water storage within the distribution system is used
to supply the following needs:

Operations (which exceed the maximum day


supply of the transmission pipelines)
Fire flow
Emergency supply (such as a facility outage)

Reservoirs are typically sized to provide storage for


each pressure zone for the total of each storage
component listed above. Storage can be shared
among multiple reservoirs within a zone, which is the case for several District pressure zones. If
storage cannot be provided within the zone, then storage should be located in a higher pressure
zone that is connected via a PRS. The storage criteria include 25 percent of maximum day
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demand for operating storage. The fire flow storage and durations vary based on the largest fire
flow required for that zone. Distribution system emergency storage shall be 50 percent of the
average day demand, which assumes localized distribution outages can be typically corrected
within 12 hours during an average day demand. Due to the Districts multiple interconnections
between zones and other agencies and its supply pipelines, this is considered a reasonable
volume of distribution emergency storage.

4.3

Water Demands

The District is predominately built-out, and therefore the review and evaluation of water
demands is mostly focused on existing consumption and patterns. This demand data has also
been important input for the development of the new hydraulic computer model, which simulates
existing demands. This section reviews historic water meter use within the District and also
presents a basis for estimating future demands.

4.3.1 Historic and Existing Demands


Existing water demands for the District were determined by examining a database of actual
meter readings for the past 5 years. However, during this process it was discovered that the
billing data for years 2002 through 2004 was not reliable on a parcel-by-parcel basis as it was
developed under a software system no longer used by the District. Moreover, a new accounting
software program was implemented during 2005 and it was discovered that the data from that
year was incomplete for modeling purposes. Therefore, the 2006 water meter data was used as
the baseline for determining existing water demands on a parcel level. Figure 4-4 displays
monthly potable water demands for 2006. The existing water demands exclude flows through
all non-permanent use meters such as temporary construction meters, interim service meters,
fire meters, and unmetered water losses in the system.
In reconciling the water meter database it was estimated that the District served approximately
11,572 water accounts throughout its service area ranging in size from -inch to 8-inch. There
are a number of residential water meters that serve multi-family projects, as well as commercial
areas of multi-use.
In total, approximately 92 percent of the water use in the District is residential users, of which
nearly 79 percent is by single family residential units. Although the District experiences a large
influx of tourists during the summer months, it was found that the total impact of the hotels on an
average annual basis was less than anticipated. Table 4-5 provides a breakdown of the number
of accounts served by the District in 2006 by land use.
The meter data provided by the District included monthly meter readings by address and
account. The total demand for 2006 was summed by account and divided by the number of
days in the year to obtain the average annual demand for that account. Demand and land use
code by account were then linked to the parcels within the GIS coverage for the District. Those
accounts that could not be directly linked to parcels were sorted from highest demand to lowest
demand. The highest demands were then located manually within the District until at least 95
percent of the total demand was associated to a parcel.

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10.00

8.00
2006 AAD = 7.6
7.00
6.00
5.00
4.00
3.00
2.00
1.00

ec
em
be

r
N

ov
em
be

ct
o
O

te
m
Se
p

be
r

be
r

t
us
Au
g

Ju
ly

Ju
ne

M
ay

il
Ap
r

ch
M
ar

br
ua
Fe

ar

ry

0.00
Ja
nu

Average Annual Demand (MGD)

9.00

Month

Figure 4-4. Monthly Potable Water Demand (2006)

Table 4-5. Percent of Accounts By Land Use


Land Use

# of Accounts

% of Total Accounts

Hotels

28

0.2%

Hospital

34

0.3%

Other

43

0.4%

Restaurant

60

0.5%

Recreation/Public Use Facilities

89

0.8%

Multi-Family Residential

351

3.0%

Commercial/Office

351

3.0%

Irrigation

362

3.1%

1,144

9.9%

9,110

78.7%

11,572

100%

Medium-Density Residential
Single Family Residential
Total

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Based on the 2006 meter data provided, the largest users on an average annual basis were
SOCWA at 0.23 MGD (34152 Del Obispo Street location), the Ritz Carlton at 0.20 MGD, and
the St. Regis at 0.19 MGD. The top ten users account for approximately 18% of the total use
within the District.
Each parcel within the District was assigned to a node within the water system. Demands were
then pulled from the parcels and inputted into the hydraulic water model using the capabilities of
InfoWater and a Python script written by PBS&J. This resulted in a demand allocation of
average use throughout the entire Districts pressure zones. Table 4-6 shows the average
annual water consumption by pressure zone within the District.
Table 4-6. Existing Consumption by Pressure Zone
Total Average Consumption
Pressure Zone

gpm

MGD

290

1,077.3

1.55

415

845.8

1.22

490

412.4

0.59

South Coast System

690

61.9

0.09

2,397.3

3.45

217

191.0

0.27

390

1,105.9

1.59

470

192.5

0.28

1,489.4

2.14

832.7

1.20

Total South Coast


Capistrano Beach System
Dana Point Subsystem

Subtotal
Capo Beach Subsystem
345
Subtotal

832.7

1.20

Total Capistrano Beach

2,322.0

3.34

Total

4,719.4

6.80

The total average annual water demand used in the existing water system model was estimated
to be approximately 6.80 MGD. This compares well, within 5 percent, to the Districts 2007
annual demands. It is not uncommon for the District to experience slightly higher or lower
annual demands based on a wet or dry year or a varying transient population.

4.3.2 Peaking Factors


A potable water system must be able to supply water at rates that fluctuate over a wide range
while maintaining minimum residual pressure and maximum velocity requirements. Demand
rates most important to the planning, design, and operation of a water system are annual
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average day demand (AAD), maximum day demand (MDD), peak hour, and fire flow. AAD use
is the yearly total water demand divided by the number of days in a year, and as noted above is
approximately 6.8 MGD. The AAD is used as the baseline for projecting maximum day and peak
hour demands and typically for estimating operating costs and expected revenues. The MDD is
the maximum quantity of water used on any day of the year and is used to size pump station
and storage reservoir facilities. The peak hour demand typically occurs during the maximum day
and is met through a combination of system supply, typically from pump station and storage
facilities.
For this Master Plan an important parameter is the maximum day peaking factor. Pump station
and storage capacity needs are primarily based on the maximum day demand. The maximum
day peaking factor can vary depending upon climate, the mix of customers served (land use),
and the size of the service area. In general, the peaking factors tend to decrease as the total
demand increases. Also, more extreme climates (dry, arid areas) can cause the peaking factors
to increase.
It was difficult to determine, with a high level of confidence, an accurate maximum day factor
due to the limitation of reliable consumption data. It appears that maximum day demands within
the District could range from a low of 1.4 to a high of near 1.8. Until more accurate data can be
evaluated, it is recommended that a conservative maximum day factor of 2.0 be used for
distribution system model simulation runs and sizing of facilities. Peak hour factors are typically
150 percent to 200 percent of the maximum day demand. For evaluating the distribution system
a peak hour factor of 4.0 was used.
Minimum water demand conditions occur during low nighttime water use periods and can
typically range from 0.40 to 0.80 percent of a typical average day demand. This peaking factor
is used to evaluate age of water and water quality issues in the system. Based on a review of
SCADA data in the Capistrano Beach System, it is recommended that a peaking factor of 0.4 be
used to estimate minimum demand in the system.

4.3.3 Demand Criteria


In order to determine water duty factors for various types of land uses, the Districts water meter
database was again used and sorted by land use classification. The water consumption data
was analyzed for each land use type, and an average usage was determined. Focus was
placed on recognizing abnormally high water users and organizing the land uses classifications
to include appropriately similar uses. Table 4-7 presents the land uses used by this Master Plan
and the total existing consumption for each. Table 4-8 presents the recommended unit
demands by land use.

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Table 4-7. Existing Consumption by Land Use
Land Use

Average Annual Demand (gpm)

Single Family Residential

2,075

Hotels

566

Irrigation

559

Multi-Family Residential

449

Medium-Density Residential

342

Commercial/Office

282

Other

235

Recreation/Public Use Facilities

95

Hospital

94

Restaurant
Total (GPM)

74
4,771

Total (MGD)

6.87

Table 4-8. Unit Demands


Unit Demands
Land Use

Water

Recycled Water

Single-Family Residential

450 gpd/DU

0% @ 2.5 AFY/ac

Medium-Density Residential

400 gpd/DU

0% @ 2.5 AFY/ac

Multi-Family Residential

300 gpd/DU

10% @ 2.5 AFY/ac

Rec/Public Use Facilities/Park

1,200 gpd/ac

10% @ 2.5 AFY/ac

Hotel/Motel

95 gpd/room

10% @ 2.5 AFY/ac

Commercial/Office

2,500 gpd/ac

15% @ 2.5 AFY/ac

School

2,500 gpd/ac

50% @ 2.5 AFY/ac

Landscaping/Irrigation

2,500 gpd/ac

100% @ 2.5 AFY/ac

Hospital

4,200 gpd/ac

10% @ 2.5 AFY/ac

Restaurant

2,500 gpd/ac

10% @ 2.5 AFY/ac

4.3.4 Buildout/Ultimate Demands


Ultimate or build-out water demands were developed for the water system based upon known
development projects and the historical growth pattern within the District, as presented in
Chapter 2. Table 4-9 summarizes the build out water demands within the District by major
proposed development. These future demands represent an increase of approximately
5 percent. Although important to consider in future water planning needs, the Districts water
distribution and storage needs are still largely driven by the existing demand, fire flow
requirements, and system reliability needs.

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Table 4-9. Buildout/Ultimate Demands
Project Name and Description

Average Demand (gpd)

North Development
29 DUs
(2)
Aliso Creek Inn

13,050
68,708

Adjacent Parcel to Aliso Creek Inn


15 DUs
Dana Point Harbor Revitalization

6,750

(+/-) 40,000 sqft Retail (Eq. 1.84 ac)

4,600

(+/-) 40,000 sqft Restaurant (Eq. 1.84 ac)

4,600

Subtotal

9,200

Headlands
119 DUs

53,550

90 Room Hotel

8,550

40 Room Hostel

3,800

Restaurant

2,500

Commercial (1.6 AC)

4,000

Nature Interpretive Center

1,200

Subtotal

73,600

General District Growth


3% by 2030
Total

(1)
(2)

4.4

(1)

210,000
381,308

Existing Demand

7.0 MGD

Buildout Demand

7.4 MGD

Assumed to include Dana Point Town Center redevelopment.


Estimated Demand taken from Water Distribution Analysis, Wilson Mikami, April 2008.

Water System Hydraulic Model

As part of the new Master Plan, the District has authorized the selection and preparation of a
new GIS-based hydraulic computer model to analyze the capacity in the water distribution
system. The new existing system water model will be turned over to the District to be used as a
planning tool in evaluating future projects and enhancing operations of the water system. As
part of the scope of services, PBS&J conducted a model selection workshop with the District. It
was recommended that the District utilize the InfoWater modeling software by MWHSoft for its
water system model. This section describes the development of the new hydraulic model and
calibration of the existing system model. The model calibration effort included an extensive field
testing program conducted by a team of experts from PBS&Js subconsultant (EarthTech).
Appendix B-1 includes the model calibration technical memorandum.

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4.4.1 Hydraulic Model Development
The hydraulic water model was developed using the Districts new GIS database as the base
information for pipes, junctions, valves, pumps, tanks, and pressure reducing valves. Since the
GIS network was relatively new, data clean-up was necessary to ensure full connectivity to the
model. For example, GIS nodal features that were not located at the end of a pipe would not be
modeled, and therefore needed to be excluded from the data brought into InfoWater. A separate
field was created in the GIS to identify whether or not certain features would be included in the
new hydraulic model.
Pump and tank information was obtained from District staff and input in the model as previously
presented in Tables 4-2 and 4-3, respectively. Pressure zone separation is typically
accomplished through normally closed valves or in some cases PRSs. This information was
located using the Districts Section Maps for both the South Coast and Capistrano Beach
systems. Flow control valves were added to the model to simulate the systems boundary
conditions, such as connections to the JTM, WIP, or other agency interconnections.
Junction or node data in the model requires a specific ground elevation and water demand. The
model was populated with existing demands based on the meter billing records for each parcel
within the District, as previously described. Elevation data was not readily available as the
District did not own high resolution digital topography for its water service area. As part of the
Master Plan, the District purchased a digital terrain model. Five foot contours were then
developed to determine node elevations through an intersection calculation. The accuracy of
these elevations is likely limited to plus or minus 8 feet and may deviate more in steep areas.
As part of the model calibration some of these elevations were reviewed and adjusted. The
District may want to consider developing more accurate topography of two foot contours for
future use in the model and other District-wide needs.
Appendix B-2 includes the InfoWater input file for the base water model, which includes over
6,300 pipes and nodes that were created from the Districts GIS water system.

4.4.2 Model Calibration


The accuracy and reliability of the Districts new InfoWater model is necessary for properly
analyzing the complete water distribution system. A properly calibrated model provides the
confidence needed to make significant capital planning decisions and provides a planning tool
for operational decisions.
As a first step of model calibration, a Calibration Plan was developed with District engineering
and operations staff to identify the extent of field testing and data collection necessary.
Comprehensive macro and micro level calibration procedures were developed, which include
the use of continual pressure monitoring equipment and extensive hydrant flow tests. In
summary the District Calibration Plan consisted of:

Establishment of project calibration goals


A structured field-testing program
Identification of number of flow tests per pressure zone

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Location plan for digital pressure logging devices in system


Process to assign globally C-values

Water system field tests were performed for use in calibrating the hydraulic model. Flow and
pressure test results were used to verify that the model accurately simulates actual field
conditions. Continuous pressure monitoring data was collected and used to provide several data
points during the flow and pressure testing for micro calibration of the model. Continuous
monitoring of pressures provides data points with which the hydraulic model can be macro
calibrated over an extended period of time.
Flow and pressure test results were conducted from December
11 through 18, 2007. A pressure and flow test can be described
as flowing one (or more) hydrant(s) while measuring the
pressure at other nearby fire hydrants. Tests were not
performed for determining available fire flow at each hydrant,
but rather for comparing flows and pressures measured in the
field with those simulated by the hydraulic model.
A total of forty-three tests were performed at representative
locations throughout the system, with a goal of at least two flow
tests per pressures zone. Figure 4-5 (Figure 1 from the
Technical Memorandum in Appendix B-1) illustrates the
location of each hydrant flow test. The results of these flow tests are also included in Appendix
B-1 which was used to perform a steady-state macro-calibration.
In addition to the field testing that was performed, additional data was gathered that assisted in
the calibration of the model and understanding of system operations. In addition to continuous
pressure monitoring data that was utilized for calibration, operational trend data was provided by
the District. The data was used to establish boundary conditions for steady state calibration and
provide calibration data for extended period calibration.
Steady State Model Calibration
Steady state model calibration is performed by simulating the flow and pressure test data within
the hydraulic model and then making global adjustments to the modeling parameters until the
simulated results closely match the observed field test results. During this process, roughness
coefficients (Hazen-Williams C-values) for the water mains are typically
adjusted to either increase or decrease pressure drops in the simulated
results. The primary goal for this analysis is to match the difference
between static and dynamic pressure drop for each test location. This
process will provide a model that can accurately simulate static and
dynamic conditions under steady state.
Two model simulations were performed for each field test conducted,
one under no flow (static) conditions and one under flowing (dynamic)
conditions. The static condition simulates the water system under
normal operating conditions, while the dynamic condition simulates the
water system under the stress of the hydrant flushing. While the
individual pressures under both static and dynamic conditions are
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SOURCE: EarthTech Water System Hydraulic


Model, Model Calibration Technical Memo.
See Appendix 1.

H:\Waterres\SouthCoastWaterDistrict\620889 SCWD Master Plans\Report\FinalRpt\FinalFigures\620889TestLocations.cdr 10-28-08

FLOW AND PRESSURE TEST


LOCATIONS
FIGURE 4-5
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important, the general criterion for calibration is to match the pressure drop for each test
location (the difference between static and dynamic pressure). The steady state calibration
process ensures that the model can accurately simulate static and dynamic conditions under
steady state analysis.
Appendix B-1 includes a summary of the initial calibration results where the model predicted
nearly 75 percent of the flow tests to an accuracy level within a 10 psi pressure drop at the
residual hydrant. In order to increase the level of accuracy, Earth Tech evaluated the potential
for closed valves and pipe geometry inaccuracies, which typically affect the calibration results.
After working to calibrate the model using global adjustments, localized adjustments were
evaluated to improve calibration.
Twelve flow tests were investigated for localized adjustments using the hydraulic model and
predicted localized changes improved calibration at these locations. Localized changes that
were made include closed valves, pipe diameter changes, localized C-values changes, and
connections to large transmission main. Appendix B-1 includes mapping in the vicinity of each
of the proposed adjusted field tests and the recommended field confirmation of valve status,
pipe diameter, and connections. Based upon the final steady-state calibration, the hydraulic
model is believed to provide a reasonable representation of the actual system characteristics as
shown on Figure 4-6 (Figure 2 from Appendix B-1).
Extended Period Calibration
In addition to steady state calibration, the Districts hydraulic model was calibrated for an
extended period. Extended period calibration was performed to ensure that the model
accurately reflects how the overall system operates over time with respect to transmission
mains, pumps, and reservoir operations under normal operating conditions. Prior to the
extended period calibration, the steady state calibration provided a reasonably accurate
representation of actual system characteristics in terms of water main geometry, spatial demand
allocation, and pipe roughness.
Based upon the size and number of facilities in the developed model, the desired accuracy of
the extended period calibration is summarized in Appendix B-1. The primary calibration
accuracy considers pressure differences and reservoir levels between field and model
conditions over a 24-hour period.
For extended period calibration, a time of day demand curve was determined for each pressure
zone based on collected SCADA data of pump operations and tank levels. The time of day
demand curve is a series of 24 hourly demand factors that define how water usage varies over
the course of a day. Each demand factor is defined as the ratio of the hourly demand to the
daily average. Illustrated in Figure 4-7 are two diurnal curves used in the calibration, one is for
South Coast System (490 PZ) and the other for Capistrano Beach System (345 PZ).
Note both system diurnal curves show the traditional double hump pattern of water use
through-out the day, with a morning peak hour demand and evening peak hour demand. Since
the extended period calibration occurred during December 2007, overall water system
consumption was well below a typical average day demand. It was estimated that demands
were about 60-70 percent of average day demand, or about 4.3 MGD. The morning peak hour

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demand which occurred around 7:00 am-8:00 am, was about two times the average use for the
day and the minimum demand was about 0.40 times the average.
Extended period simulations were performed on the District water system with the demand
curve developed above as well as pump control strategies and set points. In general, the
extended period macro calibration satisfied the accuracy criteria developed in Appendix B-1.
An example of the calibration results are shown in Figure 4-8, which illustrate some of the
variations between the field data and model simulations. Two of the 490 PZ reservoirs and
pump stations show close accuracy between actual reservoir water levels and pump flows and
the model predictions.
Calibration Summary
During the hydraulic model calibration process, updates were made to the hydraulic model data.
Based on information learned during field testing from facility visits and District personnel
knowledge, facility updates were made to the hydraulic model. Additionally, during model
calibration certain facility parameters were required to be changed to accurately model field
conditions. A list of facility changes is included in Appendix B-1.
In summary, the hydraulic model was calibrated for both steady state and extended period
conditions. It is our opinion that the Districts hydraulic model is well-calibrated and meets the
accuracy level desired. The hydraulic model is believed to provide a reasonable representation
of the actual system characteristics based on steady state and extended period calibration. In
the future, additional water system mapping, refinement of elevations, and geometry information
will improve the hydraulic model and lead to even higher levels of accuracy.

4.5

Water System Analysis

This section presents the evaluation of the existing and ultimate water system based on District
design criteria and use of the calibrated hydraulic computer model. Pump station and reservoir
capacity requirements were analyzed by pressure zone. The distribution system capacity was
based on hydraulic computer modeling, including global fire flow scenarios and peak hour
demands. Water quality simulations were performed to evaluate the impacts of the new
Groundwater Recovery Facility (GRF) on the distribution system.
The Districts water system is also predominately built-out and therefore the primary focus of the
Master Plan is to identify any existing deficiencies. The ultimate system analysis was limited to
an assessment of potential pressure zone conversion to enhance pressures.
The results of these analyses are compiled below. The resulting projects are consolidated and
described at the end of this chapter.

4-32

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

SOURCE: EarthTech Water System Hydraulic


Model, Model Calibration Technical Memo.
See Appendix 1.

FINAL CALIBRATION ACCURACY


H:\Waterres\SouthCoastWaterDistrict\620889 SCWD Master Plans\Report\FinalRpt\FinalFigures\620889CalibAccuracy.cdr 10-28-08

FIGURE 4-6
South Coast Water District Master Plan
November 2008

Water Distribution System Master Plan

490 Pressure Zone

345 Pressure Zone

Figure 4-7. Time of Day Patterns


Source: Earth Tech Water System Hydraulic Model, Model Calibration Technical Memo (see Appendix 1).

4-35

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Water Distribution System Master Plan

Figure 4-8. Example Calibration Results


Source: Earth Tech Water System Hydraulic Model, Model Calibration Technical Memo (see Appendix 1).
4-36

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Water Distribution System Master Plan


4.5.1 Existing Water System Analysis
The Districts water distribution system is characterized by a well-looped and interconnected
system network of pipes, supported by a number of well-placed pump stations and operating
reservoirs, which maintain a strong hydraulic grade line. A good indicator was how well the
water system responded to the forty-three hydrant flow test conducted as part of the calibration
data collection.
Hydrant Flow Tests
Although the hydrant flow tests were not necessarily designed to evaluate fire flow availability in
the system, they became a good indicator on the strength of the Districts water system. All
forty-three hydrant flow tests conducted in the South Coast, Dana Point, and Capistrano Beach
systems resulted in all pressures exceeding a minimum residual hydrant pressure of 20 psi at
the flowing hydrant. Highlights of the field test data include:

Hydrants were on the average flowed between 1,080-2,360 gpm


A majority of the test locations ranged in static pressures between 75 psi-90 psi
These locations exhibited no more than a 10 psi-20 psi in the vicinity of the test
Remote from the flow tests, the pressure recorders showed very little change in pressure
before, during and after the flow test.

It was estimated that well over 200,000 gallons were drawn from the system during the weekplus of testing and it became apparent that each night the reservoirs were adequately
replenished and the District was able to meet all flow and demand conditions. For the test
locations selected, which included tests in every pressure zone, the water distribution system
demonstrated:

Adequate supply and reservoir recovery


Sufficient static pressures in each zone to maintain strong residuals
Minimal pressure swings throughout the distribution system

Global Fire Flow Model Analysis


The hydrant flow tests encompassed representative areas of the District, but did not specifically
address the available fire flow at each hydrant location District-wide. One of the powerful
aspects of the hydraulic model is the ability to analyze each hydrant in the water system to
determine the available fire flow at 20 psi minimum pressure.
Fire flows are governed by the specific land use, flow requirement, and duration as presented in
Table 4-4. As such, fire flow can be assigned to a specific hydrant through out the system
based upon these criteria. Using the steady-state calibrated model, fire flow simulations can be
performed for every hydrant based upon assumed reservoir levels, pump operations and flow
control settings. The goal of these simulations is to identify potentially undersize water main
extensions that may be limiting fire flows. The two design criteria that are reviewed are
maximum velocity and minimum pressure.
A series of computer simulation runs were performed on the Districts system. Table 4-10
presents those water mains which serve hydrants that were unable to deliver adequate fire flow
at 20 psi. Although a number of main extensions exceeded the 12 fps velocity criteria, many of
4-37

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Water Distribution System Master Plan


these pipelines and corresponding hydrant locations met the minimum pressure requirements
and were not identified as candidates for pipeline replacement. The high priority pipeline
replacements are those water mains that could not convey more than 80 percent of the fire flow
at 20 psi. A total of 7,000 feet of main replacement was identified and generally included
upsizing 4-inch and 6-inch mains to 8-inch. These projects should be included in the Districts
five year CIP. Those pipelines that were within 20 percent of the required fire flow are included
as low priority and shown after the five year CIP. These should be reviewed on a case-by basis
to determine the actual timing and need.
Peak Hour Analyses
Another test of the strength of the Districts water system is its ability to meet peak hour
demands which typically occur during the morning hours and are typically 2 times the average
for that day. During the summer months, this may range to as great as from 3 to 4 times the
average. To be conservative, the steady-state calibrated model was used to evaluate peak
hour demands with a peak hour factor of 4.0 times the average day demand. For the District
system, this required an hourly peak flow rate of 18,000 gpm to be supplied from all source
connections, reservoirs, and pump stations, compared to an average day of about 4,500 gpm.
The results of the network analyses indicate that the system was able to maintain a minimum
pressure of 40 psi throughout a majority of the District except in areas of high elevation and low
static pressures. During this peak hour demand simulation, pressure drops generally ranged
from 10 to 25 psi. Based on static pressures ranging from 60-70 psi, the District will likely meet
the minimum 40 psi requirement. The simulation assumed a peak hour factor of 4.0, which may
be overly conservative for this system. Factors less than 4.0 would result in lower pressure
drops and higher residuals pressures.

4.5.2 Water Storage and Pump Stations Analysis


This section evaluates water storage and pump station capacity based on the Districts design
criteria presented in Table 4-4. Since the District is predominately built-out, the storage and
pumping analysis were preformed on only the existing water system.
Water Storage
Table 4-11 summarizes existing distribution storage analysis based on each pressure zone
needs. Fire flow storage was based on the largest fire flow required within a pressure zone.
Generally, the lower zones include 4,000 gpm fire flow and the upper zones 1,500 gpm fire
flows. A breakdown of operational, fire, and emergency storage is included for each pressure
zone to determine the total required storage volume. A surplus or deficit of storage is indicated
for each zone.
In summary, the District maintains an excess of nearly 11 million gallons to operate the
distribution system, this also includes 50 percent of average demands in storage for various
potential distribution outages. The South Coast System (290 PZ and 415 PZ) has the greatest
excess of storage, while the Capistrano Beach System (345 PZ and 390 PZ) is deficient in
storage.

4-38

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Water Distribution System Master Plan

Table 4-10. Fire Flow Improvement Projects


Fire
Condition
1,500 gpm

Model Node ID

Pipe
Diameter

Location

Available
Fire Flow
(gpm)(1)

Length
(ft)

Coral Bay

6"

1,207

240

8"

Low

WCV-75

Bothnia Bay

6"

1,132

180

8"

High

WCV-79

Danzig Bay

6"

1,073

150

8"

High

WF-2336

Galleon Way

6"

1,154

200

8"

High
High

WF-3248

Catalina Avenue

521

300

8"

WF-263

Marina Vista Drive

looped 4"
8"

1,397

1,305

10"

Low

WLP-13933

Vista de San Clemente

6"

733

1,005

8"

High

WLP-1756

La Senda Drive

6"

1,322

350

8"

Low

WLP-2928

Timor Bay

6"

1,322

215

8"

Low

WSV-1430

Brooks Street

looped 6"

1,127

870

8"

High

WSV-294

Mesa Vista Drive

775

8"

High

6"

901

3,480

Single Family Residential Fire Total LOW Priority Projects

2,110

WF-1393

St. Edward Catholic


Church (Calle la
Primavera)

looped 6"

2,414

745

8"

Low

WF-1791

Coast Hwy at Street of the


Golden Lantern (South
side)

6"

1,575

200

12"

High

WF-2974

Gloria Dei Lutheran


Church (Tuna Dr. west of
Big Sur Street)

6"

1,406

345

12"

High

WF-456

County Club Road

8"

1,836

1,860

12"

High

WLP-11561

Blue Lantern at Santa


Clara Ave

8"

2,512

215

12"

High

WF-1543

SW corner of Domingo
Ave & Sepulveda Ave

looped 4"
(& 6")

2,399

565

8"

High

WF-1624

Camino de Estrella at
Camino El Molino

8"

2,432

105

12"

Low

WSV-2583

Meridian Dr at Sea Gull Ct

3460

Doheny Park Rd north of


Victoria Blvd

--

Dana Point Harbor


Improvements

looped 6"

425

430

8"

High

8"

2,523

1,490

12"

Low

6", 8", 10"

varied

5,482

12"

Low

Commercial Fire Total HIGH Priority Projects

2,970

Commercial Fire Total LOW Priority Projects

8,467

Total HIGH Priority Projects

6,450

Total LOW Priority Projects

10,577

(1)
(2)

Priority(2)

WCV-74

Single Family Residential Fire Total HIGH Priority Projects


3,000 gpm

Recommended
Size

Available fire flow at 20 psi residual.


High Priority projects are those that cannot produce a minimum 80% of the desired fire flow. Low Priority projects are those
areas that are greater than 80%, but less than the desired flow.

4-39

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Water Distribution System Master Plan


Table 4-11. Existing Distribution Storage Analysis
Projected Average
Annual Demand
Pressure Zone
South Coast System
290

Max Day Demand


(ADD x 2.0)

gpm

MGD

gpm

MGD

1,077

1.55

2,155

3.10

415

846

1.22

1,692

2.44

490

412

0.59

825

1.19

Existing Storage
Storage
Facility
Capacity
1A
2A
4A
5A
5A-1
5B
5B-1(5)
2B
3B
4B
4B-1
2C
1E(5)

0.6 MG
2.0 MG
0.6 MG
2.0 MG
2.4 MG
2.0 MG
7.1 MG
0.1 MG
0.1 MG
1.0 MG
0.5 MG
0.5 MG
1.0 MG
19.9 MGD

Required Storage per Design Criteria


Operational
Emergency
(0.25 x MDD)
Fire(1)
(0.50 x ADD)
Total
0.78 MG

0.96 MG

0.78 MG

2.51 MG

5.09 MG

0.61 MG

0.96 MG

0.61 MG

2.18 MG

6.92 MG

0.30 MG

0.54 MG

0.30 MG

1.13 MG

0.57 MG

0.04 MG
0.01 MG

0.39 MG
0.31 MG
6.5 MGD

0.11 MG
0.67 MG
13.4 MGD

-0.60 MG
0.80 MG
--

-2.16 MG
2.13 MG
-4.3 MGD
10.8 MGD

690
62
0.09
124
0.18
0.04 MG
0.30 MG
920
9
0.01
18
0.03
0.01 MG
0.30 MG
Total South Coast
3.5 MGD
6.9 MGD
Capistrano Beach System
217(2)
191.0
0.27
382
0.55
----345(3)
833
1.20
1,665
2.40
--0.60 MG
0.96 MG
390
1,106
1.59
2,212
3.18
DP
2.0 MG
0.80 MG
0.54 MG
470(4)
193
0.28
385
0.55
----Total Cap. Beach
3.3 MGD
6.7 MGD
2.0 MGD
Totals
6.8 MGD
13.6 MGD
21.9 MGD
(1)
Fire flow storage is based on the following primary land use for each pressure zone:
Residential - 2,500 gpm, 2 hour duration
Commercial - 3,000 gpm, 3 hour duration
Industrial/Schools/Hospitals - 4,000 gpm, 4 hour duration
(2)
Supply to the 217 PZ is provided by the 390 PZ; storage capacity for the 217 PZ has been included in the 390 PZ calculations.
(3)
No storage exists in the 345 PZ.
(4)
Supply to the 470 PZ is provided by the 390 PZ; storage capacity for the 470 PZ has been included in the 390 PZ calculations.
(5)
SCWD owns 7.1 MG of the 7.8 MG of the 5B-1 Reservoir and 0.98 MG of the 2.0 1E Reservoir. Remaining capacity owned by MNWD.

4-40

Surplus/
(Deficit)

(2.16) MG
(0.13) MG
(2.29) MG
11.1 MGD

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Water Distribution System Master Plan


Chapter 3 analyzed a number of potential emergency water supply scenarios to meet varying
demand conditions, including maximum month. These scenarios evaluated the ability of the
District to access alternative water sources, including storage to meet varying demand
conditions. Typically, for most Southern California water purveyors who rely on imported water,
the ability to meet several days of demand with loss of imported water is a critical measure of
reliability. The Metropolitan Water District recommends about seven days of treated water
independence should the imported system be out of service, including schedule shutdowns.
Referring to Table 4-11, the District currently maintains about 3 days of treated water storage in
the distribution system. When the Bradt Reservoir (12.8 MG) is included, the District storage is
increased to 5 average days. The proposed Upper Chiquita Reservoir currently under design
will increase the Districts treated water storage by an additional 16 MG, resulting in over 7
average days of treated water storage.
The Capistrano Beach 345 PZ does not have zone storage and demands are supplied by the
Juanita Connection and the JTM. Since the JTM is connected to the regional Bradt Reservoir,
its operational storage and fire storage needs are adequately provided by these facilities. In an
emergency, the Capistrano Beach system can also receive flow from a connection to the WIP at
Victoria. Therefore, no new 345 PZ storage is recommended for Capistrano Beach system.
Although the 390 PZ has an apparent storage deficiency, most of this is could be considered in
the emergency component. Since the District has a surplus in the 415 PZs and has
interconnections between the two systems, emergency supplies can be conveyed to the 390 PZ
from the 415 PZ. Therefore, no new 390 PZ storage is recommended for the 390 PZ.
The 290 PZ included five distribution reservoirs and a surplus of 5 million gallons. However, the
4A Reservoir (0.6 MG) does experience high turn-over as it also operates as a forebay reservoir
for PS #4. Although no specific forebay criterion was developed, the 4A Reservoir and pumped
system would benefit from a slightly larger reservoir, possibly as large as 1.0 MG. Although not
a high priority CIP project, it is recommended that the District evaluate the feasibility of
maximizing storage on the site.
The excess 290 PZ storage may also provide the District flexibility in possibly converting one of
the two 5A Reservoirs to recycled water in the future. This option is discussed further in
Chapter 6.
Pump Stations
Table 4-12 summarizes pump station capacities required to serve the existing pressure zones
based on the design criteria developed in Table 4-4. The capacity required is conservatively
estimated, since it assumes the largest pump out of service at each facility. A surplus or deficit
of pump capacity is indicated for each zone.
The District operates both open and closed system water pump stations. Based on the design
criteria, the open system pump stations serving the 490 PZ and the 690 PZ have sufficient
capacity to meet maximum day demands and replenish fire storage. The closed system pump
stations also appear to be sufficiently sized, although it is recommended that the fire flow
capacity and redundancy be reviewed for PS #9. The District should consider the cost/benefit

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South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Water Distribution System Master Plan


of a second fire flow pump for redundant purposes as PS #9 is the sole source of fire protection
for the area.

4.5.3 Water Quality Considerations


The Master Plan included a review of current water quality in the distribution system and a
preliminary investigation on the potential opportunities to maximize the uses of the new
Groundwater Recovery Facility (GRF) and its impacts on the distribution and blending of
multiple sources of water.
Water quality is a key focus for every water purveyor. After imported water supply sources are
treated, disinfectants such as chlorine or chloramines are added to maintain a safe water supply
as it travels to and throughout the Districts pipelines, pump stations and reservoirs. Chlorine
residuals and chloramine concentrations decrease with age. The decreasing concentrations
mean that water quality problems are more likely to occur where water takes a long period of
time to travel through the distribution systems or where water is stored in reservoirs with poor
cycling.
Table 4-12. Pump Station Capacities

Pressure
Zone

Pump
Station
No.

Zone
Average
Annual
Demand

Max Day
Demand
(ADD x
2.0)

Fire
Replenish(1)

Required
Supply(2)

Available
PS
Capacity

Surplus/
(Deficit)

gpm

gpm

gpm

gpm

gpm

gpm

5,000

1,077

2,155

667(7)

2,821

N/A

See note
(7)

7,000

54

108

N/A

2,608

3,700

1,092

2,900

358

717

375

1,092

1,450

358

750

62

124

208

332

375

43

Rated
Total
Number
Discharge Capacity
of
Pumps
gpm
gpm

South Coast System


1(4)

1,500

6(4)

1,000

490

400

(Closed)

3,300

290

490

550

Open

900

690

375

920

(5)

850

Subtotal

850

18

16,500

1,561

3,121

3,000

193

385

208

227

N/A

See note
(8)

N/A

2,885

2,500(9)

(385)

Capistrano Beach System


470

750

(Closed)

9(6)

1,500

Subtotal
Total
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)
(7)
(8)
(9)

3,000

193

385

19,500

1,753

3,506

Fire Replenishment = Fire storage recovered in 24 hours


Required Supply = MDD + Fire Replenishment for open systems; MDD + Fire Flow for closed systems
Available PS Capacity includes duty pumps; stand-by or emergency pumps are not included.
PS #1 and #6 not normally operated.
PS #7 - emergency supply only
PS #9 - fire pump only
Maximum day demand plus fire replenishment provided by Coast Supply turnout.
Provided by Moulton Niguel Water District.
PS #8 duty pump and PS #9 fire pump running.

4-42

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Water Distribution System Master Plan


In general, the District has not experienced water quality problems associated with the
distribution system. The District benefits from having multiple supply sources and the ability to
increase and decrease supplies during low demand periods to help promote drain/fill cycles in
the distribution system reservoirs.
Water Quality Field Sampling
As part of the water model calibration and field data collection, water quality samples were
taken at various hydrant locations, just prior to installation of the pressure recorders. A total of
19 water quality samples were taken throughout the distribution system on December 10 and
11, 2007, as shown on Table 4-13.
Table 4-13. Water Quality Test
Location

Sample Location

Telog ID
Location

Date

Time

Free Chlorine
Reading (mg/L)

Total Chlorine
Residual (mg/L)

Victoria Blvd, west of Sepulveda Ave

3144

10-Dec

1:03 PM

1.52

1.97

Calle Juanita at Calle real (NE Corner,


on 6" main)

3145

10-Dec

1:20 PM

1.75

1.88

Sample port at San Clemente - JTM


connection

10-Dec

1:28 PM

0.05

0.70

Sample port at Juanita - JTM


connection

10-Dec

1:37 PM

0.28

1.00

Camino del Estrella at Camino


Capistrano

3146

10-Dec

1:48 PM

0.02

1.88

Beach Rd near Beach Rd Intertie to


WIP

3646

10-Dec

2:15 PM

1.34

2.01

Windham Dr (south end)

2487

10-Dec

2:44 PM

1.07

1.46

Selva Road at Street of the Copper


Lantern

2486

10-Dec

2:58 PM

0.04

1.98

Street of the Blue Lantern at Selva


Road (NE corner)

2485

10-Dec

3:09 PM

1.39

1.97

10

Coast Highway, east of Street of the


Copper Lantern

2488

10-Dec

3:20 PM

0.02

1.19

11

Dana Point Harbor, South of Coast


Highway

3143

10-Dec

3:35 PM

0.04

0.83

12

Tirremia Dr at Monarch Beach Road

2217

11-Dec

8:17 AM

1.69

1.81

13

Garibaldi Ave at Selva Road

1739

11-Dec

9:06 AM

0.08

1.86

14

Niguel Road at Coast Highway (NE


corner, 16" main)

1652

11-Dec

9:40 AM

2.20

2.18

15

Acapula Drive at Street of the Golden


Lantern

2218

11-Dec

9:55 AM

0.49

1.98

16

Mediterranean Dr at Baltic Sea Dr

1656

11-Dec

10:23 AM

0.13

1.49

17

Sea Island Dr at Somerset Circle

1738

11-Dec

11:31 AM

0.05

0.66

18

234 Monarch Bay Drive

1509

11-Dec

11:57 AM

0.60

1.54

19

South of Ocean Vista Dr at Coast


Highway

1508

11-Dec

1:29 PM

0.05

1.96

4-43

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Water Distribution System Master Plan


In general, the District maintained total chlorine residuals within 1.0 mg/l and 2.0 mg/l thoughout the distribution system, at the time the sampling was conducted. There were a few
locations, at dead-ends or extremities of the system, which recorded below a chlorine residual
of 1.0 mg/l. The District does conduct periodic hydrant flushing to improve water quality in
known problem areas of the system, typically dead-end areas.
An age-of-water analysis, utilizing the extended period computer model, can be performed to
estimate areas of the distribution system that may warrant further attention in addressing water
quality problems. The hydraulic computer model calculates age of water based on the amount
of time it takes water to travel from supply and storage locations to the water customer. In order
for the age of water in the reservoirs to reach equilibrium, an extended period simulation would
need to be conducted for 7 to 14 days under a minimum day condition (0.4 times average
annual demands). Should the District experience an increase in water quality problems, the
hydraulic model may be a valuable tool to assist in addressing this issue. At this time, it does
not appear to be a major problem in day-to-day water system operations.
Groundwater Recovery Facility Source Analysis
During the preparation of this Master Plan, the District was preparing to bring on-line its new
Groundwater Recovery Facility (GRF), and desired to better understand how the new high
quality water would be blended in the distribution system. The District retained HDR to develop
a separate technical memorandum analyzing a number of supply source alternatives. PBS&J
supported their ongoing work by conducting a series of minimum water demand computer
simulations to better trace the new water source in the system.
The design capacity of the new GRF provides for a constant discharge of about 600 to 700 gpm
of treated drinking water. The plant was designed to discharge this new supply at two different
locations:

Dana Point Subsystem (390 PZ)


South Coast System (415 PZ) through the WIP (540 HGL)

The hydraulic analysis was to determine the preferred initial location for the GRF to discharge,
as the facility was coming on line in December 2007. Figure 4-9 shows the location of the
facility in relation to the proposed discharge locations. Ultimately, the goal of the GRF facility is
to reduce the Districts dependency on imported water.
The District staff had concerns over the water quality produced from the GRF, so blending the
product water is a high priority. Hydraulic model simulations were performed under minimum
demand conditions to identify customers receiving GRF product water and what percentage of
the new product water. The InfoWater model was used to perform a source analysis which
can estimate the percent of blended imported water and GRF water within the distribution
system.

4-44

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

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Figure 4-9
South Coast Water District
GRF MINIMUM DAY
SOURCE ANALYSIS

Water Distribution System Master Plan


Current production of GRF is expected to be 600 gallons per minute (gpm). Because the facility
needs to operate at a constant flow rate, it was not practical to convey this water to Capistrano
Beach subsystem where minimum demands are 50 percent of the GRF capacity during the
nighttime. The initial preferred location is to supply directly into the 390 PZ (Dana Point
Subsystem), where the minimum nighttime demands more closely matches the GRF capacity
and the zone has the ability to store water in the Dana Point Reservoir. This condition holds
true in the summer months. In the winter months when demands are reduced, it is more
advantageous to send GRF flows to the South Coast system (415 PZ), via the WIP at 540 HGL.
Figure 4-9 illustrates a source analysis simulation under minimum demands with the GRF
supplying the 390 PZ. In general the areas closest to the source receive nearly 100 percent
GRF water and those areas near the harbor, for example experience a 30-40 percent blend of
GRF to imported water.

4.5.4 Ultimate Water System Considerations


The District basically operates two independent water systems which consist of the former
Capistrano Beach Water District system and South Coast system. As part of the Master Plan,
several areas of the distribution system were reviewed to evaluate the potential to further
enhance or simplify system operations. The ultimate system evaluation included assessing
several issues raised by the District including:

Impact of future water demands on the system (Future Demands)


Fire flow and potential wildfire impacts (Fire System Upgrades)
Lack of storage in the 345 PZ in Capo Beach (Storage Needs)
Water quality and turnover in 290 PZ reservoirs (Storage Needs)
345 PZ conversion (Zone Analyses)

Future Demands
Since the District is predominately built-out the future increase in water demands associated
with new developments and some re-development, which may range from 5 to 10 percent, is
not anticipated to have major impact on pipeline, reservoir or pumping capacities. As noted in
our pump station and reservoir analyses, there is surplus capacity in the system and the District
should be able to meet future demands, including planned re-development projects.
Future developments should conduct fire flow analyses to confirm the local distribution systems
ability to meet the required fire flow demand. In some cases, larger fire flows may be required
under proposed re-development projects.
Fire System Upgrades
A global fire flow analysis of the existing system resulted in recommendations to upgrade
undersized water mains to increase fire flow capacity. In the future, the District in conjunction
with the local fire agencies, may want to evaluate available fire flows along wildfire boundary
areas such as canyon rim and areas exposed to potential brush fires. The use of recycled
water versus potable water for fire protection along wildland/urban interface boundaries was
reviewed and discussed with District staff. It was concluded that the recycled water system
would require a significant expansion to provide high fire flow capacity, while the potable system
would only require minimal upgrades to increase fire protection along wildfire boundaries. The
4-47

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Water Distribution System Master Plan


challenges of using recycled water for fire protection include: (1) significant pipeline capacity
expansion of the recycled water system, (2) need for fire storage, (3) water quality with
oversized system, (4) increased reliability of system, (5) Health Department issues associated
with Fire Department use, and (6) overall infrastructure improvement and capital costs.
The potable water system hydraulic model could be used to evaluate the cost and benefit of
increasing fire flows along these areas. As an example, this may include increasing 6-inch and
8-inch mains to 12-inch in diameter in order to increase the available fire flow capacity. These
areas would need to be evaluated on a site specific case, as flow and pressure would vary from
one system to another.
Storage Needs
The District, overall, has an excess of distribution water storage to meet the daily needs of its
customers, even with an allowance for potential local system outages. Only the 345 PZ in Capo
Beach lacks any operational storage.
The 345 PZ was reviewed to potentially consider construction of a new reservoir. In order to
properly function in the system, this reservoir would ideally be located a pad elevation of about
310 feet and would consist of a 32-foot high reservoir, approximately 2.2 MG in size. As a built
out community, the District has very few options with respect to siting and locating new
reservoirs. In addition, land value likely prohibits the purchase of any new site. Based on a
cursory reconnaissance of sites, it is recommended that the 345 PZ continue to be operated off
the JTM and Bradt.
The 290 PZ has the largest excess of storage volume and number of operating reservoirs.
Unfortunately, not all are in the best location based on their size. A total of 4.4 MG, between
two reservoirs, is located at the south end of the South Coast system, which experiences lower
demands and hence reservoir turn-over challenges. The District should continue to utilize PS
#6 to supply to the south end of the system and improve water quality. In the future, the District
should consider conversion of one of the 5A Reservoirs to a recycled water tank, should the
recycled system continue to expand.
The 4A Reservoir (0.6 MG) cycles the greatest, as it serves as important forebay storage for PS
#4, which can pump at a rate of 900 gpm. At only 0.6 MG this reservoir can drain quickly based
on the operational settings of the PS #4. It is recommended that the District evaluate the
feasibility of replacing the existing 4A Reservoir with a larger size (approximately 1.0 MG) to
provide more forebay storage for PS #4 and also to replace an aging facility.
Zone Analyses
A pressure zone conversion of the 345 PZ east of I-5 was explored with the goal of importing
operating pressures at high and low elevation areas. The area east of I-5 was identified as a
potential area for increased pressures by operations staff because there are two locations at I-5
at which PRVs could be constructed to maintain existing 345 PZ pressures west of I-5.
The 345 PZ receives its main supply from the JTM through the Juanita Connection (PRV
420/345). Elevations in the area east of I-5 range from approximately 185 feet to 285 feet, which
results in existing static pressures ranging from 26 psi to 69 psi, respectively. In order to avoid
increasing pressures in this area above 90 psi, an HGL of 390 feet was determined as the most
4-48

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Water Distribution System Master Plan


desirable. At 390 feet HGL, the pressures in the area east of I-5 would range from
approximately 45 psi to 90 psi, providing a 20 psi increase in static pressures. Emergency
bypass piping should be constructed as part of the PRSs to allow back feeding of this new
pressure zone if the Juanita Connection is down. Figure 4-10 conceptually illustrates the 390
PZ conversion of the 345 PZ system east of I-5.

4.5.5 Summary of Recommended Improvements


In summary, the District maintains a water system with no major capacity deficiencies, as
evident by this numerous hydrant flow tests and analyses of the water system compared to
design criteria. Several of the recommended projects are designed to further improve reliability
and provide the District even more operational flexibility. Some study work is recommended
which may result in future capital projects that may need to incorporate in future CIP planning.
The CIP projects for the water distribution system are recommended to be programmed in over
the next five years. No future projects beyond five years have been included. In addition, it is
anticipated that upgrades will be needed to accommodate future demands from the City of Dana
Point Town Center Project, in the Capistrano Beach System, Dana Point Subsystem.
Phase I 5-Year Water Capacity CIP (2009-2013)
The recommended five year program for potable water (PW) projects, in no particular order, is
described below. Estimated capital costs are included in Chapter 7.
Project PW-1 PS #9. Add an emergency generator or portable generator back-up to the fire
pump at Pump Station #9 for added reliability during potential power outage. Review and
evaluate the possible need for second back-up fire pump to serve the 470 PZ in the event one
pump is out of service.
Project PW-2 Misc. Pipeline Upgrades for Fire Flow. Replace approximately 16,000 feet of
4-inch and 6-inch main with 8-inch main to increase fire flow protection in the areas noted in
Table 4-10. These small upgrade projects should be coordinated with other local street or
drainage improvements for economy of scale and efficiency.
Project PW-3 345 PZ Conversion. Construct two pressure reducing stations located at each
I-5 crossing in the 345 PZ. The Juanita connection should be adjusted to reduce pressure to
390 feet HGL, and the new PRVs will reduce pressure from 390 feet HGL to 345 feet HGL.
Project PW-4 Reservoir 4A Replacement Study. Conduct a reservoir feasibility study to
replace the existing 0.6 MG steel reservoir, on the same site, with a new larger reservoir
(approximately 1.0 MG) to provide increased forebay storage for PS #4 operations.
Project PW-5 GRF Integration. Conduct the necessary hydraulic and modeling studies to
optimize the operation of the GRF Facility and plan for the next expansion.
Project PW-6 Wildfire Urban Interface. Working in conjunction with local fire agencies
conduct a technical study and develop costs and benefit to enhance fire flow capacity in and
around wildland and urban interface areas of the District.

4-49

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Water Distribution System Master Plan


Project PW-7 Age of Water. If desired, perform an age of water simulation on the distribution
system to quantify those locations of aged water or areas of potential lower chlorine residuals.

4-50

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

New Pressure
Reducing Station
390/345

BRADT
RESERVOIR

k
j




Upper 345 PZ
Served from San Clemente
15 homes at 437-ft HGL

New Pressure
Reducing Station
390/345

11/19/08 KM KM Z:\Projects\IS\SCWD\MXD\ReportFigures\FinalReport\Conversion345pz.mxd




PACIFIC
OCEAN
Legend
< 65 psi
65 psi

Pressure Zone + Name


345 - Capo Beach
390 - Dana Point

 Pump Station

k
j

Water Reservoir
South Coast Water District Boundary
Municipal Boundaries

Note: Pressure Reducing Stations


should be equipped with an
emergency bypass (345/390) in the
event the Juanita connection is down

U
V
1

Figure 4-10
South Coast Water District
POTENTIAL 390 / 345
PRESSURE ZONE CONVERSION

Chapter 5
Wastewater Master Plan
This chapter addresses the sewer collection system within the District. It includes a detailed
description of the operation of the existing system and a capacity evaluation of the gravity sewer
system and sewer lift stations to determine capacity needs. The Districts newly calibrated
hydraulic computer model is presented, as well as the findings of the collection system hydraulic
analyses. Recommended sewer collection system improvements are included.

5.1

Existing Wastewater Collection System

South Coast Water District collects the wastewater from homes and businesses and conveys it
through miles of sewer mains and a series of lift stations and force mains. The collected
wastewater is treated at two treatment plants. The Coastal Treatment Plant in Aliso Canyon,
Laguna Niguel has a 6.7 MGD capacity and treats wastewater collected from the northern part
of the District. The J.B. Latham Treatment Plant in Dana Point has a 13 MGD capacity and
treats wastewater from the southern part of the District. Figure 5-1 graphically presents the
regional wastewater collection system.
The existing wastewater collection system consists of three separate service areas/systems:
South Coast, Dana Point, and Capistrano Beach, which formerly were operated as the
independent sewer districts of South Laguna Sanitary District, Dana Point Sanitary District, and
Capistrano Beach Sanitary District, respectively. Figure 5-2 graphically displays the three
systems. A portion of each system lies outside the current District boundary. In addition to the
services provided to its residents, the District performs several levels of contract operations. In
July of 1997, approximately 400 residential units in the communities of Laguna Sur and
Monarch Point were transferred to the Moulton Niguel Water District (MNWD). The District
continues to provide wastewater collection to these communities under contract with MNWD. In
July of 1999, the District transferred the South Laguna area to the City of Laguna Beach. The
South Laguna area begins at the community of Three Arch Bay and continues north to Nyes
Place. The District continues to provide potable water, recycled water and wastewater collection
to this area under contract with the City of Laguna Beach.
Figure 5-3 illustrates the location of the gravity mains, trunk sewers, lift stations, and force
mains that are owned, operated and maintained by the District. The Districts sewer system
includes approximately 140 miles of sewer ranging in size from 6 inch to 24 inch diameter, 14 lift
stations and 3 miles of force mains.
South Coast System
The South Coast System service area generally includes the areas along Pacific Coast Highway
(PCH) from south Laguna Beach to the northern part of the City of Dana Point. It is
characterized by relatively short sewers conveying flows from the eastern hillsides to the PCH
area. Sewer Lift Stations #1, and #3 through #7 are located along PCH to convey flows from
sewer sub basins, to the north, to Lift Station #2 where the service area flows are pumped into
the Coastal Plant. The South Coast System also includes a 10,500 foot gravity sewer tunnel
(Tunnel Interceptor), stretching from the south tip of Three Arch Bay to Aliso State Beach.
5-1

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

TRABUCO CANYON
WATER DISTRICT
IRVINE RANCH
WATER DISTRICT

TCWD
ROBINSONS
RANCH
WRP

LAKE FOREST

IRWD LOS
ALISOS WRP

RANCHO SANTA
MARGARITA

ETWD
WWTP

EL TORO
WATER DISTRICT

LAGUNA WOODS

LAGUNA HILLS

MOULTON
NIGUEL
WATER
DISTRICT

ALISO VIEJO

EMERALD BAY
SERVICE DISTRICT

SMWD
OSO CREEK
WRP
MNWD
PLANT 3A
WWTP

ALICIA
PARKWAY
PS

CITY OF
LAGUNA BEACH
LAGUNA
BEACH PS

MISSION VIEJO

SANTA MARGARITA
WATER DISTRICT
SMWD
CHIQUITA
WRP

LAGUNA BEACH

BLUEBIRD
PS

NICHOLS
INSTITUTE
WRP

REGIONAL
TREATMENT PLANT
(RTP)
LAGUNA NIGUEL

COASTAL
TREATMENT PLANT
(CTP)

SAN JUAN CAPISTRANO

DANA POINT

SOUTH COAST
WATER DISTRICT
JB LATHAM
TREATMENT
PLANT (JBL)

SAN CLEMENTE

CITY OF
SAN CLEMENTE

CSC WRP

LEGEND

REGIONAL WASTEWATER
COLLECTION SYSTEM
FIGURE 5-1
Source: Cathcart Garcia von Langen Engineers, SOCWA, 2008

South Coast Water District Master Plan


October 2008

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Wastewater System
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11/19/08 KM KM Z:\Projects\IS\SCWD\MXD\ReportFigures\Final Report\WastewaterSystems.mxd

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Figure 5-2
South Coast Water District
WASTEWATER SYSTEMS MAP

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!
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!

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SC - LS 3

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South Coast Water District Boundary

Sewer Gravity Mains

San Clemente

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P ic

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DP - LS 10

DP - LS 11

i

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11/19/08 KM KM Z:\Projects\IS\SCWD\MXD\ReportFigures\FinalReport\Lift StationsFlowMetering.mxd

SCS_LS_6

Legend

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LS





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4,000

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Figure 5-3
LIFT STATIONS AND TEMPORARY
FLOW METERING MAP

Wastewater Master Plan


Dana Point and Capistrano Beach System
The Dana Point and Capistrano Beach System sewer service areas are served by the Latham
Plant. Dana Point System Lift Stations #8 through #11 convey flows from various smaller
basins, such as the Harbor area, to gravity trunk sewers which drain to the Latham Plant. The
Capistrano Beach System includes two smaller lift stations along the coast (#13 and #14). Flow
from this service area is conveyed to Lift Station #12, where it is pumped to the Latham Plant.

5.1.1 Metered Sewer Basins


The existing sewer collection system was temporarily metered in several strategic locations to
provide accurate flow records to assist in hydraulic model calibration, as well as estimating peak
dry weather sewer flows. The flow meter locations were strategically selected to quantify flows
from portions of Dana Point and Laguna Beach. There were other areas of the District that
were not metered because flow data was available from other District sources, such as
permanent meters at the treatment plants and a majority of the sewer lift stations. For example,
no new flow monitoring was conducted in the Capistrano Beach System because flow data was
available from meter data at Lift Station #12.
ADS Environmental Services was retained to provide flow meter data during a month long
monitoring period at four locations during May 2007. Appendix C-1 includes the full report and
analysis. Each meter captured weekday as well as weekend hourly flow data. No rainfall
events occurred during the monitoring period. The metered locations and lift station drainage
basins are described below and are shown graphically in Figure 5-3.
Meter 1 Sewer Basin
The Meter 1 Basin encompasses approximately 300 acres in the Dana Point System and
extends from Calle La Primavera westerly to the street boundary of El Encanto Avenue. The
Meter 1 Basin is bounded to the south by PCH and to the north by Stonehill Drive and is
characterized as a predominately residential area, with a few schools and commercial areas.
The Meter 1 Basin collects flow tributary to a 10 inch trunk sewer located on PCH, south of
Golden Lantern. Basin sewers drain generally southeast to this trunk sewer, and then flow
north along Del Obispo Street to the Latham Plant.
Meter 2 Sewer Basin
The Meter 2 Basin encompasses approximately 300 acres in the South Coast System and
extends from Niguel Road easterly to Marlinspike Drive. The Meter 2 Basin includes the
proposed Headlands Development and Lift Station #5. The Meter 2 Basin collects flows tributary
to a 10 inch trunk sewer located on PCH north of Niguel Road and is characterized by a mix of
residential and commercial land uses. Basin sewers drain generally to the northwest to the
trunk sewer, which continues north along PCH and drains to Lift Station #6, west of PCH.
These flows are eventually conveyed to the Coastal Plant.
Meter 3 Sewer Basin
The Meter 3 Basin encompasses approximately 25 acres in the middle of the South Coast
System and extends from PCH easterly to Sunset Avenue. The Basin is bounded to the north
by Second Avenue and to the south by Eastline Road. The Meter 2 Basin is directly to the
south. The Meter 3 Basin collects flow tributary to a 10 inch trunk sewer that crosses PCH at
Circle Drive and includes wastewater flows from the South Coast Medical Center. Basin sewers

5-7

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Wastewater Master Plan


drain generally southwest to the trunk sewer, which continues north along PCH and connects to
the Interceptor Sewer Tunnel, west of PCH.
Meter 4 Sewer Basin
The Meter 4 Basin encompasses approximately 600 acres, also in the South Coast System, and
extends from Aliso State Beach south along the coast, across the District boundary, to Via
Siena. It is bounded to the east by Pacific Island Drive and to the west by the coastline. As with
Meter 2, this basin includes a mix of residential and commercial land uses. The Meter 3 Basin
lies to the southeast. The Meter 4 Basin includes Lift Station #6 and collects flow tributary to the
Interceptor Sewer Tunnel. Basin sewers drain generally to the northwest to the Tunnel, which
then conveys the wastewater north along the coast, where it drains to Lift Station #2.

5.1.2 Wastewater Treatment Facilities


The South Coast System is served by the 6.7 MGD Coastal Treatment Plant, owned and
operated by the South Orange County Wastewater Authority (SOCWA). The Coastal Plant is
located just outside of the Districts northeast boundary in unincorporated Orange County (Aliso
and Wood Canyons Wilderness Park) and is also owned and operated by SOCWA. The District
currently owns 2.0 MGD of wastewater treatment capacity in the Coastal Plant. It is estimated
that the District will sewer approximately 2.0 MGD to the Coastal Treatment Plant at buildout. It
is recommended that the District closely monitor their capacity in the Coastal Treatment Plant.
Effluent from the Coastal Plant is treated to secondary or tertiary levels dependent on disposal
or reuse of the wastewater. Recycled water is treated to Title 22 standards at an Advanced
Water Treatment Plant (AWT) located adjacent to the Coastal Plant. This facility is also owned
and operated by SOCWA. Treated effluent that is not recycled is disposed through the Aliso
Creek Ocean Outfall. During the summer months, over 2 MGD of recycled water can be
produced by the AWT. Chapter 6 provides a discussion of the Districts use of recycled water
from the AWT.
The Dana Point and Capistrano Beach Systems are served by the 13 MGD J.B. Latham
Treatment Plant. Owned and operated by SOCWA, the Latham Plant has 3.75 MGD in capacity
reserved for the Districts wastewater flows. No recycled water is currently produced at the
Latham Plant. Wastewater is treated to secondary levels and conveyed directly to the San Juan
Creek Outfall. It is estimated that the District will sewer approximately 2.2 MGD to the J.B.
Latham Treatment Plant at buildout.

5.1.3 Interconnections and Intra-Agency Service


Due to the local topography, the District provides sewer service to some customers outside the
District, but along its boundaries, to avoid the construction and operation of sewer lift stations in
neighboring districts. There are currently five interconnections in the Districts wastewater
system.

The District provides sewer collection services to the South Laguna area, via a service
agreement with the City of Laguna Beach

Approximately 400 customers within the MNWD sewer by gravity to the Districts South
Coast System.
5-8

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Wastewater Master Plan

Approximately 295 homes within the City of San Juan Capistrano north of the Latham
Plant gravity flow to the District system near Stonehill Drive and Del Obispo.

Approximately 20 homes just east of the Meter #1 and north of Meter #2 Basins flow to a
Moulton Niguel lift station on Crown Valley Parkway west of Pacific Island Drive.
Approximately 40 homes northeast of Lift Station #7 flow to the Districts system at
connections bordered by Pacific Island Drive, Isle Vista, and Sea Island Drive.

Flows from approximately 300 homes in the City of San Clemente enter the District
system, north of Camino El Molino and Calle Juanita.

5.1.4 Flow Diversions


In order to comply with local stormwater quality regulations, the District has seen a large
increase in the construction of flow diversion structures connected to its sanitary sewer system.
There are currently 33 existing flow diversions in operation within the District and a proposed
new flow diversion for Poche Creek. These flow diversions typically consist of (1) Culvert
Diversion Structures (CDS), (2) Storm Drain Diversion, (3) Groundwater Diversion, and (4)
Treatment Backwash. The most common being the CDS and storm drain diversions which are
designed to convey nuisance or low flow runoff of poor quality from the storm drain system to
the sanitary sewer system. The existing and proposed flow diversion locations are shown on
Figure 5-4. Most of the units are located along the coastal area. Table 5-1 summarizes the
name, location, type, flow and the organization responsible for maintenance for the existing and
proposed flow diversions. Currently, most Diversion Agreements call for the systems to be shut
down during the winter rainy months (October 15 April 15), or when chance of rain exceeds 50
percent. Most are also limited to maximum flows of 10,000 gallons per day. Proper operation is
the responsibility of the individual owners, with activities reported to the District.
These flow diversion structures present an inherent risk to the Districts collection system if not
properly operated. The District could experience high inflow rates into its sewer system if
diversion structures are not operated properly. In addition, poor quality runoff could result in
increased maintenance of the collection system. Since many of these facilities are dictated by
local municipal land development codes, the District should work closely with local agencies to
develop policy procedures for approved types of structures, replacement of existing nonconforming structures, and identify maintenance responsibilities.
Table 5-1. Flow Diversions
Ref.
Number

Name

Index Map/
MH No.

Contract (Max.)
Inflow

Type

Average
Inflow(1)

Observed
(Max.) Inflow(1)

1
2
3

Montage (North)
Montage (South)
Montage (Public Parking)

A-2 / S1513
B-3 / S1501
B-3 / S1470

CDS Unit
CDS Unit
CDS Unit

unk
unk
unk

unk
unk
unk

5th Street & PCH

C-5 / S1153

CDS Unit

unk

unk

3 Arch Bay (North) - N. La D-7 / S991


Senda
3 Arch Bay (South I) - Bay D-8 / S981
Drive
3 Arch Bay (South II) - S. D-8 / S974
La Senda

6
7

Maintained By

CDS Unit

10,000 GPD

unk

unk

Montage
Montage
City of Laguna
Beach
City of Laguna
Beach
3 Arch Bay

CDS Unit

10,000 GPD

unk

unk

3 Arch Bay

CDS Unit

10,000 GPD

not yet
not yet
operational operational

5-9

3 Arch Bay

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Wastewater Master Plan

Table 5-1 (continued)


Ref.
Number
8

20

Salt Creek Ozone


Treatment
Niguel Shores - Niguel
Shores Drive & Windlass
Niguel Shores - Magellan
Isle
Niguel Shores - Magellan
Isle & Niguel Shores Drive
Niguel Shores - Niguel
Shores Drive & Mercator
Isle
Niguel Shores - Mercator
Isle & Niguel Shores Drive
Niguel Shores - Nauticus
Isle & Niguel Shores Drive
Niguel Shores Beach
Parking OC Storm Drain
Headlands CDS Unit 1 Strand Beach Drive
Headlands CDS Unit 2 Strand Beach Drive
Headlands CDS Unit 3 Strand Beach Drive
Baby Beach - Dana Point
Harbor
North Creek

21

Del Obispo

22

Alipaz

23

GRF

24

Beach Road No. 1

9
10
11
12

13
14
15
16
17
18
19

(1)

Name

Index Map/
MH No.

Contract (Max.)
Inflow

Type

E-9 / S356A

Average
Inflow(1)

Observed
(Max.) Inflow(1)

Maintained By

Treatment
Backwash
G-11 / S153A Groundwater
Diversion
F-11 / near
Storm Drain
S305
Diversion
F-11 / S303
Groundwater
Diversion
F-11 / S267
Groundwater
Diversion

144,000 GPD,
constant flow
10,000 GPD

62,766
GPD
unk

259,900
GPD
unk

SCWD

10,000 GPD

unk

unk

Niguel Shores HOA

10,000 GPD

unk

unk

Niguel Shores HOA

10,000 GPD

unk

unk

Niguel Shores HOA

F-11 / near
S266
F-12 / near
S264
F-12 / S288E

10,000 GPD

unk

unk

Niguel Shores HOA

10,000 GPD

unk

unk

Niguel Shores HOA

10,000 GPD

F-12 / S4095

CDS Unit

10,000 GPD

F-13 / S4108

CDS Unit

10,000 GPD

G-13 / D757

CDS Unit

10,000 GPD

not yet
operational
not yet
operational
not yet
operational
not yet
operational
not yet
operational
unk

not yet
operational
not yet
operational
not yet
operational
not yet
operational
not yet
operational
unk

City of Dana Point

F-12 / S4110

Storm Drain
Diversion
Storm Drain
Diversion
Storm Drain
Diversion
CDS Unit

Storm Drain
Diversion
J-12 / C4002A Storm Drain
Diversion
J-11 / D659
Storm Drain
Diversion
J-12 / C782
Treatment
Backwash

10,000 GPD

I-13 / D810

J-14 / C715

10,000 GPD

Niguel Shores HOA

Headlands Reserve
Headlands Reserve
Headlands Reserve
City of Dana Point
City of Dana Point

7,276 GPD 28,765 GPD

City of Dana Point

44,958
85,143 GPD
GPD
120 gpm, constant not yet
not yet
flow (240 gpm w/ operational operational
GRF Expansion)
10,000 GPD
unk
unk

City of Dana Point

72,000 GPD

Storm Drain
Diversion
25
Beach Road No. 2
K-14 / C710
Storm Drain 10,000 GPD
unk
Diversion
26
Beach Road No. 3
K-14 / C684
Storm Drain 10,000 GPD
<1000
Diversion
GPD
27
Capistrano Beach/
K-15 / C696
Storm Drain 10,000 GPD
10.6 GPD
Palisades
Diversion
28
Beach Road No. 4
K-15 / C681
Storm Drain 10,000 GPD
<1000
Diversion
GPD
29
Camino de Estrella @
L-15 / C518
Storm Drain
unk
Camino Capistrano
Diversion
30
Beach Road No. 5
L-15 / C666A Storm Drain 10,000 GPD
unk
Diversion
31
Beach Road No. 6
M-17 / C659
Storm Drain 10,000 GPD
<1000
Diversion
GPD
32
Beach Road No. 7
M-17 / C658
Storm Drain 10,000 GPD
<1000
Diversion
GPD
33
Beach Road No. 8
M-17 / C653
Storm Drain 10,000 GPD
unk
Diversion
34
Poche Creek
N-18 / near
Treatment
144,000 GPD,
not yet
C651
Backwash
constant flow
operational
Average Inflow is based on Average Daily Flow Reports from City of Dana Point, May - Sept 2007

5-10

SCWD

City of Dana Point

unk

City of Dana Point

unk

City of Dana Point

258.4 GPD

City of Dana Point

1440 GPD

City of Dana Point

unk

City of Dana Point

unk

City of Dana Point

1000 GPD

City of Dana Point

unk

City of Dana Point

unk

City of Dana Point

not yet
operational

Undetermined
(Proposed SCWD)

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Alicia

Antonio

oa
C
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l

LS



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ills

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sM
Lo
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# 21

# 20

Sewer Force Main

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Treatment Backwash

as
t

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Dan

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# 17

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# 16

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Pa r

LATHAM PLANT
LS



# 15

D oh

LS



# 14

Type

Sewer Lift Station

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tH

# 13

FlowDiversions

LS



Ston

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Dana Point

# 12

PACIFIC
OCEAN

Portico D

# 23

# 11

Sewer Treatment Plant

Val

bis
p
De
lO

el

st

San Clemente

P ic

Sewer Gravity Mains


Freeway

# 24

Highway
Major Road

Municipal Boundary

Wastewater System
Capistrano Beach

# 25

# 26

# 33

U
V
1

# 27

# 34
El

Feet

Dana Point
South Coast

i
LS str


an

South Coast Water District Boundary

C
ap

11/19/08 KM KM Z:\Projects\IS\SCWD\MXD\ReportFigures\Final Report\FlowDiversions.mxd

oa

LS


LS



#8

# 10

le

#7

D e l A v io n

Nig
u

ci
fic

ee

ua
n

Go

Is

lde

La

San Juan Capistrano

n
Sa

Pa

Storm Drain Diversion

via

cif
ic

#6

Groundwater Diversion

No

Pa

#5

Legend

La

LS 1


U
V

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j
Vie
ho
nc
Ra

n
istra
Cap

#4

!


U
V
74

74

iejo

#1

aH

oV

ri n
Ma

COASTAL PLANT

# 28
4,000

# 29

# 30

# 31

# 32

Ca
m

in
o

rr o
De l C e

Re
al

Figure 5-4
South Coast Water District
FLOW DIVERSIONS

Wastewater Master Plan


5.1.5 Lift Stations
There are currently 14 sewer lift stations in operation as shown in Figure 5-2. The lift stations
are sequentially numbered from north to south, generally following the sewer service areas:

South Coast System (Lift Stations #1 through #7)


Dana Point System (Lift Stations #8 through #11)
Capo Beach System (Lift Stations #12 through #14)

The remaining section describes the location of the lift station, its service area, number of
pumps and nominal capacity.
Lift Station #1 Blue Lagoon
The Blue Lagoon Lift Station is located within the Blue Lagoon condominium complex adjacent
to the Montage Resort. Lift Station #1 has two operating and one spare Flygt pumps with a
design capacity of 400 gpm at 105 feet of TDH. Two 30 hp Variable Frequency Drive (VFD)
motors service the pumps with 1,755 rpm. The station lifts wastewater from the coastal section
of Laguna Beach up to PCH.
Lift Station #2 Aliso Creek / Maintenance Shop
The Main Shop Lift Station is located on Country Club Road just east of Coast Highway. Lift
Station #2 has two operating and one spare 1986 Centrifugal Allis Chalmers pumps with a
design capacity of 2,200 gpm at 125 ft of TDH. Two 125 hp Variable Frequency Drive (VFD)
motors service the pumps with 1,185 rpm. The station lifts all wastewater from the South Coast
system of the District to the Coastal Treatment Plant. It is the Districts largest lift station.
Lift Station #3 Monarch Bay
The Monarch Bay Lift Station is located west of Beach Club Drive. Lift Station #3 has two
operating early 1980s Centrifugal Fairbanks Morse pumps with a design capacity of 520 gpm at
115 feet of TDH. Two 25 hp motors power the pumps at 1,755 rpm. The station lifts
wastewater from the Meter #3 Basin (described previously) and the adjacent neighborhood, and
pumps the wastewater to Lift Station #6.
Lift Station #4 County Beach Lift Station
The County Beach Lift Station is located on the beach west of Ritz Cove Drive. Lift Station #4
has two operating 2007 Flygt pumps with a design capacity of 150 gpm at 47 feet of TDH. Two
7.4 hp motors power the pumps at 1,750 rpm. The station primarily services two restrooms at
the beach and pumps wastewater to Lift Station #3.
Lift Station #5 Niguel Shores
The Niguel Shores Lift Station is located at the beach parking lot on Breakers Isle. Lift Station
#5 has two operating 1970 Centrifugal Fairbanks Morse pumps with a design capacity of 520
gpm at 115 feet of TDH. Two 25 hp motors power the pumps at 1,750 rpm. The station
services Niguel Shores and surrounding neighborhoods and pumps wastewater to Lift
Station #6.

5-13

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Wastewater Master Plan


This lift station is scheduled for relocation as part of the Headlands Development improvements.
The new lift station will operate two 2008 Flygt pumps with a design capacity of 825 gpm at 155
feet of TDH. Two 70 hp motors will power the pumps at 1775 rpm.
Lift Station #6 Ritz Cove
The Ritz Cove Lift Station is located on the Monarch Beach Golf Course west of Ritz Cove
Drive. Lift Station #6 has three operating Centrifugal 1984 Crane Deming pumps with a
capacity of 1,360 gpm at 95 feet of TDH each. Three 75 hp VFD motors power the pumps at
1,175 rpm. The station lifts wastewater from the Dana Point area of the District to the Tunnel
Trunk Sewer ending up at Lift Station #2. This station also currently receives approximately
50 gpm of constant flow from the Salt Creek Ozone Treatment Plants backwash, which is
adjacent to the station.
Lift Station #7 Circle Drive
The Circle Drive Lift Station is located below Circle Drive. Lift Station #7 has one operating
Submersible 2004 Barnes pump. One 1.5 hp motor powers the pump at 1,750 rpm. The station
serves only three residences and pumps wastewater to the Tunnel Trunk Sewer ending up at
Lift Station #2.
Lift Station #8 Acapulco
The Acapulco Lift Station is within the Dana Point system and is located at the intersection of
Caracas Street and Santiago Drive. Lift Station #8 has recently been upgraded with two
operating 2008 Flygt Dry Pit Submersible pumps that have a design capacity of 750 gpm at
90 feet of TDH. Two 30 hp motors power the pumps at 1,760 rpm. The station services the
northern portion of Dana Point. The station pumps wastewater to Stonehill Drive, where it
gravity flows through the Del Obispo Trunk Sewer into the Latham Treatment Plant.
Lift Station #9 South Harbor Island Way
The South Harbor Island Way Lift Station is located on the Dana Point Harbor at the intersection
of Dana Drive and Island Way. Lift Station #9 has two operating Dry Pit Submersible 1990
WEMCO pumps with a design capacity of 275 gpm at 44 feet of TDH. Two 10 hp motors power
the pumps at 1,170 rpm. Lift Station #9 total flows are then pumped to Lift Station #10.
Lift Station #10 North Harbor Island Way
The North Harbor Island Way Lift Station is located at the intersection of Dana Point Harbor and
Island Way. Lift Station #10 has two operating Dry Pit Submersible 1990 WEMCO pumps with
a design capacity of 350 gpm at 20 feet of TDH. Two 7.5 hp motors power the pumps at
1,170 rpm. The Marine Institute typically conveys flows during tank flushing operations, which
can at times be scheduled or managed to minimize capacity impacts. The station also services
the northwestern portion of Dana Point Harbor and pumps wastewater to Lift Station #11.
Lift Station #11 Embarcadero
The Embarcadero Lift Station is located near the intersection of Dana Point Harbor and Puerto
Place. Lift Station #11 has two operating Dry Pit Submersible 1991 WEMCO pumps with a
design capacity of 600 gpm at 34 feet of TDH. Two 15 hp motors power the pumps at
1,160 rpm. The station receives flow from the northeastern portion of Dana Point Harbor and
pumps wastewater to the Latham Plant.

5-14

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Wastewater Master Plan


Lift Station #12 Victoria
The Victoria Lift Station is within the Capo Beach system and is located near the intersection of
Victoria Boulevard and Santa Fe Avenue. Lift Station #12 has three operating Submersible
2003 KSB pumps with a design capacity of 1,345 gpm at 39 feet of TDH. Three 25 hp VFD
motors power the pumps at 1,170 rpm. The Station receives flow from Capo Beach and pumps
wastewater to the Latham Plant. The station also currently receives approximately 120 gpm of
constant flow from the GRFs Iron and Manganese removal and RO reject streams. It is
anticipated that the station will receive approximately 240 gpm of flow from the GRF when it is
expanded.
Lift Station #13 State Park
The State Park Lift Station is located along Beach Road in the State Park parking lot. Lift
Station #13 has two operating Flygt submersible pumps with a design capacity of 500 gpm at 18
feet TDH. Two 7.5 hp motors power the pumps at 1,740 rpm. The station receives flow from
Lift Station #14 and the northern Beach Road homes, and pumps across and down Beach
Road. This lift station is also downstream of the future Poche Creek UV Treatment Plant.
Lift Station #14 Beach Road
The Beach Road Lift Station is located along Beach Road, south of Lift Station #13. The lift
station has two operating Flygt submersible pumps with a design point of 200 gpm at 17 feet of
TDH. Two 2.2 hp motors power the pumps at 1,670 rpm. The station receives flows from the
homes along the southern portion of Beech Road and pumps to a gravity sewer main that drains
to Lift Station #13. It is anticipated that LS #14 will receive approximately 100 gpm of treatment
backwash from Poche Creek. This lift station is immediately downstream of the future Poche
Creek UV Treatment Plant, and will receive approximately 100 gpm of backwash flows from the
plant.

5.2

Wastewater System Design Criteria

This section summarizes the wastewater system planning and design criteria used for the
hydraulic capacity evaluation of wastewater facilities, as part of the wastewater master plan.

5.2.1 District Design Criteria


The Districts sewer system design criteria are summarized in Table 5-2. The criteria were
reviewed and updated based on the following:

Review of previous District planning studies and criteria


Current District Standard Specifications
Comparison to other sewer agency criteria
Meetings and discussion with the Districts engineering and operations staff

The criteria also include standards for design capacity calculations, gravity sewer design, and
force main and lift station design.

5-15

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Wastewater Master Plan


Table 5-2. Hydraulic Sewer Design Criteria
Item

Criteria

Gravity Main Criteria


Minimum Pipe Diameter

8 inches

Minimum Velocity

2 fps at peak flow rate

Manning's Roughness Coefficient

0.013

Maximum Peak d/D Ratio for Existing Sewers

0.75

Maximum Peak d/D Ratio for New Sewers

0.50 for diameters < 12 inches


0.75 for diameters > 12 inches

Force Main Criteria


Minimum Pipe Diameter

4 inches

Minimum Velocity

3 fps

Maximum Velocity

8 fps

Pump Station Criteria


Minimum Number of Pumps

Minimum Pump Capacity

Duty pumps capable of handling ultimate wet weather capacity

Standby Capacity

100% of largest pump capacity

Emergency Power

Required

Emergency Storage Capacity

6 hours of average flow

To account for the daily variations in wastewater flow rates, the peak design flow rate within a
specific reach of sewer is approximated by multiplying the total average flow rate in the pipe by
a corresponding peaking factor. This peaking factor, especially under dry weather flows, is a
function of the tributary average flow draining to the reach. This factor can be difficult to
quantify and estimate at low flows. As part of this master plan, a peaking curve was developed
by adjusting the standard Federov peaking curve to best fit the temporary sewer flow metering
data collected. The new peaking curve and predicted peaking equation are shown in Figure
5-5, in comparison to the Districts current peaking curve. It was recommended by the District,
that the current peaking curve be used for steady-state analysis of the smaller collector sewers
(8 inch and 10 inch). The major trunk sewers larger than 10 inches and larger were evaluated
based on the calibrated dynamic sewer model.

5.2.2 Return-to-Sewer Capacity Methodology


A return-to-sewer generation rate, based upon actual individual customer water billing records,
was developed as the basis for estimating existing sewer flows in the District. Generally, a
sewer system experiences between 65 and 85 percent return rates of water use to the sewer,
depending on the type of land use and extent of outdoor water use. The return ratio can be as
high as 90 percent or more during wet periods. Appendix C-2 summarizes the allocated potable
water demands to their associated tributary sewer manhole. This methodology coupled with
temporary sewer flow meter records and lift station records can produce fairly accurate sewer
flow estimates for individual sewer basins in evaluating existing system capacities.

5-16

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Wastewater Master Plan

3.5

Peaking Factor

2.5

1.5
District Peaking PF Eqn = 2.4 x Q ^ -.011
Modified Federov PF = 8.172/Q^.121
Note: Minimum Peaking Factor=1.5

0.5

0
1000

10000

100000

1000000

10000000

AVERAGE WASTEWATER FLOW, gpd


Modified Fedorov Equation

District Peaking Equation

Figure 5-5. Peaking Factor for Wastewater Flows

As noted in Chapter 2, the District sewer service area does not anticipate large additional
development, as it is predominately built-out. However, to assess the impacts of future
development on the sewer system, unit generation rates by land use were developed based on
the return-to-sewer rate and billing records based on water meter time data. Flows through all
irrigation and non-permanent use meters such as temporary construction meters, interim
service meters, and unmetered water losses in the system, were excluded. Table 5-3
summarizes the return-to-sewer rate and proposed unit generation rates by land use.

5.3

Wastewater Generation Forecasting

The District is predominately built-out and therefore the review and evaluation of sewage
generation is mostly focused on existing flows and patterns. This demand data is also important
input for the development of a new hydraulic computer model, which simulates existing
demands. This section reviews historic sewage generation within the District and also presents
a basis for estimating future sewage generation.

5-17

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Wastewater Master Plan


Table 5-3. Sewer Unit Generation Rates
Land Use

Return-to-Sewer Rate

Unit Generation Rate

Single-Family Residential

65%

280 gpd/DU

Medium-Density Residential

65%

260 gpd/DU

Multi-Family Residential

65%

175 gpd/DU

Rec/Public Use Facilities

90%

1,000 gpd/ac

Hotel / Motel

85%

75 gpd/room

Commercial / Office

65%

1,800 gpd/ac

School

65%

1,000 gpd/ac

Note: Estimated based on water billing records, limited temporary sewer meters and sewer
lift station meter data.

5.3.1 Historic and Existing Flows


As presented in Chapter 4, existing water demands for the District were determined by
analyzing actual water meter records for the past 5 years. However, during this process it was
discovered that the billing data for years 2002 through 2004 was not reliable on a parcel by
parcel basis as it was developed under a software system no longer used by the District.
Moreover, a new accounting software program was implemented during 2005 and it was
discovered that the data was incomplete for modeling purposes. Therefore, the 2006 data was
used as the baseline for determining existing sewer flows, for use in the model, via a return-tosewer methodology. The District reports an existing sewer flow 4.0 mgd.

5.3.2 Buildout/Ultimate Forecast


Ultimate or build-out sewer flow estimates were developed for the sewer system based upon
known development projects and the historical growth pattern within the District, as presented in
Chapter 2. Table 5-4 summarizes the buildout sewer flow estimates within the District by major
proposed development. These future flows represent an increase of approximately 5 percent.
Although new development and redevelopment are important to consider in future capacity
needs, the Districts sewer capacity needs will largely be driven by its peaked sewer flows
typically seen during the influx of large weekend transient population.

5.4

Wastewater System Hydraulic Model

As part of this Master Plan, the District has authorized the selection and preparation of a new
GIS-based hydraulic computer model to analyze the existing capacity in the sewer collection
system. The new model will be turned over to the District to be used as planning tools on future
sewer system capacity needs. As part of the scope of services, PBS&J conducted a model
selection workshop. It was recommended that the District utilize the InfoSewer dynamic
modeling software by MWHSoft for its sewer system model. This section describes the
development of the new hydraulic model.

5-18

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Wastewater Master Plan


Table 5-4. Buildout/Ultimate Sewer Flow Generation
Project Name & Description

Average Demand

North Development
29 DUs

8,120

Aliso Creek Inn

(2)

44,660

Adjacent Parcel to Aliso Creek Inn


15 DUs

4,200

Dana Point Harbor Revitalization


(+/-) 40,000 sqft Retail (Eq. 1.84 ac)

3,312

(+/-) 40,000 sqft Restaurant (Eq. 1.84 ac)

3,312

Subtotal

6,624

Headlands
119 DUs

33,320

90 Room Hotel

6,750

40 Room Hostel

3,000

Restaurant

1,800

Commercial (1.6 AC)

2,880

Nature Interpretive Center

1,000

Subtotal

48,750

General District Growth


3% by 2030

(1)

120,000

Total

(1)
(2)

232,354

Existing Demand

4.0 MGD

Buildout Demand

4.2 MGD

Assumes to include Dana Point Town Center redevelopment.


Assumed at 65% of Water Demand, see Table 4-9.

5.4.1 Hydraulic Model Development


A detailed hydraulic computer model is required to analyze the complex operation of the Citys
wastewater system including collection system sub basins of gravity flow as well as the
operation of 14 sewer lift stations and force mains. The steps of hydraulic model development
include:

obtaining the sewer systems physical data,


translating the physical data into a network of pipes and nodes,
determining basin boundaries and sewer flows, and
calibrating the sewer model to known flow conditions to validate its use as a planning
tool.

The hydraulic model was developed using the Districts new GIS database as the base
information for pipes, manholes, and lift stations. The Districts sewer system GIS was
developed with a consultant and provided to PBS&J in early 2007. As part of the sewer
5-19

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Wastewater Master Plan


modeling effort, known system updates and corrections were tracked and provided to the
District with the new sewer model.
Lift Station information, including pump curve data and wet well control information, was
obtained from District staff and input into the model. Manhole rim elevation data was taken from
a digital terrain model developed from 5-meter aerial elevation extraction of the Districts sewer
service area. Missing information was either populated by the District or inferred from existing
information within the GIS. There is an area of Capistrano Beach System that does not have
record drawings available to populate manhole inverts, and the District provided updated invert
elevations from CCTV inspections. The hydraulic model was populated with existing average
sewer demands by applying the specific land-use-based return-to-sewer rate to the meter billing
records for each parcel.

5.4.2 Sewer Model Calibration


An integral part of developing and utilizing any hydraulic model for planning decisions involved a
process of calibrating or validating the model. The new InfoSewer model was calibrated to
meter data by comparing the simulated flow hydrographs to actual meter data at the four
metered sites. Results of the model calibration are presented in Figures 5-6 through 5-9. In
each of the four metered basins, May 2007 diurnal flow data was extracted for a typical day
(shown in black), for weekdays (shown in red) and for weekend days (shown in blue). The
results of the hydraulic model are shown in a thick pink line.
The comparison allowed refinement of the estimated model parameters so that the simulated
flow conditions reasonably approximated the measured flow conditions. These parameters
generally include return to sewer rates, diurnal curve patterns, and peak to average flow ratios
(peaking factors). Since the return to sewer rates were computed from actual flow data, the
parameters adjusted to calibrate the model were primarily the peaking factors applied to the
estimated diurnal patterns, input at each of the loading manhole by land use class. Model
calibration was improved by assigning a specific diurnal curve to the land use classes.
Typical sewer volume and peak flows range for sewer calibration is + or 10 percent for master
planning. Table 5-5 summarizes the results of the model calibration. These results were
sufficient to confidently approach hydraulic modeling to evaluate the Districts system under
existing and future conditions.
Table 5-5. Model Calibration Table

Meter

Volume
Calibration

Peak
Calibration

Meter 1

-25%

-18%

Unable to calibrate to this meter. Flow was too low.

Meter 2

0.50%

18%

Calibrated to the volume to be conservative. High peak flow is


the result of dual pump operation at LS #5

Meter 3

17%

0.10%

Meter 4

-10%

11%

Notes

Calibrated to match the peak if it occurred on a weekend,


subsequently overestimating the volume.
Calibrated to both peak and volume.

5-20

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Wastewater Master Plan


1
0.9

Metered Discharge (mgd)

0.8
0.7
0.6
0.5
0.4
0.3
0.2
0.1
0

20:00

21:00

22:00

23:00

0:00

20:00

21:00

22:00

23:00

0:00

19:00

18:00

17:00

16:00

15:00

14:00

13:00

12:00

11:00

10:00

9:00

8:00

7:00

6:00

5:00

4:00

3:00

2:00

1:00

0:00

Time of Day
5/13/2007

Weekend

Weekday

Model Simulation

Figure 5-6. Meter #1 DP 308


1
0.9

Metered Discharge (mgd)

0.8
0.7
0.6
0.5
0.4
0.3
0.2
0.1
0

19:00

18:00

17:00

16:00

15:00

14:00

13:00

12:00

11:00

10:00

9:00

8:00

7:00

6:00

5:00

4:00

3:00

2:00

1:00

0:00

Time of Day
5/28/2007

Weekday

Weekend

Model Simulation

Figure 5-7. Meter #2 SCS 329


5-21

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Wastewater Master Plan

0.5

Metered Discharge (mgd)

0.4

0.3

0.2

0.1

20:00

21:00

22:00

23:00

0:00

20:00

21:00

22:00

23:00

0:00

19:00

18:00

17:00

16:00

15:00

14:00

13:00

12:00

11:00

10:00

9:00

8:00

7:00

6:00

5:00

4:00

3:00

2:00

1:00

0:00

Time of Day
5/3/2007

Weekend

Weekday

Model Simulation

Figure 5-8. Meter #3 SCS 1156


4

3.5

Metered Discharge (mgd)

2.5

1.5

0.5

19:00

18:00

17:00

16:00

15:00

14:00

13:00

12:00

11:00

10:00

9:00

8:00

7:00

6:00

5:00

4:00

3:00

2:00

1:00

0:00

Time of Day
5/28/2007
Weekend

Weekday
Model Simulation

Figure 5-9. Meter #4 SCS 1344

5-22

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Wastewater Master Plan

5.5

Wastewater System Analysis

The hydraulic computer model (InfoSewer) and wastewater generation projections were utilized
to analyze the capacity of the existing and ultimate wastewater systems. Lift station capacity
requirements were analyzed based on model flow projections and the Districts lift station and
force main design criteria. Sewer collection system capacity was based on a review of the
hydraulic modeling and design criteria. Appendix C-3 summarizes the hydraulic model
simulation results.
The coastal cities within the District are popular tourist destinations, which cause the District to
experience seasonal and weekend increases in wastewater generation due to transient
population influx. The District has observed that this seasonal influence increases wastewater
flows more than rainfall events. Therefore, peak wet-weather flows are not a critical design
parameter for the District.
A transient model condition was therefore developed to assess maximum or peak wastewater
flows within the Districts collection system accounting for this seasonal variance. The transient
model condition globally increased wastewater flows within the model by approximately 25
percent based upon a review of the historic maximum potable water month demands, which
typically occurs during the busy summer months.
The results of these analyzes were compiled below. The resulting sewer system improvements
projects are consolidated and are further described in this chapter and the Capital Improvement
Program (CIP), Chapter 7, of this master plan.

5.5.1 Lift Station Capacity Analysis


The sewer lift stations were evaluated to determine surplus or deficient pump capacity. The
District had previously analyzed the physical condition of each lift station; specific upgrades
based on this conditions assessment are part of the current capital program. Typically, each
sewer lift station includes a normal operating pump and a stand-by unit. These pumps are
alternated for operation to ensure equal wear on each unit. Therefore, lift station pump capacity
is based upon the largest pump (stand-by unit) being out of service. Table 5-6 summarizes the
lift station capacity analysis for existing and future ultimate conditions in the District.
Based upon Table 5-6 lift station capacity analysis and associated hydraulic model simulations
the following lift station improvements are recommended:

Additional pump capacity at Lift Station #2 through existing pump capacity upgrades.
Review current pump operations at Lift Stations #10 and #11
Consider pump level setting changes at Lift Stations #10 and #11 to avoid dual pump
operation.

The hydraulic model also indicated that the downstream force mains from each sewer lift station
have sufficient capacity and meet District design criteria. As part of the Lift Station #2 capacity
upgrades, the force main velocities should be reviewed as part of pump selection.

5-23

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Wastewater Master Plan


Table 5-6. Lift Station Capacity Analysis

Lift
Stations

Name

No. of
Pumps

Pump
Capacity
(gpm)

Firm
Capacity
(gpm)

Existing
Peak
Inflow
(gpm)

Existing
Transient
Peak
Inflow
(gpm)

Future
Peak
Inflow
(gpm)

Future
Transient
Peak
Inflow
(gpm)

Surplus /
(Deficit)
(gpm)

South Coast
LS #1

Blue Lagoon

400

400

40

50

41

52

348

LS #2

Main Shop

2,200

2,200

2,721(1)

3,339(1)

2,839(1)

3,540(1)

(1,340)

LS #3

Monarch Bay

520

520

65

82

67

84

436

LS #4

County Beach

150

150

150

LS #5

Niguel Shores(4)

825

825

126

158

170

212

613

LS #6

Ritz Cove

1,360

2,720

1,842(6)

2,114(6)

1,893(6)

2,283(6)

437(6)

LS #7

Circle Drive

250

249

Dana Point
LS #8

Acapulco(5)

750

750

218

272

224

280

470

LS #9

S Harbor Island Way

275

275

36

46

38

47

228

LS #10

N Harbor Island Way

350

350

207(1)

211(1)

208(1)

212(1)

138

(1)

(1)

(1)

(1)

223

LS #11

Embarcadero

600

600

319

380

320

377

1,400

2,800

1,554(2)

1,741(2)

1,572(2)

1,794(2)

1,006

(3)

(3)

(3)

Capo Beach
LS #12

Victoria

LS #13

State Park

500

500

290

291

243

286(3)

214

LS #14

Beach Road

200

200

125(3)

131(3)

126(3)

132(3)

68

(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)

Back up pump operated during model simulation


Includes 240 gpm from the GRF and 100 gpm from Poche Creek
Includes 100 gpm from Poche Creek
Future Headlands Lift Station
Upgraded Acapulco Lift Station
Includes 50 gpm from Salt Creek Ozone Treatment Plant

5.5.2 Sewer Pipeline Capacity Assessment


The hydraulic computer models for existing and ultimate flows were used to assess whether the
existing collection system could convey wastewater flows within the Districts design standard
for depth-to-diameter ratios. A ratio (d/D) of less than 75 percent is appropriate for pipes, larger
than 12 inches in diameter and less than 50 percent for pipes 12 inches in diameter and
smaller. A d/D ratio of 75 percent was used to assess capacity for all diameters in the transient
population model scenarios, which were considered the worse-case flow analysis. An extended
period simulation using diurnal flow patterns was utilized to determine peak flow operating
conditions. Table 5-7 lists the sewer pipelines that do not meet the District design criteria. A
summary of the model findings includes the following:

The existing condition model runs identified that 55 existing individual pipe segments,
totaling approximately 10,500 feet, failed to meet the design criteria.

The build out condition model runs identified that 6 additional existing individual pipe
segments beyond the existing condition model scenario, totaling an additional
approximately 1,600 feet, failed to meet the design criteria.
5-24

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Wastewater Master Plan

The existing transient condition model runs identified that 49 existing individual pipe
segments, totaling approximately 8,000 feet, failed to meet the design criteria of 75
percent for all pipe line diameters

The buildout transient condition model runs identified that 24 additional existing
individual pipe segments beyond the existing transient condition model scenario, totaling
approximately 3,600 feet, failed to meet the design criteria of 75 percent for all pipe line
diameters.

5.6

Summary of Recommended Improvements

Using Table 5-7 as a guide, recommended improvement projects were developed and phased
based upon pipelines which failed to meet District criteria, and those with a high probability for a
sanitary sewer overflow. This was determined by analyzing the degree of surcharging in the
dynamic model and the potential risk for spill. These critical pipelines were defined as having a
d/D of 0.90 or 0.75 for the transient and non-transient model conditions, respectively.

Table 5-7. Model Identified Deficiencies


Upstream MH ID
Existing (d/D > 0.75)
C696
C696A
C696B
D745
C684
C793
D728
D729
D790
S3943
S3919

Downstream MH ID

Diameter (in)

Length (ft)

d/D

C696A
C696B
C697
D746
CLS13
CLS12
D729
D730
D792
S999
S3918

12
12
12
12
8
8
8
8
8
21
21

130
50
100
300
40
110
130
30
400
20
10

1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
0.79
0.76

Existing Transient (d/D > 0.75)


S1018
S3938
S1158
S1159
S3931
S3930
S3937
S1019
S3938
S3937
D746
D751A
C522
C567
S901
S902
S3917
S3932
S1020
S1158
S981
S998
S1166
S1167
S3930
S3929
S3932
S3931
S1201
S1344
S900
S901

21
21
21
21
21
12
8
8
21
21
21
21
21
21
21
8

90
150
90
80
120
250
140
140
90
220
590
100
70
130
130
160

1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
0.82
0.82
0.81
0.81
0.81
0.80
0.80
0.79

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South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Wastewater Master Plan

Table 5-7 (continued)


Upstream MH ID
S1019
S1170
C703
S3926
S911
S1000
S995
S3927
S1016
S3936
S899
S917
D741
D742
S1168
S3929
D343
S3925
S3940
D739
D1097

Downstream MH ID
S3936
S3926
C704
S3925
S915
S1001
S3951
S1170
S1017
S1020
S900
S3952
D742
D743
S3927
S1160
D344
S1171
S1016
D740
D1096

Diameter (in)
21
21
18
21
15
21
21
21
21
21
8
21
12
12
21
21
12
21
21
12
10

Existing (Dia. < 12" & d/D > 0.75)


D740
D741
D792
D794
D703
D704
S650
S651
S902
S903
D788
D789
D743
D743A
D743A
D744
C187
C188
D706
D728
S203
S204
D731
D732
S1469
S1470
D732
D733
C186
C187
D705
D706
S908
S909
D704
D705
S356A
SLS6
S356A
SLS6
S893
S894
C665
C666
S1477
S1478
C666
C667
D744
D745
C667
C668

12
10
8
8
8
8
12
12
12
8
10
10
8
10
12
8
12
8
12
12
8
12
8
12
12
12

5-26

Length (ft)

d/D

90
140
190
170
40
120
330
180
350
270
190
400
310
260
40
70
40
60
260
240
340

0.79
0.79
0.79
0.78
0.78
0.78
0.77
0.77
0.77
0.77
0.77
0.77
0.77
0.76
0.76
0.76
0.76
0.76
0.76
0.76
0.75

160
340
320
110
220
40
190
210
80
310
320
150
330
140
150
140
130
210
10
10
100
520
320
520
220
210

0.65
0.65
0.64
0.63
0.62
0.62
0.60
0.60
0.58
0.58
0.58
0.57
0.57
0.56
0.56
0.54
0.54
0.54
0.53
0.53
0.53
0.53
0.53
0.53
0.53
0.52

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Wastewater Master Plan

Table 5-7 (continued)


Upstream MH ID
C48
D702
D701
D733
C17
CC47A
S1155
C668

Downstream MH ID
C186
D703
D702
D734
C25
C48
S1156
C669

Diameter (in)
10
8
8
10
8
10
8
12

Length (ft)
270
350
370
310
310
140
90
210

d/D

Buildout Transient (d/D > 0.75)


S1001
S3942
S1015
S3940
S999
S1000
S3941
S1015
S3948
S997
S3942
S3941
S3145
S3919
S3148
S3921
S3944
S3943
S3921
S1195
S998
S3944
S3920
S3145
S1159
S3935
S1167
S3928
S3928
S1168
S1160
S1166
S3934
S3933
S3933
S3917
S3935
S3934
S1192
S1193
S1193
S3149
S1188
S1189
S1195
S3920
S1189
S1190

21
21
21
21
21
21
21
21
21
21
21
21
21
21
21
21
21
21
21
21
21
21
21
21

60
70
290
130
10
310
130
40
320
300
100
160
100
180
100
390
130
60
130
270
300
150
40
380

0.81
0.81
0.81
0.81
0.81
0.80
0.79
0.79
0.79
0.78
0.78
0.78
0.78
0.78
0.78
0.77
0.77
0.77
0.77
0.76
0.76
0.76
0.76
0.75

Buildout (Dia. < 12" & d/D > 0.75)


S331
S332
C567A
C568
D932
D935
S344
S345
D935
D969

12
10
8
10
8

290
40
250
310
690

0.52
0.51
0.51
0.50
0.50

0.52
0.52
0.52
0.52
0.52
0.51
0.51
0.51

Each sewer pipeline and lift station project was evaluated with the other improvements to
determine whether some efficiency could be realized by combining certain improvements. The
following recommended improvements are summarized below based upon their priority.
It is recommended prior to any sewer pipeline replacement or up-grade that the District conduct
sewer flow metering to confirm the model predictions and that the existing pipelines do exceed
District criteria.
5-27

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Wastewater Master Plan


Phase I 5-Year Sewer Capacity CIP (2009-2013)
Project SLS 1 Sewer Lift Station #2 Upgrade. Under peak flows, the dynamic hydraulic
model predicted the need for a second pump to operate over short periods. However,
operations staff confirmed that unless there was a high rainfall event, this usually does not
occur. It is further recommended that the District consider a detailed capacity study of the lift
station. Due to the age of the lift station and its internal accessibility, the District has slated it for
replacement. As part of the Aliso Creek Redevelopment, a new lift station location is being
discussed. The District has also been in discussions with the City of Laguna Beach to convey
pumped flows from the North Coast Interceptor.
Project SP 1 Dana Point Harbor. Replace approximately 400 feet of existing 8 inch gravity
main and 350 feet of existing 10 inch gravity main with 12 inch diameter. Figure 5-10 graphically
presents the location of this replacement project. The existing 10 inch main did not exceed the
replacement criteria, however was included as an upgraded because of its proximity and the
fact that it exceeded the Districts design criteria. Minor traffic control measures and utility
conflicts are anticipated for this project. Coordination with Harbor businesses and general
activity will need to be considered. This project may be constructed as part of the planned
Harbor Redevelopment.
Project SP 2 Del Obispo at Village Road. Replace approximately 600 feet of existing
12 inch gravity main with 18 inch diameter. Figure 5-11 graphically presents the location of this
replacement project. Traffic control measures and utility conflicts are anticipated with this
project.
Project SP 3 Del Obispo at Stonehill Drive. Replace approximately 150 feet of existing
8 inch gravity main with 12 inch diameter. Figure 5-12 graphically presents the location of this
replacement project. Traffic control measures and minor utility conflicts are anticipated with this
project.
Project SP 4 Headlands Off Site. As part of this Master Plan, a Technical Memorandum
was submitted to the District evaluating the available existing capacity in the Districts sewer
system in PCH to serve the Headlands Development. The Headlands Development Technical
Memorandum is included as Appendix A-1. The Technical Memorandum identified that an
approximate 285 foot section of existing 12 inch gravity main needs to be replaced with a 15
inch diameter or paralleled with a 12 inch diameter relief sewer.
Phase II 5-Year Sewer Capacity CIP (2014-2018)
Project SP 5 Camino Capistrano. Replace approximately 150 feet of existing 8 inch gravity
main with 10 inch diameter. Figure 5-13 graphically presents the location of this replacement
project. Minor traffic control measures and utility conflicts are anticipated for this project.
Project SP 6 Links at Monarch Beach. Parallel approximately 150 feet of existing 8 inch
gravity main with 8 inch diameter. Figure 5-14 graphically presents the location of this
replacement project. No traffic control measures or utility conflicts are anticipated for this
project. The project also appears to be highly accessible despite its location. Due to a landslide
5-28

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Wastewater Master Plan


in the area an emergency replacement project has already been constructed. Because there
were no record drawings for the replacement, it was assumed that the slope is relatively similar
and as such remains a potential recommended improvement. However, the District should
conduct a field survey of this pipeline, and flow/depth inspection, to verify the slope and confirm
the need for this recommended project. Currently this project is affected by litigation between
the District and the Developer due to geotechnical instability in this area. Project likely to be
delayed until a resolution is reached on the litigation.
Project SP 7 Monarch Bay Drive. Replace approximately 375 feet of existing 8 inch gravity
main with 10 inch diameter. Figure 5-15 graphically presents the location of this replacement
project. The downstream sewer main did not exceed the replacement criteria; however, it was
included as an upgrade because it failed to meet the Districts design criteria. Utility conflicts are
anticipated for this project due to the parallel water main. The project is located on a narrow
street, which may cause some traffic and mobility issues.
In summary, a total of approximately 2,000 feet of sewer is recommended to be upgraded over
the next 10 years to mitigate potential capacity constraints, which represents about 0.3 percent
of the total 140 miles system. The Districts generally steep topography, relatively short
segments of collector sewer, and minimal inflow and infiltration problems have contributed to
there being only a few capacity upgrades required to provide more reliable service. It is not
anticipated that any upgrades will be needed to accommodate future flows.

5-29

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

HARBOR

LS



CAS

ITAS

PL

T
DANA POIN

D790

10/27/08 KM KM Z:\Projects\IS\SCWD\MXD\ReportFigures\FinalReport\DanaPointHarbor.mxd

I S LA

ND W

DP_LS_10

D792

Approx. 350-feet of
Exist. 10-inch Gravity Main
Replace w. 12-inch Dia.
(d/D > 0.5)

D794

Legend
Sewer Manholes

Feet

Recommended Project
Sewer Gravity Main

Approx. 400-feet of
Exist. 8-inch Gravity Main
Replace w. 12-inch Dia.

120

Figure 5-10
SEWER REPLACEMENT PROJECT 1
DANA POINT HARBOR

EA

LL
AG

Approx. 600-feet of
Exist. 12-inch Gravity Main
Replace w. 18-inch Dia.

VI

BE
D

FO

RD

RD

LN

CA

MB

DE
LO

R ID

BIS

GE

PO

RD

ST

BY T
HE S

RANO
PI S T

CA
10/27/08 KM KM Z:\Projects\IS\SCWD\MXD\ReportFigures\SewerProjects\FinalReport\DelObispoandVillage.mxd

D745

D746

Latham Treatment Plant


D751A

Legend

Sewer Manholes
Recommended Project
Sewer Gravity Main

Feet

Potable Water Main


Recycled Water Main

110

Figure 5-11
SEWER REPLACEMENT PROJECT 2
DEL OBISPO AT VILLAGE ROAD

EAST
W

IND D

D728
Approx. 150-feet of
Exist. 8-inch Gravity Main
Replace w. 12-inch Dia.

Legend
Sewer Manholes

Sewer Gravity Main

BRE E

Feet

Recommended Project

RT WY

D730

ILL D

BAYPO

D729

DEL OBISPO ST

10/27/08 KM KM Z:\Projects\IS\SCWD\MXD\ReportFigures\FinalReport\DelObispoatStonehill.mxd

STON
EH

Z E WO

OD S

50

Figure 5-12
SEWER REPLACEMENT PROJECT 3
DEL OBISPO AT STONEHILL DRIVE

CL
EF

RA

NA

ST

Approx 150-feet of
Exist. 8-inch Gravity Main
Replace w. 10-inch Dia.

TU

PI
CA

OR

M
CA

C567

NO

10/27/08 KM KM Z:\Projects\IS\SCWD\MXD\ReportFigures\FinalReport\CaminoCapistrano.mxd

C522

CO
AS
T

HW

Legend

BE
Sewer Manholes
AC
Replacement
H Project
RDMain
Sewer Gravity
Potable Water Main

Feet

50

Figure 5-13
SEWER REPLACEMENT PROJECT 5
CAMINO CAPISTRANO

WY
NV
AL

LE
Y

PK

The Links at Monarch Beach

S665

S666

Sewer Manholes
Recommended Project

Feet

Sewer Gravity Main


Potable Water Main

IS

Legend

CA
SS

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CR

OW

Approx. 150-feet of
Exist. 8-inch Gravity Main
Parallel w. 8-inch Dia.
District to confirm slope
with a field survey

100

Figure 5-14
SEWER PARALLEL PROJECT 6
THE LINKS AT MONARCH BEACH

M
O
NA
H
RC
B
AY
DR

RR
BA

S901

AN

M ON A R
Approx. 225-feet of
Exist. 8-inch Gravity Main
Replace w. 10-inch Dia.
(d/D > 0.5)

S906

MONARCH BAY DR

11/19/08 KM KM Z:\Projects\IS\SCWD\MXD\ReportFigures\FinalReport\MonarchBayDr.mxd

CH

BA
Y

WAY

Approx. 150-feet of
Exist. 8-inch Gravity Main
Replace w. 10-inch Dia.

DR

AC A
S902

Legend
SewerManholes
Recommended Project

Feet

Sewer Gravity Main


Potable Water Main

100

MONARCH BAY DR
Figure 5-15
SEWER REPLACEMENT PROJECT 7
MONARCH BAY DRIVE

Recycled Water Master Plan


960 AFY of recycled water to 98 accounts (33 customers; 171 meters) in Laguna Beach and
Dana Point, including MNWD, which annually uses about 15 percent of the average supply.
A map of the Districts existing recycled water system is shown in Figure 6-1. The distribution
system begins at the AWT facility to the north and a 12 inch pipeline runs south along Pacific
Coast Highway to Stonehill Drive. The existing recycled water system currently has a hydraulic
bottleneck along Pacific Coast Highway, where the recycled water pipeline decreases in size
from a 12 inch pipeline to a 10 inch pipeline, and then increases back to a 12 inch pipeline at
10th Street. Pump stations and reservoirs are used to convey the recycled water from the lower
pressure zone along the coast to the higher pressure zone inland, as illustrated in Figure 6-2.
PS #1 is located at the AWT facility adjacent to a 2 MG forebay reservoir (Reservoir #1) and has
two 800 gallon per minute (gpm) centrifugal pumps to serve the Low Zone. PS #2, located
along Aliso Way, is a booster station equipped with two 1,600 gpm centrifugal pumps. PS #2
has a manual bypass that is opened when the pump station is not in operation. The pumps run
during the off-peak period to help fill Reservoir #2 (HWL = 290 feet). The Low Zone begins at
the AWT facility and services the majority of the District via a 10 inch transmission line along
coast Highway.
PS #3 serves the High Zone and has two 1,450 gpm centrifugal pumps to serve Dana Point and
Niguel Shores. The pump station is manually operated through SCADA, based on the water
level of Reservoir #3.
Reservoir #1, located at the AWT facility, serves as a forebay reservoir for the Low Zone with a
water level of approximately 138 feet. The total storage capacity in this zone is 2.0 MG.
Reservoir #2 is located at PS #3 and serves the Low Zone with a hydraulic grade of
approximately 290 feet. The total storage capacity is 1.7 MG. The District also has a 1.1 MG
share of the joint 3.3 MG reservoir with MNWD that is located along Golden Lantern Drive. The
reservoir has an HWL of 590 feet and is served by PS #3 to serve the High Zone.
Table 6-1 summarizes the existing pump station data and Table 6-2 summarizes the existing
reservoir data.
Water Quality
The District is committed to providing safe and reliable recycled water to its customers.
Recycled water receives extensive treatment and testing based on stringent State and Federal
regulations. Recycled water standards can very depending on the application, but for most
applications in California recycled water is treated to Title 22 Standards. Title 22 standards
allow human full body contact with recycled water but not potable consumption without further
treatment. In the District, recycled water is currently used for non-potable irrigation uses only.
Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) is commonly used as a water quality parameter for recycled water.
The Districts recycled water TDS has ranged from 872 mg/L to 1,356 mg/L from 2001 to 2007,
based on water quality data received from SOCWA. The 2006 average TDS was 1,055 mg/L.
As a comparison, southern California water customers received potable water with TDS ranging
from 500 to 600 mg/L and recycled water ranging from 900 to 1,100 mg/L. Water exceeding a
1,000 mg/L TDS threshold is considered only marginally suitable for many irrigation
applications, particularly where there are soils with a high clay content.
6-2

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

ie jo
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Ma

rina

H il

ls

Coastal Plant !


Aliso Viejo

U
V

k 2 MG RES #1
j

12'




'

10
16''

''

8 ''

RPS #1

'
12'



Laguna Beach

Ca p

RPS
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Crown Valle
y

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an
t

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nL

3.3 MG
JOINT
RES

8 ''

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San Juan Capistrano

Go

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De

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Sa

MNWD

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12''

6'

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16'

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RPS #3
12''

16
'
6'

6 ''

1.7 MG
RES #2


5


590 ZONE

4 ''

''
2 ''

! Wastewater Treatment Plant




 Pump Station


Dana Point

Freeway

Del Prado

2,500
Dana Point Ha rb o

Major Road

San Clemente

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High Zone - 590' HGL

ill

as

V
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Reduced High Zone - 460' HGL

ny P

Low Zone - 290' HGL

Stone
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ehill

Doh
e

South Coast Water District Boundary

Pressure Zone

Highway

3 ''

PCH-Bottleneck

Ston

460 ZONE

Co

8 ''

'
6'

Existing Recycled Water Main

Stonehill

8 ''

'
4'

6 ''

2 ''
2 '' 4 ''

Reservoir

6 ''

PACIFIC
OCEAN

4 ''

k
j

4 ''

Legend

4 ''

11/19/08 KM KM Z:\Projects\IS\SCWD\MXD\ReportFigures\FinalReport\ExistingRecycledWaterSystem.mxd

oV
ch

10

PCH Bottleneck

n
Ra

no
istra

Laguna Niguel

Note: Zone boundaries are approximate.

Figure 6-1
South Coast Water District
EXISTING RECYCLED WATER SYSTEM

3.3 MG
600

600

590
1.44 MGD (CONTRACTED)
1.0 MGD (ASSUMED
MAX DAY)
TO MNWD

HIGH ZONE

MNWD - 2.2 MG
SCWD - 1.1

500

500

400

400

PRV

1.7 MG

300

ELEVATION IN FEET

460

300

290

LOW ZONE
200
MANUAL
BYPASS

2.0 MG
138

AWT

100

P1&P2
800 GPM EA

RPS#3
2 PUMPS
1450 GPM EA
1 DUTY, 1 STANDBY

200

RPS#2
2 PUMPS
1600 GPM EA
1 DUTY, I STANDBY

100

RPS#2 OPERATES AT HIGH DEMANDS OR TANK FILLING


MANUAL BYPASS IS CLOSED WHEN RPS#2 IS ON

RPS #1

LEGEND
2.0 MG
138

RECYCLED WATER
RESERVOIR
PUMP STATION
MANUAL BYPASS VALVE
FLOW DIRECTION

H:waterres\SouthCstWD\620889SCWD MP\Rpt\FinalRpt\
FinalFigs\620889syst-Exist-RW.cdr November 18, 2008

EXISTING
RECYCLED WATER SYSTEM
SCHEMATIC
FIGURE 6-2
South Coast Water District Master Plan
November 2008

Recycled Water Master Plan


Table 6-1. Existing Recycled Water Pump Station Summary
Pump Station
Date Re(1)
No.
Constructed

(1)

Number of
Pumps

Rated Discharge
(gpm)

Total Capacity
(gpm)

Discharge
Pressure Zone

Back-up
Power

1991

800

1,600

290

None

1991

1,600

3,200

290

None

1992

1,450

2,900

580

None

Original construction in the 1980s.

Table 6-2. Existing Recycled Water Reservoir Summary

Reservoir ID

Zone

Capacity
(MG)

Year Installed

Ground Elev.
(ft)

Diameter (ft)

Material

Low

2.0

1990

106.5

104

Welded Steel

Low

1.7

1986

267.0

134

Welded Steel

High

3.3

1991

556.8

158

Buried PCC

Joint
(1)

(1)

SCWD has 1.1 MG capacity of the 3.3 MG shared Joint Reservoir with MNWD

6.1.2 Proposed Recycled Water Supply Projects


The AWT facility is operating close to its maximum capacity at peak periods and assuming
contracted flows delivered to MNWD, as discussed further in Section 6.3.3. Therefore, the
District is considering participation in regional projects described herein. Between 8.5 and 30
MGD potential regional recycled water supply for future use has been identified in proposed
new projects and facility expansions. Regional recycled water supply projects are described
below.
San Clemente and San Juan Capistrano Recycled Water Project Grants
H.R. 1140 was introduced to the House of Representatives on February 16, 2007 by Rep. Ken
Calvert (R-CA-44). H.R. 1140 would amend the Reclamation Wastewater and Groundwater
Study and Facilities Act (P.L. 102-575, title XVI; 43 U.S.C. 390h et seq.) and authorizes
funding for two separate water recycling projects in the vicinity of the District.
The San Juan Capistrano project would treat secondary effluent from the Latham Treatment
Plant in Dana Point. The current total average daily flow tributary to the Latham Treatment
Plant is 8.5 MGD. The plant has a design capacity of 13 MGD. Effluent is currently treated to
secondary levels and conveyed directly to the San Juan Creek Outfall. The new facility is a
regional project which would consist of a new AWT and an extensive recycled water system that
could serve not only the City of San Juan Capistrano but also portions of MNWD and SCWD.
The District has agreed to participate with the City of San Juan Capistrano and MNWD in a 0.5
MGD pilot program through 2010.
The San Clemente project would double the capacity of the city's water recycling plant, extend
pumping and recycled water transmission infrastructure, and build a reservoir to hold recycled
water for peak usage. It is estimated that an extension of transmission infrastructure would
6-6

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Recycled Water Master Plan


allow the City to replace 3,340 AFY of potable irrigation water with recycled waterreducing the
city's total use of imported potable water by more than 25 percent.
The legislation specifies that the Federal government is responsible for 25 percent of the total
cost of each project, but is not responsible for the operation and maintenance of either facility.
This bill authorizes the appropriation of $18,500,000 for the San Juan Capistrano project and
$5,000,000 for the San Clemente project.
On May 2, 2007, the Natural Resources Committee met to consider the bill. It was favorably
reported to the House of Representatives by unanimous consent. H.R. 1140 has been sent to
the Senate for consideration and is under review by the Committee on Energy and Natural
Resources.
Salt Creek Reclamation Project and Sea Terrace Park Reservoir
A potential recycled water project that has been discussed at the District staff level is a new
recycled water reservoir at the proposed Sea Terrace Park and the use of the effluent from the
Salt Creek Ozone Treatment Plant. The Plant would have to be modified to include RO
treatment to reduce salinity. As previously described, the existing recycled water system
currently has a bottleneck along Pacific Coast Highway (PCH), where the recycled water
pipeline decreases in size from a 12 inch pipeline to a 10 inch pipeline, and then increases back
to a 12 inch pipeline at Crown Valley Parkway. The new reservoir and potential supplemental
recycled water from the Salt Creek Ozone Treatment Plant could possibly alleviate this
bottleneck and the added supply could lower the overall TDS concentration in the recycled
water system. Section 6.5 includes the hydraulic analysis of the bottleneck section. Brine
discharge from ozone treatment plants is a critical issue and the cost of RO treatment and brine
disposal must be considered when evaluating the viability of this project. The Salt Creek Ozone
Treatment Plant currently discharges into Sewer Lift Station #6.
Aliso Creek Water Harvesting Project
The District has conducted a preliminary investigation of a project to intercept and treat a portion
of the urban runoff in lower Aliso Creek for subsequent use in the recycled water system (see
Chapter 3). Treatment would consist of filtration and reverse osmosis facilities near the Coastal
Plant. The plant would produce up to 0.5 MGD of low TDS water which, when blended into the
Districts recycled water system, would result in reduced salinity to make the recycled water
more attractive for irrigation users.
Upgrade of AWT Facility to Increase Capacity
An option which should be considered if additional recycled water is needed to meet the peak
demands of an expanded recycled water system is an upgrade to the AWT facility. The existing
tertiary system consists of chemical coagulation and filtration to meet Title 22 requirements.
Since the AWT facility was designed and constructed in the mid-1980s, a cost effective upgrade
using more current technology might be identified to increase the capacity.
The projects described above are possible options to increase recycled water supply; however,
the magnitude of future recycled water demands in the District is limited by the potential for new
customers to be added within a reasonable cost. However, with the current limited available
water supply, proposed new developments may seek to fund recycled water expansion projects
to offset there estimated potable use. The need for additional future supply is discussed further
in Section 6.3.3.
6-7

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Recycled Water Master Plan

6.2

Recycled Water System Design Criteria

Presented in Table 6-3 are the recycled water system criteria for the District. The criteria were
developed based on the following:

Meetings and discussion with the Districts engineering and operations staff
Review of historical demands and SCADA data
Comparison to other recycled water purveyor criteria

The recycled water criteria are similar in many respects to the potable water criteria, which are
discussed in detail in Section 4.2 of this report. One major difference is reservoir storage.
Reservoir storage in recycled water systems has a larger operational component due to the
limited nighttime irrigation window, but fire flow and emergency supply criteria are typically not
applied to recycled water reservoirs.

Table 6-3. Recycled Water Infrastructure Criteria


Item

Criteria

Peaking Factors
Max Day/Avg Day Ratio

1.8

Max Month/Avg Month Ratio

1.6

Peak Hour/Avg Day Ratio

5.4

Pressure Criteria
Maximum Desirable

120 psi

Minimum Static

70 psi

Minimum Pressure (Peak Hour)

50 psi

Velocity Criteria
Maximum Velocity (Peak Hour)

5 to 7 fps

Storage
Operating Storage

6.3

2/3 MDD (8 hour irrigation period)

Recycled Water Demand Forecast

Recycled water usage in the District has increased slowly, but continued demand growth is
constrained by the limited recycled water infrastructure available to serve customers and
potential high costs for users to retrofit their systems. Demands will continue to increase only
as the District continues to invest in recycled water infrastructure. Recycled water demands can
be classified into three categories:

Existing customers: Customers currently using recycled water.

Conversion customers: Customers that are currently using potable water via dedicated
irrigation meters; demands that could be met by recycled water if it were available.
Conversion customers are typically assessed by whether they are located within an
economically feasible distance to the recycled water facilities.
6-8

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Recycled Water Master Plan

New customers: Because the District is primarily built out, few new customers are
anticipated. Significant redevelopment projects may be considered new projects if
substantial renovations, including new landscape and irrigation systems, are part of the
project.

6.3.1 Demand Criteria


Similar to potable water, unit demands were used to estimate future recycled water usage. An
average unit demand of 2,200 gallons per day per irrigated acre (gpd/ac) was applied. This
equates to an irrigation application rate of 2.5 feet of water per acre per year. Irrigation
application rates typically range from 2 to 4 feet per year per acre depending on the local
climate and soils. The unit demand is consistent with previous District planning efforts.
However, when planning for expanded or conversion to recycled water use at existing customer
sites, historic billing data is the best guide for estimating future recycled water demands.
Figure 6-3 displays monthly recycled water demands from 2005 to 2007 based on records from
the SCWD Monthly Recycled Water Monitoring Reports. As expected, the predominantly
landscape-based demands vary seasonally with higher demands in the dry summer months and
lower demands in the wet winter months. The annual average day demand (AAD) in 2006 was
0.81 MGD, including MNWD. Contractually, MNWD could increase its demand in the summer
months at a peak day potentially minimizing the available supply for the District.

1.80
2005

2006

2007

1.40
1.20
1.00
2006 AAD = 0.81 MGD
0.80
0.60
0.40
0.20

ec
em
be
r
D

ov
em
be
r
N

ct
ob
er
O

Se
pt
em
be
r

Au
gu
st

Ju
ly

Ju
ne

M
ay

Ap
ril

M
ar
ch

Fe
br
ua
ry

0.00
Ja
nu
ar
y

Average Annual Demand (MGD)

1.60

Month

Figure 6-3. Monthly Recycled Water Demand 2005-2007

6-9

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Recycled Water Master Plan


6.3.2 Distribution System Peaking Factors
Peaking criteria is extremely important in recycled water system sizing. An unrealistically high
peaking factor can lead to an oversized system and water quality issues. A low peaking factor
can result in insufficient capacity. Future changes in management approaches could assist in
increases to system capacity without additional infrastructure. These changes could include
adding onsite storage ponds at golf courses, longer irrigation windows, or proactive
management by the District to coordinate water operation of major users and reduce peaks on
the system.
Distribution system assessment typically uses maximum day and peak hour scenarios to
evaluate system performance. Peaking factors are used to convert average annual water
usage to these specific conditions. In general, the larger the service area, the smaller the
variation in peak demands to average demands. The master plan demand scenarios include
the entire District. Therefore, the peaking factors used in the overall master plan hydraulic
model could be considered lower than what would be appropriate for a smaller area study, a
development plan, or an individual pressure zone analysis.
The following summarizes the master plan peaking factors utilized in the recycled water
distribution system analysis. These factors were developed based on historical supply records
and operational data. Recycled water peaking factors for smaller areas should be discussed
with District staff.

Maximum Day - Representative of the highest use day during the peak month in each
year and is typically used to assess distribution system operation. For recycled water
irrigation systems, the maximum month demand is considered to be essentially equal to
the maximum day demand. Figure 6-4 shows the monthly peaking factors based on
2 year averaged flow data, including MNWD supplies. A value of 1.8 was used in the
hydraulic analysis to determine available capacity in the existing system and assess
overall operations.

Peak Hour Representative of the highest rate of water use during the maximum day.
In recycled water systems, this can be approximately calculated by dividing the
maximum day factor by the irrigation application period (in hours) and multiplying by 24
hours. A peaking factor value of 5.4 was used for the master plan hydraulic analysis,
assuming an 8 hour irrigation period. The District requires that recycled water irrigation
occur between 10:00 p.m. and 6:00 a.m.

6-10

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Recycled Water Master Plan

1.80
1.67

Peaking Factor from Average Annual Demand

1.60
1.47
1.37

1.35

1.40

1.20

1.12
0.94

1.00

0.85
0.80

0.72
0.63

0.60

0.54

0.40

0.57

0.29

0.20

ec
em
be
r
D

ov
em
be
r
N

ct
ob
er
O

Se
pt
em
be
r

Au
gu
st

Ju
ly

Ju
ne

M
ay

Ap
ril

M
ar
ch

Fe
br
ua
ry

Ja
nu
ar
y

0.00

Month

Figure 6-4. Recycled Water Monthly Peaking Factors 2005-2007

6.3.3 Historic and Existing Demands


Recycled water deliveries to District customers began in 1984. The demands have steadily
increased since the systems inception reaching approximately 940 AFY of demand and 171
meters served in 2006. Recycled water now accounts for approximately 11 percent of the total
water used in the District. The recycled water usage is primarily for landscape irrigation such as
golf courses, parks, and landscaped medians. A list of the existing recycled water users (2006
billing data) is provided in Table 6-4.
Monarch Beach Golf Links is the Districts largest recycled water customer using approximately
282 AF in 2006. The second largest customer is Niguel Shores HOA (50 irrigation meters in
total) using approximately 130 AF. The third largest customer is MNWD which has an
agreement with SCWD to receive a contracted amount not to exceed 1.44 MGD. Historically,
MNWD has not taken more than approximately 1.0 MGD out of the Joint Reservoir during the
summer months. In 2006 the total average annual use for MNWD was 128 AFY or 0.11 MGD.
In order to minimize MNWDs annual demand, SCWD will allow MNWD to exchange excess
supply from the Joint Reservoir to offset the MNWD demand.
Excluding MNWD, the District uses 0.72 MGD of recycled water from the AWT facility on an
average day and approximately 1.3 MGD on a maximum day. Contractually, MNWD can take
the remaining supply during the summer months. The AWT facility has a capacity of 2.61 MGD,
so recycled water available to serve new markets on a max day could be limited to
approximately 0.3 MGD (330 AFY), depending on the quantity supplied to MNWD. The District
could also feasibly provide new markets with recycled water by utilizing potable makeup water
during the summer months. The total quantities required from the potable system would be very
6-11

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Recycled Water Master Plan


small; sufficient only to supplement the small deficit during short term peaks in demand.
Moreover, it is recommended that SCWD modify its agreement with MNWD to limit their usage
rate of recycled water during the summer months.
Table 6-4. Existing Recycled Water Customers
Customer

City

2006 Demand (AFY)

Monarch Beach Golf Links


Dana Point
282.14
Niguel Shores HOA
Dana Point
130.36
(1)
Moulton Niguel Water District
Dana Point
127.83
City of Dana Point
Dana Point
66.93
Ritz Cove HOA
Dana Point
32.45
Emerald Ridge
Dana Point
31.46
County of Orange
Dana Point
25.06
Capo Unified School District
Dana Point
23.17
Monarch Beach Master Association
Dana Point
22.52
Laguna Beach Resorts
Laguna Beach
21.87
Corniche Sur Mer HOA
Dana Point
21.01
Monarch Hills Condo Association
Dana Point
20.64
Regatta Homeowners Association
Dana Point
17.24
Tennis Villas
Dana Point
13.94
Pointe Monarch
Dana Point
13.68
City of Laguna Beach
Laguna Beach
10.53
SOCWA
Laguna Niguel
10.29
Estates at Monarch Beach
Dana Point
7.74
Monarch Bay Association
Dana Point
6.81
Antigua HOA
Dana Point
6.80
Ritz Pointe at Monarch Beach
Dana Point
6.62
Montego at Monarch Beach Association
Dana Point
5.92
Corniche Master Association
Dana Point
5.31
St Regis
Dana Point
5.27
Cape Cove HOA
Dana Point
5.09
Marquesa/Monarch Beach
Dana Point
2.84
Villas at Monarch Beach
Dana Point
2.01
Monarch Cove Community Association
Dana Point
1.92
Niguel Shores Prof. Building
Dana Point
1.71
ARR Properties
Dana Point
1.54
Tennis Club at Monarch Beach
Dana Point
0.95
Monarch Bay Chevron
Dana Point
0.58
South Coast Water District
Dana Point
0.26
Total
932.49
(1)
MNWD average annual use. Actual seasonal use varies depending on MNWD
system needs.

6-12

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Recycled Water Master Plan


6.3.4 Buildout/Ultimate Demands
Ultimate recycled water customers include existing recycled customers, conversion customers
and new customers. Potential recycled water customers were subjected to a preliminary
screening to evaluate whether it would be feasible to connect by examining their proximity to
existing and potential infrastructure. The Capistrano Beach area was excluded from this
analysis due to its proximity to existing infrastructure; however, Caltrans could potentially be a
large customer and if the Latham Plant moves forward with an AWT, the District should consider
its capacity rights at Latham and the potential to service the Capistrano Beach area.
Overall, an upper limit of an additional 480 AFY of demand has been targeted, as described in
the following sections. Ultimately, recycled water demands could continue to increase beyond
that limit in small increments if other existing potable water users are converted. However, the
potential numbers and quantities are relatively small. Single-family residential irrigation
customers were excluded from ultimate conversion demands, as it is difficult to permit and
control recycled water use for single-family residential irrigation.
Conversion Customers
In the Districts service area, approximately 13 percent of the potable water supply is used for
landscape irrigation.
Conversion customers represent a significant potential market for
expanding recycled water usage. Conversion customers currently use potable water for uses
that could be served by recycled water, such as irrigating medians, homeowners association
landscaping, school playgrounds, and golf courses. These customers also typically have
dedicated irrigation meters to serve their irrigation system. Conversion customers require
retrofitting, which can be costly, both in expenses and District staff coordination time.
Retrofitting is the conversion of existing potable water uses to recycled water use. Retrofitting
of the customers onsite piping system must be designed, achieve regulatory approval, and be
constructed. A market assessment is critical to assess retrofit customers. The preliminary
assessment performed as part of this master plan was primarily based on these main questions:

Could the customers existing water use be met with recycled water?
How much water could they use?
What is the proximity to existing and planned infrastructure?

Billing information was used to map existing landscape irrigation customers throughout the
District. Usage was summarized based on potable water irrigation meter records from 2006.
The targeted customers typically use over 1 AFY and are located near existing infrastructure.
When systems are retrofitted, an overall reduction in water use is typical. The reduction can be
caused by a number of factors including replacement of leaking or less efficient irrigation
systems, better water management, or cost/practicality constraints limiting the conversion to
only certain portions of the existing potable system. To be conservative in evaluating the
recycled water system limitations, conversion demands will be assumed at 80 percent of 2006
potable water irrigation demands.
Potable irrigation customers along the existing recycled water infrastructure corridors were
primary targets for conversion to recycled water. Actual on-site retrofit costs were not
considered when creating this approach but may limit the number of potential customers
6-13

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Recycled Water Master Plan


considered. Potential conversion customers were grouped into the following tiers and are
shown on Figure 6-5. A description of the proposed tiers is provided as follows:

Tier I potable irrigation customers within 500 feet of the existing recycled water system

Tier II potable irrigation customers with large demands requiring an extension of the
existing recycled water pipeline. Smaller demand customers that can be served along
the pipeline extension were also included in this Tier.

Tier III potable irrigation customers with smaller demands that can be served off
additional pipeline extensions and future/redevelopment projects.

Tier I. Table 6-5 lists the Tier I users. Existing potable water landscape irrigation users within
500 feet of the existing recycled water distribution system represent approximately 239AFY of
potential demand that could be converted to the recycled water system.
The largest Tier I conversion customer is Aliso Creek Inn and Golf Course which used 65.81 AF
of potable water for irrigation in 2006. The Aliso Creek Inn and Golf Course is planning to
undergo redevelopment which may increase its potential recycled water demand. The Ritz
Carlton is the second largest Tier I conversion customer and is located off Pacific Coast
Highway. In 2006, the site used 35 AF of potable water for irrigation.
The City of Dana Point is currently planning to use recycled water for the proposed Sea Terrace
Park. The park is estimated to be 21.6 acres and would use approximately 62 AFY of water for
irrigation, per proposed plans. The park would be an ideal candidate for recycled water, as it is
located near the existing recycled water system.
Tier II. Table 6-6 lists the Tier II users, which are characterized as large potable water users
not located along the existing recycled water system. Tier II conversion customers are grouped
by the proposed five pipeline extensions, labeled A to E on Figure 6-5. Together, these potable
water landscape users represent 220 AFY of potential irrigation demand that could be converted
to the recycled water system.
The largest Tier II customer is the State of California Park, located south of Dana Point Harbor.
In 2006, the park used 110 AF of potable water for irrigation. The second largest Tier II
customer is Laguna Beach Colony Villas which used 32 AF potable water for irrigation in 2006.
The District is considering a 4,100-foot recycled water pipeline extension to serve the Dana
Point Harbor. The Dana Point Harbor had a potable irrigation demand of 34 AF in 2006 that
could be converted to recycled water irrigation. The Dana Point Harbor Extension is shown on
Figure 6-5.
Tier III. In addition to the demands served by Tier II pipeline extensions, an additional 38 AFY
of recycled water irrigation could be served with additional pipeline extensions. Approximately
48 AFY of potable water irrigation can be converted to recycled water by constructing 3,500 feet
of pipe (Extension F) north of the end of Tier IIs Extension C. Tier III extensions are labeled on
Figure 6-5. Potential Tier III customers are listed in Table 6-7.

6-14

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Antonio

C
oa
st

Ra

oV
ie j o

5
6
7

RES #1

8
9
10
11
12



RPS #2
y

n ter
La

38
Sea Terrace Park (I-A)
PACIFIC
OCEAN

Reservoir

26

Transmission Main

Harbor, Headlands, & Stonehill


PCH-Bottleneck
South Coast Water District Boundary
Freeway
Highway
Major Road

ua

b is

48
49
50
51
52
53
54

55
56
57
58
59
60

Tier III Extension F


64
arb

27

Dana P o i n

II-A

ID No.

61
62
63
64
65

47
45

II-A

Harbor Extension

49
52
48

8.43
0.75
6.50

0 Sea Gull Ct
0 Moon Ring Ct

Dana Point
Dana Point

5.86
5.62

34111 Selva Rd
0 Bluff Drive
0 Table Rock

Dana Point
Laguna Beach
Laguna Beach

5.83
0.11
0.02

0 Sea Point Dr
0 Meridian Dr
31852 S Coast Hwy

Dana Point
Dana Point
Laguna Beach

3.57
3.25
3.55

0 Lantern Hill Dr
24482 Lantern Hill Dr

Dana Point
Dana Point

3.21
1.32

32802 Pacific Coast Hwy


21542 Wesley Dr
0 Dana Strand Rd
2 Saint Francis Ct
23831 Stonehill Dr

Dana Point
Laguna Beach
Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point

2.33
2.03
1.78
1.30
1.12

0 Blue Lantern St
0 Mariner Dr
33522 Niguel Rd
33542 Via Corvalian
0 Calle De Tenis
33709 Chula Vista Ave
0 Eastline Rd
7 Ritz Cove Dr
34080 Golden Lantern St
20 Ritz Cove Dr
0 Monarch Bay Dr

Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point
Laguna Beach
Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point

1.01
0.30
0.92
0.86
0.78
0.68
0.60
0.47
0.29
0.24
0.02
62.00
239.10

le
Va l

62
63
65
61

Del Prado

53, 54
3,000





Stonehill
Extension
Ston
ehill Stonehill

Tier II Extension D

Feet

Municipal Boundary
Parcels

4
10

45
46
47

tH

Headlands Extension

Distribution Main
Planned Extensions

Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point

Premise Address

City

Demand
(AFY)

30801 S Coast Hwy


30872 S Coast Hwy

Laguna Beach
Laguna Beach

25.60
6.24

32712 Crown Valley Pky


0 Lumeria Ln
0 Crown Valley Pky

Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point

7.58
3.84
2.17

34331 Pacific Coast Hwy


0 Park Lantern
34320 Pacific Coast Hwy

Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point

88.52
22.59
1.49

25117 Terrace Lantern e Dana Point


Nort Dana Point
25058
DelLantern
icoTerrace
Port
34189 Pacific Coast Hwy Dana Point
34207 Pacific Coast Hwy
34249 Pacific Coast Hwy

Dana Point
Dana Point

0.83
0.91
0.44
0.08
0.07

0 Golden Lantern St
24857 Western Lantern

Dana Point
Dana Point

13.02
6.70

0 Ocean Ridge
33246 Ocean Bright
24784 Ocean Spray
33131 Ocean Bright
33129 Ocean Bright
33214 Ocean Ridge

Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point

3.47
3.41
2.23
1.84
1.49
0.59

0 Dana Point Harbor Dr

Dana Point

27.24
220.37

es

Tier III Customer


Extension F - 3,500 feet
Village at Dana Point HOA
Harbor Creek Community Association
The Fountains at Sea Bluffs
Spinnaker Run
The Village at Dana Point HOA
Total

Premise Address

34149 Del Obispo St


33852 Del Obispo St
25411 Sea Bluffs Dr
25611 Quail Run
0 Village Rd

City

Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point

Demand
(AFY)
8.30
7.86
6.84
13.32
1.67
38.00

lla

 Pump Station


2
31

9
8

23791 Mariner Dr
24083 Stonehill Dr
0 Monarch Bay Plz

74

tre

Potential Recycled Water Main Extension

34
37
51
50

52.65
28.26
22.78
10.65

46

Es

III - 38 AFY; 3,500 LF

Stonehill

Demand
(AFY)

Laguna Beach
Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point

Tier II Extension C

De

II - 220 AFY; 13,850 LF

42
43
44

I - 239 AFY; 0 LF

City

31106 S Coast Hwy


33533 Ritz Carlton Dr
1 Monarch Beach Resort
34034 Selva Rd

Dana Point

Tier II Customer
Extension A - 1,300 feet
Laguna Beach Colony Villas
Aliso Creek Shopping Center
Extension B - 2,000 feet
S Shores Church
Monarch Bay Terrace HOA
City of Dana Point
Extension C - 4,000 feet
State of California
Monarch Bay Terrace HOA
Doheny Park Plaza LLC
Pacific Terrace HOA
Pacific Terrace HOA
Pacific Terrace HOA
Downunder LLC
Raymond Gall
Dana Niguel Veterinary
Extension D - 750 feet
Lantern Bay Villas
Lantern Bay Estates
Extension E - 1,700 feet
Marinita Townhouse HOA
Marinita Townhouse HOA #243
Marinita Townhouse HOA #244
Marinita Townhouse HOA #245
Marinita Townhouse HOA #246
Marinita Townhouse HOA #247
Marinita Townhouse HOA #248
New Projects/Redevelopment
Dana Point Harbor - 4,100 feet
Total

TIER

I-A

40
41

55, 56
59, 60
57, 58
13, 14

17
16
29
32

ID No.

Tier II Extension E

RES #2
RPS
#3 
k
j

ee

as

Legend

Co

36

28

n
Sa

Pa r
k

5
30

k
j

en y

po

l de

st

D e l A v io n

lO

33

D oh

oa

44
42
43

De

or

JOINT
RES
el

11/19/2008 KM KM Z:\Projects\IS\SCWD\MXD\ReportFigures\Final Report\PotentialCustomers.mxd

Go

l a nd

Ni
gu

Is

MNWD

sM

Crown Valle
ic

29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39

Premise Address

Aliso Creek Inn


Ritz Carlton
St. Regis
Niguel Beach Terrace
Villas at Monarch Beach
Villas at Monarch Beach
Villas at Monarch Beach
William J Cagney
Sea Ridge Condo #1 Association
Sea Ridge Condo #1 Association
Sea Ridge Condo #1 Association
County of Orange
County of Orange
County of Orange
County of Orange
Waterford Point HOA
Waterford Point HOA
Waterford Point HOA
SCMC Foundation
Lantern Hill HOA
Lantern Hill HOA
Lantern Hill HOA
Ritz Cove HOA
Salt Creek LTD
National Church
Headlands Resort LLC
Regatta HOA
Orange County Fire Authority
City of Dana Point
City of Dana Point
City of Dana Point
KB-Dana Point LLC
Dana Light HOA
Moulton Niguel Water District
Monarch HOA
Tab District
Steven Udvar-Hazy
Joe Lovullo
Mary Silver
Monarch Bay Club
New Projects/Redevelopment
Sea Terrace Park
Total

via

ifi

No

jo

cif

35
39
Pa
c

La

V ie

Pa

24
25
26
27
28

ho

15

nc

Tier II Extension B

24
PCH-Bottleneck

16
17

Ra

no

V
U

is tr a

12

13
14
15

Ca p

11

Tier I Customer

1
2
3
4

RPS #1

25

k
j

ID No.

Lo

l
rin

ls

De

ue

k
j



40
41
1

Ma

nch

N ig

Tier II Extension A

il
aH

Figure 6-5
South Coast Water District
POTENTIAL RECYCLED WATER CUSTOMERS

Recycled Water Master Plan


Table 6-5. Tier I Potential Conversion Customers

ID No.

Customer

Premise Address

City

2006
Demand
(AFY)

Conversion
Reduction
Factor

Retrofit
Demand
(AFY)

1
2
3
4

Aliso Creek Inn


31106 S Coast Hwy
Laguna Beach
65.81
80%
52.65
Ritz Carlton
33533 Ritz Carlton Dr
Dana Point
35.33
80%
28.26
St. Regis
1 Monarch Beach Resort Dana Point
28.48
80%
22.78
Niguel Beach Terrace
34034 Selva Rd
Dana Point
13.32
80%
10.65
Villas at Monarch Beach
5
Villas at Monarch Beach
23791 Mariner Dr
Dana Point
10.54
80%
8.43
6
Villas at Monarch Beach
24083 Stonehill Dr
Dana Point
0.93
80%
0.75
7
William J Cagney
0 Monarch Bay Plz
Dana Point
8.13
80%
6.50
Sea Ridge Condo #1 Association
8
Sea Ridge Condo #1 Assoc
0 Sea Gull Ct
Dana Point
7.32
80%
5.86
9
Sea Ridge Condo #1 Assoc
0 Moon Ring Ct
Dana Point
7.02
80%
5.62
County of Orange
10
County of Orange
34111 Selva Rd
Dana Point
7.28
80%
5.83
11
County of Orange
0 Bluff Drive
Laguna Beach
0.13
80%
0.11
12
County of Orange
0 Table Rock
Laguna Beach
0.03
80%
0.02
Waterford Point HOA
13
Waterford Point HOA
0 Sea Point Dr
Dana Point
4.46
80%
3.57
14
Waterford Point HOA
0 Meridian Dr
Dana Point
4.07
80%
3.25
15
SCMC Foundation
31852 S Coast Hwy
Laguna Beach
4.44
80%
3.55
Lantern Hill HOA
16
Lantern Hill HOA
0 Lantern Hill Dr
Dana Point
4.02
80%
3.21
17
Lantern Hill HOA
24482 Lantern Hill Dr
Dana Point
1.65
80%
1.32
24
Salt Creek LTD
32802 Pacific Coast Hwy Dana Point
2.91
80%
2.33
25
National Church
21542 Wesley Dr
Laguna Beach
2.54
80%
2.03
26
Headlands Resort LLC(1)
0 Dana Strand Rd
Dana Point
2.23
80%
1.78
27
Regatta HOA
2 Saint Francis Ct
Dana Point
1.62
80%
1.30
28
Orange County Fire Authority
23831 Stonehill Dr
Dana Point
1.40
80%
1.12
City of Dana Point
29
City of Dana Point
0 Blue Lantern St
Dana Point
1.26
80%
1.01
30
City of Dana Point
0 Mariner Dr
Dana Point
0.38
80%
0.30
31
KB-Dana Point LLC
33522 Niguel Rd
Dana Point
1.15
80%
0.92
32
Dana Light HOA
33542 Via Corvalian
Dana Point
1.07
80%
0.86
33
Moulton Niguel Water District
0 Calle De Tenis
Dana Point
0.97
80%
0.78
34
Monarch HOA
33709 Chula Vista Ave
Dana Point
0.85
80%
0.68
35
Tab District
0 Eastline Rd
Laguna Beach
0.75
80%
0.60
36
Steven Udvar-Hazy
7 Ritz Cove Dr
Dana Point
0.58
80%
0.47
37
Joe Lovullo
34080 Golden Lantern St Dana Point
0.36
80%
0.29
38
Mary Silver
20 Ritz Cove Dr
Dana Point
0.30
80%
0.24
39
Monarch Bay Club
0 Monarch Bay Dr
Dana Point
0.03
80%
0.02
New Project/Redevelopment
I-A
Sea Terrace Park
Dana Point
62.00
Total
166.63
239.10
Notes: Demands have been adjusted to account for retrofit induced conversions and system limitations on retrofit conversions.
Future efforts should validate the ability to connect users and the minimum threshold demand by confirming costs to benefits.
(1)
The demands for Headlands Resort LLC (#26) are the projected usage for 2009.

6-17

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Recycled Water Master Plan


Table 6-6. Tier II Potential Conversion Customers

ID No.

Customer

Premise Address

City

2006
Demand
(AFY)

Conversion
Reduction
Factor

Retrofit
Demand
(AFY)

Extension A - 1,300 feet


Laguna Beach Colony Villas
30801 S Coast Hwy
Laguna Beach
32.01
80%
25.60
Aliso Creek Shopping Center
30872 S Coast Hwy
Laguna Beach
7.81
80%
6.24
Extension B - 2,000 feet
42
S Shores Church
32712 Crown Valley Pky Dana Point
9.47
80%
7.58
43
Monarch Bay Terrace HOA
0 Lumeria Ln
Dana Point
4.79
80%
3.84
44
City of Dana Point
0 Crown Valley Pky
Dana Point
2.72
80%
2.17
Extension C - 4,000 feet
45
State of California
34331 Pacific Coast Hwy Dana Point
110.65
80%
88.52
46
Monarch Bay Terrace HOA
0 Park Lantern
Dana Point
28.24
80%
22.59
47
Doheny Park Plaza LLC
34320 Pacific Coast Hwy Dana Point
1.86
80%
1.49
48
Pacific Terrace HOA
25117 Terrace Lantern
Dana Point
1.04
80%
0.83
49
Pacific Terrace HOA
25058 Terrace Lantern
Dana Point
1.14
80%
0.91
50
Downunder LLC
34189 Pacific Coast Hwy Dana Point
0.55
80%
0.44
51
Raymond Gall
34207 Pacific Coast Hwy Dana Point
0.11
80%
0.08
52
Dana Niguel Veterinary
34249 Pacific Coast Hwy Dana Point
0.09
80%
0.07
Extension D - 750 feet
53
Lantern Bay Villas
0 Golden Lantern St
Dana Point
16.28
80%
13.02
54
Lantern Bay Estates
24857 Western Lantern
Dana Point
8.38
80%
6.70
Extension E - 1,700 feet
55
Marinita Townhouse HOA #243 0 Ocean Ridge
Dana Point
4.33
80%
3.47
56
Marinita Townhouse HOA #244 33246 Ocean Bright
Dana Point
4.27
80%
3.41
57
Marinita Townhouse HOA #245 24784 Ocean Spray
Dana Point
2.79
80%
2.23
58
Marinita Townhouse HOA #246 33131 Ocean Bright
Dana Point
2.30
80%
1.84
59
Marinita Townhouse HOA #247 33129 Ocean Bright
Dana Point
1.86
80%
1.49
60
Marinita Townhouse HOA #248 33214 Ocean Ridge
Dana Point
0.74
80%
0.59
New Projects/Redevelopment
II-A
Dana Point Harbor - 4,100 feet 0 Dana Point Harbor Dr
Dana Point
34.06
80%
27.24
Total
275.46
220.37
Notes: Demands have been adjusted to account for retrofit induced conversions and system limitations on retrofit conversions.
Future efforts should validate the ability to connect users and the minimum threshold demand by confirming costs to benefits.
40
41

Table 6-7. Tier III Potential Conversion Customers

ID No.

Customer

Premise Address

City

2006
Demand
(AFY)

Conversion
Reduction
Factor

Retrofit
Demand
(AFY)

Extension F - 3,500 feet


61

Village at Dana Point HOA

34149 Del Obispo St

Dana Point

10.37

80%

62

Harbor Creek Community Assoc

33852 Del Obispo St

Dana Point

9.83

80%

7.86

63

The Fountains at Sea Bluffs

25411 Sea Bluffs Dr

Dana Point

8.56

80%

6.84

64

Spinnaker Run

25611 Quail Run

Dana Point

16.65

80%

13.32

65

The Village at Dana Point HOA

0 Village Rd

Dana Point

2.09

80%

Total

47.50

8.30

1.67
38.00

Notes: Demands have been adjusted to account for retrofit induced conversions and system limitations on retrofit conversions.
Future efforts should validate the ability to connect users and the minimum threshold demand by confirming costs to benefits.

6-18

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Recycled Water Master Plan


Potential New Customers
The District is in the process of implementing several recycled water expansion projects as
noted below and shown on Figure 6-5.
Headlands Development. The Headlands Development is a 35-acre site located in Dana Point
and is planned to include residential units, restaurant, and commercial space. The District is
currently evaluating a 2,800 foot recycled water extension in Pacific Coast Highway to serve the
Headlands irrigation needs in the future. This would be considered a Tier II candidate.
Stonehill Drive Expansion. A 1,500 foot recycled pipeline is being planned to extend the end
of the recycled water pipeline in Stonehill Drive. This extension will allow the District to serve
customers farther east and possibly provide the option of pipeline looping if future recycled
water extensions are constructed.
Fuel Modification Zones. There are a number of development areas within the District that
interface with wildland and canyon areas. There are new requirements for landscaping along
urban interface areas to better protect structures from wildfires. In the future, the District may
have opportunities to use recycled water for irrigation of these fuel modification zones.
Demands are currently not identified for this use and have not been included in Tier I, II, or III
totals.
Future Retrofit/Conversion Considerations
Evaluation criteria should be developed to provide guidance on future retrofit decisions. The
criteria goal would provide a qualitative and quantitative means to determine whether the District
should invest in recycled water retrofits or distribution pipeline extensions. In deciding which
existing potable customers are suitable candidates for conversion to recycled water, the
following considerations should be made:
Quantitative Considerations

Surplus recycled water must be available to meet peak demands.

Operational costs may increase with demand due to additional pump operation.

Infrastructure costs (pipeline, reservoirs, pumps)

Retrofit costs per site compared to potential recycled water revenue

Revenue generated by recycled water sales (current rate = $892/AF) and savings
associated with purchasing and delivering less potable water (current rate = $1,116/AF)

Qualitative Considerations

Increased recycled water use is consistent with District goals.

Recycled water is a local, reliable water resource.

Recycled water is considered uninterruptible, providing an economic benefit during


droughts.

Potable water cost inflation is projected to outpace recycled water supply costs and
could offset the need to improve or expand the potable water system.

Converting customers to recycled water reduces the overall potable water demand.
6-19

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Recycled Water Master Plan

Converting potable to recycled water use will not normally capture 100 percent of
existing usage for.

Retrofits can be difficult in design, costly and require significant staff time to coordinate.

Recycled water quality may impact landscaping as compared to potable water.

Retrofit cost data was evaluated from various sources, including recent recycled water studies
in nearby areas. Retrofit conversion costs include on-site engineering design and planning,
meters and backflow preventers, piping and isolation valves, construction inspection and
testing, and District review. Costs are estimated to range from $20,000 to $50,000 per site,
depending on total irrigation acreage and potential recycled water demand.

6.4

Recycled Water System Hydraulic Model

A detailed hydraulic computer model was developed to analyze the Districts recycled water
system. The steps of model formulation included obtaining the systems physical data (the
facilities such as pipelines, and reservoirs), translating the physical data into a network of nodes
(demand locations) and links (pipelines), determining pressure zone boundaries, importing
demands, and verifying that the network matches existing data.
Existing System Computer Model
The Districts existing recycled water system model was developed using GIS and digitizing
methodology. The computer model includes all the major transmission and distribution mains, 4
inch diameter and larger. The model includes annotation of pipeline size and material, and
isolation/control valve sizes and type of valve. Node elevations were obtained via the same
process discussed in Chapter 4. Reservoirs were annotated with capacity, HWL, diameter, and
height. Pump stations were added with their corresponding pump curves. The manual bypass
valve at PS #2 was also added with controls to open only when the pump station was not in
operation. The District may want to consider converting the bypass valve to an automatic
motor-operated valve for ease in operation.
Ultimate System Computer Model
The ultimate water system was also assessed using the hydraulic computer model. Proposed
transmission mains, reservoirs, pump stations, and potential improvements were added to the
existing system hydraulic model based on proposed conversion customers. Ultimate facilities
were identified and discussed at meetings with District staff.
Model Calibration
Recycled water SCADA data and existing billing records were the primary tools to validate the
hydraulic model. A steady state recycled water model calibration was performed utilizing
District pump station SCADA data to confirm that the observed flow was simulated through the
system. SCADA data for tank levels was also reviewed to determine appropriate level settings.
However, tank levels fluctuation is not observed in a steady state model.

6-20

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Recycled Water Master Plan

6.5

Existing Recycled Water System Analysis

As previously discussed, the District experiences operational issues through a hydraulic


bottleneck in Pacific Coast Highway. The first step in the recycled water analysis was to
evaluate existing storage and pump capacity thresholds for the existing recycled water system.
Following this analysis, an evaluation of the impact of the bottleneck was completed to
determine if pipe replacement or other mitigating measures were necessary to serve existing
and ultimate customers.

6.5.1 Existing Storage and Pumping Analysis


The recycled water system reservoir storage was assessed to determine if storage criteria was
met under existing demands. Recycled water storage criterion was evaluated at two-thirds of a
MDD. The resulting storage assessment is included in Table 6-8.
Table 6-8. Existing Recycled Water Reservoir Analysis

Existing Average
Annual Demand
(District Only)

Max Day
Demand
(AAD x 1.8)

Required
Operational
Storage per
Design Criteria

Pressure
Zone

gpm

MGD

MGD

(0.67 x MDD)

Low

316

0.45

0.82

0.55 MG

High

186

0.27

0.48

0.32 MG

Totals

502

0.72

1.30

0.87 MG

(1)
(2)

Existing Storage
Storage
Facility

Capacity

Res #1

2.0 MG

Surplus/
(Deficit)

(1)

Res #2

1.7 MG
(2)

Joint Res

1.15 MG

1.1 MG

0.78 MG

2.8 MG

1.93 MG

Res #1 is not included in Operational storage as it serves as a forebay reservoir for PS #1.
SCWD has 1.1 MG capacity of the 3.3 MG shared Joint Reservoir with MNWD

The current reservoirs have sufficient capacity for the existing system demands. An additional
requirement is that this operational storage can be fully used and replaced on maximum day
demand.
Under steady-state simulations, the model confirmed that adequate trial
replenishment occurs at Reservoir #2 and the Joint Reservoir.
A recycled water pump station capacity analysis was performed and is summarized in Table
6-9. As previously noted, the District is contracted with MNWD to deliver up to 1.44 MGD of
recycled water. Currently, under normal operating conditions, MNWD exchanges recycled
water on a monthly basis out of the Joint Reservoir to minimize the monthly charge for water it
takes from SCWD. Typically, MNWD will only take recycled water from SCWD, without
exchange, if they have one of their treatment plants down for maintenance. For the purposes of
this study and capacity analysis it is assumed that 1 MGD of recycled water is delivered to
MNWD under maximum day demand conditions.

6-21

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Recycled Water Master Plan


PS #1 must have capacity to serve the Low and High Zone demands plus the MNWD demand
out of the Joint Reservoir. PS #1 is near capacity to meet the maximum day demands of the
existing system, assuming 1.0 MGD supply to MNWD.
Table 6-9. Existing Recycled Water Pump Station Analysis

Pressure
Zone
Low
High
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)

Zone
Average
Rated
Total
Annual
Discharge Capacity Demand

Pump
Station
No.

No. of
Pumps

800

(2)

1,600

1,450

gpm

Max Day
Demand
(AAD x
1.8)

gpm

gpm

gpm

1,600

578

(3)

1,598

2,900

263

(4)

1,030

Available
AAD
MDD
PS
Surplus/ Surplus/
(1)
Capacity
(Deficit) (Deficit)
gpm

gpm

gpm

(5)

1,600

1,022

(5)

1,450

1,187

420

Available PS Capacity includes duty pumps; stand-by or emergency pumps are not included.
PS #2 works in series with PS #1 during peak demands.
Low and High Zone demand + MNWD average demand of 0.11 MGD
High Zone demand + MNWD average demand of 0.11 MGD
Max Day Demand includes MNWD Max Day demand of 1.0 MGD

6.5.2 Hydraulic Bottleneck Analysis


The existing recycled water system has a 6,100-foot hydraulic bottleneck in PCH, just
downstream of PS #2, where the pipe diameter reduces from 12 inch to 10 inch for
approximately 3,100 feet and then returns to a 12 inch pipeline. The 10 inch pipe is encased
within a 16 inch pipe with redwood spacers. The headloss across the bottleneck is
approximately 110 feet. Figure 6-6 shows the hydraulic grade line from Reservoir #1 to
Reservoir #2.
An analysis was performed on the existing recycled water system to evaluate replacing the
bottleneck with a 16 inch pipeline. The headloss across this stretch of pipe was reduced and
total flow capacity through the Low Zone increased. The improved hydraulic grade line is
shown in Figure 6-7.

6.5.3 Existing Operational Analysis


The recycled water pipeline network is relatively simple and includes both transmission and
distribution facilities. The hydraulic computer model was utilized to assess the existing system
operation. Appendix D includes the steady-state simulation results from the computer model.
System pressures ranged from 24 to 96 psi at all nodes. Every node that had a demand had
predicted pressures within 44 psi and 96 psi. The City of Dana Point Golden Lantern Street
connection had a maximum pressure of 180 psi (Node AIM-RWSV-111). The hydraulic model
predicted system pipeline velocities below 7 feet per second.

6-22

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Recycled Water Master Plan

500

450

Hydraulic Grade Line


1,640 gpm - Existing Max Day Fill

400

10" PCH
Bottleneck

350

16"

Elevation

300

12"

RPS #2

250

290 1.7 MG
RSVR #2

200

RPS #1
150

RSVR #1

100

Ground Elevation
50

0
0+00

50+00

100+00

150+00

200+00

250+00

300+00

Station

Figure 6-6. Existing Hydraulic Grade Line

500

Hydraulic Grade Line


2,225 gpm - Replace Bottleneck w/ 16"

450

400

PCH Bottleneck 16"

350

16"
12"

Elevation

300

250

290 1.7 MG
RSVR #2

RPS #2

200

RPS #1

150

RSVR #1
100

Ground Elevation
50

0
0+00

50+00

100+00

150+00

200+00

250+00

300+00

Station

Figure 6-7. Proposed Hydraulic Grade Line

6-23

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Recycled Water Master Plan

6.6

Ultimate Recycled Water System Analysis

The future recycled water system was evaluated to include Tier I, II, and III demands.

6.6.1 AWT Facility Capacity Analysis


The production capacity of the AWT facility should be considered when evaluating the recycled
water system and potential expansion. The AWT facility has a design capacity of 2.61 MGD,
which was compared to future recycled water demands at each Tier addition. The AWT facility
capacity analysis is summarized in Table 6-10.

Table 6-10. AWT Production Capacity Analysis


Average Demand
MGD
gpm
AWT
Existing
MNWD

(1)

0.72

497

0.11

78

Max Day Demand (1.8 x AAD)


MGD
gpm
2.61
1.29
(2)

1.00
0.38
0.35
0.06
0.18
3.26

Tier I
0.21
146
Tier II
0.20
137
Tier III
0.03
24
Unidentified Future Use
0.10
68
Total
1.36
949
Surplus/(Deficit)
Existing + MNWD
0.32
w/Tier I
(0.005)
w/Tier II
(0.41)
Ultimate
(0.65)
Note: Unidentified future use assumes 20% of Tier I-III totals.
(1)
Existing SCWD demand less 128 AFY for MNWD
(2)
Assumed contracted capacity of 1.0 MGD during maximum day demand

1,813
895
694
267
246
42
122
2,266

The AWT facility is near capacity to serve existing demands. By utilizing existing reservoir
surplus storage, Tier I demands could be served without additional recycled water supply.
However, the addition of Tier II demands would result in a 0.4 MGD deficit in recycled water
supply under maximum day conditions. Ultimate future demands assuming all three tiers were
implemented would require 0.65 MGD above the AWT facilitys capacity.
The District is currently participating in regional studies of projects which could provide
additional recycled water supply to the system, as discussed earlier in Section 6.1.2. In addition
to the Latham Plant, Salt Creek, and Aliso Creek project evaluations underway, it is
recommended that the District initiate a study of the feasibility of upgrading the Coastal Plant
AWT to increase its rated capacity. Furthermore, the District should review its current contract
agreement with MNWD to determine the required supply during maximum day and revisit
opportunities to reduce this commitment, in order to free-up supply for the Districts future
customers. Continued involvement in these studies and assessments will help ensure that the
District will have the available capacity to serve future recycled water markets.
6-24

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Recycled Water Master Plan

The ultimate recycled water demand beyond the AWT facility capacity is relatively small
compared to the total recycled water demands. The District could potentially serve future users
by supplementing their recycled water supply with potable make-up water. The recycled water
Reservoir #2 is located adjacent to potable water Reservoir #5-A. Reservoir #5-A has a 2.0 MG
capacity and has historically had water quality issues due to reduced use. The potable water
Reservoir could be retrofitted for use as a recycled water Reservoir to store water that would
serve the future demands in the recycled water system.

6.6.2 Ultimate Storage and Pumping Analysis


The recycled water system reservoir storage was assessed to determine if storage criteria was
met under ultimate demands. Recycled water storage criterion was evaluated at two-thirds of a
MDD. The resulting storage assessment is included in Table 6-11.
Table 6-11. Ultimate Recycled Water Reservoir Analysis

Demand

(1)
(2)

Average Annual
Demand
(District Only)
gpm
MGD

Max Day
Demand
(AAD x 1.8)
MGD

Required
Operational Storage
per Design Criteria
(0.67 x MDD)

Low

466

0.67

1.21

0.81 MG

High

341

0.49

0.89

0.59 MG

Totals

805

1.16

2.10

1.39 MG

Cumulative
Ultimate
Surplus/(Deficit)

Storage
Facility

Capacity

Res #1
Res #2
Joint Res(2)

2.0 MG(1)
1.7 MG
1.1 MG

1.71 MG

4.0 MG

2.61 MG

0.89 MG

Res #1 is not included in Operational storage as it serves as a fore-bay reservoir for PS #1.
SCWD has 1.1 MG capacity of the 3.3 MG shared Joint Reservoir with MNWD

The current reservoirs have sufficient capacity for the ultimate system demands. An additional
requirement is that this operational storage can be fully used and replaced on maximum day
demand. Hydraulic factors, such as pump capacity, the PCH bottleneck, requested flows from
MNWD, and utilization of storage operation, can limit the ability for the District to replace
maximum day demands. By replacing the bottleneck and upgrading PS #1, the District should
ultimately fully use its operational storage.
A recycled water pump station analysis was performed for ultimate demands and summarized in
Table 6-12.
PS #1 must have capacity to serve the Low and High Zone demands plus the MNWD demand
out of the Joint Reservoir. The pump station has deficient capacity to meet the maximum day
demands of the ultimate system. An additional 800-gpm pump at PS #1 would increase the
system capacity to serve future demands.

6-25

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Recycled Water Master Plan


Table 6-12. Ultimate Recycled Water Pump Station Analysis

Pressure
Zone
Low
New Pump
High(4)
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)

Pump
Station
No.

Number
of Pumps

Rated
Discharge
gpm

1
2(2)
1
3

2
2
1
2

800
1,600
800
1,450

Total
Capacity
gpm

Zone Average
Annual
Demand
gpm

1,600

881 (3)

2,400
2,900

418 (4)

Max Day
Demand
(AADx1.8)
gpm

Available
PS
Capacity(1)
gpm

AAD
Surplus/
(Deficit)
gpm

MDD
Surplus/
(Deficit)
gpm

2,143 (5)

1,600

719

(543)

2,400
1,450

1,519
1,032

257
141

1,309 (5)

Available PS Capacity includes duty pumps; stand-by or emergency pumps are not included.
PS #2 works in series with PS #1 during peak demands.
Low and High Zone demand + MNWD average demand of 0.11 MGD
High Zone demand + MNWD average demand of 0.11 MGD
Max Day Demand includes MNWD Max Day demand of 1.0 MGD

6.6.3 Ultimate Operational Analysis


The future recycled water system is limited by the total capacity of the AWT facility, transmission
system, and pump station capacities. In order for the District to serve new or conversion
recycled water customers, system improvements should be completed to provide more capacity
within the recycled water system.
Replacing the 10 inch bottleneck in PCH with a 16 inch pipeline provides approximately 550
gpm more maximum day supply to serve existing and future recycled water demands. In order
to accommodate this higher flow, an additional 800-gpm pump is required at PS #1. This
additional capacity would serve Tier I and II customers under maximum day conditions.
Tier I customers can be served with minimal or relatively minor off-site pipeline improvements.
However, it is recommended that a site-specific customer market assessment be conducted to
evaluate the feasibility of converting all Tier I customers to recycled water. On-site retrofits
would be required for each conversion site.
Tier II customers require off-site pipeline extensions to connect to the existing recycled water
system. As shown in Tables 6-6 and 6-7, pipeline extensions range from 750 to 4,000 feet in
length.
An evaluation of the AWT facility technology upgrade was discussed in Section 6.1.2. If the
AWT facility is upgraded to expand its total capacity, the District should consider upgrading the
9,100 feet of 12 inch pipeline in PCH between the bottleneck and existing 16 inch pipeline to a
16 inch diameter pipeline. This pipeline improvement would provide up to 2,900 gpm of
maximum day supply through the Low Zone.
The District is currently participating in discussions involving regional projects and new recycled
water sources. These projects were not evaluated as part of this Master Plan but should be
considered during the initial design process of any existing recycled water facility improvements.

6-26

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Recycled Water Master Plan

6.7

Summary of Recommended Improvements

In order for the District to continue to provide existing customers and expand the reliable service
of the recycled water system, the following recommended improvements are proposed. As part
of any facility design, the District should review and validate the assumptions of this plan to
confirm final facility sizes.
Phase I 5-Year Recycled Water Capacity CIP (2009-2013)
RW-1 PCH Bottleneck Replacement. Replace approximately 3,100 feet of the existing 10
inch diameter pipeline in the bottleneck in PCH with 16 inch diameter pipeline. Upgrading the
bottleneck will decrease headloss within the pipe and provide more capacity within the system.
RW-2 New 800-gpm pump at PS #1. Upgrade PS #1 with an additional 800-gpm pump to
increase capacity to Reservoir #2.
RW-3 Bypass Valve at PS #2. Install new motor-operated valve at Control (Bypass) Valve to
facilitate operation of PS #2.
RW-4 Customer Market Assessment Study - Tier I Customers. Perform customer market
assessment and cost analysis study for all Tier I potential recycled water customers, including
site visits.
RW-5 Participation in Regional Studies. Continue participation in studies and pilot testing
of possible AWT at Latham Treatment Plant. Conduct Feasibility Study of upgrade to Coastal
Treatment Plant AWT to increase rated capacity.
RW-18 Recycled Water Retrofit Conversion Design and Construction Tier I. Prepare
preliminary design of onsite facilities needed to connect Tier I Potential Recycled Water
Customers, including retrofit conversion. Implement Tier I retrofit conversions.
RW-21 TDS Reduction at AWT. Conduct alternatives study of possible measures to reduce
TDS of Coastal Treatment Plant AWT effluent to make it more attractive for irrigation customers.
Phase II 5-Year Recycled Water Capacity CIP (2014-2018)
RW-6 Customer Market Assessment Study - Tier II Customers. Perform customer market
assessment and cost analysis study for all Tier II potential recycled water customers, including
site visits.
RW-7 to RW-14 Recycled Water Pipeline Extensions. Tier II Pipeline Extensions A through
E, Dana Point Harbor, Headlands, and Stonehill.
RW-17 Prepare conceptual study for Potable Reservoir R-5A conversion to a Recycled
Water Reservoir. Prepare Conceptual Feasibility Study for Potable Reservoir 5-A (2.0 MG)
conversion to a Recycled Water Reservoir to identify opportunities and constraints. Identify
piping requirements and new potable makeup water connection and review benefits of
integration into existing recycled system.
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South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Recycled Water Master Plan


RW-19 Recycled Water Retrofit Conversion Design and Construction Tier II. Prepare
preliminary design of onsite facilities needed to connect Tier II Potential Recycled Water
Customers, including retrofit conversion. Implement Tier I retrofit conversions.
RW-22 Replace 12" PCH pipeline with 16" diameter pipeline Replace 12" pipeline from
bottleneck to existing 16" pipe in PCH. Contingent on AWT facility expansion
RW-23 Stand-by Pump Upgrades at PS #1 and #2. Upgrade recycled Pump Stations #1
and #2 with backup pumps for improved reliability. This project may be necessary should the
recycled water system be used for fire protection.
Phase III 5-Year Recycled Water Capacity CIP (2019-Beyond)
RW-15 Customer Market Assessment Study - Tier III Customers. Perform customer
market assessment and cost analysis study for all Tier III potential recycled water customers,
including site visits.
RW-16 Recycled Water Pipeline Extensions. Tier III Pipeline Extension F, if retrofit
conversions are considered to be a viable project, construct pipeline extensions and retrofit
conversions.
RW-20 Recycled Water Retrofit Conversion Design and Construction Tier III. Prepare
preliminary design of onsite facilities needed to connect Tier I Potential Recycled Water
Customers, including retrofit conversion. Implement Tier I retrofit conversions.
RW-24 Rebuild PS #1. Rebuild PS #1 to match capabilities of PS #2 to balance and optimize
system hydraulics. Matching pump station capabilities also improves efficiency and simplifies
operations.

6-28

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Chapter 7
Proposed Capital Improvement Program
This chapter presents the proposed Capital Improvement Program (CIP) for the District based
on the findings of the Infrastructure Master Plan. The Master Plan primarily focuses on near
term and future capacity needs for the water distribution system, wastewater collection system,
and recycled water system. In addition, specific projects to enhance water supply reliability are
presented. There are a number of recommendations where it will be in the best interest of the
District to conduct feasibility or preliminary engineering evaluations before embarking on a
major capital investment. These planning or feasibility studies are also included in the capital
program.
Our detailed CIP developed for the Districts water, recycled water and wastewater systems are
prioritized capacity or reliability improvements to the existing system. A Phase I (2009-2013)
CIP is developed that represents high priority projects that should be planned or constructed
over the next five years. Lower priority projects are indentified as Phase II projects that would
be included over the following five years (2014-2018). Projects that may evolve from feasibility
or engineering studies or are conceptual at this time are included as Phase III (2019 and
beyond).
This Master Plan CIP does not include specific rehabilitation or replacement projects due to age
or condition of facilities, as condition assessment was not part of this scope of work.
Rehabilitation and replacement projects have historically been separately identified and
budgeted in Master Plan CIPs, mostly based on Operations Department input. It is
recommended that District-identified replacement and rehabilitation projects be combined with
this Master Plans capacity and reliability projects for its comprehensive five year CIP program.

7.1

Development of Unit Costs

The unit cost estimates reflect full capitalization inclusive of engineering design, environmental,
legal, construction management and contract administration. The values are presented in mid2008 dollars based on an anticipated ENR Construction Cost Index (ENR-CCI) of 9400 for the
Los Angeles/Orange County area. These estimates are based on representative available data
at the time of this report; however, since prices of materials and labor fluctuate over time, new
estimates should be obtained at or near the time of construction of proposed facilities.
Unit costs were developed based in part on input from District staff on recent construction
projects in the community. Many of the District projects, especially pipelines, require public
involvement, traffic control, utility re-locations, and paving replacement, and accordingly have
fairly high unit costs. Since some of the pipeline projects are relatively short in distance, a
scaling factor has been included to address the economy of scale of constructing smaller scale
projects.
The CIP has been divided into three phases as follows:

Phase I 2009-2013
7-1

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Proposed Capital Improvement Program

Phase II 2014-2018
Phase III 2019 and beyond

Projects are categorized and numbered per type and phase using the following convention:
CIP #, System, Facility Type, and Phase
Example: PW-1 (Water System, Pumps, Phase I)

7.1.1 Pipelines
Base unit costs for pipeline material and installation including repaving and system
appurtenances that, collectively, constitute principal elements of the water distribution and
wastewater collection system facilities, are presented in Table 7-1. A base cost range has been
provided for potable/recycled mains and gravity sewers.
The lower unit values are
representative of typical un-encumbered installations for larger scale projects, whereas the
upper values are applicable for smaller scale projects, difficult conditions, constrained access,
congested areas, etc. Determination of the appropriate unit cost within this range will be based
on project-specific conditions.
Table 7-1. Pipeline Unit Costs
Potable Water

Sewer, Gravity

Diameter (inches)

Sewer, Force Main

Recycled Water

$/LF

82 - 190

95 - 120

190

125

98 - 202

104 - 133

202

144

124 - 235

132 - 156

235

160

12

148 - 260

150 - 173

260

180

16

170 - 278

182 - 198

278

212

20

196 - 326

210 - 230

326

260

24

276 - 442

226 - 252

442

320

30

340 - 530

240 - 298

530

36

460 - 652

286 - 355

652

Notes:
Gravity sewer lines at average depth (5-8 ft) including manholes every 200 ft.
Sewer force mains use upper range of potable water line unit costs.
Recycled water lines assume PVC pipelines in public streets to POC/meter.

The unit costs provided above reflect full capitalization inclusive of engineering design,
environmental, legal, construction management and contract administration.
Special
circumstances (e.g., jacking, trenchless installations, tunnels, etc.) are considered separately on
a case-by-case basis.

7-2

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Proposed Capital Improvement Program


7.1.2 Pump Stations
Pump station capital costs for upgrades are based on the specific upgrade proposed, as no new
pump stations are proposed in the District systems. The cost for water/recycled pump station
and sewer lift station upgrades typically would include pumps and motors, miscellaneous piping
and valving, instrumentation, controls, of engineering design, environmental, legal, construction
management and contract administration.

7.1.3 Reservoirs
The cost for reservoirs is based on total capacity and includes limited site work, yard piping,
valving, fencing, landscaping, of engineering design, environmental, legal, construction
management and contract administration.

7.1.4 Recycled Water Retrofits


Costs were estimated for recycled water retrofits which would allow customers to convert from
potable water to recycled water, in accordance with State Health Department requirements. A
retrofit cost of $50,000 per year was assumed for the District budget as financial assistance to
owners. This assumed cost could include such items as capital costs for a new meter, backflow
device, a service connection, engineering design, environmental, legal, construction
management and contract administration. Retrofit costs are highly variable and site specific, as
such, each site should be evaluated to determine its cost benefit to recycled water. It is
recommended that the District create a policy for recycled water conversion and address
financial assistance.

7.2

Recommended CIP Program

The CIP projects identify facilities needed to meet existing system needs based on the Districts
design criteria for the water, wastewater, and recycled water systems. As previously discussed,
the CIP projects are presented in two major phases of work based on priority needs. A third
phase is included for future potential projects that are not necessarily identified as a priority or
cost effective at this time.
Phase I (2009-2013) includes our recommended high priority
projects, as well as important project studies addressing future system needs. Phase II (20142018) includes lower priority projects.

7.2.1 Water Supply


Table 7-2 summarizes the recommended water supply projects, including several proposed
studies and continued participation in regional water supply planning work. The five year Water
Supply CIP is estimated to be about $6.57 million.

7-3

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Proposed Capital Improvement Program


7.2.2 Water System
Table 7-3 summarizes the recommended water distribution projects, including several proposed
reliability upgrades and preliminary engineering studies. Figure 7-1 illustrates the specific CIP
projects through-out the District. Since only a handful of water projects have been identified, all
have been included in Phase I. The five year Water Distribution CIP is estimated to be about
$3.05 million.

7.2.3 Wastewater System


Table 7-4 summarizes the recommended sewer collection projects. Figure 7-2 illustrates the
specific CIP projects throughout the District for the two proposed phases of capacity upgrades.
The five year Wastewater CIP is estimated to be about$2.83 million.

7.2.4 Recycled Water System


Table 7-5 summarizes the recommended recycled water system projects including the
necessary studies to determine the actual customer market and cost benefit to continue to
expand the recycled program. Figure 7-3 illustrates the proposed CIP projects throughout the
District for all three phases. The five year Recycled Water System CIP is estimated to be about
$5.59 million, assuming the District assists in the funding of customer retrofits, which is
estimated at $2.0 million.

7-4

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Proposed Capital Improvement Program


Table 7-2. Capital Improvement Program Proposed Water Supply Projects
Phased Cost

Units

CIP Cost

II

III

II

III

WS-1

Water
Supply

Study /
Reservoir

Upper Chiquita Reservoir


Participation in SMWD Upper Chiquita
Reservoir Project

49 AF

$61,200/AF

1.0

$3,000,000

100%

0%

0%

$3,000,000

$ -

$ -

WS-2

Water
Supply

Study

Lower San Juan GW Basin Operations


Study Share of recommended LSJB
Operations Study to assess impacts and
responses in the Lower San Juan
Groundwater Basin to multiple projects
including; SCWD GRF, CSJC expanded
GRF, and DP Ocean Desalination. Study
costs are recommended to be shared by
other SJBA members.

1 EA

$50,000/EA

1.0

$50,000

100%

0%

0%

$50,000

$ -

$ -

WS-3

Water
Supply

Study /
Project

GRF Expansion Well, siting study, 2nd


well, connecting pipeline, and treatment
plant expansion.

1 EA

$2,200,000/EA

$2,200,000

100%

0%

0%

$2,200,000

$ -

$ -

WS-4

Water
Supply

Study /
Project

IRWD Interconnect Participation in


IRWD Interconnect Project.

2 cfs

$300,000/cfs

1.0

$600,000

100%

0%

0%

$600,000

$ -

$ -

WS-5

Water
Supply

Study /
Project

Aliso Creek Streamflow Recovery


Feasibility Investigation of concept to
expand or amend Aliso Creek Water
Harvesting Project as a "Local Water
Source Project" which would intercept and
provide advanced treatment of up to an
additional 4 cfs of Aliso Creek urban
runoff stream-flow for potable supply.

1 EA

$100,000/EA

1.0

$100,000

100%

0%

0%

$100,000

$13.8
million(1)

$ -

WS-6

Water
Supply

Study /
Project

Dana Point Ocean Desalination


Share for pro-rata participation in the
coming pre-design phase of the Dana
Point Ocean Desalination Project, if not
already budgeted.

4 YR

1.0

$600,000

100%

0%

0%

$600,000

$24
million(1)

$ -

Water
Supply

Study

Baker Treatment Plant Continue


participation in the IRWD Interconnect
project, and to preserve the option for
capacity on an emergency basis in the
planned new Baker Treatment Plant, as
directed by the Board.

1 cfs

1.0

$20,000

100%

0%

0%

$20,000

CIP #

WS-7

W/S/R

Type

Project / Description

Scaling
Factor Description

Phase

Base Unit
Cost

$150,000/YR

$20,000

Total

$6,570,000

7-5

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Proposed Capital Improvement Program


Table 7-3. Capital Improvement Program Proposed Water System Projects

CIP #

W/S/R

Type

Project / Description

Units

Base Unit
Cost

PW-1

Water

Pump
Station

PS #9 Add an emergency generator or


portable generator hook-up to fire pump at
Pump Station #9 for added reliability
during potential power outage. Review
and evaluate the possible need for
second back-up fire pump to serve the
470 PZ.

1 EA

$300,000/EA

1.0

PW-2

Water

Pipeline Misc. Pipeline Upgrades for Fire Flow 17,027


Replace approximately 16,000 feet of 4LF
inch and 6-inch main with 8-inch and 12inch main to increase fire flow protection
in the areas noted in Figure 4-2. These
upgrade projects should be coordinated
with other local street or drainage
improvements for economy of scale and
efficiency.

8: $150/LF
12: $250/LF

1.5

PW-3

Water

345 PZ Conversion Construct two


pressure reducing stations located at
each I-5 crossing in the 345 PZ. The
Juanita connection should be adjusted to
reduce pressure to 390 feet HGL, and the
new PRVs will reduce pressure from 390
feet HGL to 345 feet HGL. Bypass piping
should be included to allow lower
pressure (345 PZ) to enter the 390 PZ if
the Juanita Connection is not operational.

2 EA

$300,000/EA

PW45

Water Reservoir Reservoir 4A Replacement Study


Conduct a reservoir feasibility study to
replace the existing 0.6 MG steel
reservoir, on the same site, with a new
larger reservoir (approximately 1.0 MG) to
provide increased forebay storage for PS
#4 operations. Replacement costs are
estimated in Phase II.

1 EA

$50,000/EA

GRF Integration Update the hydraulic


and modeling studies to optimize the
operation of the GRF Facility and plan for
the next expansion.

1 EA

PW-6

Water

PRV

Study

$30,000/EA

Scaling
Factor

Phase
III

0%

0%

$300,000

38%

62%

0%

$2.0 million

1.0

$600,000 100%

0%

0%

1.0

$50,000 100%

0%

0%

7-6

CIP Cost

Phased Costs

II

1.0

Description

$300,000 100%

The base unit


$5,300,000
cost was taken
at average. The
scaling factor
was taken at 1.5
to account for
mobilization
costs

$30,000 100%

0%

0%

II

III

$ -

$ -

$3.3
million

$ -

$600,000

$ -

$ -

$1.8
million

$ -

$50,000

$30,000

$ -

$ -

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Proposed Capital Improvement Program


Table 7-3 (continued)
Base Unit
Cost

Scaling
Factor

CIP #

W/S/R

Type

Project / Description

Units

PW-7

Water

Study

Wildfire Urban Interface Working in


conjunction with local fire agencies
conduct a technical study and develop
costs and benefit to enhance fire flow
capacity in and around wildland and urban
interface areas of the District. New
construction and/or replacement costs are
estimated in Phase III.

1 EA

$50,000/EA

1.0

PW-8

Water

Study

Age of Water If desired, perform an age


of water simulation on the distribution
system to quantify those locations of aged
water or areas of potential lower chlorine
residuals.

1 EA

$20,000/EA

1.0

Total

Phase
Description

CIP Cost

Phased Costs

II

III

II

III

$50,000 100%

0%

0%

$50,000

$ -

$3.5
million

$20,000 100%

0%

0%

$20,000

$ -

$ -

$6,350,000

7-7

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Proposed Capital Improvement Program


Table 7-4. Capital Improvement Program Proposed Wastewater System Projects

CIP #

W/S/R

Type

Project / Description

Units

Base Unit
Cost

Scaling
Factor

$2.0 million/
EA

1.0

Phase
Description

CIP Cost

Phased Costs

II

III

II

III

$2.0 million 100%

0%

0%

$2.0 million

$0

$0

SLS- Sewer
1

Lift
Station

SLS #2 Lift Station


Replacement

SP-1 Sewer

Pipeline

Dana Point Harbor Replace


approximately 400 feet of
existing 8 inch gravity main and
350 feet of existing 10 inch
gravity main with 12 inch
diameter.

750 LF

$170/LF

2.0

The base unit cost was taken


above average to account for
utility conflicts and traffic
control. The scaling factor was
taken at 2.0 to account for
mobilization costs

$255,000 100%

0%

0%

$255,000

$0

$0

SP-2 Sewer

Pipeline

Del Obispo at Village Road


Replace approximately 600 feet
of existing 12 inch gravity main
with 18 inch diameter

600 LF

$220/LF

2.5

The base unit cost was taken


above average to account for
utility conflicts and traffic
control. The scaling factor was
taken at 2.5 to account for
mobilization costs

$330,000 100%

0%

0%

$330,000

$0

$0

SP-3 Sewer

Pipeline

Del Obispo at Stonehill Drive


Replace approximately 150 feet
of existing 8 inch gravity main
with 12 inch diameter.

150 LF

$170/LF

3.0

The base unit cost was taken


above average to account for
utility conflicts and traffic
control. The scaling factor was
taken at 3.0 to account for
mobilization costs

$77,000 100%

0%

0%

$77,000

$0

$0

SP-4 Sewer

Pipeline

Headlands Off Site Replace


or parallel approximately 285 feet
of existing 12-inch gravity main
with 15 inch or 12 inch,
respectively.

285 LF

$175/LF

2.0

The base unit cost was taken


above average to account for
utility conflicts and traffic
control. The scaling factor was
taken at 2.0 to account for
mobilization costs

$100,000 100%

0%

0%

$100,000

$0

$0

SP-5 Sewer

Pipeline

Camino Capistrano Replace


approximately 150 feet of
existing 8 inch gravity main with
10 inch diameter.

150 LF

$155/LF

3.0

The base unit cost was taken


above average to account for
utility conflicts and traffic
control. The scaling factor was
taken at 3.0 account for
mobilization costs

$70,000

25%

75%

0%

$18,000

$52,000

$0

SP-6 Sewer

Pipeline

Links at Monarch Beach


Parallel approximately 150 feet
of existing 8 inch gravity main
with 8 inch diameter.

150 LF

$145/LF

3.0

The base unit cost was taken


at average. The scaling factor
was taken at 3.0 to account for
mobilization costs

$65,000

25%

75%

0%

$16,000

$49,000

$0

1 EA

7-8

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Proposed Capital Improvement Program


Table 7-4 (continued)

CIP #

W/S/R

SP-7 Sewer

Type
Pipeline

Project / Description

Units

Monarch Bay Drive


Approximately 375-ft of 8"diameter to be replaced with 10"diameter

375 LF

Base Unit
Cost
$155/LF

Phase

Scaling
Factor
2.5

Description
The base unit cost was taken
above average to account for
utility conflicts and traffic
control. The scaling factor was
taken at 2.5 to account for
mobilization costs

Total

CIP Cost
$145,000

Phased Costs

II

III

25%

75%

0%

I
$36,000

II
$109,000

III
$0

$3,042,000

7-9

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Proposed Capital Improvement Program


Table 7-5. Capital Improvement Program Proposed Recycled Water System Projects

CIP #

W/S/R

Type

Project / Description

Units

Base Unit
Costs

Scaling
Factor

6,100 LF

$212/LF

2.5

Phase
Description

CIP Costs

Phased Costs

II

III

II

III

$3,233,000 100%

0%

0%

$3,233,000

$ -

$ -

RW-1

Recycled Pipeline PCH Bottleneck Replacement


Design and construction of
3,100 feet of 16-inch recycled
water main, replacement the
existing 10-inch diameter
recycled pipeline encased
within a 16-inch diameter
encasement.

RW-2

Recycled PS

New 800-gpm pump at PS #1


Install additional pump for
increased capacity

1 EA

$150,000/EA

1.0

$150,000 100%

0%

0%

$150,000

$ -

$ -

RW-3

Recycled PS

Bypass Valve at PS #2
Installation of new motorized
operated valve at Control
(Bypass) Valve to facilitate
operation of PS #2.

1 EA

$50,000/EA

1.0

$50,000 100%

0%

0%

$50,000

$ -

$ -

RW-4

Recycled Study

Customer Market
Assessment Study - Tier I
Customers Contact and
include site visits to potential
customers.

40 SITE

$2,000/SITE

1.0

$80,000 100%

0%

0%

$80,000

$ -

$ -

RW-5

Recycled

Participation in Regional
Studies District participation
in regional studies concerning
advanced water treatment at
the Latham Treatment Plant.
Conduct Feasibility Study of
upgrade to Coastal Treatment
Plant AWT to increase rated
capacity.

2 EA

$20,000/EA

1.0

$40,000 100%

0%

0%

$40,000

$ -

$ -

22

$2,500/SITE

1.0

$55,000

100%

0%

$ -

$55,000

$ -

Pilot
Phase

RW-6

Recycled Study

Customer Market
Assessment Study - Tier II
Customers Contact and
include site visits to potential
customers.

The base unit cost


was taken at
average. The scaling
factor was taken at
2.5 to account for the
large scale
mobilization, traffic
control, and access
costs

7-10

0%

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Proposed Capital Improvement Program


Table 7-5 (continued)

CIP #

W/S/R

Type

Project / Description

Units

Base Unit
Costs

Scaling
Factor

Phase
Description

CIP Costs

Phased Costs

II

III

II

III

RW-7

Recycled Pipeline RW Pipeline Extensions


Tier II - Extension A, 32 AFY

1,300 LF

$212/LF

1.2

The base unit cost


was taken at
average. The scaling
factor was taken at
1.2 to account for
traffic control and
mobilization costs

$330,000

0%

100%

0%

$ -

$330,000

$ -

RW-8

Recycled Pipeline RW Pipeline Extensions


Tier II - Extension B, 13 AFY

2,000 LF

$212/LF

1.2

The base unit cost


was taken at
average. The scaling
factor was taken at
1.2 to account for
traffic control and
mobilization costs

$510,000

0%

100%

0%

$ -

$510,000

$ -

RW-9

Recycled Pipeline RW Pipeline Extensions


Tier II - Extension C, 115 AFY

4,000 LF

$212/LF

1.2

The base unit cost


was taken at
average. The scaling
factor was taken at
1.2 to account for
traffic control and
mobilization costs

$1,020,000

0%

100%

0%

$ -

$1,020,000

$ -

RW-10 Recycled Pipeline RW Pipeline Extensions


Tier II - Extension D, 19 AFY

2,000 LF

$212/LF

1.2

The base unit cost


was taken at
average. The scaling
factor was taken at
1.2 to account for
traffic control and
mobilization costs

$510,000

0%

100%

0%

$ -

$510,000

$ -

RW-11 Recycled Pipeline RW Pipeline Extensions


Tier II - Extension E, 13 AFY

1,700 LF

$212/LF

1.2

The base unit cost


was taken at
average. The scaling
factor was taken at
1.2 to account for
traffic control and
mobilization costs

$432,000

0%

100%

0%

$ -

$432,000

$ -

7-11

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Proposed Capital Improvement Program


Table 7-5 (continued)
Phase

Units

Base Unit
Costs

Scaling
Factor

RW-12 Recycled Pipeline RW Pipeline Extensions


Tier II - Dana Point Harbor,
27 AFY

4,100 LF

$212/LF

1.2

The base unit cost


was taken at
average. The scaling
factor was taken at
1.2 to account for
traffic control and
mobilization costs

RW-13 Recycled Pipeline RW Pipeline Extensions


Tier II - Headlands Extension,
2 AFY

2,800 LF

$212/LF

1.2

RW-14 Recycled Pipeline RW Pipeline Extensions


Tier II - Stonehill Extension

1,500 LF

$212/LF

1.2

5 SITE

$2,500/SITE

1.0

3,500 LF

$212/LF

1.2

CIP #

W/S/R

Type

RW-15 Recycled Study

Project / Description

Customer Market
Assessment Study - Tier III
Customers Contact and
include site visits to potential
customers.

RW-16 Recycled Pipeline RW Pipeline Extensions


Tier III - Extension F, 38 AFY

Description

Phased Costs

II

III

II

III

$1,043,000

0%

100%

0%

$ -

$1,043,000

$ -

The base unit cost


was taken at
average. The scaling
factor was taken at
1.2 to account for
traffic control and
mobilization costs

$713,000

0%

100%

0%

$ -

$713,000

$ -

The base unit cost


was taken at
average. The scaling
factor was taken at
1.2 to account for
traffic control and
mobilization costs

$382,000

0%

100%

0%

$ -

$382,000

$ -

$13,000

0%

0%

100%

$ -

$ -

$13,000

$890,000

0%

0%

100%

$ -

$ -

$890,000

The base unit cost


was taken at
average. The scaling
factor was taken at
1.2 to account for
traffic control

7-12

CIP Costs

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Proposed Capital Improvement Program


Table 7-5 (continued)
Phase

Project / Description

Units

Base Unit
Costs

Scaling
Factor

Prepare conceptual study for


Potable Reservoir R-5A
conversion to a Recycled
Water Reservoir Identify
piping requirements and new
potable make-water connection,
and review integration into
existing recycled system.
Conversion costs are estimated
in Phase III.

1 EA

$50,000/EA

1.0

RW-18 Recycled Retrofit Recycled Water Retrofit


Conversion Design and
Construction Tier I

40 SITE

$50,000/SITE

1.0

$2,000,000 100%

RW-19 Recycled Retrofit Recycled Water Retrofit


Conversion Design and
Construction Tier II

22 SITE

$50,000/SITE

1.0

$1,100,000

RW-20 Recycled Retrofit Recycled Water Retrofit


Conversion Design and
Construction Tier III

5 SITE

$50,000/SITE

1.0

1 EA

$50,000/EA

1.0

9,100 LF

$212/LF

1.2

2 EA

$200,000/EA

1.0

CIP #

W/S/R

Type

RW-17 Recycled Study

RW-21 Recycled Study

TDS Reduction at AWT


Alternatives study of TDS
reduction at AWT effluent, to
become more attractive for
existing and potential
customers.

RW-22 Recycled Pipeline Replace 12" PCH pipeline


with 16" diameter pipeline
Replace 12" pipeline from
bottleneck to existing 16" pipe
in PCH. Contingent on AWT
facility expansion

RW-23 Recycled PS

Stand-by Pump Upgrades at


PS #1 and #2 Add backup
pumps for improved reliability

Description

CIP Costs

II

III

0%

100%

0%

$ -

0%

0%

$2,000,000

$ -

$ -

0%

100%

0%

$ -

$1,100,000

$ -

$250,000

0%

0%

100%

$ -

$ -

$50,000

75%

25%

0%

$37,000

$13,000

$ -

$2,315,000

0%

100%

0%

$ -

$2,315,000

$ -

$400,000

0%

100%

0%

$ -

$400,000

$ -

$50,000

The base unit cost


was taken at
average. The scaling
factor was taken at
1.2 to account for the
large scale
mobilization, traffic
control, and access
costs

7-13

Phased Costs

II

III

$50,000 $300,000

$250,000

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Proposed Capital Improvement Program


Table 7-5 (continued)

CIP #

W/S/R

Type

RW-24 Recycled PS

Project / Description

Units

Base Unit
Costs

Scaling
Factor

Rebuild PS #1 Rebuild PS#1


to match capabilities of PS#2 to
balance/optimize TDH levels.
This will also simplify
operations and improve PS
efficiency

1 EA

$750,000/EA

1.0

Phase
Description

CIP Costs
$750,000

Total

Phased Costs

II

III

II

0%

0%

100%

$ -

$ -

III
$750,000

$16,366,000

Retrofit Subtotal

$3,350,000

Facilities/Studies Subtotal

$13,016,000

7-14

South Coast Water District


Infrastructure Master Plan
November 2008

Alicia

Antonio

Aliso Viejo
oa
C
st

nch
Ra

Nig
ue
ri n
Ma

aH

ills

R-1A

U
V
74

74

iejo

PS # 1

430 - ZONE B (Closed)

oV

Laguna Beach




k
j


PS # 2

R-1E

k
j
R-2A

rn

nt e
La

San Juan Capistrano

k

kj
j


De

lO

n
Sa

k
j

el

ci
fic

Nig
u

Pa

oa

R-5B

Project
PW-1

st

PS # 6

R-5A

Val

D e l A v io n

Global Projects:
PW-2 Fire Flow Improvements (Table 4-9)
PW-6 Wildfire Urban Interface Study
PW-7 Age of Water Study

le

R-4B

ee

ua
n

PS # 5

Cr

b is
po

lde

PS # 4 R-4A

Go

k
j

k PS # 7
j



R-3B

via

No

R-2C

U
V

La

j
Vie
ho
nc
Ra

PS # 3

Project
PW-4

k
j


n
istra
Cap

k
j

Laguna Niguel
Crown Valley

R-2B






k
j
k
j

Portico D

el Norte

R-DP
Ston

Project
PW-5

ehill Stonehill

Dana Point

Project
PW-3




PS # 9
k
j

as
t

290 - ZONE A

sM
ar e

tH

217 - (HARBOR)

BRADT

k
j
RESERVOIR

Co

ar b
or

Del Prado

D oh

Pressure Zone + Name

eny

Pa r

Legend

tr e
De

Es

PACIFIC
OCEAN

430 - ZONE B (Closed)

lla

390 - Dana Point


415 - ZONE B-1

Upper 345 PZ
437 HGL from San Clemente
Serves Approx. 15 Homes
San Clemente

D e Lo

Dana P o i n

345 - Capo Beach

470 - Dana Point Boosted (Closed)

P ic

490 - ZONE B
690 - ZONE C
920 - ZONE E




is

Pump Station
Water Reservoir
South Coast Water District Boundary
Municipal Boundary
Freeway

Major Road

rr o
De l C e

U
V
1

El

Feet

Highway

tra
n

k
j

C
ap

11/20/08 KM KM Z:\Projects\IS\SCWD\MXD\ReportFigures\FinalReport\WaterCIP.mxd

Stonehill

PS # 8

Refer to Table 7-2 for project descriptions.


4,000

Ca
m

in
o

Re
al

Figure 7-1
South Coast Water District
PHASES I AND II
WATER SYSTEM IMPROVEMENTS

Alicia

Antonio

oa
C
st

Aliso Viejo
nch
Ra

Nig
ue
l

Laguna Beach

! COASTAL PLANT



!
Meter 4
!

ills

U
V
74

74

iejo

LS



aH

oV

SCS_LS_1

ri n
Ma

SCS_LS_2 LS


Laguna Niguel
Crown Valley

rn

nt e
l a nd

Cr

lde

La

San Juan Capistrano

oa

SCS_LS_4

Sewer Force Main




5

LS
DP_LS_8 

Stonehill

Ston

ehill Stonehill

Dana Point

Portico D

el Norte

Project
SP-2

Temporary Flow Meter Location

LS
SCS_LS_5 

LATHAM PLANT
Del Prado

SC - LS 1

!
Meter 1
!

!


LS CB_LS_12



Lift Station Basin

PACIFIC
OCEAN

SC - LS 6

De

De

DP - Gravity

LS
CB_LS_13 

lla

SC - LS 5

tr e

SC - LS 4

LS DP_LS_11



Es


LS
DP_LS_9 

LS
DP_LS_10 

Lo

SC - LS 2
SC - LS 3

re

sM

South Coast Water District Boundary

Sewer Gravity Mains

as
t

!
!




! Meter 2
!

LS

Project
SP-4

Sewer Lift Station

le

st

SCS_LS_6

Sewer Treatment Plant

Co



LS

n
Sa

San Clemente

DP - LS 8

P ic

DP - LS 9
DP - LS 10

Project
SP-1

DP - LS 11

CB - LS 13
CB - LS 14
Municipal Boundary
Freeway

Major Road

rr o
De l C e

U
V
1

Project
SP-5

Feet

Highway

i

CB_LS_14 
LS str
a

CB - LS 12

C
ap

11/20/08 KM KM Z:\Projects\IS\SCWD\MXD\ReportFigures\FinalReport\SewerCIP.mxd

!


Val

bis
p
De
lO

D e l A v io n

Nig
u

ci
fic

el

Project
SP-3

ee

ua
n

Go

Is

 
LS


Project
SP-6

via

cif
ic

SCS_LS_3 
LS

Legend

No

Pa

Pa

Project
SP-7

La

Meter 3 !
!

LS


SCS_LS_7

j
Vie
ho
nc
Ra

n
istra
Cap

Project
SLS-1

Refer to Table 7-3 for project descriptions.


4,000

El

Ca
m

in
o

Re
al

Figure 7-2
PHASES I AND II
SEWER IMPROVEMENTS

Project
RW-21

!
Coastal Plant


H
rina

ills

k 2 MG RES #1
j

U
V

Aliso Viejo




Project
RW-7



RPS
#2

Laguna Beach

RPS #1
Project
RW-2
RW-23

Cap
istra

Project
RW-3
RW-23

Ma

no

Crown Valley

Laguna Niguel

te
r
La
n

3.3 MG
JOINT
RES

Project
RW-17

k
j

ED

San Juan Capistrano


l
De

Potential Customers
Tier II - 220 AFY; 13,850 LF

is p

De l Avion

ifi

oa

st

Project
RW-11

RPS #3


Project
RW-22

Tier I - 239 AFY; 0 LF

Ob

MNWD

Project
RW-8

Legend

! Wastewater Treatment Plant




 Pump Station


k
j

en

lan

Va ll
e

RV

Is

el

Pa
c

SE

cif
ic

Nig
u

EE
N
N
O
ZZO

Project
RW-14

k 1.7 MG
j

1.7 MG
RES #2


5


590 ZONE
Stonehill

Dana Point

Reservoir

Ston

460 ZONE

Stone
h

ehill

ill

Potential Recycled Water Main Extension

PACIFIC
OCEAN

Transmission Main
Distribution Main

Project
RW-9

Recycled Water Main Extensions


Harbor, Headlands, & Stonehill

High Zone - 590' HGL


South Coast Water District Boundary

Feet

Freeway

Major Road

2,500

Project
RW-10
Refer to Table 7-5 for project descriptions.

k
Del Prado

as

V
U

eny

Reduced High Zone - 460' HGL

San Clemente
1

Co

Low Zone - 290' HGL

Highway

Project
RW-13
Pa r

PCH-Bottleneck

Pressure Zone

D oh

10/29/08 KM KM Z:\Projects\IS\SCWD\MXD\ReportFigures\FinalReport\RecycledCIP.mxd

N
O
T

00
2299

Global Projects:
Phase I
RW-4 Tier I Customer Market Assessment
RW-5 Participation in Regional Studies
RW-18 Tier I Customer Retrofit Design & Construction
Phase II
RW-6 Tier II Customer Market Assessment
RW-19 Tier II Customer Retrofit Design & Construction

Pa

Go
ld

Project
RW-1

PCH Bottleneck

Project
RW-12

r
Dana P oint Ha rb o

Note: Zone boundaries are approximate.

Figure 7-3
South Coast Water District
PHASES I AND II
RECYCLED WATER IMPROVEMENTS

Appendix A
Technical Memorandum
A-1

Headlands Development Technical Memorandum Off-Site Sewer System


Capacity Analysis

A-2

St. Catherines Church Development Technical Memorandum Hydraulic


Analysis

A-3

Aliso Creek Development Hydraulic Analysis Review and


Recommendations

Appendix A-1
Headlands Development Technical Memorandum
Off-Site Sewer System Capacity Analysis

An employee-owned company

June 10, 2008

Mr. Robert Clark


South Coast Water District
31592 West Street
Laguna Beach CA 92651
SUBJECT:

HEADLANDS DEVELOPMENT TECHNICAL MEMORANDUM


OFFSITE SEWER SYSTEM CAPACITY ANALYSIS

Dear Mr. Clark:


The purpose of this Technical Memorandum is to evaluate the available existing capacity in the Districts
sewer system in Pacific Coast Highway (PCH) to serve the Headlands Development (Development). This
Technical Memorandum utilizes hydraulic information from the South Coast Water District (District)
Infrastructure Master Plan (Master Plan), currently in progress, in order to assist the District in
determining, if any, appropriate Developer responsible capacity upgrades.
The Development consists of a 35-acre site located in the City of Dana Point and will include 119
residential units, a 40-room hostel, restaurant, and commercial space. The property is currently under
development and is planned to discharge to the new relocated Sewer Lift Station No. 5 (SLS No. 5). The
new SLS No. 5 will also receive existing flows currently draining into the existing SLS No. 5. The
existing SLS No. 5 will eventually be abandoned, which currently pumps through the existing 8 and 10inch diameter force mains to a 15-inch gravity sewer main in Magellan Isle. Wastewater flows are then
conveyed to the PCH Trunk Sewer, with varying diameters of 10, 12 and 15-inches. PCH Trunk Sewer
flows then drain to Sewer Lift Station No. 6.
As part of the Master Plan, unit demand factors were developed to assist in assessing future development
impacts on the Districts sewer system. These factors were developed from the Districts water billing
database and estimated return-to-sewer-rates for varying land uses within the District.
Flow metering was conducted at four locations as part of the Master Plan by ADS Environmental
Services during the period of May 3 through June 3, 2007 for the purpose of calibrating the hydraulic
sewer model. Meter No. 2 was located along the PCH Trunk Sewer and observed a maximum discharge
of 0.817 mgd or 1.264 cfs on May 28th at 11:15 am. The PCH Trunk Sewer receives tributary flow from
LS No. 5, Ritz Carlton Drive gravity basin, and the Niguel Road gravity basin. Utilizing the unit demand
factors generated District-wide from the Master Plan, Table 1 summarizes the average and peak flows
from each basin tributary to the PCH Trunk Sewer.
The District in June 2007 requested PBS&J perform steady state calculations for the PCH Trunk Sewer
based upon flow monitoring data at Meter No. 2 to determine the existing capacity of the PCH Trunk
Sewer. The calculations indicated that the existing PCH Trunk Sewer was flowing between 30 to 48
percent full under peak dry weather conditions. Steady state calculations are provided as an attachment.

9275 Sky Park Court, Suite 200 San Diego, California 92123 Telephone: 858.874.1810 Fax: 858.514.1001 www.pbsj.com

Mr. Robert Clark


South Coast Water District
June 10, 2008
Page 2 of 3

Table 1. PCH Trunk Sewer Flow Summary


Average Flow

Peak Flow

Gravity Basins
Ritz Carlton Drive

0.041 cfs

0.082 cfs

Niguel Road

0.381 cfs

0.762 cfs

0.422 cfs

0.844 cfs

--

1.159 cfs

0.422 cfs

0.844 cfs

--

2.003 cfs

--

1.838 cfs

0.422 cfs

0.844 cfs

--

2.682 cfs

--

2.680 cfs

0.422 cfs

0.844 cfs

--

3.524 cfs

Subtotal
Existing SLS No. 5
Gravity Basins
TOTAL
New SLS No. 5 - 1 Pump
Gravity Basins
TOTAL
New SLS No. 5 - 2 Pump
Gravity Basins
TOTAL

Since that time, PBS&J has developed a dynamic system sewer model of the Districts sewer collection
system. This new dynamic hydraulic model was calibrated to the flow metering data and available
SCADA data reported at the District Lift Stations. The calibrated existing system model also estimated a
d/D range of 30 to 48 percent full. Dynamic model results and an accompanying exhibit are provided as
Table 2 and Exhibit 1, respectively. Therefore, it is our opinion that the PCH Trunk Sewer is currently
operating at or near capacity when compared to the Districts design criteria of d/D = 50 percent for
diameters 12 inches and smaller, during peak dry weather flows.
In order to evaluate the capacity impacts of the proposed Development to the existing sewer system, the
new dynamic sewer system model was updated to include the estimated Development flows, new SLS
No. 5 pumps with pump curves, and the proposed 335-feet of 8-inch and 10-inch force main extensions.
For this analysis, the 10-inch diameter force main was used for all calculations per the District. Two
hydraulic model simulations under various pumping operations were performed to identify the proposed
Development capacity impacts on the existing system:

One pump operational/running (825 gpm) under peak dry weather flows. Design criteria at 0.75
d/D for pipes greater than 12-inch diameter and 0.50 d/D for pipe 12-inch diameter and smaller.
o

Gravity main from manhole SCS_331 to SCS_332 along PCH

d/D = 0.59 (Approx. 285-ft of 12-dia.)

Replace with 15 dia. or Parallel with 12 dia.

Mr. Robert Clark


South Coast Water District
June 10, 2008
Page 3 of 3

Existing flows in the model are supported by CCTV Inspection in March 2004 by
National Plant Services

Two pumps operational/running (1,200 gpm) under peak dry weather flows. Threshold criteria
increased to 0.9 d/D at peak discharge:
o

SCS_303 SCS_303A: d/D = 1.00 (Approx. 105-ft of 15-dia.)

First gravity main section downstream of force main.

Not a recommended project because it is likely that the model is under-estimating the
flow attenuation from the force main discharge.

1,200 gpm was the modeled pump output for dual pump operation at SLS No. 5. This is
based upon a force main C factor of 140 and the pump performance curve.

The District has designed the new SLS No. 5 to operate with only one pump running, and the second
pump is intended to be a standby. The District intends to utilize dual pump operation for standard
maintenance (quarterly) or in the event of unusually high flows, or inflow reaches the system; as such the
PCH Trunk Sewer needs to have sufficient capacity to accommodate dual pump operation.
The review of the hydraulic capacity and model simulations identified that an approximate 285 feet
section of existing 12 inch gravity main needs to be replaced with a 15 inch diameter or paralleled with a
12 inch diameter relief sewer. Exhibit 1 graphically presents the recommended project and the location of
the PCH trunk sewer. Traffic control measures will need to be taken into account for this project. Minimal
utility conflicts are anticipated for this project but would need to be reviewed by the designer. A
preliminary engineers cost of approximately $100,000 has been estimated for this project including
design, processing, and construction.
Please feel free to call me at 715.347.4635 or Kyle McCarty at 858.514.1020, should you have any
questions.
Sincerely,

Mark B. Elliott
Project Manager
c:

Mark Mountford SCWD


Gary Eikermann PBS&J
Kyle McCarty PBS&J
File 620889.09 0900

SCS_677

SCS_658

TZ
RI
CO

LS



SCS_332

VE

SCS_AIM_2492

SCS_674

Approx 285-feet of
Exist. 12-inch Gravity Main
Replace w. 15-inch Dia. or
Parallel w. 12-inch Dia.

SCS_675

DR
CO
AS
T
H
Y
W
SCS_355
SCS_331
SCS_676
SCS_354

SCS_353

SCS_378

SCS_330

SCS_351

SCS_352

SCS_350

4/21/07 KM KM Z:\Projects\IS\SCWD\MXD\headlands1.mxd

SCS_369

SCS_370

SCS_368

SCS_349

SCS_329

SCS_348

ADS Flow Meter No. 2

Legend

SCS_371

Sewer Manholes
Recommended Project

SCS_347

Feet

Sewer Gravity Main


Potable Water Main

Meter 2
!
!

100

SCS_345

Exhibit 1
South Coast Water District
HEADLANDS RECOMMENDED
PCH TRUNK SEWER UPGRADE

Headlands Technical Memorandum - Hydraulic Model Results - Dynamic Simulations


Pipe Segment
Pipe
Segment
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22

USMH
SCS_303
SCS_303A
SCS_304
SCS_305
SCS_306
SCS_321
SCS_AIM_4025
SCS_AIM_4024
SCS_AIM_4023
SCS_324
SCS_325
SCS_326
SCS_327
SCS_328
SCS_329
SCS_330
SCS_331
SCS_332
SCS_356
SCS_AIM_2493
SCS_AIM_2492
SCS_AIM_2492

DSMH
SCS_303A
SCS_304
SCS_305
SCS_306
SCS_321
SCS_AIM_4025
SCS_AIM_4024
SCS_AIM_4023
SCS_324
SCS_325
SCS_326
SCS_327
SCS_328
SCS_329
SCS_330
SCS_331
SCS_332
SCS_356
SCS_AIM_2493
SCS_AIM_2492
SCS_LS_6
SCS_LS_6

Diameter
(inches)
15
15
16
16
16
15
15
15
15
15
15
12
10
10
10
10
12
12
18
18
12
12

Length
(feet)
103.2
344.9
337.8
199.8
253.6
153.2
160.6
166.9
6.8
314.7
675.0
368.4
327.5
372.8
215.2
359.5
283.8
46.4
59.8
58.3
5.0
5.0

Slope
Discharge
(feet/foot)
(cfs)
0.002
1.275
0.004
1.231
0.003
1.125
0.003
1.022
0.003
0.974
0.004
0.943
0.004
0.921
0.004
0.901
0.016
0.880
0.003
1.553
0.002
1.480
0.014
1.304
0.046
1.299
0.033
1.298
0.033
1.296
0.086
1.294
0.006
1.293
0.136
1.287
0.005
2.761
0.006
3.568
0.010
1.778
0.010
1.778

Existing
Velocity
(fps)
2.17
2.84
2.50
2.56
2.35
2.79
2.79
2.67
4.38
2.85
2.41
4.69
7.35
6.54
6.53
9.25
3.46
10.65
4.00
4.46
4.54
4.54

d/D
(%)
48.3
38.4
35.9
32.8
33.8
32.0
31.4
32.0
22.1
45.6
50.1
38.5
36.0
39.2
39.2
30.4
48.1
21.1
41.4
46.3
49.9
49.9

Headlands - 1 Pump
Discharge Velocity
d/D
(cfs)
(fps)
(%)
1.866
2.38
61.0
1.821
3.15
47.7
1.818
2.84
46.8
1.798
2.99
44.6
1.780
2.76
47.0
1.760
3.30
44.8
1.742
3.33
44.2
1.722
3.18
45.4
1.699
5.29
30.8
2.064
3.07
53.8
2.004
2.58
60.4
1.872
5.16
47.0
1.855
8.10
43.7
1.846
7.17
47.8
1.836
7.16
47.7
1.831
10.19
36.4
1.826
3.76
59.3
1.811
11.76
25.0
3.205
4.16
45.0
3.942
4.58
49.0
1.964
4.65
52.9
1.964
4.65
52.9

Headlands - 2 Pump
Discharge Velocity
d/D
(cfs)
(fps)
(%)
2.705
2.20
100.0
2.602
3.43
59.3
2.369
3.03
54.7
2.166
3.13
49.6
2.080
2.87
51.5
1.994
3.41
48.1
1.946
3.42
47.1
1.902
3.26
48.0
1.857
5.42
32.3
2.467
3.19
60.3
2.333
2.67
67.1
2.125
5.33
50.6
2.098
8.36
46.9
2.085
7.40
51.3
2.068
7.38
51.1
2.059
10.52
38.8
2.050
3.85
64.1
2.026
12.15
26.5
3.283
4.19
45.6
4.624
4.76
53.9
2.303
4.84
58.4
2.303
4.84
58.4

Table 3. Headlands Technical Memorandum - Steady State Calculations


Pipe Segment
Pipe
Segment
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22

USMH
SCS_303
SCS_303A
SCS_304
SCS_305
SCS_306
SCS_321
SCS_AIM_4025
SCS_AIM_4024
SCS_AIM_4023
SCS_324
SCS_325
SCS_326
SCS_327
SCS_328
SCS_329
SCS_330
SCS_331
SCS_332
SCS_356
SCS_AIM_2493
SCS_AIM_2492
SCS_AIM_2492

DSMH
SCS_303A
SCS_304
SCS_305
SCS_306
SCS_321
SCS_AIM_4025
SCS_AIM_4024
SCS_AIM_4023
SCS_324
SCS_325
SCS_326
SCS_327
SCS_328
SCS_329
SCS_330
SCS_331
SCS_332
SCS_356
SCS_AIM_2493
SCS_AIM_2492
SCS_LS_6
SCS_LS_6

Diameter
(inches)
15
15
16
16
16
15
15
15
15
15
15
12
10
10
10
10
12
12
18
18
12
12

Length
(feet)
103.2
344.9
337.8
199.8
253.6
153.2
160.6
166.9
6.8
314.7
675.0
368.4
327.5
372.8
215.2
359.5
283.8
46.4
59.8
58.3
5.0
5.0

Slope
Discharge
(feet/foot)
(cfs)
0.002
0.004
0.003
0.003
0.003
0.004
0.004
0.004
0.016
0.003
1.26
0.002
1.26
0.014
1.26
0.046
1.26
0.033
1.26
0.033
1.26
0.086
1.26
0.006
1.26
0.136
0.005
0.006
0.010
0.010

Existing
Velocity
(fps)

2.64
2.32
7.16
7.28
6.47
6.47
9.17
3.43

d/D
(%)

41.3
45.7
27.6
35.5
38.8
38.8
30.0
47.4

Headlands - 1 Pump
Discharge Velocity
d/D
(cfs)
(fps)
(%)

2.68
2.68
2.68
2.68
2.68
2.68
2.68
2.68

3.17
2.73
8.83
8.86
7.83
7.83
11.28
4.00

65.1
74.5
41.0
54.3
60.1
60.1
44.9
79.5

Headlands - 2 Pump
Discharge Velocity
d/D
(cfs)
(fps)
(%)

3.52
3.52
3.52
3.52
3.52
3.52
3.52
3.52

3.29
N/A
9.49
9.41
8.24
8.24
12.08
N/A

81.6
>94%
47.8
64.8
73.1
73.1
52.7
>94%

Appendix A-2
St. Catherines Church Development
Technical Memorandum
Hydraulic Analysis

An employee-owned company

August 7, 2008

Mr. Robert Clark


South Coast Water District
31592 West Street
Laguna Beach CA 92651
SUBJECT:

ST. CATHERINES CHURCH DEVELOPMENT


TECHNICAL MEMORANDUM - HYDRAULIC ANALYSIS

Dear Mr. Clark:


The purpose of this Technical Memorandum is to evaluate the available fire flow, proposed onsite
pipeline diameters and any required offsite improvements for the St. Catherines Church Development
(Development). This Technical Memorandum utilizes the planning and modeling information the Master
Planning work to analyze the fire flow requirements for this Project.
The Development is located on Terry Road, east of Pacific Coast Highway (PCH) and south of the
Districts flow control facility at Pump Station 1 (PS 1). The Development is planning to connect to the
Districts 290 Pressure Zone (PZ) via an existing 10 inch water distribution main located in Pacific Coast
Highway (PCH) as well as on Terry Road near PS 1. (See Figure 1)
The flow control facility at PS 1 is normally connected to the Canyon Supply Line through a metered
connection and pressure reducing station to the South Coast Systems 290 PZ. No flow is typically taken
from the Coast Supply Line. The flow rate through the Canyon Supply Line connection is requested at
frequent intervals by the District and supplied by MWDOC at a constant rate. In an emergency, flow from
the Coast Supply Line can be fed through this facility. Also, in an emergency Pump Station #1 can boost
pressure for flows from both the Canyon and Coast Supply lines to enhance system pressures in the 290
zones.
Because the Development is located on the hillside, it has higher ground elevations than neighboring
properties in the 290 PZ. This results in static pressures for the proposed buildings on the site ranging
from 44.5 to 61.0 psi. Table 1, attached, summarizes the static pressures for the proposed buildings on the
site. This analysis assumes that the Development will connect to the 290 PZ and pipelines will be sized to
accommodate the Districts dynamic pressure criteria.
As part of the Master Plan, the 290 PZ reservoirs were analyzed to determine whether they had sufficient
storage capacity. Water storage within a PZ consists of operational, emergency and fire storage. The
Master Plan found that the 290 PZ had a surplus storage of approximately 5.09 MG within its reservoirs
based upon a 4,000 gpm fire flow for a 4 hour duration resulting in 0.96 million gallons (MG) of fire flow
storage. The Laguna Beach Fire Department (LBFD) is requiring the development to meet a 2,750 gpm
fire flow for a 4 hour duration resulting in 0.66 MG of fire flow storage, which is below what was
analyzed in the Master Plan.

9275 Sky Park Court, Suite 200 San Diego, California 92123 Telephone: 858.874.1810 Fax: 858.514.1001 www.pbsj.com

Mr. Robert Clark


South Coast Water District
August 7, 2008
Page 2 of 2

Typically Max Day plus Fire and Peak Hour flow rates are used to size onsite pipeline diameters. Since
no development information has been provided for the site, only the fire flow rate was analyzed and
pipeline diameters were sized to accommodate fire flows within the Districts Max Day plus Fire Flow
criteria (Max Velocity = 12 fps and Min Pressure = 20 psi). To determine pipeline diameters, The Master
Plan Hydraulic Model was updated to include the major fire pipelines for the Development. The LBFD
has proposed a "stand alone" or "shelter-in-place" protection for the school site because the site is
exposed to a wild-land urban fire. Due to this fire protection classification, the District has requested that
hydraulic model analysis be performed with the assumption that the flow control facility at PS 1 is out of
service and as such all fire flows will be provided by the 290 PZ reservoirs.
The hydraulic model analysis concluded that a 10 inch pipeline diameter is required from PCH to the
bend on Terry Road and that 8 inch pipeline is required from that point to the connection of any fire
hydrant as well as back to the flow control facility at PS 1. However, since the development demands
were not included in the analysis and the static pressures are at the lower end of the pressure ranges, it is
recommended that a 12 inch diameter pipeline be installed in Terry Road from PCH to PS 1 and to all fire
hydrants. It would also be prudent for the Development to install an 8 inch diameter pipeline to all fire
risers for the following reasons; (1) fire sprinkler systems typically require between 30 to 50 psi of
residual pressure, (2) each fire riser demand is approximately 500 gpm and some of them are located
along the same pipeline, and (3) the site already has low static pressure. Figure 1 and Table 2 summarize
the on site model analysis and recommended pipeline sizes.
Please feel free to call me at 715.347.4635 or Kyle McCarty at 858.514.1020, should you have any
questions.
Sincerely,

Kyle O. McCarty, P.E.


Senior Civil Engineer
Attch: Figure 1. Pipeline Diameters
Table 1. Static Pressures
Table 2. Model Results
c:

Mark Mountford SCWD


Gary Eikermann PBS&J
Mark Elliott PBS&J
File 620889.09 0900

Table 1 Static Pressures


PAD
Elevation

Building

2nd Floor
Elevation

Pressure
Zone

Static
Pressure

Administration

173.70

187.2

290

44.5

psi

Elementary

168.70

182.2

290

46.7

psi

Unknown

173.70

--

290

50.3

psi

Gymnasium

173.60

--

290

50.4

psi

Chapel

170.65

--

290

51.7

psi

Middle

163.00

--

290

55.0

psi

Field

149.00

--

290

61.0

psi

Table 2 Model Results

ID
STCC1
STC5
STC4
STC3
STC2

ID
STC6
STC5
STC3
STC2
STC1

From
Node
STC4
STC2
STC2
STCC1
AIM-WF-685

To
Node
STC5
STC4
STC3
STC2
STCC1

Demand
(gpm)
23
1375
0
1375
0

Length
(ft)
56.36
159.51
106.62
141.16
171.42

Junction
Elevation
(ft)
143
170
149
165
158

Head
(ft)
253.39
238.58
240.73
242.75
246.82

Pipeline
Diameter
(in)
Roughness
8
120
8
120
8
120
10
120
10
120

Pressure
(psi)
47.83
29.71
39.75
33.69
38.49

Flow
(gpm)
1,375
1,375
1,375
2,750
2,773

Velocity
(ft/s)
8.78
8.78
8.78
11.23
11.33

Headloss
(ft)
2.15
6.09
4.07
6.57
8.1

HL/1000
(ft/kft)
38.21
38.21
38.21
46.52
47.24

An employee-owned company

January 5, 2009
Mr. Robert Clark
South Coast Water District
31592 West Street
Laguna Beach CA 92651
SUBJECT:

ALISO CREEK DEVELOPMENT


HYDRAULC ANALYSIS REVIEW AND RECOMMENDATIONS

Dear Mr. Clark:


The primary purpose of this Technical Memorandum is to summarize the water distribution system
requirements to meet fire flow requirements for the proposed Aliso Creek Development, including both
onsite system sizing and any potential offsite upgrades including transmission and/or storage. The
analysis performed to date was based on the following:

Review of Water Study for Aliso Development by Wilson Mikami (April 2008)
Teleconference with Laguna Beach (City) Fire Department (September 2008)
Existing Calibrated SCWD Hydraulic Model (April 2008)
SCWD Infrastructure Master Plan (Draft July 2008)
Review of Recycled Water Study for Aliso Development by Wilson Mikami (April 2008)

This Technical Memorandum utilizes the planning and modeling data developed from the Master Plan
work to conduct fire flow analyses for the Project. However, because of the high fire flows proposed by
the Developers Engineer, it is further recommended that these fire flows be reviewed with the City Fire
Department, to ensure they accurately reflect the maximum probable fire flow demand, for the critical
building structure and the wild land/urban interface areas north of the Project. The Hotel/Inn required fire
flow should consider the actual proposed square footage and building material. A lower fire flow
requirement would provide significant savings on offsite water infrastructure.
PROJECT DESCRIPTION
The Project is a re-development of the present-day Aliso Creek Inn Development area. The Project
Description is outlined in the Mikami Report and highlights include:

Hotel and SPA Resort (4.9 acres)


Guest Cottages (4.6 acres)
New 9-hole golf course to replace existing golf course (35.4 acres)
Open Space (225 acres)

A private street system is also planned. The open space, primarily to the north, exposes the proposed
development to potential wild land fires and as such, the City Fire Department has also required fire
protection, under this scenario. This will include additional fire flow capacity to be available, from either
the potable and/or recycled water systems through a series of high volume sprinklers or water cannons.
The Project is located along Country Club Lane extension off Pacific Coast Highway and is currently
served by an 8-inch potable water system. The proposed Development will continue to be served off the
Districts 290 Pressure Zone (PZ), which includes Reservoir 1A (0.6 MG) to the northwest of the Project;
9275 Sky Park Court, Suite 200 San Diego, California 92123 Telephone: 858.874.1810 Fax: 858.514.1001 www.pbsj.com

Mr. Robert Clark


South Coast Water District
December 3, 2008
Page 2 of 5

the primarily source of operational and fire storage. A new 18-inch distribution main has been proposed
from Pacific Coast Highway (PCH) to the development area within Country Club Lane.
Proposed elevations of the Project range from 20 feet to 50 feet, resulting in static pressures for the
proposed buildings on the site ranging from 104 psi to 117 psi, respectively. This analysis assumes that
the Development will continue to be served from the 290 PZ and onsite and offsite pipelines will be sized
in accordance with the Districts design criteria.
FIRE FLOW REQUIREMENTS
The maximum day demand plus fire flow for the Project is the critical design requirement to size the
onsite system and also determine if any offsite facilities are required. The maximum fire flow demand
must be provided at a minimum 20 psi residual pressure at the hydrant. The Project has two critical areas
of fire protection: the Hotel/Inn structure and the urban-interface area to the north.
Mikami Report. Based on our review of the Mikami Report it was recommended that a total fire flow of
8,000 gpm fire flow be provided for the proposed Hotel/Inn building. This fire flow was modeled as two
simultaneous 4,000 gpm fires, with 4 hour durations, along the proposed water distribution system.
Preliminary hydraulic model calculations were performed to estimate the minimum residual pressure,
based on supply from the Districts 1A Reservoir.
The wild land urban/interface fire flow requirements are found in the Recycled Water Study and are based
on a total required demand of 2,210 gpm. The fire duration was also assumed at four hours for storage
purposes. A system of 17 cannons or large irrigation sprinklers is proposed surrounding the project.
Each cannon is rated for about 130 gpm and requires 50 psi to operate.
Teleconference w/Laguna Beach Fire (September 2008). PBS&J contacted Mr. Tom Christopher to
review the preliminary fire flow requirements for the Project, since the Districts water system has
historically only been designed for a maximum of approximately 4000 gpm fire and four hours duration.
The City indicated that an 8,000 gpm fire flow for the Hotel/Inn does appear high, especially when
mitigation measures such as fire sprinkler systems are constructed.
The City is also very concerned about the wild land fire protection and indicated that the Developer has
been requested to conduct a fire model simulation for the wild land area to quantify the duration of this
fire. This information is an important piece of data to determine the flow and duration for the wild land
area, as well as, determine the required infrastructure upgrades. It appears this will be a relatively short
duration event, which could be suppressed with water cannons. For the purposes of this technical review,
the Mikami report assumed water cannon fire flow of 2210 gpm for 4 hours was used for the urban
interface area.
MASTER PLAN OVERVIEW/STORAGE
As part of the Master Plan, the 290 PZ reservoirs were analyzed to determine whether they had sufficient
storage capacity. Water storage within a PZ consists of operational, emergency and fire storage. The
Master Plan determined, based on storage criteria, that the 290 PZ had a surplus storage of approximately
5.09 MG within its total reservoir storage based upon a 4,000 gpm fire flow for a 4 hour duration, or 0.96
million gallons (MG) of fire flow storage.

Mr. Robert Clark


South Coast Water District
December 3, 2008
Page 3 of 5

However, the ability to supply large fire flows within the District depends on a number of factors
including proximity to storage reservoirs, transmission mains head losses, distribution sizes, and service
elevations. Therefore, each Project must be analyzed on a case by case basis.
As part of the Master Plan, several fire hydrants were flowed and pressure tested throughout the District
to develop flow and pressure data for hydraulic modeling, as well as updated field test data.
Appendix B-1 includes Fire Flow Test No. 30, which was performed near Aliso Creek Development on
the 290 PZ where approximately 1,800 gpm was available at residual pressure of 38 psi.
REVIEW OF MIKAMI REPORT HYDRAULIC STUDY
An independent hydraulic model was developed in the Mikami Report to evaluate the 8,000 gpm fire flow
requirement for the Project, which included offsite facilities and proposed demands. Although the
skeleton model was used to demonstrate the available of 8,000 gpm with certain improvements, we have
concerns with its accuracy and assumptions as noted below:

Model assumes a 24-inch from 1A Res to PCH (the correct pipeline is 10/12 inch).
Model assumed WL = 290 feet for analysis; should assume half full reservoir for steady-state
Model assumed 1A Res = 2.0 MG; it is actually only 0.6 MG
Model does not analyze drain and refill of 1A Res; need EPS to adequately evaluate

Based on these assumptions, the submitted model results do not accurately represent the conditions
needed to be evaluated in the system, although the basic network geometry and water demands appear
reasonable. It is recommended that the Districts calibrated model be used for any additional simulations
or fine-tuning of the proposed water system.
SCWD WATER MODEL RESULTS
As part of this analysis and review, PBS&J conducted a maximum day plus 8,000 gpm fire flow
simulation over four-hour duration. The large fire flow results in Reservoir 1A and 2A completely drain
during the event and large pressures drops and low pressures are experienced near these reservoirs, as
seen in the attached figure. Unless new large diameter transmission mains are constructed from PCH to
each of the reservoirs, an 8,000 gpm fire flow can not be supplied. Furthermore, it would be
recommended that the 0.6 MG reservoir be upsized to accommodate an 8,000 gpm fire flow for 4 hour
duration, especially in light that is nearly double what was planned for in the Master Plan.
It is recommended that the maximum fire flow and duration be re-evaluated based on a detailed review by
the City Fire Department. As a comparison, a 4,000 gpm fire flow was evaluated and water system
pressures significantly improved. Under this scenario, an 18-inch pipeline from PCH to the Project site
would be required. Based on the location of the Project in the District water system, an approximate
4,000 gpm fire flow is the maximum able to be delivered and meet 20 psi minimum residual pressure. In
order to adequately replenish the existing reservoirs, the District may desire to increase supply to the 290
Zone by using additional supply sources, such as Pump Station No. 1 and back-feeding from the 415
Zones 5B-1 Reservoir (7.8 MG) through an emergency interconnect.
In summary, we still have some concerns over fire flow replenishment of each of the reservoirs, which
could potentially require some additional piping upgrades. However, we believe it is important to refine

Mr. Robert Clark


South Coast Water District
December 3, 2008
Page 4 of 5

this hydraulic analysis based on the maximum fire flow (possible considering wildland fire flow as well,
as discussed below) and determine the extent, if any, of offsite pipelines and confirm final onsite sizes.
REVIEW OF MIKAMI REPORT RECYCLED WATER STUDY
An independent hydraulic model was developed in the Mikami Report to evaluate the 2,210 gpm wildland
urban interface fire flow requirement for the Project. Although the hydraulic calculations indicate that
sufficient recycled water capacity exists to serve the fire flow, we also have concerns with the
assumption, and therefore conclusions, as noted below:

Model assumed adequate pumping capacity is available; in fact only limited capacity is available
during maximum day
Recycled Reservoir No. 1 = 255 feet for the analysis, actual reservoir high water level is only 138
feet.
No other recycled water demands assumed on the system

Based on these assumptions, the model does not accurately represent the conditions needed to be
evaluated in the recycled system, although the basic network geometry and fire flow demands appear
reasonable. It is recommended that the Districts model be used for any additional simulations or finetuning of the proposed recycled water system.
SCWD RECYCLED WATER SYSTEM
The Districts recycled water system was not planned and designed for fire protection. As a result,
dedicated fire storage, oversized pipelines, and pump station redundancy are not designed into the
recycled water system. However, because of the proximity of the Project to the recycled water supply
(AWT facility) and Recycled Reservoir # 1 (2.0 MG) there are opportunities to develop and expand the
recycled water supply and system to meet the fire flow requirements for the wildland areas. Additional
hydraulic modeling is recommended, however the major improvements would include:

Utilizing portion of the 2.0 MG Recycled Reservoir No 1 for fire storage.


Upgrade Recycled Pump Station No. 1 to provide fire flow; currently can only provide a
maximum of 1,600 gpm.
Provide the necessary level of reliability satisfactory to the City Fire Department at the Pump
Station (i.e. stand-by power).
Upgrade the 12-inch transmission main to 16-inch to convey both fire flows and irrigation
demands to the Districts systems.

As with the potable water fire flow, it is recommended that the wildland fire flow and duration be
confirmed with the City Fire Department. It also may be feasible to serve both off the potable water
system depending on the actual fire flow demands and durations required.
SUMMARY OF FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
Potable Water System
1.

The assumed fire flow of 8,000 gpm for 4 hour duration can not be supplied by the District
without significant storage and transmission main upgrades.

Mr. Robert Clark


South Coast Water District
December 3, 2008
Page 5 of 5

2.

3.

4.

5.

The Hotel/Inn fire flow requirement should be re-evaluated in conjunction with the wild land
urban interface fire flow need with the City Fire Department. A structural building fire flow
on the order of 4,000 gpm appears more appropriate, with building fire sprinklers.
PBS&J conducted a fire flow availability analysis for the proposed development using the
new calibrated hydraulic model and estimated that approximately 4,000 gpm would be
available at a minimum residual pressure of 20 psi, assuming completion of the Country Club
Lane 18-inch pipeline upgrade.
No offsite storage or piping upgrades would be recommended if required fire flows were less
than 4,000 gpm and 4 hours duration assuming the District utilizes its available 290 Zone
sources to assist in replenishing the depleted fire storage. If fire flows exceeded
approximately 4,000 gpm, it would be recommended that Reservoir 1A be upgraded to
approximately 1.0 MG. The system should be reevaluated if the fire flow requirement differs
from what was assumed in this analysis.
Consideration should be given to provide water cannon demands from the potable system
based on the recycled water system findings below.

Recycled Water System


6.
7.

8.
9.

10.
11.
12.

The recycled water system during maximum day demand does not have available capacity to
provide fire flow, primarily limited by Pump Station No. 1 capacity.
The City Fire Department also expressed concern over providing any fire suppression off a
recycled water system due to potential risks for the potable water system, because their
equipment is not designed to be used off both systems.
The recycled water system was not designed to provide the storage and pump station
reliability to meet fire flow demands.
The wild land urban interface fire flow requirements may want to be evaluated off the potable
water system unless significant storage and pumping upgrades are considered off the recycled
water system.
The City Fire Department will require upgrades at recycled water Pump Station No. 1 to meet
their desired level of reliability.
The existing 12-inch recycled water transmission main is not adequately sized to convey both
fire flows and peak day irrigation demands.
Revise and evaluate fire flow demands, as necessary, once the Developers fire model
simulation for the wildland area is complete.

Please feel free to call me at 715.347.4635 or Kyle McCarty at 858.514.1020, should you have any
questions.
Sincerely,

Mark B. Elliott, P.E.


Project Manager
Attch: Figure
c:
Mark Mountford SCWD
Gary Eikermann PBS&J
Kyle McCarty PBS&J

1A & 2A Reservoirs: 8,000 gpm fire for 4 hours (Aliso Creek)


100

1A

2A

90

80
Fire Flow
Period
70

% Full

60

50

40

30

20

10

0
0

10

12
Time

14

16

18

20

22

24

Appendix B
Water System Analysis
B-1

Technical Memorandum Summary of Model Calibration, Assistance with


Engineering Services for Infrastructure Systems for South Coast Water
District, California, Prepared by EarthTech, Inc., April 2008

B-2

Demand Loading for Water Model

B-3

Water Model Input

Appendix B-1
Technical Memorandum
Summary of Model Calibration,
Assistance with Engineering Services for
Infrastructure Systems for
South Coast Water District, California,
Prepared by EarthTech, Inc., April 2008

Technical Memorandum
Summary of Model Calibration

Assistance with Engineering Services for


Infrastructure Systems for
South Coast Water District, California

Prepared for:

PBS&J
9275 Sky Park Court
San Diego, CA 92123-4386
Prepared by:
Earth Tech, Inc.
200 Indiana Avenue
Stevens Point, WI 54481

April 2008
Earth Tech Project No. 103163

South Coast Water District


Summary of Model Calibration

Technical Memorandum

TECHNICAL MEMORANDUM
ASSISTANCE WITH ENGINEERING SERVICES FOR INFRASTRUCTURE SYSTEMS FOR
SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT, CALIFORNIA
SUMMARY OF MODEL CALIBRATION
EARTH TECH PROJECT NO. 103163

To:

Mark Elliot, PBS&J

c:

Tom Degen, Earth Tech, Inc.

Prepared by:

Jason K. Bordewyk, Earth Tech, Inc.

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Section

Page

1.0

INTRODUCTION..................................................................................................

2.0

FIELD TESTING ..................................................................................................


2.1 Continuous Pressure Monitoring................................................................
2.2 Flow and Pressure Testing ........................................................................
2.3 SCADA Trend Data....................................................................................

1
1
2
3

3.0

STEADY STATE CALIBRATION ........................................................................


3.1 Accuracy Criteria........................................................................................
3.2 Calibration Data .........................................................................................
3.3 Static Pressures .........................................................................................
3.4 Initial Calibration Results ...........................................................................
3.5 Final Calibration Results ............................................................................
3.6 Calibration Adjustments .............................................................................

4
4
4
5
5
6
6

4.0

EXTENDED PERIOD CALIBRATION ................................................................


4.1 Water Demands and Time of Day Curve ...................................................
4.2 Pump Control Strategies............................................................................
4.3 Results and Discussions ............................................................................

7
8
8
8

5.0

HYDRAULIC MODEL UPDATES .......................................................................

10

6.0

SUMMARY...........................................................................................................

10

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South Coast Water District


Summary of Model Calibration

Technical Memorandum

LIST OF TABLES
Table
1
2
3
4

Initial Hydraulic Model Calibration Results


Final Hydraulic Model Calibration Results
Hydraulic Model Facility Updates
Hydraulic Model Water Main Updates

LIST OF FIGURES
Figure
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13

Flow and Pressure Test Locations


Final Calibration Accuracy
Extended Period Calibration Results 290 Pressure Zone
Extended Period Calibration Results 290 Pressure Zone
Extended Period Calibration Results 290 Pressure Zone
Extended Period Calibration Results 490 Pressure Zone
Extended Period Calibration Results 490 Pressure Zone
Extended Period Calibration Results 690 Pressure Zone
Extended Period Calibration Results 415 Pressure Zone
Extended Period Calibration Results 415 Pressure Zone
Extended Period Calibration Results Dana Point Water System
Extended Period Calibration Results Dana Point Water System
Extended Period Calibration Results Capistrano Beach Water System

LIST OF APPENDICES
Appendix
A
B
C
D

Flow and Pressure Test Forms


Calibration Adjustments for Review
Hydraulic Model Demand Patterns
Hydraulic Model Control Strategy

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April 2008

South Coast Water District


Summary of Model Calibration

Technical Memorandum

1.0

INTRODUCTION

This technical memorandum (TM) summarizes the field testing and model calibration of the
South Coast Water District (SCWD) water distribution system hydraulic model. Field testing and
model calibration was completed as part of the Infrastructure Master Plan Study being
completed by PBS&J for SCWD.
A new hydraulic computer model was created by PBS&J to replicate the distribution system and
to be used for deficiency analysis and long term planning. Before utilizing the new hydraulic
model to complete the Infrastructure Master Plan Study, it is necessary to calibrate the model to
ensure that it accurately simulates the water distribution system.
Water system field tests were performed for use in calibrating the hydraulic computer model.
Flow and pressure test results are used to verify that the model accurately simulates actual field
conditions. Additionally, continuous pressure monitoring data was collected and used to provide
several data points during the flow and pressure testing for calibration of the model. Continuous
monitoring of water system pressures also provides data points with which the hydraulic model
can be calibrated over an extended period simulation.
Calibration of the new hydraulic model was performed utilizing the results of field tests and data
gathered during December 2007. Both steady state calibration and extended period calibration
were performed to ensure that the model is adequate for the Infrastructure Master Plan Study.
2.0

FIELD TESTING

Field testing for the steady state calibration of the new hydraulic model was conducted
December 11 through December 18, 2007. Flow and pressure test results gathered in the field
were then used to compare to model simulation results under the same operating conditions.
Pressure monitoring for macro-calibration took place from December 19 through December 27,
2007. The data gathered was used for macro-calibration to simulate pressures over extend
periods. In addition, supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) trend information was
gathered from SCWD and was used to establish the operational characteristics of the water
system during the calibration period.
2.1

Continuous Pressure Monitoring

Continuous (extended period) pressure monitoring was performed to collect data for both steady
state and extended period calibration of the hydraulic model. The purpose of collecting the data
was to compare actual field data with the results from model simulations for calibration
purposes. Extended period pressure monitoring was conducted throughout the water
distribution system for the complete week following completion of flow and pressure testing.
Seventeen Telog dataloggers were used for continuous pressure monitoring during the
monitoring period. The Telog dataloggers recorded pressure on a continuous basis and saved
average pressure readings every twenty seconds. The locations of the Telogs are summarized
in the table below.

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April 2008

South Coast Water District


Summary of Model Calibration

Technical Memorandum

SUMMARY OF TELOG LOCATIONS


Location
System
South of Ocean Vista Drive at Coast Highway
South Coast
234 Monarch Bay Drive
South Coast
Niguel Road at Coast Highway (NE corner, 16-inch main)
South Coast
Mediterranean Drive at Baltic Sea Drive
South Coast
Sea Island Drive at Somerset Circle
South Coast
Garibaldi Avenue at Selva Road
South Coast
Tirremia Drive at Monarch Beach Road
South Coast
Acapula Drive at Street of the Golden Lantern
South Coast
Street of the Blue Lantern at Selva Road (NE corner)
Dana Point
Selva Road at Street of the Copper Lantern
Dana Point
Windham Drive (South End)
Dana Point
Coast Highway, East of Street of Copper Lantern
Dana Point
Dana Point Harbor, South of Coast Highway
Dana Point
Victoria Boulevard, West of Sepulveda Avenue
Capistano Beach
Calle Juanita at Calle Real (NE corner, on 6-inch main)
Capistano Beach
Camino de Estrella at Camino Capistrano
Capistano Beach
Monarch Beach Drive at Marquesa
South Coast

2.2

Pressure Zone
290
290
290
490
690
415
415
415
470
390
390
390
217
345
345
345
415

Telog No.
1508
1509
1652
1656
1738
1739
2217
2218
2485
2486
2487
2488
3143
3144
3145
3146
3646

Flow and Pressure Testing

Flow and pressure tests were performed to collect data for the steady-state calibration of the
hydraulic model. A pressure and flow test can be described as flowing one (or more) hydrant(s)
while measuring the pressure at other nearby fire hydrants. The tests are not performed for
determining available fire flows, but rather for comparing flows and pressures measured in the
field with those simulated by the hydraulic model.
Forty three flow and pressure tests were performed at representative locations throughout the
different pressure zones within the SCWD water system. A summary of flow and pressure test
locations are found in the table below. The location of each flow and pressure test is illustrated
in Figure 1. Field test forms for the flow and pressure tests are included as Appendix A.
No.
F-1
F-2
F-3
F-4
F-5
F-6
F-7
F-8
F-9
F-10
F-11
F-12
F-13

Date
12/11/2007
12/12/2007
12/12/2007
12/12/2007
12/12/2007
12/12/2007
12/12/2007
12/12/2007
12/12/2007
12/13/2007
12/13/2007
12/13/2007
12/13/2007

Zone
345
345
345
345
345
345
345
345
345
390
390
390
390

SUMMARY OF FLOW AND PRESSURE TESTS


Flowing Hydrant(s)
Residual Hydrant 1

Residual Hydrant 2

Beach Rd

Beach Rd, N. of flowing hydrant

Beach Rd, South end

Vista de Todo at Vista de Dons

Vista de Todo

Paseo Gallita at Vista Pato

Calle La Veta at Calle Guaymas

Calle La Veta, SE of flowing

Calle Borrego, South end

NE corner of Sears parking lot

North side of Sears parking lot

SW corner of Sears parking lot

Calle Real at Calle Del Sol

Calle Maria at Calle Del Sol

Calle Fortuna at Calle Loma

Calle Cambio at Calle Juanita

Calle Juanita at Calle Paloma

Calle Cambio at Calle Ultima

Calle Juanita at Calle Naranja

Calle Juanita at Calle Carmelita

Calle Naranja at Carmelita

West end of Dana Bluffs

Vista Dr, North of Vista Verde

Capistrano at Vista Verde

Domingo Ave, West end

Domingo at Doheny Park Rd

Victoria, E of Doheny Park Rd

Tuna Drive at Astoria Street

Tuna Drive at Big Sur Street

Big Sur Street at Perch Drive

Lapis at Capistrano by the Sea

Capistrano by the Sea at Midnight

Indigo, North of Midnight Lane

Moongate Ct

Vista Elevado at Formosa Drive

Aurelio Dr., N. of Vista Elevado

Santa Clara, E. of Amber Lantern

Amber Lantern at Santa Clara

Santa Clara at Ruby Lantern

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April 2008

South Coast Water District


Summary of Model Calibration

Technical Memorandum

No.
F-14
F-15
F-16
F-17
F-18
F-19
F-20
F-21
F-22
F-23
F-24
F-25
F-26
F-27
F-28
F-29
F-30
F-31
F-32
F-33
F-34
F-35
F-36
F-37
F-38
F-39
F-40
F-41
F-42
F-43

2.3

Date
12/13/2007
12/13/2007
12/12/2007
12/12/2007
12/13/2007
12/13/2007
12/14/2007
12/14/2007
12/14/2007
12/17/2007
12/13/2007
12/13/2007
12/14/2007
12/14/2007
12/14/2007
12/17/2007
12/17/2007
12/17/2007
12/17/2007
12/17/2007
12/17/2007
12/17/2007
12/17/2007
12/18/2007
12/18/2007
12/18/2007
12/18/2007
12/18/2007
12/18/2007
12/18/2007

Zone
390
390
217
217
470
470
415
415
415
415
415
415
415
415
415
290
290
290
290
290
290
290
290
490b
490
490
490
490
690
690

SUMMARY OF FLOW AND PRESSURE TESTS (cont)


Flowing Hydrant(s)
Residual Hydrant 1

Residual Hydrant 2

La Serena Dr at alley on S. end

Amber Lantern at alley

La Serena Drive, S of La Cresta

Colegio Drive at La Paz Avenue

Golden Lantern at La Paz Ave

La Cresta Drive at Colegio Dr

Ensenada, S of Dana Point Harbor

Dana Point Harbor at Ensenada

Dana Point Harbor, N.of Island

Dana Drive, West of Island Way

Dana Drive, West of Island Way

Island, S of Dana Point Harbor

Lantern Hill Drive, West End

Lantern Hill Drive, East end

Aalt Vista Drive at Stonehill Dr

Morning Star Lane, E of North Star

Morning Star, W of North Star

Dana Point, W of Golden Lantern

Sea Knoll Drive

Ocean Hill Drive at Sea Knoll

Ocean Hill Drive at Marina Vista

Elisa Drive, N of Acapulco Drive

Elisa Drive, N of Acapulco Drive

Acapulco Dr at Caracas Street

Intera Way at Cortes Road

Cortes Road at Galleon Way

End of De Leon Drive

Matthew Drive at Titus Drive

Titus Drive, West of Matthew

Philemon Drive at Leah Drive

Venezia at Villa Franche

Villa Franche, South of Venezia

Corniche Dr, E of Villa Franche

Forest Hills Ct at Tennis Villas Dr

Tennis Villas Dr at Forest Hills

Tennis Villas at S End of Centre

Capstan Dr, S of Niguel Shores Dr

Capstan Drive, North of Flowing

Halyard Drive at Niguel Shores

Vista del Cielo at Vista D'Onde

Vista del Cielo at Porto Fino

Vista Capri, N of Vista del Cielo

Palm Beach Court, East end

Palm Beach Court, S of Regatta

Regatta Way, N of Palm Beach

Across from 101 Blue Lagoon

Behind 65 Blue Lagoon

Coast Highway at Blue Lagoon

Marilyn Drive, S of Ocean Vista Dr

Marilyn Drive at Ocean Vista

West end of Ocean Vista Drive

Wildwood Road at Third Avenue

Fourth Avenue at Fairview Rd

Third Avenue at Virginia Way

Portola at Encino

Portola at Calle Cita

Encino at Vista del Sol

128 Monarch Bay Drive

117 Monarch Bay Drive

101 Monarch Bay Drive

Montessori Academy

Southeast of CVS Pharmacy

Southeast of Starbucks

30 Ritz Cove

Empty lot, N of 35 Ritz Cove

62 Ritz Cove

15 Breakers Isle

9 Breakers Isle

Niguel Shores at Nauticus Isle

Marilyn Drive, N of Ocean Vista

Driftwood Drive at Ocean Vista

Driftwood at Wesley Drive

Scenic Drive at Fourth Avenue

Scenic Drive at Third Avenue

Scenic Dr at Eagle Rock Way

Vista Orvieto, North end

Vista Mentona at Vista Orvieto

Vista Mentona at Vista Cordova

Caribbean Dr at Caspian Sea Dr

Caribbean, N of Caspian Sea

Caribbean Drive, S of reservoir

End of Ascension Road

Ascension Road, E of Crete Rd

Crete Road, N of Sea Island Dr

North end of Azores Road

Azores Road, N of Crete Road

Palawan Circle, East End

Balearic Circle, S of Azores Rd

Balearic Circle, S of flowing

Azores Rd, S of Crete Road

SCADA Trend Data

In addition to the field testing that was performed, Earth Tech also gathered additional data that
assisted in the calibration of the model and understanding of system operations. In addition to
continuous pressure monitoring data that was utilized for calibration, operational trend data was
provided by SCWD. SCWD personnel worked to export SCADA data that included water supply
flow and pressure and storage tank levels as monitored and recorded by SCADA. The data
was used to establish boundary conditions for steady state calibration and provide calibration
data for extended period calibration.

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South Coast Water District


Summary of Model Calibration

Technical Memorandum

3.0

STEADY STATE CALIBRATION

Steady state calibration is performed by simulating flow and pressure test data with the
hydraulic model and then making global adjustments to the modeling parameters until the
simulated results closely match the observed field test results. During this process, roughness
coefficients (Hazen-Williams C-values) of the water mains are adjusted to either increase or
decrease pressure drops in the simulated results.
Two model simulations were performed for each field test conducted, one under no flow (static)
conditions and one under flowing (dynamic) conditions. The static condition simulates the water
system under normal operating conditions, while the dynamic condition simulates the water
system under the stress of the hydrant flushing. While the individual pressures under both static
and dynamic conditions are important, the general criterion for calibration is to match the
pressure drop for each test location (the difference between static and dynamic pressure). The
steady state calibration process ensures that the model can accurately simulate static and
dynamic conditions under steady state analysis.
3.1

Accuracy Criteria

Precise duplication of the field test results at all locations within the water distribution system
during steady state calibration is not realistic due to the many factors that influence field test
results. The goal of steady state calibration is to minimize the error between field test data and
model simulations and create a best fit at all locations. Some error between field tests and
model simulations is expected. However, limits to the amount of allowable error must also be
made to ensure the calibrated model is a reasonably accurate representation of the actual water
distribution system. The desired accuracy for the SCWD water system hydraulic model is
summarized below in the table below.
SUMMARY OF STEADY STATE CALIBRATION ACCURACY CRITERIA
Parameter
Allowable Deviation
Minimum Acceptance Required
Static Pressure

3 psi

Residual Hydrant Pressure Differential (pressure drop


greater than or equal to 10 psi)
Residual Hydrant Pressure Differential (pressure drop
less than to 10 psi)

5 psi
2 psi

Telog Pressure Differential

3.2

3 psi

90 percent
80 Percent
90 Percent

Calibration Data

Field testing for the steady state calibration of the new hydraulic model was conducted
December 11 through December 18, 2007. Flow and pressure test results gathered in the field
were compared to model simulation results under the same operating conditions.
Where agreement between model simulation results and field test results could not be achieved
after reasonable adjustments to the model, other unknown system conditions were evaluated.
System conditions including closed or partially closed valves, inaccurate water system
geometry, or incorrect water main diameters or materials can prevent model simulations from
matching field observed results.

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April 2008

South Coast Water District


Summary of Model Calibration

Technical Memorandum

If closed or partially closed valves were suspected, Earth Tech attempted to identify the specific
valve locations. At times, it is possible with reasonable certainty to pinpoint the exact valves
that are closed. Other times, it is only possible to identify an area within which the suspected
closed valves are located. Similarly, water main diameter and material can directly impact the
calibration process. Water main data can be reviewed for accuracy of the hydraulic model and
valve turns counted in the field to clarify water main diameter questions. A list of field
investigations that can be completed by SCWD will be provided in this technical memorandum.
3.3

Static Pressures

The first step in steady state calibration is to accurately simulate static pressures. While it is
possible for static pressures to be affected by demands, and to an even lesser extent C-values,
accurate elevations will generally result in accurate static pressures.
Concerns over static pressures were discussed during project status updates with PBS&J. The
general consensus was that contour data used to create the hydraulic model may not be as
accurate throughout the SCWD service area as desired. Hydrant location elevations may vary
greatly as ground elevations are very steep throughout the SCWD service area. Most locations
with varied static pressures have locations with accurate static pressures in the vicinity. Sixteen
residual locations have static pressures which differ by greater than 3 psi. Of these sixteen
residual locations, eight have static pressures which differ by greater than 5 psi.
Additional work or investigations were not conducted to improve the level of accuracy of static
pressures. Based on complete static pressure data obtained within individual pressure zones, it
is believed that despite isolated locations of varied system pressure, the model accurately
represents the water system. Evaluations conducted with the model that are sensitive to
accurate elevations will require additional work to verify the accuracy of elevations used.
3.4

Initial Calibration Results

The table below summarizes the results of initial steady state calibration using field test data
gathered in December 2007. Data presented in the table represents the results after numerous
trials of globally adjusting C-values. The results exclude any simulations with assumed closed
valves or water main changes. The following table summarizes the accuracy of the model
based upon established criteria. The complete initial calibration results are presented in Table 1.
STEADY STATE CALIBRATION ACCURACY
Level of Accuracy
Percent of Field Tests within Level of Accuracy
Static Pressure
83%
Residual Hydrant Pressure Differential
75%
Pressure Differential (Pressure drops greater than 10 psi)
74%
Pressure Differential (Pressure drops less than 10 psi)
78%
Telog Pressure Differential
92%

As can be seen in the above summary table, after the initial steady state calibration, the model
does not meet Earth Techs accuracy criteria for pressure differential established for the SCWD
model. In order to increase the level of accuracy, Earth Tech evaluated the potential for closed
valves and pipe geometry inaccuracies.

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April 2008

South Coast Water District


Summary of Model Calibration

Technical Memorandum

3.5

Final Calibration Results

After working to calibrate the model using global adjustments, localized adjustments were also
evaluated with the model. A localized adjustment will often explain problems with calibration
when telog data points are calibrated by global changes. For instance, on the north end of the
SCWD system Flow Test F-29 telog data is calibrated within the pressure zone, but the residual
hydrants have too much loss in the hydraulic model. Adding an additional connection to the 24inch transmission main near Laugnita Drive brings the residual hydrants to within 3 psi of field
data. Mapping should be reviewed and field investigation completed to determine the accuracy
of this interconnection. If an interconnection is not believed to exist it is possible that field data
is inaccurate due to unknown system conditions and field test should be repeated to confirm.
Twelve flow tests were investigated for localized adjustments using the hydraulic model and
predicted localized changes improve calibration at these locations. Localized changes that
were made include closed valves, pipe diameter changes, pipe material changes, localized
C-values changes, and as mentioned previously, an additional connection to large transmission
main. Based upon Earth Techs assumption of potential localized changes, Table 2 includes all
calibration results and the table below summarizes the results of the calibration after localized
adjustments.
STEADY STATE CALIBRATION ACCURACY WITH ADJUSTMENTS
Level of Accuracy
Percent of Field Tests within Level of Accuracy
Static Pressure
83%
Residual Hydrant Pressure Differential
85%
Pressure Differential (Pressure drops greater than 10 psi)
86%
Pressure Differential (Pressure drops less than 10 psi)
83%
Telog Pressure Differential
94%

It is Earth Techs opinion that the SCWD hydraulic model calibration exceeds the accuracy level
desired. Based upon the final calibration, the hydraulic model is believed to provide a
reasonable representation of the actual system characteristics based on steady state
calibration. Addition water system mapping and geometry information will improve the hydraulic
model and lead to higher levels of calibration. Figure 2 graphically illustrates the steady state
calibration accuracy of the SCWD hydraulic model.
3.6

Calibration Adjustments

To improve the level of final calibration accuracy, localized changes were made to the hydraulic
model which need to be verified to ensure accuracy of the hydraulic model. Detailed mapping
on each change is included in Appendix B and summarized in the table below.
Flow Test
F-1
F-9
F-14
F-20
F-21
F-24
F-26

HYDRAULIC MODEL CALIBRATION ADJUSTMENTS


Calibration Adjustment
Increased localized C-values on Beach Road 6-inch water main from 100 to 105.
Increased pipe diameter from 6-inch to 8-inch in alley, North of Domingo Ave and West of Doheny Park Road.
Closed valve on South end of La Serena Drive near alley.
Increased pipe diameter on Ocean Hill Dr; however, other increases in the vicinity would improve calibration.
Closed valve on Elisa Drive at Acapulco Drive.
Closed valve located on Villa Franche between Venezia and through easement to Corniche Drive.
Increase pipe diameter from 6-inch to 8-inch on Capstan Drive.

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April 2008

South Coast Water District


Summary of Model Calibration

Technical Memorandum

Flow Test
F-28
F-29
F-33
F-36
F-41

HYDRAULIC MODEL CALIBRATION ADJUSTMENTS (cont)


Calibration Adjustment
Closed valve located on New York Court between Regatta Way and Palm Beach Court.
Additional interconnection with 24-inch water main at 6-inch water main on Lagunita Drive.
Closed valve on connection to 24-inch water main in easement at 236 Monarch Bay Drive
Change pipe material (with appropriate increase in C-value) to PVC for entire Breakers Isle water main.
Decrease pipe diameter from 8-inch to 6-inch on Ascension Road.

Appendix B includes mapping in the vicinity of adjusted field tests listed in the table above. It is
recommended that all available mapping sources be reviewed for accuracy of water main
diameter, material, and layout in the vicinity of adjusted flow test locations. The calibration
adjustments made were determined to improve calibration; however, other different changes to
the hydraulic model may also result in improved calibration. Therefore, review of the provided
mapping for accuracy of water main geometry (water main layout and connections) and
diameter is important and may provide answers to improve calibration.
Field confirmation of calibration adjustments is preferred to verify the accuracy of the hydraulic
model. Field investigation should be conducted to determine the status of identified valves and
turns counted to determine approximate valve sizes on questions water main segments listed
above.
4.0

EXTENDED PERIOD CALIBRATION

In addition to steady state calibration, Earth Tech also calibrated the SCWD hydraulic model for
an extended period simulation. Extended period calibration was performed to ensure the model
accurately reflects how the overall system operates over time with respect to transmission
mains, pumps, tanks, and reservoir operations under normal operating conditions. Prior to the
extended period calibration, steady state calibration was conducted and believed to provide a
reasonably accurate representation of actual system characteristics in terms of water main
geometry, spatial demand allocation, and pipe roughness.
As with steady state calibration, precise duplication of the data recorded at all locations within
the water distribution system during extended period calibration is not realistic due to many
factors that may influence the field test results. As previously stated, the goal of model
calibration is to minimize the error between the field data and the model simulations, and create
a best fit at all locations. Therefore, some error between the field data and model simulations
is expected; however, limits to the amount of allowable error must be made to ensure the
calibrated model is a reasonably accurate representation of the actual water distribution system.
Based upon the size and number of facilities in the developed model, the desired accuracy of
the extended period calibration for the SCWD hydraulic model was:
1.

Minimum of 24-hour EPS.

2.

Pressure difference between field data and model simulations within 5 psi at least
80 percent of the time.

3.

Pressure difference between field data and model simulations within 8 psi the entire
time.

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April 2008

South Coast Water District


Summary of Model Calibration

Technical Memorandum

4.

Tank levels within 5 feet between field data and model simulations at least 80 percent of
the time.

5.

Tank levels within 8 feet between field data and model simulations the entire time.

6.

Correct pump status within 1 hour.

4.1

Water Demands and Time of Day Curve

For extended period calibration, a time of day demand curve was estimated for each pressure
zone based on collected SCADA data of pump operations and tank levels. The time of day
demand curve is a series of 24 hourly demand factors that define how water usage varies over
the course of a day. Each demand factor is defined as the ratio of the hourly demand to the
daily average. In addition, the model demands were adjusted to more accurately represent the
actual demands for the period of calibration.
The following table summarizes the estimated water demands for each pressure zone during
the extended period calibration period, which were compared with the design average day
demands in the hydraulic model. Overall, the water demand for the system was estimated to be
between 50 75 percent of the design average day demand. The design time of day curves for
the pressure zones are documented in Appendix C.
HYDRAULIC MODEL WATER DEMAND DURING EXTENDED PERIOD CALIBRATION
Water System
Pressure Zone
Average Day Demand
Calibration Demand
South Coast
290
1,077 gpm
473 gpm
South Coast
490
412 gpm
245 gpm
South Coast
690
61.9 gpm
33.2 gpm
South Coast
415
846 gpm
639 gpm
Dana Point
217/ 390/ 470
1,489 gpm
972 gpm
Capistrano Beach
345
833 gpm
615 gpm
Total
2,977 gpm
4,719 gpm

4.2

Pump Control Strategies

Important variables in extended period calibration are the pump control strategies and set
points. Some of pump control set points and strategies of the system were collected during
creation of the hydraulic model. Other pump control set points were estimated after a review of
the SCADA data provided by SCWD personnel. The controls from the hydraulic model are
included in Appendix D. Operation of the new Groundwater Recovery Facility and Pump
Station 6 was completed manually during the extended period calibration period. Controls
should be reviewed to ensure that hydraulic model controls match current or desired operation
of all facilities during hydraulic model evaluations.
4.3

Results and Discussions

The extended period calibration results including all the field and model simulated pressures,
flows, and water levels are illustrated graphically in the following figures:

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April 2008

South Coast Water District


Summary of Model Calibration

Technical Memorandum

Figure No.
Figure 3
Figure 4
Figure 5
Figure 6
Figure 7
Figure 8
Figure 9
Figure 10
Figure 11
Figure 12
Figure 13

Description
290 Pressure Zone Reservoir water level
290 Pressure Zone Reservoir water level and water system flow rate
290 Pressure Zone Water system pressure
490 Pressure Zone Reservoir water level
490 Pressure Zone Water system flow rate and pressure
690 Pressure Zone Reservoir water level and water system flow rate and pressure
415 Pressure Zone Reservoir water level and system flow rate
415 Pressure Zone Water system pressure
Dana Point Water System - Reservoir water level and water system flow rate and pressure
Dana Point Water System - Water system pressure
Capistrano Beach Water System Water system flow rate and pressure

As illustrated in the figures, in general, the extended period macro calibration meets the criteria
established. Some examples of the results are included in the figures below which illustrate
some of the variations between the field data and model simulations. However, overall, the
macro calibration results meet the criteria desired.
0.1 MG Reservoir 2B Water Level
490 Pressure Zone

30

Pump Station #3 Flow


290 Pressure Zone Supply 490 Pressure Zone

400
350

25
Flowrate (gpm)

300

Level (ft)

20
15
10

250
200
150
100

50

0
12/20/07
12:00 AM

12/20/07
6:00 AM

12/20/07
12:00 PM

12/20/07
6:00 PM

12/21/07
12:00 AM

12/21/07
6:00 AM

12/21/07
12:00 PM

12/21/07
6:00 PM

12/22/07
12:00 AM

12/20/07
12:00 AM

Time
Observed Reservoir Level

12/20/07
6:00 PM

12/21/07
12:00 AM

12/21/07
6:00 AM

Observed Flow rate

12/21/07
12:00 PM

12/21/07
6:00 PM

12/22/07
12:00 AM

Model Flow rate

Pump Station #4 Flow


290 Pressure Zone Supply 490 Pressure Zone

1,200

25
Flowrate (gpm)

1,000

20
Level (ft)

12/20/07
12:00 PM

Time

Model Reservoir Level

0.5 MG Reservoir 4B Water Level


490 Pressure Zone

30

15
10
5

800
600
400
200

0
12/20/07
12:00 AM

12/20/07
6:00 AM

12/20/07
6:00 AM

12/20/07
12:00 PM

12/20/07
6:00 PM

12/21/07
12:00 AM

12/21/07
6:00 AM

12/21/07
12:00 PM

12/21/07
6:00 PM

12/22/07
12:00 AM

12/20/07
12:00 AM

Time
Observed Reservoir Level

12/20/07
6:00 AM

12/ 20/ 07
12:00 PM

12/ 20/ 07
6:00 PM

12/21/07
12:00 AM

12/21/07
6:00 AM

12/ 21/ 07
12:00 PM

12/ 21/ 07
6:00 PM

12/22/07
12:00 AM

Time

Model Reservoir Level

Observed Flow rate

Model Flow rate

The figures above illustrate the field and model simulated water levels for the 490 Pressure
Zone in the South Coast Water System. As seen in the figures above, the hydraulic model
simulates more operation of Pump Station 3 and less operation of Pump Station 4. The
variations between the simulated and observed data may be the result of the quantity and
location of simulated water demands, the nature of operational controls, or both. Overall, the
490 Pressure Zone replicates adequate operation despite the difference in station flow rate.

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April 2008

South Coast Water District


Summary of Model Calibration

Technical Memorandum

Pump Station #5 Flow


490 Pressure Zone Supply 690 Pressure Zone

450

0.5 MG Reservoir 2C Water Level


690 Pressure Zone

30

400

25
20

300

Level (ft)

Flowrate (gpm)

350

250
200

15

150

10

100

50

0
12/20/07
12:00 AM

12/20/07
6:00 AM

12/20/07
12:00 PM

12/20/07
6:00 PM

12/21/07
12:00 AM

12/21/07
6:00 AM

12/21/07
12:00 PM

12/21/07
6:00 PM

12/20/07
12:00 AM

12/22/07
12:00 AM

12/20/07
12:00 PM

12/20/07
6:00 PM

12/21/07
12:00 AM

12/21/07
6:00 AM

12/21/07
12:00 PM

12/21/07
6:00 PM

12/22/07
12:00 AM

Time

Time
Observed Flow rate

12/20/07
6:00 AM

Observed Reservoir Level

Model Flow rate

Model Reservoir Level

The figures above illustrate the field and model simulated flow rate at Pump Station 5 into the
690 Pressure Zone and the field and model simulated water levels for the 2C Reservoir. As
seen in the two figures the model simulation results mimic the pump station and reservoir
observed data as desired. Overall the simulated results match well with the observed data.
5.0

HYDRAULIC MODEL UPDATES

During the hydraulic model calibration process, updates were made to the hydraulic model data.
Based on information learned during field testing from facility visits and SCWD personnel
knowledge facility updates were made to the hydraulic model. Additionally, during model
calibration certain facility parameters were required to be changed to accurately model field
conditions. For example, to match static pressure observed during field testing based on
SCADA tank water level, the hydraulic grade of the Dana Point Reservoir was required to be
raised. Water system mapping indicates a base elevation of 344.5 feet; however, to accurately
model static pressure the base elevation was raised to 358 feet. A list of all facility changes is
included in Table 3.
Similarly, changes were made to the distribution system as problems were identified during
hydraulic model calibration. Water mains that were not connected at both ends were corrected
and listed in Table 4. Additionally, water mains changed during calibration are also listed.
6.0

SUMMARY

Based on current elevation data in the hydraulic model, it is recommended that prior to
performing evaluations that are sensitive to accurate elevations, additional work to be done to
verify the accuracy of elevations used. Overall, the hydraulic model predicts accurate static
pressures within each pressure zone; however, localized errors in elevation data were noted
during calibration.
The hydraulic model was calibrated for both steady state and extended period conditions. It is
Earth Techs opinion that the SCWD hydraulic model calibration meets the accuracy level
desired. The hydraulic model is believed to provide a reasonable representation of the actual
system characteristics based on steady state and extended period calibration. Addition water
system mapping and geometry information will improve the hydraulic model and lead to higher
levels of calibration.

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\tech memo\scwd_techmemo.doc

10

April 2008

TABLES

TABLE 1
INITIAL HYDRAULIC MODEL CALIBRATION RESULTS
SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT

76

58

18

87

70

17

345

88

70

18

1,790 gpm

79

62

17

345

76

59

17

1,660 gpm

65

58

345

62

55

1,970 gpm

121

63

58

345

118

60

58

2,360 gpm

147

97

50

345

147

92

55

1,700 gpm

80

60

20

390

81

55

26

1,700 gpm

74

59

15

390

79

66

13

2,050 gpm

102

81

21

390

103

81

22

2,010 gpm

95

77

18

390

96

76

20

1,900 gpm

98

82

16

390

99

86

13

1,900 gpm

79

67

12

390

80

68

12

1,970 gpm

76

57

19

217

74

58

16

1,820 gpm

77

49

28

217

85

53

32

1,150 gpm

59

24

35

470

57

21

36

1,790 gpm

59

48

11

470

57

44

13

1,270 gpm

92

42

50

470

89

38

51

1,990 gpm

92

66

26

470

89

58

31

-2

-3

-3

78

62

16

102

83

19

101

84

17

73

54

19

74

58

16

62

55

65

58

98

76

22

100

76

24

144

99

45

146 101

45

72

60

12

75

61

14

67

58

74

64

10

99

82

17

99

80

19

90

73

17

92

74

18

88

79

88

73

15

93

86

95

87

75

57

18

74

60

14

73

53

20

85

64

21

59

25

34

59

24

35

59

49

10

59

49

10

77

37

40

77

34

43

77

67

10

77

66

11

-2

-3

-4

70

70

70

70

70

70

70

70

70

70

70

69

69

69

69

70

70

69

69

70

70

67

67

70

70

67

67

70

70

69

69

70

70

69

69

55

54

54

55

55

54

54

55

55

54

54

55

55

54

54

55

55

53

53

55

55

53

53

55

55

51

51

55

55

51

51

55

55

54

54

55

55

54

54

56

56

56

56

56

56

56

56

56

56

56

56

56

56

53

53

53

53

56

56

56

56

96

99

99

96

96

99

99

95

95

99

99

95

95

99

99

95

95

99

99

95

95

99

99

96

96

95

95

96

96

95

95

95

95

92

92

95

95

92

96

-4

95

95

95

95

95

95

95

98

-3

73

74

74

73

73

74

74

73

73

74

74

73

73

74

74

73

73

73

73

73

73

74

74

73

73

74

74

73

73

75

75

73

73

75

75

73

73

75

75

70

70

75

75

70

70

74

74

73

73

74

74

73

73

-3

62

62

64

64

62

62

64

64

62

64

-2

62

62

62

62

61

61

62

62

61

61

62

62

61

61

62

62

61

61

62

62

62

62

62

62

64

64

64

64

64

64

64

64

61

61

60

60

61

61

60

60

61

61

62

62

61

61

62

62

74

74

77

77

74

74

77

77

74

74

77

77

74

75

-1

73

73

74

74

73

73

74

74

73

73

74

74

73

73

74

74

74

74

74

74

73

73

74

74

77

77

75

75

77

77

75

75

73

73

72

72

73

73

72

72

73

73

74

74

73

73

74

74

-2

46

46

48

48

46

46

48

48

46

46

48

48

46

46

48

48

46

48

-2

46

46

46

46

46

46

46

46

45

45

46

46

45

45

46

46

45

45

46

46

45

45

46

46

48

48

48

48

48

48

48

48

45

45

44

44

45

45

44

44

45

45

46

46

45

45

46

46

-1

66

66

66

66

66

66

65

65

66

66

65

63

66

66

66

66

66

66

64

66

-2

66

66

65

65

66

66

65

63

66

66

65

65

66

66

65

63

66

66

65

65

66

66

66

66

66

66

65

65

66

61

65

65

66

63

65

33

32

66

32

34

65

58

66

57

64

28

36

66

29

37

64

56

66

61

-2

42

42

46

46

42

42

46

46

42

42

47

47

42

42

46

46

42

42

46

46

42

42

40

40

42

42

47

42

46

42

46

41

46

41

45

40

45

39

44

39

44

38

45

40

44

39

45

40

44

39

44

39

42

36

45

41

42

36

46

43

36

34

46

43

36

33

45

43

39

35

45

43

39

37

-2

-2

-2

-3

-1

-1

103 103

107 107

103 103

108 108

103 103

108 108

103 103

108 108

103 103

107 107

103 103

107 107

103 103

107 107

103 103

108 100

107

99

107

98

107

98

107 100

106

97

105 100

97

106 100

104

105

98

106 100

105

99

106 100

103

94

106 101

94

107 105

103

97

94

107 105

93

106 104

97

99

95

106 104

99

97

119 119

120 120

119 119

120 120

119 119

121 121

119 119

121 121

119 119

121 121

119 119

121 121

119 119

121 121

119 119

120 120

119 119

121 115

123 117

120 113

123 116

120 113

122 113

119 111

121 111

10

119 112

121 113

120 114

122 114

119 112

119 109

10

120 114

119 109

10

121 117

114 109

121 117

114 108

120 118

116 111

120 118

116 113

75

75

80

77

75

75

80

80

75

75

80

80

75

75

80

80

75

75

80

80

75

75

80

80

75

75

80

80

75

75

80

80

75

75

80

77

75

75

81

81

75

75

81

81

75

75

81

81

75

75

81

81

75

75

81

81

75

75

77

81

-4

75

63

12

77

65

12

75

64

11

77

65

12

75

75

77

77

75

75

77

77

75

75

77

77

75

75

77

77

-4

139 133

143 137

140 129

11

143 133

10

138 122

16

143 130

13

139 123

16

143 129

14

139 127

12

143 131

12

140 123

17

143 129

14

139 125

14

143 129

14

140 137

143 139

140 120

20

143 123

20

140 100

40

143 103

40

138 138

143 143

138 138

143 143

139 139

143 143

140 140

143 143

139 139

143 143

139 139

143 143

139 139

143 143

140 140

143 143

140 140

143 143

140 140

143 143

140 140

143 143

140 140

143 143

38

38

38

37

38

38

38

36

38

35

38

35

38

31

38

35

38

36

38

36

38

36

38

35

38

36

38

36

38

36

38

36

38

36

38

35

38

33

-1

-3

-2

-3

38

34

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

37

37

38

38

37

37

38

38

37

37

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

100

93

100

94

100

90

10

100

90

10

100

82

18

100

85

15

100

82

18

100

84

16

100

86

14

100

86

14

100

85

15

100

85

15

100

87

13

100

87

13

100

98

100

96

100

87

13

100

85

15

100

78

22

100

81

19

98

98

101 101

99

99

101 101

99

99

101 101

100 100

-4

-1

101 101

100 100

101 101

100 100

101 101

100 100

101 100

100 100

101 100

100 100

101 100

100 100

101 100

100 100

101 100

100 100

101 100

151 120

31

-1

151 123

28

152

70

82

151

-3

-2

-3

36

115

150 130

20

151 132

19

151 132

19

151 133

18

151 138

13

151 137

14

151 135

16

151 136

15

151 137

14

151 137

14

151 149

151 147

151 136

15

151 134

17

151 124

27

151 124

27

75

70

75

70

75

68

75

69

75

68

74

66

74

64

10

72

61

11

74

63

11

73

60

13

75

68

73

65

75

60

15

75

62

13

75

65

10

75

67

63

30

33

62

27

35

63

56

62

57

61

24

37

62

23

39

61

57

62

59

D Pressure Differential (psi)

70

70

54

55

56

95

96

73

64

77

49

65

46

107 107

Pressure Differential (psi)

70

54

56

99

62

64

74

77

46

49

66

65

42

46

103 103

77

Residual Pressure (psi)

74

62

74

46

66

42

75

80

D Pressure Differential (psi)

69

55

96

73

74

122 122

75
0

Telog 17 (Telog 3646)

Static Pressure (psi)

70

69

54

55

56

99

96

73

65

77

49

65

45

0
0

Pressure Differential (psi)

70

54

56

99

62

65

74

77

46

49

66

65

42

45

122 122
119 119

Residual Pressure (psi)

74

62

74

46

66

42

108 108

Pressure Differential (psi)

69

55

96

73

74

0
0

Residual Pressure (psi)

70

69

53

55

56

99

96

73

65

77

49

66

47

108 108
103 103

Static Pressure (psi)

70

54

56

99

62

65

74

77

46

49

66

66

47

D Pressure Differential (psi)

75

62

74

46

66

-2

Pressure Differential (psi)

70

55

96

73

75

42

Residual Pressure (psi)

69

70

54

55

56

99

96

73

65

77

-2

49

65

47

42

Pressure Differential (psi)

70

54

56

99

62

65

74

77

48

49

65

47
-2

Residual Pressure (psi)

75

62

74

-1

46

-1

Static Pressure (psi)

79

55

96

73

75

66

D Pressure Differential (psi)

70

79

54

55

56

99

96

73

65

-1

77

50

65

66

Pressure Differential (psi)

70

54

56

99

62

65

75

77

50

67
-2

Residual Pressure (psi)

75

62

74

-2

-2

D Pressure Differential (psi)

69

55

96

73

75

48

Static Pressure (psi)

70

69

54

55

56

99

96

73

-2

64

78

50

46

Pressure Differential (psi)

70

54

56

99

64

65

78

50
-1

Residual Pressure (psi)

75

62

-1

Pressure Differential (psi)

69

54

96

73

75

75

Residual Pressure (psi)

70

69

54

54

56

99

96

73

66

78

74

Pressure Differential (psi)

70

54

56

99

66

78
-2

Residual Pressure (psi)

75

-2

Pressure Differential (psi)

69

54

96

73

75

64

Residual Pressure (psi)

70

69

54

54

56

99

96

73

66

62

Pressure Differential (psi)

70

54

56

99

66
0

Residual Pressure (psi)

74

Pressure Differential (psi)

69

54

96

74

Residual Pressure (psi)

70

69

54

54

56

99

96

Pressure Differential (psi)

70

54

56

99

Residual Pressure (psi)

Pressure Differential (psi)

69

54

Residual Pressure (psi)

70

69

54

54

Pressure Differential (psi)

70

54

Residual Pressure (psi)

D Pressure Differential (psi)

15

Pressure Differential (psi)


23

61

56

Static Pressure (psi)

64

76

69

56

73

Telog 16 (Telog 3146)

D Pressure Differential (psi)

345
1,900 gpm

87

70

69

96

74

73

Static Pressure (psi)

17

70

54

96

74
4

Telog 15 (Telog 3145)

D Pressure Differential (psi)

29

58

-1

54

54

Telog 14 (Telog 3144)

Pressure Differential (psi)

65

75

23

54

95

Telog 13 (Telog 3143)

Residual Pressure (psi)

94

21

64

96

99

Telog 12 (Telog 2488)


D Pressure Differential (psi)

73

87

69

96
0

Telog 11 (Telog 2487)

Static Pressure (psi)

345
1,730 gpm

94

-2

69

69

Static Pressure (psi)

29

70

56

Telog 10 (Telog 2486)

D Pressure Differential (psi)

26

62

36

56

56

Static Pressure (psi)

60

91

22

Residual Pressure (psi)

Pressure Differential (psi)

Residual Pressure (psi)

Test Location

86

123

67

56

0
1

Telog 9 (Telog 2485)

D Pressure Differential (psi)

F-19A

29

89

Static Pressure (psi)

F-19

345
1,900 gpm

152

46

53

D Pressure Differential (psi)

F-18A

28

70

56

54

Static Pressure (psi)

F-18

155

56

70

56
1

FIELD TESTING/MODEL SIMULATIONS


Telog 7 (Telog 2217)
Telog 8 (Telog 2218)

D Pressure Differential (psi)

F-17

-3

84

D Pressure Differential (psi)

F-16

152

87

69

Telog 6 (Telog 1739)

Static Pressure (psi)

F-15

65

70

70

Static Pressure (psi)

F-14

345
1,820 gpm

152

70

Telog 5 (Telog 1738)

D Pressure Differential (psi)

F-13

109

D Pressure Differential (psi)

F-12

40

85

Telog 4 (Telog 1656)

Static Pressure (psi)

F-11

149

77

67

Static Pressure (psi)

F-10

75

152

Telog 3 (Telog 1652)

D Pressure Differential (psi)

F-9

1,420 gpm

152
5

Static Pressure (psi)

F-8

101

Telog 2 (Telog 1509)

D Pressure Differential (psi)

F-7

96

51

Pressure Differential (psi)

F-6

54

152

Residual Pressure (psi)

F-5

150

Telog 1 (Telog 1508)

Static Pressure (psi)

F-4

345

Static Pressure (psi)

F-3

1,510 gpm

Residual 2
D Pressure Differential (psi)

F-2

Static Pressure (psi)

F-1A

F= Field Test Data


M= Model Data

F-1

Test Hydrant Flow (gpm)

Flow Test Number

Residual 1

-3

33

-1

-1

-1

-1

-2

-2

-2

-1

TABLE 1
INITIAL HYDRAULIC MODEL CALIBRATION RESULTS
SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT

23

415

84

64

20

1,900 gpm

74

54

20

415

73

42

31

1,790 gpm

56

39

17

415

55

41

14

1,550 gpm

78

54

24

415

76

59

17

2,160 gpm

106

78

28

290

114

70

44

1,790 gpm

49

38

11

290

50

39

11

1,630 gpm

54

50

290

52

49

1,660 gpm

52

40

12

290

52

31

21

1,330 gpm

68

52

16

290

66

54

12

1,870 gpm

60

50

10

290

59

51

1,850 gpm

82

60

22

290

79

60

19

1,970 gpm

96

62

34

290

88

46

42

1,080 gpm

90

16

74

490b

91

22

69

1,870 gpm

90

78

12

490b

91

80

11

1,990 gpm

109

72

37

490

111

72

39

1,970 gpm

86

73

13

490

85

71

14

2,070 gpm

76

67

490

74

66

1,330 gpm

80

36

44

490

97

73

24

1,850 gpm

117

82

35

690

121

83

38

1,820 gpm

147

83

64

690

148

84

64

59

64

60

67

61

65

60

71

63

-2

-3

-5

-1

-1

-20

68

62

112

40

72

112

43

69

112 103

112 104

101

60

41

100

62

38

95

85

10

96

84

12

33

31

32

31

80

69

11

92

81

11

107

76

31

106

72

34

120

74

46

148 105

43

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

-8

-1

-1

-2

-3

-1

-3

-1

-3

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Calibration\[Calib_Flow Test Forms_JY.xls]Calib(4)

50

53

52

55

48

53

52

55

53

53

52

55

55

53

52

55

55

53

52

55

55

54

54

55

55

54

54

55

55

54

54

55

55

54

54

54

54

54

54

55

55

54

54

55

55

54

54

55

55

54

54

56

56

58

58

56

56

58

58

56

55

58

58

56

55

57

57

56

55

57

57

56

54

57

57

56

54

58

58

56

56

58

58

56

56

58

58

56

56

58

58

56

56

58

58

56

56

58

58

56

56

58

58

56

56

58

58

56

56

-4

-6

-1

95

95

96

96

95

95

95

95

95

95

95

95

95

95

95

95

95

95

95

95

95

95

95

95

95

95

95

95

95

95

96

96

95

95

96

96

95

95

96

96

95

95

96

91

95

90

96

93

95

92

96

95

95

95

96

96

95

95

96

96

95

95

73

73

74

74

73

73

74

74

73

73

74

74

73

73

74

74

73

73

74

74

73

73

74

74

73

73

74

74

73

73

74

74

73

73

75

75

73

73

75

75

73

73

75

75

73

73

75

75

73

73

75

75

73

73

75

75

73

73

75

55

20

73

51

22

75

54

21

73

51

22

-1

14

64

53

11

65

52

13

64

55

64

64

64

64

64

64

64

64

65

65

64

64

65

65

64

64

66

66

64

64

65

65

64

64

66

66

64

64

66

66

64

64

66

66

64

64

66

66

64

64

65

65

64

64

66

66

64

64

66

66

64

64

66

66

64

64

66

66

64

64

66

66

64

64

64

76

65

11

76

67

77

67

10

76

68

77

67

10

76

69

76

76

75

75

77

77

75

75

77

77

75

75

78

78

75

75

78

78

75

75

78

78

75

75

78

78

75

75

78

78

75

75

78

78

75

75

78

78

75

75

78

78

75

75

78

78

75

75

78

78

75

75

78

78

75

75

78

78

75

75

78

78

75

75

-4

-3

-4

41

45

42

45

41

49

46

48

44

49

47

48

45

48

46

48

45

49

49

48

48

49

49

48

48

49

49

48

48

49

49

48

48

50

50

48

48

50

50

48

48

50

50

48

48

50

50

48

48

50

50

48

48

50

50

48

48

50

50

48

48

50

50

48

48

50

50

48

48

50

50

48

48

50

50

48

48

50

50

48

48

-5

-2

-2

-3

66

65

65

66

66

66

66

66

66

65

65

66

66

65

65

66

66

65

65

66

66

65

65

66

66

65

65

66

66

65

65

66

66

65

65

66

66

65

65

66

66

64

64

66

66

66

66

66

66

66

66

66

66

65

65

66

66

65

65

66

66

65

65

66

66

64

64

66

66

65

65

66

66

65

65

66

66

66

66

66

66

66

66

66

66

42

47

47

42

42

46

46

42

42

47

47

42

42

46

46

42

42

45

45

42

42

45

45

42

42

46

46

42

42

46

46

42

42

47

47

42

42

47

47

42

42

46

46

42

42

47

47

42

42

46

46

42

42

46

46

42

42

46

46

42

42

46

46

42

42

47

47

42

42

47

47

42

42

46

46

42

42

46

46

42

42

46

46

42

42

46

46

42

42

103 103

107 107

103 103

109 109

103 103

108 108

103 103

109 109

103 103

107 107

103 103

107 107

103 103

106 106

103 103

107 107

103 103

108 108

103 103

109 109

103 103

108 108

103 103

108 108

103 103

108 108

103 103

108 108

103 103

108 108

103 103

107 107

103 103

107 107

103 103

109 109

103 103

108 108

103 103

108 108

103 103

108 108

103 103

108 108

103 103

107 107

103 103

119 119

121 121

119 119

122 122

119 119

122 122

119 119

122 122

119 119

121 121

119 119

120 120

119 119

120 120

119 119

121 121

119 119

121 121

119 119

122 122

119 119

121 121

119 119

122 122

119 119

122 122

119 119

121 121

119 119

121 121

119 119

121 121

119 119

121 121

119 119

121 121

119 119

121 121

119 119

121 121

119 119

121 121

119 119

121 121

119 119

121 121

119 119

77

75

75

77

77

75

75

77

77

75

75

77

77

75

75

77

77

75

75

77

77

75

75

77

77

75

75

77

77

76

75

77

77

75

75

77

77

75

75

77

77

75

75

77

77

75

75

77

77

75

75

77

77

75

75

77

77

74

74

77

77

75

75

77

77

75

75

77

77

75

75

77

77

75

75

77

77

75

75

77

77

75

75

77

77

75

75

77

77

75

75

77

77

75

75

77

77

-1

139 139

143 143

139 139

143 143

140 140

143 143

139 139

143 143

140 140

143 143

139 139

143 143

140 140

143 143

140 140

143 143

140 140

143 143

139 139

143 143

139 139

143 143

139 139

143 143

139 139

143 143

139 139

143 143

140 140

143 143

140 140

143 143

139 139

143 143

140 140

143 143

140 140

143 143

139 139

143 143

139 139

143 143

139 139

143 143

139 139

143 143

140 140

143 143

140 140

143 143

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

99

99

100 100

99

99

100 100

100 100

100 100

100 100

100 100

100 100

100 100

100 100

100 100

100 100

100 100

100 100

100 100

100 100

100 100

99

99

101 100

99

99

101 100

100 100

101 100

100 100

101 100

100 100

101 100

100 100

101 100

100 100

101 100

100 100

101 100

100 100

101 100

100 100

101 100

99

99

101 100

99

99

101 100

99

99

101 100

99

99

101 100

100 100

101 100

100 100

101 100

67

65

68

66

67

63

68

66

75

68

74

70

75

67

74

69

71

58

13

70

60

10

71

57

14

70

60

10

75

64

11

74

66

75

65

10

74

67

75

66

74

68

74

73

73

73

73

73

73

73

74

74

73

73

74

74

73

73

74

74

73

73

74

74

73

73

74

74

73

73

74

74

73

73

70

70

70

66

70

68

70

68

110

75

35

111

78

33

109 109

111 110

110 110

111 111

110 110

111 111

110 110

108 108

110 110

108 108

D Pressure Differential (psi)

57

64

69

69

53

55

96

74

11

51

72

-4

45

-3

66

42

75

77

Pressure Differential (psi)

63

-4

69

53

58

99

96

73

74

53

65

13

121 121

75
0

D Pressure Differential (psi)

14

55

58

99

73

64

60

42

65

46

0
0

Pressure Differential (psi)

18

54

69

55

56

-1

15

64

73

45

45

66

65

42

46

120 120
119 119

Residual Pressure (psi)

33

68

69

69

53

55

96

74

50

72

-3

48

-2

66

42

108 108

Pressure Differential (psi)

51

69

-2

53

-1

58

99

96

73

74

52

65

11

0
0

Residual Pressure (psi)

12

56

58

99

73

61

62

46

65

46

108 108
103 103

Static Pressure (psi)

39

69

55

56

13

71

73

46

49

66

65

46

D Pressure Differential (psi)

59

51

69

69

53

55

96

74

48

76

-3

48

-3

66

Pressure Differential (psi)

61

-1

69

53

-1

99

96

73

74

53

61

42

Residual Pressure (psi)

56

99

73

61

70

47

65

46

42

Pressure Differential (psi)

56

68

54

56

11

72

77

41

49

65

46
0

Residual Pressure (psi)

62

60

68

69

54

55

96

75

50

76

-4

43

-2

Static Pressure (psi)

64

69

16

54

99

96

73

75

60

61

66

D Pressure Differential (psi)

56

99

73

64

70

40

66

66

Pressure Differential (psi)

20

64

67

55

56

68

77

42

66
1

Residual Pressure (psi)

80

66

70

69

54

55

96

75

58

70

-1

D Pressure Differential (psi)

100

16

70

-2

54

99

96

73

75

60

65

40

Static Pressure (psi)

56

99

73

64

66

40

43

Pressure Differential (psi)

12

72

70

55

56

-1

70

42
0

Residual Pressure (psi)

66

76

70

70

54

55

96

74

57

Pressure Differential (psi)

78

-7

70

54

99

95

73

74

56

65

68

Residual Pressure (psi)

14

56

99

73

59

68

70

Pressure Differential (psi)

12

68

69

55

56

70
1

Residual Pressure (psi)

36

82

70

69

54

55

96

74

53

Pressure Differential (psi)

48

-3

70

-5

54

99

96

73

74

57

Residual Pressure (psi)

12

56

99

73

Pressure Differential (psi)

11

38

69

55

56

Residual Pressure (psi)

59

50

70

69

54

55

96

Pressure Differential (psi)

70

11

70

-3

54

99

96

Residual Pressure (psi)

16

56

Pressure Differential (psi)

17

54

70

56

56

Residual Pressure (psi)

68

70

70

70

54

56

Pressure Differential (psi)

85

-3

70

-3

54

Residual Pressure (psi)

20

Pressure Differential (psi)

13

67

70

Residual Pressure (psi)

67

87

Pressure Differential (psi)

80

-22

70

70

99

Pressure Differential (psi)

17

61

70

-3

55

56

Residual Pressure (psi)

67

84

16

54

55

74

55

59

D Pressure Differential (psi)

84

72

54

56

74

57
0

Telog 17 (Telog 3646)

Static Pressure (psi)

49

88

56

Telog 16 (Telog 3146)

Residual Pressure (psi)

415
2,030 gpm

56

69

73

Telog 15 (Telog 3145)

Static Pressure (psi)

39

70

69

55

96

74

73

Telog 14 (Telog 3144)

Static Pressure (psi)

13

49

70

-7

54

55

96

74
0

Telog 13 (Telog 3143)

D Pressure Differential (psi)

44

88

10

54

Telog 12 (Telog 2488)


D Pressure Differential (psi)

57

49

99

Telog 11 (Telog 2487)

Static Pressure (psi)

35

59

69

96

99

Static Pressure (psi)

415
1,970 gpm

42

-2

Residual Pressure (psi)

Pressure Differential (psi)

F= Field Test Data


M= Model Data

Test Location

13

70

69

96
0

Telog 10 (Telog 2486)

D Pressure Differential (psi)

F-43

10

45

70

Pressure Differential (psi)

F-42

43

58

14

56

Residual Pressure (psi)

F-41

53

30

55

56

Static Pressure (psi)

F-40

55

44

55

0
0

Telog 9 (Telog 2485)

D Pressure Differential (psi)

F-39

415
1,660 gpm

60

-10

Static Pressure (psi)

F-38

12

54

D Pressure Differential (psi)

F-37A

44

69

55

54

Static Pressure (psi)

F-37

40

56

69

55
0

FIELD TESTING/MODEL SIMULATIONS


Telog 7 (Telog 2217)
Telog 8 (Telog 2218)

D Pressure Differential (psi)

F-36

49

D Pressure Differential (psi)

F-35

57

70

Telog 6 (Telog 1739)

Static Pressure (psi)

F-34

415
1,210 gpm

60

69

70

Static Pressure (psi)

F-33

19

69
8

Telog 5 (Telog 1738)

D Pressure Differential (psi)

F-32

28

12

D Pressure Differential (psi)

F-31

47

66

Telog 4 (Telog 1656)

Static Pressure (psi)

F-30

70

78

Static Pressure (psi)

F-29

1,210 gpm

74
10

Telog 3 (Telog 1652)

D Pressure Differential (psi)

F-28

16

Static Pressure (psi)

F-27

39

Telog 2 (Telog 1509)

D Pressure Differential (psi)

F-26

48

55

Static Pressure (psi)

F-25

54

Telog 1 (Telog 1508)


D Pressure Differential (psi)

F-24

415

Static Pressure (psi)

F-23

1,380 gpm

Residual 2
D Pressure Differential (psi)

F-22

Residual Pressure (psi)

F-21

Static Pressure (psi)

F-20

Test Hydrant Flow (gpm)

Flow Test Number

Residual 1

-2

-3

-3

-3

-4

-3

-3

-3

-1

-4

-2

TABLE 2
FINAL HYDRAULIC MODEL CALIBRATION RESULTS
SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT

58

18

87

70

17

345

88

70

18

1,790 gpm

79

62

17

345

76

59

17

1,660 gpm

65

58

345

62

55

1,970 gpm

121

63

58

345

118

60

58

2,360 gpm

147

97

50

345

147

96

51

1,700 gpm

80

60

20

390

81

55

26

1,700 gpm

74

59

15

390

79

66

13

2,050 gpm

102

81

21

390

103

81

22

2,010 gpm

95

77

18

390

96

76

20

1,900 gpm

98

82

16

390

99

85

14

1,900 gpm

79

67

12

390

80

68

12

1,970 gpm

76

57

19

217

74

58

16

1,820 gpm

77

49

28

217

85

53

32

1,150 gpm

59

24

35

470

57

21

36

1,790 gpm

59

48

11

470

57

44

13

1,270 gpm

92

42

50

470

89

38

51

1,990 gpm

92

66

26

470

89

58

31

-2

-2

-3

78

62

16

102

83

19

101

84

17

73

54

19

74

58

16

62

55

65

58

98

76

22

100

76

24

144

99

45

146 101

45

72

60

12

75

61

14

67

58

74

64

10

99

82

17

99

80

19

90

73

17

92

74

18

88

79

88

76

12

93

86

95

87

75

57

18

74

60

14

73

53

20

85

64

21

59

25

34

59

24

35

59

49

10

59

49

10

77

37

40

77

34

43

77

67

10

77

66

11

-2

-3

-4

70

70

70

70

70

70

70

70

70

70

70

69

69

69

69

70

70

69

69

70

70

67

67

70

70

67

67

70

70

69

69

70

70

69

69

55

54

54

55

55

54

54

55

55

54

54

55

55

54

54

55

55

53

53

55

55

53

53

55

55

51

51

55

55

51

51

55

55

54

54

55

55

54

54

56

56

56

56

56

56

56

56

56

56

56

56

56

56

53

53

53

53

56

56

56

56

96

99

99

96

96

99

99

95

95

99

99

95

95

99

99

95

95

99

99

95

95

99

99

96

96

95

95

96

96

95

95

95

95

92

92

95

95

92

96

-4

95

95

95

95

95

95

95

98

-3

73

74

74

73

73

74

74

73

73

74

74

73

73

74

74

73

73

73

73

73

73

74

74

73

73

74

74

73

73

75

75

73

73

75

75

73

73

75

75

70

70

75

75

70

70

74

74

73

73

74

74

73

73

-3

62

62

64

64

62

62

64

64

62

64

-2

62

62

62

62

61

61

62

62

61

61

62

62

61

61

62

62

61

61

62

62

62

62

62

62

64

64

64

64

64

64

64

64

61

61

60

60

61

61

60

60

61

61

62

62

61

61

62

62

74

74

77

77

74

74

77

77

74

74

77

77

74

75

-1

73

73

74

74

73

73

74

74

73

73

74

74

73

73

74

74

74

74

74

74

73

73

74

74

77

77

75

75

77

77

75

75

73

73

72

72

73

73

72

72

73

73

74

74

73

73

74

74

-2

46

46

48

48

46

46

48

48

46

46

48

48

46

46

48

48

46

48

-2

46

46

46

46

46

46

46

46

45

45

46

46

45

45

46

46

45

45

46

46

45

45

46

46

48

48

48

48

48

48

48

48

45

45

44

44

45

45

44

44

45

45

46

46

45

45

46

46

-1

66

66

66

66

66

66

65

65

66

66

65

63

66

66

66

66

66

66

64

66

-2

66

66

65

65

66

66

65

63

66

66

65

65

66

66

65

63

66

66

65

65

66

66

66

66

66

66

65

65

66

61

65

65

66

63

65

33

32

66

32

34

65

58

66

57

64

28

36

66

29

37

64

56

66

61

-2

42

42

46

46

42

42

46

46

42

42

47

47

42

42

46

46

42

42

46

46

42

42

40

40

42

42

47

42

46

42

46

41

46

41

45

40

45

39

44

39

44

38

45

40

44

39

45

40

44

39

44

39

42

36

45

41

42

36

46

43

36

34

46

43

36

33

45

43

39

35

45

43

39

37

-2

-2

-2

-3

-1

-1

103 103

107 107

103 103

108 108

103 103

108 108

103 103

108 108

103 103

107 107

103 103

107 107

103 103

107 107

103 103

108 100

107

99

107

98

107

98

107 100

106

97

105 100

97

106 100

104

105

98

106 100

105

99

106 100

103

94

106 101

94

107 105

103

97

94

107 105

93

106 104

97

99

95

106 104

99

97

119 119

120 120

119 119

120 120

119 119

121 121

119 119

121 121

119 119

121 121

119 119

121 121

119 119

121 121

119 119

120 120

119 119

121 115

123 117

120 113

123 116

120 113

122 113

119 111

121 111

10

119 112

121 113

120 114

122 114

119 112

119 109

10

120 114

119 109

10

121 117

114 109

121 117

114 108

120 118

116 111

120 118

116 113

75

75

80

77

75

75

80

80

75

75

80

80

75

75

80

80

75

75

80

80

75

75

80

80

75

75

80

80

75

75

80

80

75

75

80

77

75

75

81

81

75

75

81

81

75

75

81

81

75

75

81

81

75

75

81

81

75

75

77

81

-4

75

63

12

77

65

12

75

64

11

77

65

12

75

75

77

77

75

75

77

77

75

75

77

77

75

75

77

77

-4

139 133

143 137

140 129

11

143 133

10

138 122

16

143 130

13

139 123

16

143 129

14

139 127

12

143 131

12

140 123

17

143 129

14

139 125

14

143 129

14

140 137

143 139

140 120

20

143 123

20

140 100

40

143 102

41

138 138

143 143

138 138

143 143

139 139

143 143

140 140

143 143

139 139

143 143

139 139

143 143

139 139

143 143

140 140

143 143

140 140

143 143

140 140

143 143

140 140

143 143

140 140

143 143

38

38

38

37

38

38

38

36

38

35

38

35

38

31

38

35

38

36

38

36

38

36

38

35

38

36

38

36

38

36

38

36

38

36

38

35

38

33

-1

-3

-2

-3

38

34

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

37

37

38

38

37

37

38

38

37

37

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

100

93

100

94

100

90

10

100

90

10

100

82

18

100

85

15

100

82

18

100

84

16

100

86

14

100

86

14

100

85

15

100

85

15

100

87

13

100

87

13

100

98

100

96

100

87

13

100

85

15

100

78

22

100

81

19

98

98

101 101

99

99

101 101

99

99

101 101

100 100

-4

-1

101 101

100 100

101 101

100 100

101 101

100 100

101 100

100 100

101 100

100 100

101 100

100 100

101 100

100 100

101 100

100 100

101 100

151 120

31

-1

151 123

28

152

70

82

151

-3

-2

-3

44

107

150 130

20

151 132

19

151 132

19

151 133

18

151 138

13

151 137

14

151 135

16

151 136

15

151 137

14

151 137

14

151 149

151 147

151 136

15

151 134

17

151 124

27

151 124

27

75

70

75

70

75

68

75

69

75

68

74

66

74

64

10

72

61

11

74

63

11

73

60

13

75

68

73

65

75

60

15

75

62

13

75

65

10

75

67

63

30

33

62

27

35

63

56

62

57

61

24

37

62

23

39

61

57

62

59

D Pressure Differential (psi)

70

70

54

55

56

95

96

73

64

77

49

65

46

107 107

Pressure Differential (psi)

70

54

56

99

62

64

74

77

46

49

66

65

42

46

103 103

77

Residual Pressure (psi)

74

62

74

46

66

42

75

80

D Pressure Differential (psi)

69

55

96

73

74

122 122

75
0

Telog 17 (Telog 3646)

Static Pressure (psi)

70

69

54

55

56

99

96

73

65

77

49

65

45

0
0

Pressure Differential (psi)

70

54

56

99

62

65

74

77

46

49

66

65

42

45

122 122
119 119

Residual Pressure (psi)

74

62

74

46

66

42

108 108

Pressure Differential (psi)

69

55

96

73

74

0
0

Residual Pressure (psi)

70

69

53

55

56

99

96

73

65

77

49

66

47

108 108
103 103

Static Pressure (psi)

70

54

56

99

62

65

74

77

46

49

66

66

47

D Pressure Differential (psi)

75

62

74

46

66

-2

Pressure Differential (psi)

70

55

96

73

75

42

Residual Pressure (psi)

69

70

54

55

56

99

96

73

65

77

-2

49

65

47

42

Pressure Differential (psi)

70

54

56

99

62

65

74

77

48

49

65

47
-2

Residual Pressure (psi)

75

62

74

-1

46

-1

Static Pressure (psi)

79

55

96

73

75

66

D Pressure Differential (psi)

70

79

54

55

56

99

96

73

65

-1

77

50

65

66

Pressure Differential (psi)

70

54

56

99

62

65

75

77

50

67
-2

Residual Pressure (psi)

75

62

74

-2

-2

D Pressure Differential (psi)

69

55

96

73

75

48

Static Pressure (psi)

70

69

54

55

56

99

96

73

-2

64

78

50

46

Pressure Differential (psi)

70

54

56

99

64

65

78

50
-1

Residual Pressure (psi)

75

62

-1

Pressure Differential (psi)

69

54

96

73

75

75

Residual Pressure (psi)

70

69

54

54

56

99

96

73

66

78

74

Pressure Differential (psi)

70

54

56

99

66

78
-2

Residual Pressure (psi)

75

-2

Pressure Differential (psi)

69

54

96

73

75

64

Residual Pressure (psi)

70

69

54

54

56

99

96

73

66

62

Pressure Differential (psi)

70

54

56

99

66
0

Residual Pressure (psi)

74

Pressure Differential (psi)

69

54

96

74

Residual Pressure (psi)

70

69

54

54

56

99

96

Pressure Differential (psi)

70

54

56

99

Residual Pressure (psi)

Pressure Differential (psi)

69

Residual Pressure (psi)

70

69

54

Pressure Differential (psi)

70

54

54

Residual Pressure (psi)

D Pressure Differential (psi)

15

54

56

Static Pressure (psi)

76

23

61

56

73

Telog 16 (Telog 3146)

D Pressure Differential (psi)

64

76

69

96

74

73

Static Pressure (psi)

345
1,900 gpm

87

70

69

54

96

74
4

Telog 15 (Telog 3145)

D Pressure Differential (psi)

17

70

54

54

Telog 14 (Telog 3144)

Pressure Differential (psi)

29

58

-1

54

95

Telog 13 (Telog 3143)

Residual Pressure (psi)

65

75

23

96

99

Telog 12 (Telog 2488)


D Pressure Differential (psi)

94

21

64

69

96
0

Telog 11 (Telog 2487)

Static Pressure (psi)

73

87

69

69

Static Pressure (psi)

345
1,730 gpm

94

-2

70

56

Telog 10 (Telog 2486)

D Pressure Differential (psi)

29

27

56

56

Static Pressure (psi)

26

62

Pressure Differential (psi)

Pressure Differential (psi)

60

91

22

Residual Pressure (psi)

Residual Pressure (psi)

Test Location

86

114

67

56

0
1

Telog 9 (Telog 2485)

D Pressure Differential (psi)

F-19A

38

89

Static Pressure (psi)

F-19

345
1,900 gpm

152

34

53

D Pressure Differential (psi)

F-18A

28

70

56

54

Static Pressure (psi)

F-18

143

56

70

56
1

FIELD TESTING/MODEL SIMULATIONS


Telog 7 (Telog 2217)
Telog 8 (Telog 2218)

D Pressure Differential (psi)

F-17

84

D Pressure Differential (psi)

F-16

152

87

69

Telog 6 (Telog 1739)

Static Pressure (psi)

F-15

65

70

70

Static Pressure (psi)

F-14

345
1,820 gpm

152

70

Telog 5 (Telog 1738)

D Pressure Differential (psi)

F-13

109

D Pressure Differential (psi)

F-12

40

79

Telog 4 (Telog 1656)

Static Pressure (psi)

F-11

149

77

73

Static Pressure (psi)

F-10

75

152

Telog 3 (Telog 1652)

D Pressure Differential (psi)

F-9

1,420 gpm

152
-2

Static Pressure (psi)

F-8

94

Telog 2 (Telog 1509)

D Pressure Differential (psi)

F-7

96

58

Pressure Differential (psi)

F-6

54

152

Residual Pressure (psi)

F-5

150

Telog 1 (Telog 1508)

Static Pressure (psi)

F-4

345

Static Pressure (psi)

F-3

1,510 gpm

Residual 2
D Pressure Differential (psi)

F-2

Static Pressure (psi)

F-1A

F= Field Test Data


M= Model Data

F-1

Test Hydrant Flow (gpm)

Flow Test Number

Residual 1

-3

25

-1

-1

-1

-1

-2

-2

-2

-1

TABLE 2
FINAL HYDRAULIC MODEL CALIBRATION RESULTS
SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT

23

415

84

64

20

1,900 gpm

74

54

20

415

73

56

17

1,790 gpm

56

39

17

415

55

41

14

1,550 gpm

78

54

24

415

76

52

24

2,160 gpm

106

78

28

290

114

89

25

1,790 gpm

49

38

11

290

50

39

11

1,630 gpm

54

50

290

52

49

1,660 gpm

52

40

12

290

52

31

21

1,330 gpm

68

52

16

290

66

50

16

1,870 gpm

60

50

10

290

59

51

1,850 gpm

82

60

22

290

79

60

19

1,970 gpm

96

62

34

290

88

58

30

1,080 gpm

90

16

74

490b

91

22

69

1,870 gpm

90

78

12

490b

91

80

11

1,990 gpm

109

72

37

490

111

72

39

1,970 gpm

86

73

13

490

85

71

14

2,070 gpm

76

67

490

74

66

1,330 gpm

80

36

44

490

97

49

48

1,850 gpm

117

82

35

690

121

83

38

1,820 gpm

147

83

64

690

148

84

64

59

64

60

67

61

65

60

71

63

-2

-3

-4

-5

-1

-1

68

62

112

40

72

112

43

69

112 103

112 104

101

60

41

100

62

38

95

85

10

96

84

12

33

31

32

31

80

69

11

92

79

13

107

76

31

106

72

34

120

74

46

148 105

43

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

69

-5

-1

-1

-2

-3

-1

-3

-1

-3

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Calibration\[Calib_Flow Test Forms_JY.xls]Calib(4)

50

53

48

55

48

53

48

55

53

53

52

55

55

53

52

55

55

53

52

55

55

54

54

55

55

54

54

55

55

54

54

55

55

54

54

54

54

54

54

55

55

54

54

55

55

54

54

55

55

54

54

56

56

58

58

56

56

58

58

56

55

58

58

56

55

57

57

56

55

57

57

56

54

57

57

56

54

58

58

56

56

58

58

56

56

58

58

56

56

58

58

56

56

58

58

56

56

58

58

56

56

58

58

56

56

58

58

56

56

-2

-1

95

95

96

96

95

95

95

95

95

95

95

95

95

95

95

95

95

95

95

95

95

95

95

95

95

95

95

95

95

95

96

96

95

95

96

96

95

95

96

96

95

95

96

91

95

90

96

93

95

92

96

95

95

95

96

96

95

95

96

96

95

95

73

73

74

74

73

73

74

74

73

73

74

74

73

73

74

74

73

73

74

74

73

73

74

74

73

73

74

74

73

73

74

74

73

73

75

75

73

73

75

75

73

73

75

75

73

73

75

75

73

73

75

75

73

73

75

75

73

73

75

55

20

73

51

22

75

54

21

73

51

22

-1

14

64

53

11

65

52

13

64

55

64

64

64

64

64

64

64

64

65

65

64

64

65

65

64

64

66

66

64

64

65

65

64

64

66

66

64

64

66

66

64

64

66

66

64

64

66

66

64

64

65

65

64

64

66

66

64

64

66

66

64

64

66

66

64

64

66

66

64

64

66

66

64

64

64

76

65

11

76

67

77

67

10

76

68

77

67

10

76

69

76

76

75

75

77

77

75

75

77

77

75

75

78

78

75

75

78

78

75

75

78

78

75

75

78

78

75

75

78

78

75

75

78

78

75

75

78

78

75

75

78

78

75

75

78

78

75

75

78

78

75

75

78

78

75

75

78

78

75

75

78

78

75

75

-4

-3

-4

41

45

42

45

41

49

46

48

44

49

47

48

45

48

46

48

45

49

49

48

48

49

49

48

48

49

49

48

48

49

49

48

48

50

50

48

48

50

50

48

48

50

50

48

48

50

50

48

48

50

50

48

48

50

50

48

48

50

50

48

48

50

50

48

48

50

50

48

48

50

50

48

48

50

50

48

48

50

50

48

48

-5

-2

-2

-3

66

65

65

66

66

66

66

66

66

65

65

66

66

65

65

66

66

65

65

66

66

65

65

66

66

65

65

66

66

65

65

66

66

65

65

66

66

65

65

66

66

64

64

66

66

66

66

66

66

66

66

66

66

65

65

66

66

65

65

66

66

65

65

66

66

64

64

66

66

65

65

66

66

65

65

66

66

66

66

66

66

66

66

66

66

42

47

47

42

42

46

46

42

42

47

47

42

42

46

46

42

42

45

45

42

42

45

45

42

42

46

46

42

42

46

46

42

42

47

47

42

42

47

47

42

42

46

46

42

42

47

47

42

42

46

46

42

42

46

46

42

42

46

46

42

42

46

46

42

42

47

47

42

42

47

47

42

42

46

46

42

42

46

46

42

42

46

46

42

42

46

46

42

42

103 103

107 107

103 103

109 109

103 103

108 108

103 103

109 109

103 103

107 107

103 103

107 107

103 103

106 106

103 103

107 107

103 103

108 108

103 103

109 109

103 103

108 108

103 103

108 108

103 103

108 108

103 103

108 108

103 103

108 108

103 103

107 107

103 103

107 107

103 103

109 109

103 103

108 108

103 103

108 108

103 103

108 108

103 103

108 108

103 103

107 107

103 103

119 119

121 121

119 119

122 122

119 119

122 122

119 119

122 122

119 119

121 121

119 119

120 120

119 119

120 120

119 119

121 121

119 119

121 121

119 119

122 122

119 119

121 121

119 119

122 122

119 119

122 122

119 119

121 121

119 119

121 121

119 119

121 121

119 119

121 121

119 119

121 121

119 119

121 121

119 119

121 121

119 119

121 121

119 119

121 121

119 119

121 121

119 119

77

75

75

77

77

75

75

77

77

75

75

77

77

75

75

77

77

75

75

77

77

75

75

77

77

75

75

77

77

76

75

77

77

75

75

77

77

75

75

77

77

75

75

77

77

75

75

77

77

75

75

77

77

75

75

77

77

74

74

77

77

75

75

77

77

75

75

77

77

75

75

77

77

75

75

77

77

75

75

77

77

75

75

77

77

75

75

77

77

75

75

77

77

75

75

77

77

-1

139 139

143 143

139 139

143 143

140 140

143 143

139 139

143 143

140 140

143 143

139 139

143 143

140 140

143 143

140 140

143 143

140 140

143 143

139 139

143 143

139 139

143 143

139 139

143 143

139 139

143 143

139 139

143 143

140 140

143 143

140 140

143 143

139 139

143 143

140 140

143 143

140 140

143 143

139 139

143 143

139 139

143 143

139 139

143 143

139 139

143 143

140 140

143 143

140 140

143 143

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

38

99

99

100 100

99

99

100 100

100 100

100 100

100 100

100 100

100 100

100 100

100 100

100 100

100 100

100 100

100 100

100 100

100 100

100 100

99

99

101 100

99

99

101 100

100 100

101 100

100 100

101 100

100 100

101 100

100 100

101 100

100 100

101 100

100 100

101 100

100 100

101 100

100 100

101 100

99

99

101 100

99

99

101 100

99

99

101 100

99

99

101 100

100 100

101 100

100 100

101 100

67

65

68

66

67

63

68

66

75

68

74

70

75

67

74

69

71

58

13

70

60

10

71

57

14

70

60

10

75

64

11

74

66

75

65

10

74

67

75

66

74

68

74

73

73

73

73

73

73

73

74

74

73

73

74

74

73

73

74

74

73

73

74

74

73

73

74

74

73

73

74

74

73

73

70

70

70

66

70

68

70

68

110

75

35

111

78

33

109 109

111 110

110 110

111 111

110 110

111 111

110 110

108 108

110 110

108 108

D Pressure Differential (psi)

54

64

69

69

53

55

96

74

11

51

72

-4

45

-3

66

42

75

77

Pressure Differential (psi)

63

69

53

58

99

96

73

74

53

65

13

121 121

75
0

D Pressure Differential (psi)

14

55

58

99

73

64

60

42

65

46

0
0

Pressure Differential (psi)

18

54

69

55

56

-1

15

64

73

45

45

66

65

42

46

120 120
119 119

Residual Pressure (psi)

33

68

69

69

53

55

96

74

50

72

-3

48

-2

66

42

108 108

Pressure Differential (psi)

51

69

-2

53

-1

58

99

96

73

74

52

65

11

0
0

Residual Pressure (psi)

12

56

58

99

73

61

62

46

65

46

108 108
103 103

Static Pressure (psi)

39

69

55

56

13

71

73

46

49

66

65

46

D Pressure Differential (psi)

59

51

69

69

53

55

96

74

48

76

-3

48

-3

66

Pressure Differential (psi)

61

-1

69

53

-1

99

96

73

74

53

61

42

Residual Pressure (psi)

56

99

73

61

70

47

65

46

42

Pressure Differential (psi)

56

68

54

56

11

72

77

41

49

65

46
0

Residual Pressure (psi)

62

60

68

69

54

55

96

75

50

76

-4

43

-2

Static Pressure (psi)

64

69

54

99

96

73

75

60

61

66

D Pressure Differential (psi)

56

99

73

64

70

40

66

66

Pressure Differential (psi)

64

67

55

56

68

77

42

66
1

Residual Pressure (psi)

95

66

70

69

54

55

96

75

58

70

-1

D Pressure Differential (psi)

100

-3

70

-2

54

99

96

73

75

60

65

40

Static Pressure (psi)

56

99

73

64

66

40

43

Pressure Differential (psi)

12

72

70

55

56

-1

70

42
0

Residual Pressure (psi)

66

76

70

70

54

55

96

74

57

Pressure Differential (psi)

78

70

54

99

95

73

74

56

65

68

Residual Pressure (psi)

14

56

99

73

59

68

70

Pressure Differential (psi)

12

68

69

55

56

70
1

Residual Pressure (psi)

36

82

70

69

54

55

96

74

53

Pressure Differential (psi)

48

-3

70

-5

54

99

96

73

74

57

Residual Pressure (psi)

12

56

99

73

Pressure Differential (psi)

11

38

69

55

56

Residual Pressure (psi)

59

50

70

69

54

55

96

Pressure Differential (psi)

70

-3

70

-3

54

99

96

Residual Pressure (psi)

16

56

Pressure Differential (psi)

17

54

70

56

56

Residual Pressure (psi)

68

70

70

70

54

56

Pressure Differential (psi)

85

-3

70

-3

54

Residual Pressure (psi)

20

Pressure Differential (psi)

13

67

70

Residual Pressure (psi)

67

87

Pressure Differential (psi)

80

70

70

99

Pressure Differential (psi)

39

61

70

-3

55

56

Residual Pressure (psi)

45

84

16

54

55

74

55

59

D Pressure Differential (psi)

84

72

54

56

74

57
0

Telog 17 (Telog 3646)

Static Pressure (psi)

49

88

56

Telog 16 (Telog 3146)

Residual Pressure (psi)

415
2,030 gpm

56

69

73

Telog 15 (Telog 3145)

Static Pressure (psi)

39

70

69

55

96

74

73

Telog 14 (Telog 3144)

Static Pressure (psi)

13

49

70

-7

54

55

96

74
0

Telog 13 (Telog 3143)

D Pressure Differential (psi)

44

88

10

54

Telog 12 (Telog 2488)


D Pressure Differential (psi)

57

49

Residual Pressure (psi)

Pressure Differential (psi)

Residual Pressure (psi)

Static Pressure (psi)

F= Field Test Data


M= Model Data

Test Location

35

59

99

Telog 11 (Telog 2487)

Static Pressure (psi)

F-43

415
1,970 gpm

42

-2

69

96

99

Static Pressure (psi)

F-42

13

70

69

96
0

Telog 10 (Telog 2486)

D Pressure Differential (psi)

F-41

10

45

70

Pressure Differential (psi)

F-40

43

58

14

56

Residual Pressure (psi)

F-39

53

30

55

56

Static Pressure (psi)

F-38

57

44

55

0
0

Telog 9 (Telog 2485)

D Pressure Differential (psi)

F-37A

415
1,660 gpm

60

Static Pressure (psi)

F-37

12

54

D Pressure Differential (psi)

F-36

24

44

69

55

54

Static Pressure (psi)

F-35

25

56

69

55
0

FIELD TESTING/MODEL SIMULATIONS


Telog 7 (Telog 2217)
Telog 8 (Telog 2218)

D Pressure Differential (psi)

F-34

49

D Pressure Differential (psi)

F-33

57

70

Telog 6 (Telog 1739)

Static Pressure (psi)

F-32

415
1,210 gpm

60

69

70

Static Pressure (psi)

F-31

19

69
3

Telog 5 (Telog 1738)

D Pressure Differential (psi)

F-30

28

D Pressure Differential (psi)

F-29

47

71

Telog 4 (Telog 1656)

Static Pressure (psi)

F-28

70

78

Static Pressure (psi)

F-27

1,210 gpm

74
6

Telog 3 (Telog 1652)

D Pressure Differential (psi)

F-26

12

Static Pressure (psi)

F-25

43

Telog 2 (Telog 1509)

D Pressure Differential (psi)

F-24

48

55

Static Pressure (psi)

F-23

54

Telog 1 (Telog 1508)


D Pressure Differential (psi)

F-22

415

Static Pressure (psi)

F-21

1,380 gpm

Residual 2
D Pressure Differential (psi)

F-20

Test Hydrant Flow (gpm)

Flow Test Number

Residual 1

-2

-3

-3

-3

-4

-3

-3

-3

-1

-4

-2

TABLE 3
HYDRAULIC MODEL FACILITY UPDATES
SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT
Facility Name
Juanita Supply Vault 1
Juanita Supply Vault 2 (San Clement)
Beach Road Interconnection

Adjustment
8-inch PRV set to 10 psi based on SCWD personnel provided data and field measurements.
10-inch PRV not updated and currently set to closed. Pipe diameters at Vault 1 were updated
to match field verified diameters.
Replaced negative demand with fixed head reservoir and PRV set to 60 psi. This does not
properly model Vault 2, but provides supply to San Clement customers. No field testing or
calibration occurred in this system and therefore, no field data available for comparison.
Interconnected to WIP line with 8-inch water main as noted in field. PRV set to 122 psi based
on field data collected and calibration results.

Stonehill Drive Meter Supply

Removed negative demand and modeled reservoir with controls based on DP Level.

Dana Point Reservoir

Reservoir base elevation raised to 358 feet to match field data based on SCADA data levels.
Tank diameter changed to 90 feet to simulate 2.0 MG approximate tank volume.

Pacific Coast Highway PRV Vault


Cove Road PRV Vault
Pump Station 8
Pump Station 9

FCMV#1

5B and 5B-1 Reservoirs


Cape Cove Powered Check Valve

All four PRVs modeled and PRV direction set to supply Dana Point Harbor. PRV and piping
sizes updated to match information from field measurements. PCH 3-inch PRV set to 78 psi
and 8-inch PRV set to 66 psi. Cove Road 3-inch PRV set to 74 psi and 6-inch PRV set to 70
psi. PRV settings set based on SCWD personnel information and model calibration. 3-inch
PRVs set to close when flow exceeds 450 gpm; leading to large PRVs opening.
Pumps set to provided pump curves and setting of 76% to calibrate hydraulic model. PRV set
to 62 psi added to station discharge to simulate VFD pumps.
Pump Station 9 (single fire pump) added to hydraulic model with provided design point. Fire
pump must be manually turned on with 90% setting to operate.
Replaced negative demand and connection to JTM with a fixed head reservoir simulating WIP
hydraulic grade line. FCMV#1 connection is modeled as a FCV set to field setting and PRV
set to 155 psi (approximately 415 HGL). FCMV#1 was closed during calibration and
therefore, settings based on provided data only.
Reservoir 5B and 5B-1 base elevation set to 397 feet to match field data based on SCADA
data. Tanks modeled as cylindrical tanks with 24 foot head range and diameters to match
total volume. New Reservoir 5B-1 was modeled to replace tank labeled BBEAR.
PRV set to 20 psi to model powered check valve from South Coast 415 pressure zone to 290
pressure zone. Setting based on provided data.

Niguel Terrace PRV

PRV set to 20 psi to model pressure reducing valve located in Niguel Terrorize providing
water from South Coast 415 zone to 290 pressure zone. Setting based on provided data.

Canyon Supply

Replaced negative demand with fixed head reservoir. Connection modeled as a FCV set to
field setting and PRV set to 56 psi (approximately 290 HGL).

Coast Supply

Added fixed head reservoir to model supply line; pump status remains closed. Bypass line
closed and pump direction modeled into 290 pressure zone.

5A and 5A-1 Reservoirs


290 | 490 Pressure Zone Boundary
Pump Station 2

Reservoir diameters set to match total volume. Unknown why there are two tanks modeled
per actual tank. Model not changed, but, it is recommended to model each tank as one.
The South Coast 290 and 490 Pressure Zones were not hydraulically separated in the
hydraulic model. AIM-WPM-11111 was closed to establish pressure zone boundary. Water
main AIM-WPM-12565 was opened as it is not on pressure zone boundary.
PRV set to 68 psi was added at discharge of Pump 1 to simulate VFD. Pump 2 was
calibrated using a setting of 80%.

Pump Station 3

Pump 1 was set to operate at 93% to match flow during extended period calibration.

All reservoirs

All reservoirs have a minimum level of 1 foot; however, in the field it was noted that most
tanks discharge below ground. It is recommended that this minimum level be removed.

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Calibration\[Hydraulic Model Update.xls]facility

TABLE 4
HYDRAULIC MODEL WATER MAIN UPDATES
SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT
Water Main ID

Adjustment

AIM-WPM-8455

Water main not connected at both ends; model corrected to completely connect pipes.

AIM-WPM-8858

Water main not connected at both ends; model corrected to completely connect pipes.

AIM-WPM-9197

Water main was closed (not believed to be); water main reopened for model calibration.

AIM-WPM-7821

Water main not connected at both ends; model corrected to completely connect pipes.

AIM-WPM-11429

Water main not connected at both ends; model corrected to completely connect pipes.

AIM-WPM-12640

Water main not connected at both ends; model corrected to completely connect pipes.

AIM-WPM-11111

Water main closed to establish 290 | 490 Pressure Zone boundary.

AIM-WPM-12266

Water main was closed (not believed to be); water main reopened for model calibration.

AIM-WPM-12565
AIM-WPM-9303

Water main descriptions lists "BFP." No changes to model; needs to be investigated.

AIM-WPM-9530

Water main not connected at both ends; model corrected to completely connect pipes.

HYDRAULIC MODEL WATER MAIN CALIBRATION ADJUSTMENTS


SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT

Water Main ID

Adjustment

AIM-WPM-8361, etc.

Increased pipe diameter from 6-inch to 8-inch in alley, North of Domingo Ave and West of
Doheny Park Road.

AIM-WPM-10166, etc.

Increased pipe diameter on Ocean Hill Dr; however, other increases in the vicinity would
improve calibration.

AIM-WPM-10557, etc.

Increase pipe diameter from 6-inch to 8-inch on Capstan Drive.

AIM-WPM-12726

Additional interconnection with 24-inch water main at 6-inch water main on Lagunita Drive.

AIM-WPM-11736, etc.

Change pipe C-value to replicate PVC (material left as ACP) for Breakers Isle water mains.

AIM-WPM-10772, etc.

Decrease pipe diameter from 8-inch to 6-inch on Ascension Road.

AIM-WPM-10180

Added small minor loss to replicated flow rate observed in SCADA data.

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Calibration\[Hydraulic Model Update.xls]pipes

FIGURES

F31 F
F38 F

F39 F

F32 F

Friday, April 4, 2008 - 2:44:12 PM

LEGEND

FLOW TEST LOCATIONS

FLOWING HYDRANT

PRESSURE MONITORING

PERMENANT TELOG

F42 F

F41 F

F43
F

F40 F

F33 F

F34 F

TEMPORARY TELOG
WATER MAIN

F23 F

F25 F

F26 F

F28 F

F14 F

F13 F

F15 F

F07 F

F08 F

F12 F

F10 F

F06 F

!
F11 F

2,000

4,000

FEET

6,000

F04 F

F03 F

F07 F

F06 F

F05 F

F08 F

F09 F

F16 F

F09 F

F19 F

F27 F

F36 F

F20 F

F21 F

!
!

F22 F

F18 F

F35 F

L:\work\Projects\103163\gra\Figures\Figure Field Test Locations.mxd

F24 F

F17 F

F02 F

F05 F

F04 F

F01 F

103163
SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT

F37 F

F30!F
!

APR 2008

FIGURE 1
FLOW AND PRESSURE TEST LOCATIONS

F29 F

103163

FIGURE 2
FINAL CALIBRATION ACCURACY

!
!

!!

APR 2008

F31 F
F38 F

SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT

F37 F

F29 F

! ! !

!!F30 F
!

F39 F

L:\work\Projects\103163\gra\Figures\Figure Calibration Results.mxd

Friday, April 4, 2008 - 2:42:50 PM

F32 F

F42 F

F41 F

! !!F43F
!
!F40 F
!!

!!

! F33 F
F34 F
!

!
!

LEGEND
FLOW HYDRANT

!
!

DOES CALIBRATE
WITHIN DESIRED ACCURACY

!
F35 F
!!

DOES NOT CALIBRATE


WITHIN DESIRED ACCURACY
WATER MAIN

F36 F

!!

2,000

4,000

FEET

!!

F24 F

6,000

F23 F

F25 F

F21 F

F20 F

!
!
!
F22 F
!
! F18 F

!
F10 F
!F26 F ! !

!
!
F19 F
!

!!!

F15 F
!
! F11 F
F27 F
!
!
!

!
F12 F
!
F14 F
! F28 F !
!

!
F13 F

!!
F16 F
!
!

!
F17 F
!

F09 F

!!

F08 F

F07 F

!!F06 F !

! F05 F

F03 F

F09 F

!!

!!

F08 F

F04 F
!

F07 F

!!
!!F06 F

! F05 F

F04 F
!

! ! F02 F

!! F01 F
!
!

12/20/07
12:00 PM

12/20/07
6:00 PM

Time

12/21/07
12:00 AM

12/21/07
12:00 AM

12/21/07
6:00 AM

12/21/07
12:00 PM

12/21/07
6:00 PM

12/22/07
12:00 AM

10

15

20

25

12/20/07
12:00 AM

Observed Reservoir Level

Time

Model Reservoir Level

12/20/07
6:00 PM

12/22/07
12:00 AM

12/20/07
12:00 AM

12/20/07
12:00 PM

12/21/07
6:00 PM

12/20/07
6:00 AM

12/21/07
12:00 PM

Model Reservoir Level

12/21/07
6:00 AM

0.6 MG Reservoir 4A Water Level


290 Pressure Zone

Observed Reservoir Level

12/20/07
6:00 AM

10

15

20

25

12/20/07
12:00 AM

10

15

20

25

12/20/07
12:00 AM

10

15

20

25

0.6 MG Reservoir 1A Water Level


290 Pressure Zone

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Calibration\[SCWD_MacroCalib.xls]Fig_Res (290)

Level (ft)

Level (ft)

Level (ft)
Level (ft)

12/20/07
6:00 AM

12/20/07
6:00 AM

12/20/07
6:00 PM

Time

12/21/07
12:00 AM

12/20/07
6:00 PM

Time

12/21/07
12:00 AM

12/21/07
6:00 AM

12/21/07
6:00 PM

12/22/07
12:00 AM

12/22/07
12:00 AM

Model Reservoir Level

12/21/07
12:00 PM

12/21/07
6:00 PM

Model Reservoir Level

12/21/07
12:00 PM

APR 2008

SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT


103163

FIGURE 3
EXTENDED PERIOD CALIBRATION RESULTS
290 PRESSURE ZONE
RESERVOIR WATER LEVEL

Observed Reservoir Level

12/20/07
12:00 PM

12/21/07
6:00 AM

0.6 MG Reservoir 5A Water Level


290 Pressure Zone

Observed Reservoir Level

12/20/07
12:00 PM

2.0 MG Reservoir 2A Water Level


290 Pressure Zone

12/20/07
12:00 PM

12/20/07
6:00 PM

Time

12/21/07
12:00 AM

12/21/07
12:00 AM

12/21/07
6:00 AM

12/21/07
12:00 PM

12/21/07
6:00 PM

12/22/07
12:00 AM

500

1,000

1,500

2,000

2,500

12/20/07
12:00 AM

Observed Flow rate

Time

Model Flow rate

0
12/20/07
6:00 PM

12/22/07
12:00 AM

12/20/07
12:00 AM

12/20/07
12:00 PM

12/21/07
6:00 PM

12/20/07
6:00 AM

12/21/07
12:00 PM

Model Reservoir Level

12/21/07
6:00 AM

Pump Station #2 Flow


290 Pressure Zone Supply 490b Pressure Zone

Observed Reservoir Level

12/20/07
6:00 AM

200

400

600

800

1,000

12/20/07
12:00 AM

20

40

60

80

100

120

140

160

180

12/20/07
12:00 AM

10

15

20

25

30

0.6 MG Reservoir 5A-1 Water Level


290 Pressure Zone

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Calibration\[SCWD_MacroCalib.xls]Fig_Res&Flow (290)

Level (ft)

Flowrate (gpm)

Flowrate (gpm)

Flowrate (gpm)

12/20/07
6:00 AM

12/20/07
6:00 AM

12/20/07
6:00 PM

Time

12/21/07
12:00 AM

12/21/07
6:00 AM

12/20/07
6:00 PM

Time

12/21/07
12:00 AM

12/21/07
6:00 AM

12/21/07
6:00 PM

Model Flow rate

12/21/07
12:00 PM

12/22/07
12:00 AM

12/22/07
12:00 AM

APR 2008

SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT


103163

FIGURE 4
EXTENDED PERIOD CALIBRATION RESULTS
290 PRESSURE ZONE
RESERVOIR LEVEL AND SYSTEM FLOW RATE

Observed Flow rate

12/20/07
12:00 PM

12/21/07
6:00 PM

Model Flow rate

12/21/07
12:00 PM

Pump Station #6 Flow


290 Pressure Zone Supply 415 Pressure Zone

Observed Flow rate

12/20/07
12:00 PM

Canyon Supply Flow


290 Pressure Zone Water Supply

Pressure (psi)

Pressure (psi)

12/21/07
6:00 AM

12/21/07
12:00 PM

12/21/07
6:00 PM

12/22/07
12:00 AM

12/20/07
12:00 AM

40

45

50

55

60

65

70

12/20/07
6:00 PM

Time

12/21/07
12:00 AM

Observed System Pressure

12/20/07
12:00 PM

12/21/07
12:00 PM

12/21/07
6:00 PM

Model System Pressure

12/21/07
6:00 AM

12/22/07
12:00 AM

Model System Pressure

Telog 1652 290 Zone Pressure


Niguel Road at Coast Highway (NE corner, 16-inch main)

12/20/07
6:00 AM

12/21/07
12:00 AM

12/21/07
12:00 PM

12/21/07
6:00 PM

12/22/07
12:00 AM

Model System Pressure

12/21/07
6:00 AM

APR 2008

SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT


103163

FIGURE 5
EXTENDED PERIOD CALIBRATION RESULTS
290 PRESSURE ZONE
WATER SYSTEM PRESSURE

Time

12/20/07
6:00 PM

Observed System Pressure

12/20/07
12:00 PM

Time

12/20/07
6:00 AM

Telog 1509 290 Zone Pressure


234 Monarch Bay Drive

Observed System Pressure

12/20/07
12:00 AM

12/21/07
12:00 AM

40
12/20/07
6:00 PM

12/20/07
12:00 AM

12/20/07
12:00 PM

50

12/20/07
6:00 AM

45

50

55

60

65

70

55

60

65

70

75

80

Telog 1508 290 Zone Pressure


South of Ocean Vista Drive at Coast Highway

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Calibration\[SCWD_MacroCalib.xls]Fig_Telog (290)

Pressure (psi)

12/20/07
12:00 PM

12/20/07
6:00 PM

Time

12/21/07
12:00 AM

12/21/07
12:00 AM

12/21/07
6:00 AM

12/21/07
12:00 PM

12/21/07
6:00 PM

12/22/07
12:00 AM

15

20

25

30

12/20/07
12:00 AM

Observed Reservoir Level

Time

Model Reservoir Level

0
12/20/07
12:00 AM

12/20/07
12:00 AM

12/20/07
6:00 PM

12/22/07
12:00 AM

12/20/07
12:00 PM

12/21/07
6:00 PM

10

12/20/07
6:00 AM

12/21/07
12:00 PM

Model Reservoir Level

12/21/07
6:00 AM

0.5 MG Reservoir 4B Water Level


490 Pressure Zone

Observed Reservoir Level

12/20/07
6:00 AM

10

15

20

25

30

10

15

20

25

30

12/20/07
12:00 AM

10

15

20

25

30

0.1 MG Reservoir 2B Water Level


490 Pressure Zone

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Calibration\[SCWD_MacroCalib.xls]Fig_Res (490)

Level (ft)

Level (ft)

Level (ft)
Level (ft)

12/20/07
6:00 AM

12/20/07
6:00 AM

12/20/07
6:00 PM

Time

12/21/07
12:00 AM

12/21/07
6:00 AM

12/20/07
6:00 PM

Time

12/21/07
12:00 AM

12/21/07
6:00 AM

12/21/07
6:00 PM

Model Reservoir Level

12/21/07
12:00 PM

12/22/07
12:00 AM

12/22/07
12:00 AM

APR 2008

SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT


103163

FIGURE 6
EXTENDED PERIOD CALIBRATION RESULTS
490 PRESSURE ZONE
RESERVOIR LEVEL

Observed Reservoir Level

12/20/07
12:00 PM

12/21/07
6:00 PM

Model Reservoir Level

12/21/07
12:00 PM

1.0 MG Reservoir 4B-1 Water Level


490 Pressure Zone

Observed Reservoir Level

12/20/07
12:00 PM

0.1 MG Reservoir 3B Water Level


490 Pressure Zone

12/20/07
12:00 AM

200

400

600

800

1,000

1,200

12/20/07
12:00 AM

20

40

60

80

100

120

140

160

180

12/20/07
6:00 AM

12/20/07
6:00 AM

12/20/07
6:00 PM

Time

12/21/07
12:00 AM

12/21/07
6:00 AM

12/20/07
6:00 PM

Observed Flowrate

12/20/07
12:00 PM

Time

12/21/07
12:00 AM

12/21/07
6:00 AM

12/21/07
6:00 PM

12/22/07
12:00 AM

12/22/07
12:00 AM

12/20/07
12:00 AM

80

85

90

95

100

105

110

12/20/07
12:00 AM

50

100

150

200

250

300

350

400

Model Flowrate

12/21/07
12:00 PM

12/21/07
6:00 PM

Model Flowrate

12/21/07
12:00 PM

Pump Station #4 Flow


290 Pressure Zone Supply 490 Pressure Zone

Observed Flowrate

12/20/07
12:00 PM

Pump Station #2 Flow


290 Pressure Zone Supply 490b Pressure Zone

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Calibration\[SCWD_MacroCalib.xls]Fig_Flow&Telog (490)

Flowrate (gpm)

Flowrate (gpm)

Flowrate (gpm)
Pressure (psi)

12/20/07
6:00 AM

12/20/07
6:00 AM

12/20/07
6:00 PM

Time

12/21/07
12:00 AM

12/21/07
6:00 AM

12/20/07
6:00 PM

Time

12/21/07
12:00 AM

12/21/07
12:00 PM

12/21/07
6:00 PM

12/22/07
12:00 AM

Model System Pressure

12/21/07
6:00 AM

12/22/07
12:00 AM

APR 2008

SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT


103163

FIGURE 7
EXTENDED PERIOD CALIBRATION RESULTS
490 PRESSURE ZONE
SYSTEM FLOW RATE AND PRESSURE

Observed System Pressure

12/20/07
12:00 PM

12/21/07
6:00 PM

Model Flowrate

12/21/07
12:00 PM

Telog 1656 490 Zone Pressure


Mediterranean Drive at Baltic Sea Drive

Observed Flowrate

12/20/07
12:00 PM

Pump Station #3 Flow


290 Pressure Zone Supply 490 Pressure Zone

Pressure (psi)

Level (ft)

12/20/07
12:00 AM

80
78
76
74
72
70
68
66
64
62
60

12/20/07
12:00 AM

10

15

20

25

30

12/20/07
12:00 PM

12/20/07
6:00 PM

Time

12/21/07
12:00 AM

12/20/07
6:00 AM

12/21/07
12:00 PM

12/20/07
6:00 PM

Time

12/21/07
12:00 AM

Observed System Pressure

12/20/07
12:00 PM

12/21/07
6:00 PM

12/21/07
12:00 PM

12/22/07
12:00 AM

12/22/07
12:00 AM

12/20/07
12:00 AM

50

100

150

200

250

300

350

400

450

Model System Pressure

12/21/07
6:00 AM

12/21/07
6:00 PM

Model Reservoir Level

12/21/07
6:00 AM

Telog 1738 690 Zone Pressure


Sea Island Drive at Somerset Circle

Observed Reservoir Level

12/20/07
6:00 AM

0.5 MG Reservoir 2C Water Level


690 Pressure Zone

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Calibration\[SCWD_MacroCalib.xls]Fig_Res&Flow&Telog (690)

Flowrate (gpm)

12/20/07
6:00 AM

12/20/07
6:00 PM

Time

12/21/07
12:00 AM

12/21/07
6:00 AM

12/21/07
6:00 PM

Model Flowrate

12/21/07
12:00 PM

12/22/07
12:00 AM

APR 2008

SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT


103163

FIGURE 8
EXTENDED PERIOD CALIBRATION RESULTS
690 PRESSURE ZONE - RESERVOIR
LEVEL, SYSTEM FLOW RATE AND PRESSURE

Observed Flowrate

12/20/07
12:00 PM

Pump Station #5 Flow


490 Pressure Zone Supply 690 Pressure Zone

12/20/07
12:00 PM

12/20/07
6:00 PM

Time

12/21/07
12:00 AM

12/21/07
12:00 AM

12/21/07
6:00 AM

12/21/07
12:00 PM

12/21/07
6:00 PM

12/22/07
12:00 AM

50

100

150

250
200

300

350

400

450

500

12/20/07
12:00 AM

Observed Flowrate

Time

Model Flowrate

0
12/20/07
6:00 PM

12/22/07
12:00 AM

12/20/07
12:00 AM

12/20/07
12:00 PM

12/21/07
6:00 PM

12/20/07
12:00 AM

12/20/07
6:00 AM

12/21/07
12:00 PM

Model Reservoir Level

12/21/07
6:00 AM

Pump Station #6 Flow


290 Pressure Zone Supply 415 Pressure Zone

Observed Reservoir Level

12/20/07
6:00 AM

10

15

20

25

30

500

1,000

1,500

2,000

2,500

12/20/07
12:00 AM

10

15

20

25

30

2.0 MG Reservoir 5B Water Level


415 Pressure Zone

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Calibration\[SCWD_MacroCalib.xls]Fig_Res&Flow (415)

Level (ft)

Flowrate (gpm)

Level (ft)
Flowrate (gpm)

12/20/07
12:00 PM

12/20/07
6:00 PM

Time

12/21/07
12:00 AM

12/20/07
6:00 AM

12/21/07
12:00 PM

12/20/07
6:00 PM

Time

12/21/07
12:00 AM

12/21/07
6:00 AM

12/21/07
6:00 PM

Model Flowrate

12/21/07
12:00 PM

12/22/07
12:00 AM

12/22/07
12:00 AM

APR 2008

SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT


103163

FIGURE 9
EXTENDED PERIOD CALIBRATION RESULTS
415 PRESSURE ZONE
RESERVOIR LEVEL AND SYSTEM FLOW RATE

Observed Flowrate

12/20/07
12:00 PM

12/21/07
6:00 PM

Model Reservoir Level

12/21/07
6:00 AM

FCMV #1 Flow
415 Pressure Zone Water Supply

Observed Reservoir Level

12/20/07
6:00 AM

7.8 MG Reservoir 5B-1 Water Level


415 Pressure Zone

Pressure (psi)

Pressure (psi)

12/21/07
6:00 AM

12/21/07
12:00 PM

12/21/07
6:00 PM

12/22/07
12:00 AM

12/20/07
12:00 AM

30

35

40

45

50

55

60

12/20/07
6:00 AM

12/21/07
12:00 AM

12/20/07
6:00 PM

Time

12/21/07
12:00 AM

Observed System Pressure

12/20/07
12:00 PM

12/21/07
12:00 PM

12/21/07
6:00 PM

12/22/07
12:00 AM

Model System Pressure

12/21/07
6:00 AM

Telog 2218 415 Zone Pressure


Acapula Drive at Street of the Golden Lantern

12/21/07
12:00 PM

12/21/07
6:00 PM

12/22/07
12:00 AM

Model System Pressure

12/21/07
6:00 AM

APR 2008

SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT


103163

FIGURE 10
EXTENDED PERIOD CALIBRATION RESULTS
415 PRESSURE ZONE
SYSTEM PRESSURE

Observed System Pressure

12/20/07
6:00 PM

Time
Model System Pressure

12/20/07
12:00 PM

Time

12/20/07
6:00 AM

Telog 2217 415 Zone Pressure


Tirremia Drive at Monarch Beach Road

Observed System Pressure

12/20/07
12:00 AM

12/21/07
12:00 AM

60

12/20/07
6:00 PM

12/20/07
12:00 AM

12/20/07
12:00 PM

50

12/20/07
6:00 AM

65

70

75

80

85

90

55

60

65

70

75

80

Telog 1739 415 Zone Pressure


Garibaldi Avenue at Selva Road

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Calibration\[SCWD_MacroCalib.xls]Fig_Telog (415)

Pressure (psi)

12/20/07
12:00 PM

12/20/07
6:00 PM

Time

12/21/07
12:00 AM

12/21/07
6:00 AM

12/21/07
6:00 AM

12/21/07
12:00 PM

12/21/07
6:00 PM

12/22/07
12:00 AM

Observed Flowrate

Time

Model Flowrate

12/20/07
12:00 AM

12/21/07
12:00 AM

55

60

65

70

75

80

0
12/20/07
6:00 PM

Observed Flowrate

12/20/07
12:00 PM

Time

12/21/07
12:00 AM

12/21/07
6:00 AM

Stonehill Flow
Dana Point Water Supply

12/21/07
6:00 PM

Model Flowrate

12/21/07
12:00 PM

12/20/07
6:00 PM

Time

12/21/07
12:00 AM

12/21/07
12:00 PM

12/21/07
6:00 PM

12/22/07
12:00 AM

Model System Pressure

12/21/07
6:00 AM

12/22/07
12:00 AM

APR 2008

SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT


103163

FIGURE 11
EXTENDED PERIOD CALIBRATION RESULTS
DANA POINT WATER SYSTEM - RESERVOIR
LEVEL, SYSTEM FLOW RATE AND PRESSURE

Observed System Pressure

12/20/07
12:00 PM

Telog 2485 Dana Point System Pressure


Street of the Blue Lantern at Selva Road (NE corner)

12/20/07
6:00 AM

12/20/07
6:00 AM

12/20/07
12:00 AM

50
12/20/07
6:00 PM

12/22/07
12:00 AM

12/20/07
12:00 PM

12/21/07
6:00 PM

Model Reservoir Level

12/21/07
12:00 PM

Groundwater Recovery Facility Flow


Dana Point Water Supply

Observed Reservoir Level

12/20/07
6:00 AM

12/20/07
6:00 AM

500

1,000

1,500

2,000

2,500

3,000

12/20/07
12:00 AM

500

1,000

1,500

2,000

2,500

3,000

12/20/07
12:00 AM

10

15

20

25

30

35

40

45

2.0 MG Dana Point Reservoir Water Level

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Calibration\[SCWD_MacroCalib.xls]Fig_Res&Flow (DP)

Level (ft)

Flowrate (gpm)

Flowrate (gpm)

Pressure (psi)

12/20/07
6:00 PM

Time

12/21/07
12:00 AM

12/21/07
12:00 PM

12/21/07
12:00 AM

12/21/07
6:00 AM

12/21/07
12:00 PM

12/21/07
6:00 PM

12/22/07
12:00 AM

70

75

80

85

90

12/20/07
12:00 AM

90

12/20/07
12:00 AM

Observed System Pressure

Time

Model System Pressure

12/20/07
12:00 AM

60
12/20/07
6:00 PM

12/22/07
12:00 AM

100

12/20/07
12:00 PM

12/21/07
6:00 PM

Model System Pressure

12/21/07
6:00 AM

Telog 2488 Dana Point System Pressure


Coast Highway, East of Street of Copper Lantern

Observed System Pressure

12/20/07
12:00 PM

65

12/20/07
6:00 AM

12/20/07
6:00 AM

95

100

105

110

115

120

105

110

115

120

125

130

12/20/07
12:00 AM

30

35

40

45

50

55

60

Telog 2486 Dana Point System Pressure


Selva Road at Street of the Copper Lantern

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Calibration\[SCWD_MacroCalib.xls]Fig_Telog (DP)

Pressure (psi)

Pressure (psi)

Pressure (psi)
Pressure (psi)

12/20/07
6:00 PM

Time

12/21/07
12:00 AM

12/21/07
6:00 AM

12/20/07
12:00 PM

12/20/07
6:00 PM

Time

12/21/07
12:00 AM

12/21/07
12:00 PM

12/21/07
6:00 PM

12/22/07
12:00 AM

12/22/07
12:00 AM

APR 2008

SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT


103163

FIGURE 12
EXTENDED PERIOD CALIBRATION RESULTS
DANA POINT WATER SYSTEM
SYSTEM PRESSURE

Model System Pressure

12/21/07
6:00 AM

12/21/07
6:00 PM

Model System Pressure

12/21/07
12:00 PM

Telog 3143 Dana Point System Pressure


Dana Point Harbor, South of Coast Highway

Observed System Pressure

12/20/07
12:00 PM

Observed System Pressure

12/20/07
6:00 AM

12/20/07
6:00 AM

Telog 2487 Dana Point System Pressure


Windham Drive (South End)

12/20/07
6:00 PM

Time

12/21/07
12:00 AM

12/21/07
6:00 AM

12/21/07
12:00 AM

12/21/07
6:00 AM

12/21/07
12:00 PM

12/21/07
6:00 PM

12/22/07
12:00 AM

200

400

600

800

1,000

1,200

1,400

12/20/07
12:00 AM

20

Observed System Pressure

Time

Model System Pressure

0
12/20/07
6:00 PM

12/22/07
12:00 AM

12/20/07
12:00 AM

12/20/07
12:00 PM

12/21/07
6:00 PM

Model System Pressure

12/21/07
12:00 PM

Telog 3146 Capistrano Beach System Pressure


Camino de Estrella at Camino Capistrano

Observed System Pressure

12/20/07
12:00 PM

12/20/07
12:00 AM

12/20/07
6:00 AM

12/20/07
6:00 AM

25

30

35

40

45

50

80

85

90

95

100

105

110

12/20/07
12:00 AM

120

125

130

135

140

145

150

Telog 3144 Capistrano Beach System Pressure


Victoria Boulevard, West of Sepulveda Avenue

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Calibration\[SCWD_MacroCalib.xls]Fig_Flow&Telog (345)

Pressure (psi)

Pressure (psi)

Pressure (psi)
Flowrate (gpm)

12/20/07
12:00 PM

12/20/07
6:00 PM

Time

12/21/07
12:00 AM

12/20/07
6:00 PM

Time

12/21/07
12:00 AM

12/21/07
6:00 PM

12/22/07
12:00 AM

12/21/07
6:00 AM

12/21/07
6:00 PM

Model Flow rate

12/21/07
12:00 PM

12/22/07
12:00 AM

APR 2008

SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT


103163

FIGURE 13
EXTENDED PERIOD CALIBRATION RESULTS
CAPISTRANO BEACH WATER SYSTEM
SYSTEM FLOW RATE AND PRESSURE

Observed Flow rate

12/20/07
12:00 PM

12/21/07
12:00 PM

Model System Pressure

12/21/07
6:00 AM

Juanita 8-inch PRV Flow


Capistrano Beach Water Supply

Observed System Pressure

12/20/07
6:00 AM

12/20/07
6:00 AM

Telog 3145 Capistrano Beach System Pressure


Calle Juanita at Calle Real (NE corner, on 6-inch main)

APPENDIX A
FLOW AND PRESSURE TEST FORMS

FLOW AND PRESSURE TESTS


Test Number:

SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT


LAGUNA BEACH, CALIFORNIA
12/11/07 4:37 PM
Date & Time:
FLOWING HYDRANT

F1

345

Model Node:
RESIDUAL HYDRANTS
R1
Beach Rd, North of flowing hydrant
Model Node:
Location(s):
R2
Beach Rd, South end
Model Node:
AUTOMATIC PRESSURE RECORDERS (TELOGS)
T1
Model Node:
Telog 1508 - South of Ocean Vista Drive at Coast Highway
T2
Model Node:
Telog 1509 - 234 Monarch Bay Drive
T3
Model Node:
Telog 1652 - Niguel Road at Coast Highway (NE corner, 16-inch main)
T4
Model Node:
Telog 1656 - Mediterranean Drive at Baltic Sea Drive
T5
Model Node:
Telog 1738 - Sea Island Drive at Somerset Circle
T6
Model Node:
Telog 1739 - Garibaldi Avenue at Selva Road
T7
Model Node:
Telog 2217 - Tirremia Drive at Monarch Beach Road
T8
Model Node:
Telog 2218 - Acapula Drive at Street of the Golden Lantern
T9
Model Node:
Telog 2485 - Street of the Blue Lantern at Selva Road (NE corner)
T10
Model Node:
Telog 2486 - Selva Road at Street of the Copper Lantern
T11
Model Node:
Telog 2487 - Windham Drive (South End)
T12
Model Node:
Telog 2488 - Coast Highway, East of Street of Copper Lantern
T13
Model Node:
Telog 3143 - Dana Point Harbor, South of Coast Highway
T14
Model Node:
Telog 3144 - Victoria Boulevard, West of Sepulveda Avenue
T15
Model Node:
Telog 3145 - Calle Juanita at Calle Real (NE corner, on 6-inch main)
T16
Model Node:
Telog 3146 - Camino de Estrella at Camino Capistrano
T17
Model Node:
Telog 3646 - Beach Road Near Beach Road Intertie to WIP
Nozzle Size
Velocity Pressure
Flow
Hydrant
Static Pressure Residual Pressure
(psi)
(inches)
Device
(psi)
(psi)
4
15
Flowing 1
DIF
Flowing
Flowing 2
Initial
Final
54
Residual 1
150
149
75
Residual 2
152
152
70
Telog 1
70
70
56
Telog 2
56
56
0
Telog 3
0
0
96
Telog 4
96
96
74
Telog 5
74
74
66
Telog 6
66
66
78
Telog 7
78
78
50
Telog 8
50
50
65
Telog 9
67
65
47
Telog 10
47
47
108
Telog 11
108
108
122
Telog 12
122
122
75
Telog 13
75
75
133
Telog 14
139
139
38
Telog 15
38
38
93
Telog 16
100
100
120
Telog 17
151
151
Boundary Conditions
Beach Road Intertie PRV
Upstream
Downstream
210 psi
158 psi
INITIAL
200 psi
128 psi
FLOWING
210 psi
158 psi
FINAL
Location(s):

REMARKS:

F1

Zone:

Beach Rd

Flow
(gpm)
1,510
Site Map

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Field Testing\[Calib&Flow Test Forms.xls]f-1

FLOW AND PRESSURE TESTS


Test Number:

SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT


LAGUNA BEACH, CALIFORNIA
12/11/07 4:47 PM
Date & Time:
FLOWING HYDRANT

F1A

345

Model Node:
RESIDUAL HYDRANTS
R1
Beach Rd, North of flowing hydrant
Model Node:
Location(s):
R2
Beach Rd, South end
Model Node:
AUTOMATIC PRESSURE RECORDERS (TELOGS)
T1
Model Node:
Telog 1508 - South of Ocean Vista Drive at Coast Highway
T2
Model Node:
Telog 1509 - 234 Monarch Bay Drive
T3
Model Node:
Telog 1652 - Niguel Road at Coast Highway (NE corner, 16-inch main)
T4
Model Node:
Telog 1656 - Mediterranean Drive at Baltic Sea Drive
T5
Model Node:
Telog 1738 - Sea Island Drive at Somerset Circle
T6
Model Node:
Telog 1739 - Garibaldi Avenue at Selva Road
T7
Model Node:
Telog 2217 - Tirremia Drive at Monarch Beach Road
T8
Model Node:
Telog 2218 - Acapula Drive at Street of the Golden Lantern
T9
Model Node:
Telog 2485 - Street of the Blue Lantern at Selva Road (NE corner)
T10
Model Node:
Telog 2486 - Selva Road at Street of the Copper Lantern
T11
Model Node:
Telog 2487 - Windham Drive (South End)
T12
Model Node:
Telog 2488 - Coast Highway, East of Street of Copper Lantern
T13
Model Node:
Telog 3143 - Dana Point Harbor, South of Coast Highway
T14
Model Node:
Telog 3144 - Victoria Boulevard, West of Sepulveda Avenue
T15
Model Node:
Telog 3145 - Calle Juanita at Calle Real (NE corner, on 6-inch main)
T16
Model Node:
Telog 3146 - Camino de Estrella at Camino Capistrano
T17
Model Node:
Telog 3646 - Beach Road Near Beach Road Intertie to WIP
Nozzle Size
Velocity Pressure
Flow
Hydrant
Static Pressure Residual Pressure
(inches)
(psi)
Device
(psi)
(psi)
4
13
Flowing 1
DIF
Flowing
Flowing 2
Initial
Final
40
Residual 1
149
149
65
Residual 2
152
152
70
Telog 1
70
70
56
Telog 2
56
56
0
Telog 3
0
0
96
Telog 4
96
96
74
Telog 5
74
74
66
Telog 6
66
66
78
Telog 7
78
78
50
Telog 8
50
50
65
Telog 9
65
65
47
Telog 10
47
47
108
Telog 11
108
108
122
Telog 12
122
122
75
Telog 13
75
75
129
Telog 14
140
140
38
Telog 15
38
38
90
Telog 16
100
100
70
Telog 17
152
152
Boundary Conditions
Same as F1 but with Beach Road Intertie closed
Location(s):

REMARKS:

F1A

Zone:

Beach Rd

Flow
(gpm)
1,420
Site Map

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Field Testing\[Calib&Flow Test Forms.xls]f-1A

FLOW AND PRESSURE TESTS


SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT
LAGUNA BEACH, CALIFORNIA
12/12/07 8:59 AM
F2
Test Number:
Date & Time:
Zone: 345
FLOWING HYDRANT
F2
Vista de Todo at Vista de Dons
Model Node:
Location(s):
RESIDUAL HYDRANTS
R1
Vista de Todo
Model Node:
Location(s):
R2
Paseo Gallita at Vista Pato
Model Node:
AUTOMATIC PRESSURE RECORDERS (TELOGS)
T1
Model Node:
Telog 1508 - South of Ocean Vista Drive at Coast Highway
T2
Model Node:
Telog 1509 - 234 Monarch Bay Drive
T3
Model Node:
Telog 1652 - Niguel Road at Coast Highway (NE corner, 16-inch main)
T4
Model Node:
Telog 1656 - Mediterranean Drive at Baltic Sea Drive
T5
Model Node:
Telog 1738 - Sea Island Drive at Somerset Circle
T6
Model Node:
Telog 1739 - Garibaldi Avenue at Selva Road
T7
Model Node:
Telog 2217 - Tirremia Drive at Monarch Beach Road
T8
Model Node:
Telog 2218 - Acapula Drive at Street of the Golden Lantern
T9
Model Node:
Telog 2485 - Street of the Blue Lantern at Selva Road (NE corner)
T10
Model Node:
Telog 2486 - Selva Road at Street of the Copper Lantern
T11
Model Node:
Telog 2487 - Windham Drive (South End)
T12
Model Node:
Telog 2488 - Coast Highway, East of Street of Copper Lantern
T13
Model Node:
Telog 3143 - Dana Point Harbor, South of Coast Highway
T14
Model Node:
Telog 3144 - Victoria Boulevard, West of Sepulveda Avenue
T15
Model Node:
Telog 3145 - Calle Juanita at Calle Real (NE corner, on 6-inch main)
T16
Model Node:
Telog 3146 - Camino de Estrella at Camino Capistrano
T17
Model Node:
Telog 3646 - Beach Road Near Beach Road Intertie to WIP
Nozzle Size
Velocity Pressure
Flow
Hydrant
Static Pressure Residual Pressure
(inches)
(psi)
Device
(psi)
(psi)
4
24
Flowing 1
DIF
Flowing
Flowing 2
Initial
Final
56
Residual 1
84
84
67
Residual 2
89
89
69
Telog 1
69
69
54
Telog 2
54
54
0
Telog 3
0
0
96
Telog 4
96
96
75
Telog 5
75
75
64
Telog 6
65
65
77
Telog 7
77
77
49
Telog 8
49
49
66
Telog 9
66
65
45
Telog 10
45
45
107
Telog 11
107
107
120
Telog 12
120
120
75
Telog 13
75
75
122
Telog 14
138
138
35
Telog 15
38
38
82
Telog 16
100
100
130
Telog 17
150
150
Boundary Conditions

Flow
(gpm)
1,820
Site Map

Juanita PRV
0"
2,900 gpm
Stayed at 7 psi

REMARKS:

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Field Testing\[Calib&Flow Test Forms.xls]f-2

FLOW AND PRESSURE TESTS


SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT
LAGUNA BEACH, CALIFORNIA
12/12/07 9:49 AM
F3
Test Number:
Date & Time:
Zone: 345
FLOWING HYDRANT
F3
Calle La Veta at Calle Guaymas
Model Node:
Location(s):
RESIDUAL HYDRANTS
R1
Calle La Veta, Southeast of flowing hydrant
Model Node:
Location(s):
R2
Calle Borrego, South end
Model Node:
AUTOMATIC PRESSURE RECORDERS (TELOGS)
T1
Model Node:
Telog 1508 - South of Ocean Vista Drive at Coast Highway
T2
Model Node:
Telog 1509 - 234 Monarch Bay Drive
T3
Model Node:
Telog 1652 - Niguel Road at Coast Highway (NE corner, 16-inch main)
T4
Model Node:
Telog 1656 - Mediterranean Drive at Baltic Sea Drive
T5
Model Node:
Telog 1738 - Sea Island Drive at Somerset Circle
T6
Model Node:
Telog 1739 - Garibaldi Avenue at Selva Road
T7
Model Node:
Telog 2217 - Tirremia Drive at Monarch Beach Road
T8
Model Node:
Telog 2218 - Acapula Drive at Street of the Golden Lantern
T9
Model Node:
Telog 2485 - Street of the Blue Lantern at Selva Road (NE corner)
T10
Model Node:
Telog 2486 - Selva Road at Street of the Copper Lantern
T11
Model Node:
Telog 2487 - Windham Drive (South End)
T12
Model Node:
Telog 2488 - Coast Highway, East of Street of Copper Lantern
T13
Model Node:
Telog 3143 - Dana Point Harbor, South of Coast Highway
T14
Model Node:
Telog 3144 - Victoria Boulevard, West of Sepulveda Avenue
T15
Model Node:
Telog 3145 - Calle Juanita at Calle Real (NE corner, on 6-inch main)
T16
Model Node:
Telog 3146 - Camino de Estrella at Camino Capistrano
T17
Model Node:
Telog 3646 - Beach Road Near Beach Road Intertie to WIP
Nozzle Size
Velocity Pressure
Flow
Hydrant
Static Pressure Residual Pressure
(inches)
(psi)
Device
(psi)
(psi)
4
27
Flowing 1
DIF
Flowing
Flowing 2
Initial
Final
62
Residual 1
91
91
64
Residual 2
87
86
69
Telog 1
69
69
54
Telog 2
54
54
0
Telog 3
0
0
96
Telog 4
96
96
75
Telog 5
75
75
65
Telog 6
65
65
77
Telog 7
77
77
49
Telog 8
49
49
65
Telog 9
65
65
46
Telog 10
46
46
107
Telog 11
107
107
120
Telog 12
120
120
75
Telog 13
75
75
123
Telog 14
139
139
31
Telog 15
38
38
82
Telog 16
100
100
132
Telog 17
151
151
Boundary Conditions

REMARKS:

Flow
(gpm)
1,900
Site Map

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Field Testing\[Calib&Flow Test Forms.xls]f-3

FLOW AND PRESSURE TESTS


SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT
LAGUNA BEACH, CALIFORNIA
12/12/07 10:25 AM
F4
Test Number:
Date & Time:
Zone: 345
FLOWING HYDRANT
F4
Northeast corner of Sears parking lot
Model Node:
Location(s):
RESIDUAL HYDRANTS
R1
North side of Sears parking lot
Model Node:
Location(s):
R2
Southwest corner of Sears parking lot
Model Node:
AUTOMATIC PRESSURE RECORDERS (TELOGS)
T1
Model Node:
Telog 1508 - South of Ocean Vista Drive at Coast Highway
T2
Model Node:
Telog 1509 - 234 Monarch Bay Drive
T3
Model Node:
Telog 1652 - Niguel Road at Coast Highway (NE corner, 16-inch main)
T4
Model Node:
Telog 1656 - Mediterranean Drive at Baltic Sea Drive
T5
Model Node:
Telog 1738 - Sea Island Drive at Somerset Circle
T6
Model Node:
Telog 1739 - Garibaldi Avenue at Selva Road
T7
Model Node:
Telog 2217 - Tirremia Drive at Monarch Beach Road
T8
Model Node:
Telog 2218 - Acapula Drive at Street of the Golden Lantern
T9
Model Node:
Telog 2485 - Street of the Blue Lantern at Selva Road (NE corner)
T10
Model Node:
Telog 2486 - Selva Road at Street of the Copper Lantern
T11
Model Node:
Telog 2487 - Windham Drive (South End)
T12
Model Node:
Telog 2488 - Coast Highway, East of Street of Copper Lantern
T13
Model Node:
Telog 3143 - Dana Point Harbor, South of Coast Highway
T14
Model Node:
Telog 3144 - Victoria Boulevard, West of Sepulveda Avenue
T15
Model Node:
Telog 3145 - Calle Juanita at Calle Real (NE corner, on 6-inch main)
T16
Model Node:
Telog 3146 - Camino de Estrella at Camino Capistrano
T17
Model Node:
Telog 3646 - Beach Road Near Beach Road Intertie to WIP
Nozzle Size
Velocity Pressure
Flow
Hydrant
Static Pressure Residual Pressure
(inches)
(psi)
Device
(psi)
(psi)
4
21
Flowing 1
DIF
Flowing
Flowing 2
Initial
Final
58
Residual 1
75
75
61
Residual 2
76
76
69
Telog 1
69
69
54
Telog 2
54
54
0
Telog 3
0
0
96
Telog 4
96
96
75
Telog 5
75
75
65
Telog 6
65
65
77
Telog 7
77
77
49
Telog 8
49
49
65
Telog 9
65
65
46
Telog 10
46
46
108
Telog 11
108
108
121
Telog 12
121
121
75
Telog 13
75
75
127
Telog 14
139
139
36
Telog 15
38
38
86
Telog 16
100
100
138
Telog 17
151
151
Boundary Conditions

REMARKS:

Flow
(gpm)
1,730
Site Map

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Field Testing\[Calib&Flow Test Forms.xls]f-4

FLOW AND PRESSURE TESTS


SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT
LAGUNA BEACH, CALIFORNIA
12/12/07 11:01 AM
F5
Test Number:
Date & Time:
Zone: 345
FLOWING HYDRANT
F5
Calle Real at Calle Del Sol
Model Node:
Location(s):
RESIDUAL HYDRANTS
R1
Calle Maria at Calle Del Sol
Model Node:
Location(s):
R2
Calle Fortuna at Calle Loma
Model Node:
AUTOMATIC PRESSURE RECORDERS (TELOGS)
T1
Model Node:
Telog 1508 - South of Ocean Vista Drive at Coast Highway
T2
Model Node:
Telog 1509 - 234 Monarch Bay Drive
T3
Model Node:
Telog 1652 - Niguel Road at Coast Highway (NE corner, 16-inch main)
T4
Model Node:
Telog 1656 - Mediterranean Drive at Baltic Sea Drive
T5
Model Node:
Telog 1738 - Sea Island Drive at Somerset Circle
T6
Model Node:
Telog 1739 - Garibaldi Avenue at Selva Road
T7
Model Node:
Telog 2217 - Tirremia Drive at Monarch Beach Road
T8
Model Node:
Telog 2218 - Acapula Drive at Street of the Golden Lantern
T9
Model Node:
Telog 2485 - Street of the Blue Lantern at Selva Road (NE corner)
T10
Model Node:
Telog 2486 - Selva Road at Street of the Copper Lantern
T11
Model Node:
Telog 2487 - Windham Drive (South End)
T12
Model Node:
Telog 2488 - Coast Highway, East of Street of Copper Lantern
T13
Model Node:
Telog 3143 - Dana Point Harbor, South of Coast Highway
T14
Model Node:
Telog 3144 - Victoria Boulevard, West of Sepulveda Avenue
T15
Model Node:
Telog 3145 - Calle Juanita at Calle Real (NE corner, on 6-inch main)
T16
Model Node:
Telog 3146 - Camino de Estrella at Camino Capistrano
T17
Model Node:
Telog 3646 - Beach Road Near Beach Road Intertie to WIP
Nozzle Size
Velocity Pressure
Flow
Hydrant
Static Pressure Residual Pressure
(inches)
(psi)
Device
(psi)
(psi)
4
27
Flowing 1
DIF
Flowing
Flowing 2
Initial
Final
70
Residual 1
87
86
83
Residual 2
102
102
69
Telog 1
69
69
54
Telog 2
54
54
0
Telog 3
0
0
96
Telog 4
96
96
75
Telog 5
75
75
65
Telog 6
65
65
77
Telog 7
77
77
49
Telog 8
49
49
66
Telog 9
66
66
46
Telog 10
46
46
108
Telog 11
108
108
121
Telog 12
121
121
75
Telog 13
75
75
123
Telog 14
140
140
36
Telog 15
38
38
85
Telog 16
100
100
135
Telog 17
151
151
Boundary Conditions

REMARKS:

Flow
(gpm)
1,900
Site Map

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Field Testing\[Calib&Flow Test Forms.xls]f-5

FLOW AND PRESSURE TESTS


SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT
LAGUNA BEACH, CALIFORNIA
12/12/07 11:45 AM
F6
Test Number:
Date & Time:
Zone: 345
FLOWING HYDRANT
F6
Calle Cambio at Calle Juanita
Model Node:
Location(s):
RESIDUAL HYDRANTS
R1
Calle Juanita at Calle Paloma
Model Node:
Location(s):
R2
Calle Cambio at Calle Ultima
Model Node:
AUTOMATIC PRESSURE RECORDERS (TELOGS)
T1
Model Node:
Telog 1508 - South of Ocean Vista Drive at Coast Highway
T2
Model Node:
Telog 1509 - 234 Monarch Bay Drive
T3
Model Node:
Telog 1652 - Niguel Road at Coast Highway (NE corner, 16-inch main)
T4
Model Node:
Telog 1656 - Mediterranean Drive at Baltic Sea Drive
T5
Model Node:
Telog 1738 - Sea Island Drive at Somerset Circle
T6
Model Node:
Telog 1739 - Garibaldi Avenue at Selva Road
T7
Model Node:
Telog 2217 - Tirremia Drive at Monarch Beach Road
T8
Model Node:
Telog 2218 - Acapula Drive at Street of the Golden Lantern
T9
Model Node:
Telog 2485 - Street of the Blue Lantern at Selva Road (NE corner)
T10
Model Node:
Telog 2486 - Selva Road at Street of the Copper Lantern
T11
Model Node:
Telog 2487 - Windham Drive (South End)
T12
Model Node:
Telog 2488 - Coast Highway, East of Street of Copper Lantern
T13
Model Node:
Telog 3143 - Dana Point Harbor, South of Coast Highway
T14
Model Node:
Telog 3144 - Victoria Boulevard, West of Sepulveda Avenue
T15
Model Node:
Telog 3145 - Calle Juanita at Calle Real (NE corner, on 6-inch main)
T16
Model Node:
Telog 3146 - Camino de Estrella at Camino Capistrano
T17
Model Node:
Telog 3646 - Beach Road Near Beach Road Intertie to WIP
Nozzle Size
Velocity Pressure
Flow
Hydrant
Static Pressure Residual Pressure
(inches)
(psi)
Device
(psi)
(psi)
4
23
Flowing 1
DIF
Flowing
Flowing 2
Initial
Final
62
Residual 1
79
79
54
Residual 2
73
72
69
Telog 1
69
69
54
Telog 2
54
54
0
Telog 3
0
0
96
Telog 4
96
96
75
Telog 5
75
75
65
Telog 6
65
65
77
Telog 7
77
77
48
Telog 8
48
48
65
Telog 9
65
65
47
Telog 10
47
47
108
Telog 11
108
108
121
Telog 12
121
121
75
Telog 13
75
75
125
Telog 14
139
139
36
Telog 15
38
38
87
Telog 16
100
100
137
Telog 17
151
151
Boundary Conditions

REMARKS:

Flow
(gpm)
1,790
Site Map

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Field Testing\[Calib&Flow Test Forms.xls]f-6

FLOW AND PRESSURE TESTS


SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT
LAGUNA BEACH, CALIFORNIA
12/12/07 1:18 PM
F7
Test Number:
Date & Time:
Zone: 345
FLOWING HYDRANT
F7
Calle Juanita at Calle Naranja
Model Node:
Location(s):
RESIDUAL HYDRANTS
R1
Calle Juanita at Calle Carmelita
Model Node:
Location(s):
R2
Calle Naranja at Calle Carmelita
Model Node:
AUTOMATIC PRESSURE RECORDERS (TELOGS)
T1
Model Node:
Telog 1508 - South of Ocean Vista Drive at Coast Highway
T2
Model Node:
Telog 1509 - 234 Monarch Bay Drive
T3
Model Node:
Telog 1652 - Niguel Road at Coast Highway (NE corner, 16-inch main)
T4
Model Node:
Telog 1656 - Mediterranean Drive at Baltic Sea Drive
T5
Model Node:
Telog 1738 - Sea Island Drive at Somerset Circle
T6
Model Node:
Telog 1739 - Garibaldi Avenue at Selva Road
T7
Model Node:
Telog 2217 - Tirremia Drive at Monarch Beach Road
T8
Model Node:
Telog 2218 - Acapula Drive at Street of the Golden Lantern
T9
Model Node:
Telog 2485 - Street of the Blue Lantern at Selva Road (NE corner)
T10
Model Node:
Telog 2486 - Selva Road at Street of the Copper Lantern
T11
Model Node:
Telog 2487 - Windham Drive (South End)
T12
Model Node:
Telog 2488 - Coast Highway, East of Street of Copper Lantern
T13
Model Node:
Telog 3143 - Dana Point Harbor, South of Coast Highway
T14
Model Node:
Telog 3144 - Victoria Boulevard, West of Sepulveda Avenue
T15
Model Node:
Telog 3145 - Calle Juanita at Calle Real (NE corner, on 6-inch main)
T16
Model Node:
Telog 3146 - Camino de Estrella at Camino Capistrano
T17
Model Node:
Telog 3646 - Beach Road Near Beach Road Intertie to WIP
Nozzle Size
Velocity Pressure
Flow
Hydrant
Static Pressure Residual Pressure
(inches)
(psi)
Device
(psi)
(psi)
4
19
Flowing 1
DIF
Flowing
Flowing 2
Initial
Final
58
Residual 1
65
65
55
Residual 2
62
62
69
Telog 1
69
69
55
Telog 2
55
55
0
Telog 3
0
0
96
Telog 4
96
96
74
Telog 5
74
74
64
Telog 6
64
64
77
Telog 7
77
77
48
Telog 8
48
48
63
Telog 9
65
65
46
Telog 10
46
46
107
Telog 11
107
107
121
Telog 12
121
121
75
Telog 13
75
75
137
Telog 14
140
140
36
Telog 15
38
38
98
Telog 16
100
100
149
Telog 17
151
151
Boundary Conditions

REMARKS:

Flow
(gpm)
1,660
Site Map

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Field Testing\[Calib&Flow Test Forms.xls]f-7

FLOW AND PRESSURE TESTS


SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT
LAGUNA BEACH, CALIFORNIA
12/12/07 1:58 PM
F8
Test Number:
Date & Time:
Zone: 345
FLOWING HYDRANT
F8
West end of Dana Bluffs
Model Node:
Location(s):
RESIDUAL HYDRANTS
R1
Vista Dr, North of Vista Verde
Model Node:
Location(s):
R2
Camino Capistrano at Vista Verde
Model Node:
AUTOMATIC PRESSURE RECORDERS (TELOGS)
T1
Model Node:
Telog 1508 - South of Ocean Vista Drive at Coast Highway
T2
Model Node:
Telog 1509 - 234 Monarch Bay Drive
T3
Model Node:
Telog 1652 - Niguel Road at Coast Highway (NE corner, 16-inch main)
T4
Model Node:
Telog 1656 - Mediterranean Drive at Baltic Sea Drive
T5
Model Node:
Telog 1738 - Sea Island Drive at Somerset Circle
T6
Model Node:
Telog 1739 - Garibaldi Avenue at Selva Road
T7
Model Node:
Telog 2217 - Tirremia Drive at Monarch Beach Road
T8
Model Node:
Telog 2218 - Acapula Drive at Street of the Golden Lantern
T9
Model Node:
Telog 2485 - Street of the Blue Lantern at Selva Road (NE corner)
T10
Model Node:
Telog 2486 - Selva Road at Street of the Copper Lantern
T11
Model Node:
Telog 2487 - Windham Drive (South End)
T12
Model Node:
Telog 2488 - Coast Highway, East of Street of Copper Lantern
T13
Model Node:
Telog 3143 - Dana Point Harbor, South of Coast Highway
T14
Model Node:
Telog 3144 - Victoria Boulevard, West of Sepulveda Avenue
T15
Model Node:
Telog 3145 - Calle Juanita at Calle Real (NE corner, on 6-inch main)
T16
Model Node:
Telog 3146 - Camino de Estrella at Camino Capistrano
T17
Model Node:
Telog 3646 - Beach Road Near Beach Road Intertie to WIP
Nozzle Size
Velocity Pressure
Flow
Hydrant
Static Pressure Residual Pressure
(inches)
(psi)
Device
(psi)
(psi)
4
30
Flowing 1
DIF
Flowing
Flowing 2
Initial
Final
63
Residual 1
121
121
76
Residual 2
98
97
69
Telog 1
69
69
55
Telog 2
55
55
0
Telog 3
0
0
96
Telog 4
96
96
74
Telog 5
74
74
64
Telog 6
64
64
77
Telog 7
77
77
48
Telog 8
48
48
66
Telog 9
66
66
46
Telog 10
46
46
107
Telog 11
107
107
121
Telog 12
121
121
75
Telog 13
75
75
120
Telog 14
140
140
36
Telog 15
38
38
87
Telog 16
100
100
136
Telog 17
151
151
Boundary Conditions

REMARKS:

Flow
(gpm)
1,970
Site Map

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Field Testing\[Calib&Flow Test Forms.xls]f-8

FLOW AND PRESSURE TESTS


SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT
LAGUNA BEACH, CALIFORNIA
12/12/07 2:32 PM
F9
Test Number:
Date & Time:
Zone: 345
FLOWING HYDRANT
F9
Domingo Ave, West end
Model Node:
Location(s):
RESIDUAL HYDRANTS
R1
Domingo Ave at Doheny Park Rd
Model Node:
Location(s):
R2
Victoria Blvd, East of Doheny Park Rd
Model Node:
AUTOMATIC PRESSURE RECORDERS (TELOGS)
T1
Model Node:
Telog 1508 - South of Ocean Vista Drive at Coast Highway
T2
Model Node:
Telog 1509 - 234 Monarch Bay Drive
T3
Model Node:
Telog 1652 - Niguel Road at Coast Highway (NE corner, 16-inch main)
T4
Model Node:
Telog 1656 - Mediterranean Drive at Baltic Sea Drive
T5
Model Node:
Telog 1738 - Sea Island Drive at Somerset Circle
T6
Model Node:
Telog 1739 - Garibaldi Avenue at Selva Road
T7
Model Node:
Telog 2217 - Tirremia Drive at Monarch Beach Road
T8
Model Node:
Telog 2218 - Acapula Drive at Street of the Golden Lantern
T9
Model Node:
Telog 2485 - Street of the Blue Lantern at Selva Road (NE corner)
T10
Model Node:
Telog 2486 - Selva Road at Street of the Copper Lantern
T11
Model Node:
Telog 2487 - Windham Drive (South End)
T12
Model Node:
Telog 2488 - Coast Highway, East of Street of Copper Lantern
T13
Model Node:
Telog 3143 - Dana Point Harbor, South of Coast Highway
T14
Model Node:
Telog 3144 - Victoria Boulevard, West of Sepulveda Avenue
T15
Model Node:
Telog 3145 - Calle Juanita at Calle Real (NE corner, on 6-inch main)
T16
Model Node:
Telog 3146 - Camino de Estrella at Camino Capistrano
T17
Model Node:
Telog 3646 - Beach Road Near Beach Road Intertie to WIP
Nozzle Size
Velocity Pressure
Flow
Hydrant
Static Pressure Residual Pressure
(inches)
(psi)
Device
(psi)
(psi)
4
55
Flowing 1
DIF
Flowing
Flowing 2
Initial
Final
97
Residual 1
147
147
99
Residual 2
144
144
79
Telog 1
79
79
55
Telog 2
55
55
0
Telog 3
0
0
96
Telog 4
96
96
74
Telog 5
74
74
64
Telog 6
64
64
77
Telog 7
77
77
48
Telog 8
48
48
66
Telog 9
64
64
40
Telog 10
40
40
107
Telog 11
107
107
120
Telog 12
120
120
75
Telog 13
75
75
100
Telog 14
140
140
33
Telog 15
38
38
78
Telog 16
100
100
124
Telog 17
151
151
Boundary Conditions

REMARKS:

Flow
(gpm)
2,360
Site Map

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Field Testing\[Calib&Flow Test Forms.xls]f-9

FLOW AND PRESSURE TESTS


SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT
LAGUNA BEACH, CALIFORNIA
12/13/07 8:40 AM
F10
Test Number:
Date & Time:
Zone: 390
FLOWING HYDRANT
F10
Tuna Drive at Astoria Street
Model Node:
Location(s):
RESIDUAL HYDRANTS
R1
Tuna Drive at Big Sur Street
Model Node:
Location(s):
R2
Big Sur Street at Perch Drive
Model Node:
AUTOMATIC PRESSURE RECORDERS (TELOGS)
T1
Model Node:
Telog 1508 - South of Ocean Vista Drive at Coast Highway
T2
Model Node:
Telog 1509 - 234 Monarch Bay Drive
T3
Model Node:
Telog 1652 - Niguel Road at Coast Highway (NE corner, 16-inch main)
T4
Model Node:
Telog 1656 - Mediterranean Drive at Baltic Sea Drive
T5
Model Node:
Telog 1738 - Sea Island Drive at Somerset Circle
T6
Model Node:
Telog 1739 - Garibaldi Avenue at Selva Road
T7
Model Node:
Telog 2217 - Tirremia Drive at Monarch Beach Road
T8
Model Node:
Telog 2218 - Acapula Drive at Street of the Golden Lantern
T9
Model Node:
Telog 2485 - Street of the Blue Lantern at Selva Road (NE corner)
T10
Model Node:
Telog 2486 - Selva Road at Street of the Copper Lantern
T11
Model Node:
Telog 2487 - Windham Drive (South End)
T12
Model Node:
Telog 2488 - Coast Highway, East of Street of Copper Lantern
T13
Model Node:
Telog 3143 - Dana Point Harbor, South of Coast Highway
T14
Model Node:
Telog 3144 - Victoria Boulevard, West of Sepulveda Avenue
T15
Model Node:
Telog 3145 - Calle Juanita at Calle Real (NE corner, on 6-inch main)
T16
Model Node:
Telog 3146 - Camino de Estrella at Camino Capistrano
T17
Model Node:
Telog 3646 - La Cresta Road at Granada Drive
Nozzle Size
Velocity Pressure
Flow
Hydrant
Static Pressure Residual Pressure
(inches)
(psi)
Device
(psi)
(psi)
20
4
Flowing 1
DIF
Flowing
Flowing 2
Initial
Final
60
Residual 1
80
80
60
Residual 2
72
72
70
Telog 1
70
70
55
Telog 2
55
55
0
Telog 3
0
0
96
Telog 4
96
96
74
Telog 5
74
74
62
Telog 6
62
62
73
Telog 7
73
73
46
Telog 8
46
46
65
Telog 9
65
65
42
Telog 10
47
47
100
Telog 11
108
108
115
Telog 12
121
121
75
Telog 13
75
75
138
Telog 14
138
138
38
Telog 15
38
38
98
Telog 16
98
98
70
Telog 17
75
75
Boundary Conditions

REMARKS:

Flow
(gpm)
1,700
Site Map

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Field Testing\[Calib&Flow Test Forms.xls]f-10

FLOW AND PRESSURE TESTS


SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT
LAGUNA BEACH, CALIFORNIA
12/13/07 9:21 AM
F11
Test Number:
Date & Time:
Zone: 390
FLOWING HYDRANT
F11
Lapis at Capistrano by the Sea
Model Node:
Location(s):
RESIDUAL HYDRANTS
R1
Capistrano by the Sea at Midnight Lane
Model Node:
Location(s):
R2
Indigo, North of Midnight Lane
Model Node:
AUTOMATIC PRESSURE RECORDERS (TELOGS)
T1
Model Node:
Telog 1508 - South of Ocean Vista Drive at Coast Highway
T2
Model Node:
Telog 1509 - 234 Monarch Bay Drive
T3
Model Node:
Telog 1652 - Niguel Road at Coast Highway (NE corner, 16-inch main)
T4
Model Node:
Telog 1656 - Mediterranean Drive at Baltic Sea Drive
T5
Model Node:
Telog 1738 - Sea Island Drive at Somerset Circle
T6
Model Node:
Telog 1739 - Garibaldi Avenue at Selva Road
T7
Model Node:
Telog 2217 - Tirremia Drive at Monarch Beach Road
T8
Model Node:
Telog 2218 - Acapula Drive at Street of the Golden Lantern
T9
Model Node:
Telog 2485 - Street of the Blue Lantern at Selva Road (NE corner)
T10
Model Node:
Telog 2486 - Selva Road at Street of the Copper Lantern
T11
Model Node:
Telog 2487 - Windham Drive (South End)
T12
Model Node:
Telog 2488 - Coast Highway, East of Street of Copper Lantern
T13
Model Node:
Telog 3143 - Dana Point Harbor, South of Coast Highway
T14
Model Node:
Telog 3144 - Victoria Boulevard, West of Sepulveda Avenue
T15
Model Node:
Telog 3145 - Calle Juanita at Calle Real (NE corner, on 6-inch main)
T16
Model Node:
Telog 3146 - Camino de Estrella at Camino Capistrano
T17
Model Node:
Telog 3646 - La Cresta Road at Granada Drive
Nozzle Size
Velocity Pressure
Flow
Hydrant
Static Pressure Residual Pressure
(inches)
(psi)
Device
(psi)
(psi)
4
20
Flowing 1
DIF
Flowing
Flowing 2
Initial
Final
59
Residual 1
74
74
58
Residual 2
67
68
69
Telog 1
69
69
55
Telog 2
55
55
0
Telog 3
0
0
96
Telog 4
96
96
74
Telog 5
74
74
61
Telog 6
61
61
73
Telog 7
73
73
46
Telog 8
46
46
63
Telog 9
65
65
41
Telog 10
46
46
98
Telog 11
107
107
113
Telog 12
120
120
75
Telog 13
75
75
138
Telog 14
138
138
38
Telog 15
38
38
99
Telog 16
99
99
68
Telog 17
75
75
Boundary Conditions

REMARKS:

Flow
(gpm)
1,700
Site Map

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Field Testing\[Calib&Flow Test Forms.xls]f-11

FLOW AND PRESSURE TESTS


SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT
LAGUNA BEACH, CALIFORNIA
12/13/07 10:03 AM
F12
Test Number:
Date & Time:
Zone: 390
FLOWING HYDRANT
F12
Moongate Ct
Model Node:
Location(s):
RESIDUAL HYDRANTS
R1
Vista Elevado at Formosa Drive
Model Node:
Location(s):
R2
Aurelio Drive, North of Vista Elevado
Model Node:
AUTOMATIC PRESSURE RECORDERS (TELOGS)
T1
Model Node:
Telog 1508 - South of Ocean Vista Drive at Coast Highway
T2
Model Node:
Telog 1509 - 234 Monarch Bay Drive
T3
Model Node:
Telog 1652 - Niguel Road at Coast Highway (NE corner, 16-inch main)
T4
Model Node:
Telog 1656 - Mediterranean Drive at Baltic Sea Drive
T5
Model Node:
Telog 1738 - Sea Island Drive at Somerset Circle
T6
Model Node:
Telog 1739 - Garibaldi Avenue at Selva Road
T7
Model Node:
Telog 2217 - Tirremia Drive at Monarch Beach Road
T8
Model Node:
Telog 2218 - Acapula Drive at Street of the Golden Lantern
T9
Model Node:
Telog 2485 - Street of the Blue Lantern at Selva Road (NE corner)
T10
Model Node:
Telog 2486 - Selva Road at Street of the Copper Lantern
T11
Model Node:
Telog 2487 - Windham Drive (South End)
T12
Model Node:
Telog 2488 - Coast Highway, East of Street of Copper Lantern
T13
Model Node:
Telog 3143 - Dana Point Harbor, South of Coast Highway
T14
Model Node:
Telog 3144 - Victoria Boulevard, West of Sepulveda Avenue
T15
Model Node:
Telog 3145 - Calle Juanita at Calle Real (NE corner, on 6-inch main)
T16
Model Node:
Telog 3146 - Camino de Estrella at Camino Capistrano
T17
Model Node:
Telog 3646 - La Cresta Road at Granada Drive
Nozzle Size
Velocity Pressure
Flow
Hydrant
Static Pressure Residual Pressure
(inches)
(psi)
Device
(psi)
(psi)
4
34
Flowing 1
DIF
Flowing
Flowing 2
Initial
Final
81
Residual 1
102
101
82
Residual 2
99
98
69
Telog 1
69
69
55
Telog 2
55
55
0
Telog 3
0
0
95
Telog 4
95
95
74
Telog 5
74
74
61
Telog 6
61
61
73
Telog 7
73
73
45
Telog 8
45
45
65
Telog 9
65
65
40
Telog 10
45
45
100
Telog 11
107
107
113
Telog 12
120
120
75
Telog 13
75
75
139
Telog 14
139
139
38
Telog 15
38
38
99
Telog 16
99
99
68
Telog 17
75
75
Boundary Conditions

REMARKS:

Flow
(gpm)
2,050
Site Map

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Field Testing\[Calib&Flow Test Forms.xls]f-12

FLOW AND PRESSURE TESTS


SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT
LAGUNA BEACH, CALIFORNIA
12/13/07 12:06 PM
F13
Test Number:
Date & Time:
Zone: 390
FLOWING HYDRANT
F13
Santa Clara Ave, East of Street of the Amber Lantern
Model Node:
Location(s):
RESIDUAL HYDRANTS
R1
Street of the Amber Lantern at Santa Clara Ave
Model Node:
Location(s):
R2
Santa Clara Ave at Street of the Ruby Lantern
Model Node:
AUTOMATIC PRESSURE RECORDERS (TELOGS)
T1
Model Node:
Telog 1508 - South of Ocean Vista Drive at Coast Highway
T2
Model Node:
Telog 1509 - 234 Monarch Bay Drive
T3
Model Node:
Telog 1652 - Niguel Road at Coast Highway (NE corner, 16-inch main)
T4
Model Node:
Telog 1656 - Mediterranean Drive at Baltic Sea Drive
T5
Model Node:
Telog 1738 - Sea Island Drive at Somerset Circle
T6
Model Node:
Telog 1739 - Garibaldi Avenue at Selva Road
T7
Model Node:
Telog 2217 - Tirremia Drive at Monarch Beach Road
T8
Model Node:
Telog 2218 - Acapula Drive at Street of the Golden Lantern
T9
Model Node:
Telog 2485 - Street of the Blue Lantern at Selva Road (NE corner)
T10
Model Node:
Telog 2486 - Selva Road at Street of the Copper Lantern
T11
Model Node:
Telog 2487 - Windham Drive (South End)
T12
Model Node:
Telog 2488 - Coast Highway, East of Street of Copper Lantern
T13
Model Node:
Telog 3143 - Dana Point Harbor, South of Coast Highway
T14
Model Node:
Telog 3144 - Victoria Boulevard, West of Sepulveda Avenue
T15
Model Node:
Telog 3145 - Calle Juanita at Calle Real (NE corner, on 6-inch main)
T16
Model Node:
Telog 3146 - Camino de Estrella at Camino Capistrano
T17
Model Node:
Telog 3646 - La Cresta Road at Granada Drive
Nozzle Size
Velocity Pressure
Flow
Hydrant
Static Pressure Residual Pressure
(inches)
(psi)
Device
(psi)
(psi)
4
32
Flowing 1
DIF
Flowing
Flowing 2
Initial
Final
77
Residual 1
95
95
73
Residual 2
90
90
70
Telog 1
70
70
55
Telog 2
55
55
0
Telog 3
0
0
95
Telog 4
95
95
73
Telog 5
73
73
61
Telog 6
61
61
73
Telog 7
73
73
45
Telog 8
45
45
63
Telog 9
65
65
39
Telog 10
44
44
100
Telog 11
105
105
111
Telog 12
119
119
75
Telog 13
75
75
140
Telog 14
140
140
38
Telog 15
38
38
100
Telog 16
100
100
64
Telog 17
74
74
Boundary Conditions

REMARKS:

Flow
(gpm)
2,010
Site Map

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Field Testing\[Calib&Flow Test Forms.xls]f-13

FLOW AND PRESSURE TESTS


SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT
LAGUNA BEACH, CALIFORNIA
12/13/07 11:29 AM
F14
Test Number:
Date & Time:
Zone: 390
FLOWING HYDRANT
F14
La Serena Drive at alley on South end
Model Node:
Location(s):
RESIDUAL HYDRANTS
R1
Street of the Amber Lantern at alley
Model Node:
Location(s):
R2
La Serena Drive, South of La Cresta Drive
Model Node:
AUTOMATIC PRESSURE RECORDERS (TELOGS)
T1
Model Node:
Telog 1508 - South of Ocean Vista Drive at Coast Highway
T2
Model Node:
Telog 1509 - 234 Monarch Bay Drive
T3
Model Node:
Telog 1652 - Niguel Road at Coast Highway (NE corner, 16-inch main)
T4
Model Node:
Telog 1656 - Mediterranean Drive at Baltic Sea Drive
T5
Model Node:
Telog 1738 - Sea Island Drive at Somerset Circle
T6
Model Node:
Telog 1739 - Garibaldi Avenue at Selva Road
T7
Model Node:
Telog 2217 - Tirremia Drive at Monarch Beach Road
T8
Model Node:
Telog 2218 - Acapula Drive at Street of the Golden Lantern
T9
Model Node:
Telog 2485 - Street of the Blue Lantern at Selva Road (NE corner)
T10
Model Node:
Telog 2486 - Selva Road at Street of the Copper Lantern
T11
Model Node:
Telog 2487 - Windham Drive (South End)
T12
Model Node:
Telog 2488 - Coast Highway, East of Street of Copper Lantern
T13
Model Node:
Telog 3143 - Dana Point Harbor, South of Coast Highway
T14
Model Node:
Telog 3144 - Victoria Boulevard, West of Sepulveda Avenue
T15
Model Node:
Telog 3145 - Calle Juanita at Calle Real (NE corner, on 6-inch main)
T16
Model Node:
Telog 3146 - Camino de Estrella at Camino Capistrano
T17
Model Node:
Telog 3646 - La Cresta Road at Granada Drive
Nozzle Size
Velocity Pressure
Flow
Hydrant
Static Pressure Residual Pressure
(inches)
(psi)
Device
(psi)
(psi)
4
27
Flowing 1
DIF
Flowing
Flowing 2
Initial
Final
82
Residual 1
98
98
79
Residual 2
88
88
70
Telog 1
70
70
55
Telog 2
55
55
0
Telog 3
0
0
95
Telog 4
95
95
74
Telog 5
74
74
61
Telog 6
61
61
74
Telog 7
74
74
45
Telog 8
45
45
65
Telog 9
65
65
40
Telog 10
45
45
100
Telog 11
106
106
112
Telog 12
129
129
75
Telog 13
75
75
139
Telog 14
139
139
38
Telog 15
38
38
100
Telog 16
100
100
63
Telog 17
74
74
Boundary Conditions

REMARKS:

Flow
(gpm)
1,900
Site Map

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Field Testing\[Calib&Flow Test Forms.xls]f-14

FLOW AND PRESSURE TESTS


SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT
LAGUNA BEACH, CALIFORNIA
12/13/07 10:47 AM
F15
Test Number:
Date & Time:
Zone: 390
FLOWING HYDRANT
F15
Colegio Drive at La Paz Avenue
Model Node:
Location(s):
RESIDUAL HYDRANTS
R1
Street of the Golden Lantern at La Paz Avenue
Model Node:
Location(s):
R2
La Cresta Drive at Colegio Drive
Model Node:
AUTOMATIC PRESSURE RECORDERS (TELOGS)
T1
Model Node:
Telog 1508 - South of Ocean Vista Drive at Coast Highway
T2
Model Node:
Telog 1509 - 234 Monarch Bay Drive
T3
Model Node:
Telog 1652 - Niguel Road at Coast Highway (NE corner, 16-inch main)
T4
Model Node:
Telog 1656 - Mediterranean Drive at Baltic Sea Drive
T5
Model Node:
Telog 1738 - Sea Island Drive at Somerset Circle
T6
Model Node:
Telog 1739 - Garibaldi Avenue at Selva Road
T7
Model Node:
Telog 2217 - Tirremia Drive at Monarch Beach Road
T8
Model Node:
Telog 2218 - Acapula Drive at Street of the Golden Lantern
T9
Model Node:
Telog 2485 - Street of the Blue Lantern at Selva Road (NE corner)
T10
Model Node:
Telog 2486 - Selva Road at Street of the Copper Lantern
T11
Model Node:
Telog 2487 - Windham Drive (South End)
T12
Model Node:
Telog 2488 - Coast Highway, East of Street of Copper Lantern
T13
Model Node:
Telog 3143 - Dana Point Harbor, South of Coast Highway
T14
Model Node:
Telog 3144 - Victoria Boulevard, West of Sepulveda Avenue
T15
Model Node:
Telog 3145 - Calle Juanita at Calle Real (NE corner, on 6-inch main)
T16
Model Node:
Telog 3146 - Camino de Estrella at Camino Capistrano
T17
Model Node:
Telog 3646 - La Cresta Road at Granada Drive
Nozzle Size
Velocity Pressure
Flow
Hydrant
Static Pressure Residual Pressure
(inches)
(psi)
Device
(psi)
(psi)
4
27
Flowing 1
DIF
Flowing
Flowing 2
Initial
Final
67
Residual 1
79
79
86
Residual 2
93
93
70
Telog 1
70
70
55
Telog 2
55
55
0
Telog 3
0
0
95
Telog 4
95
95
74
Telog 5
74
74
62
Telog 6
62
62
73
Telog 7
73
73
45
Telog 8
45
45
66
Telog 9
66
66
44
Telog 10
44
44
106
Telog 11
106
106
119
Telog 12
119
119
75
Telog 13
75
75
139
Telog 14
139
139
38
Telog 15
38
38
100
Telog 16
100
100
74
Telog 17
74
74
Boundary Conditions

REMARKS:

Flow
(gpm)
1,900
Site Map

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Field Testing\[Calib&Flow Test Forms.xls]f-15

FLOW AND PRESSURE TESTS


SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT
LAGUNA BEACH, CALIFORNIA
12/12/07 4:04 PM
F16
Test Number:
Date & Time:
Zone: 217
FLOWING HYDRANT
F16
Ensenada Place, South of Dana Point Harbor
Model Node:
Location(s):
RESIDUAL HYDRANTS
R1
Dana Point Harbor at Ensenada Place
Model Node:
Location(s):
R2
Dana Point Harbor, North of Island Way
Model Node:
AUTOMATIC PRESSURE RECORDERS (TELOGS)
T1
Model Node:
Telog 1508 - South of Ocean Vista Drive at Coast Highway
T2
Model Node:
Telog 1509 - 234 Monarch Bay Drive
T3
Model Node:
Telog 1652 - Niguel Road at Coast Highway (NE corner, 16-inch main)
T4
Model Node:
Telog 1656 - Mediterranean Drive at Baltic Sea Drive
T5
Model Node:
Telog 1738 - Sea Island Drive at Somerset Circle
T6
Model Node:
Telog 1739 - Garibaldi Avenue at Selva Road
T7
Model Node:
Telog 2217 - Tirremia Drive at Monarch Beach Road
T8
Model Node:
Telog 2218 - Acapula Drive at Street of the Golden Lantern
T9
Model Node:
Telog 2485 - Street of the Blue Lantern at Selva Road (NE corner)
T10
Model Node:
Telog 2486 - Selva Road at Street of the Copper Lantern
T11
Model Node:
Telog 2487 - Windham Drive (South End)
T12
Model Node:
Telog 2488 - Coast Highway, East of Street of Copper Lantern
T13
Model Node:
Telog 3143 - Dana Point Harbor, South of Coast Highway
T14
Model Node:
Telog 3144 - Victoria Boulevard, West of Sepulveda Avenue
T15
Model Node:
Telog 3145 - Calle Juanita at Calle Real (NE corner, on 6-inch main)
T16
Model Node:
Telog 3146 - Camino de Estrella at Camino Capistrano
T17
Model Node:
Telog 3646 - Dana Point Harbor, West of Ensenada Place
Nozzle Size
Velocity Pressure
Flow
Hydrant
Static Pressure Residual Pressure
(inches)
(psi)
Device
(psi)
(psi)
4
30
Flowing 1
DIF
Flowing
Flowing 2
Initial
Final
57
Residual 1
76
76
57
Residual 2
75
75
69
Telog 1
69
69
55
Telog 2
55
55
0
Telog 3
0
0
96
Telog 4
96
96
75
Telog 5
75
75
64
Telog 6
64
64
77
Telog 7
77
77
48
Telog 8
48
48
65
Telog 9
65
65
39
Telog 10
44
44
100
Telog 11
106
106
112
Telog 12
119
119
63
Telog 13
75
75
139
Telog 14
139
139
38
Telog 15
38
38
100
Telog 16
100
100
60
Telog 17
75
75
Boundary Conditions

REMARKS:

Flow
(gpm)
1,970
Site Map

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Field Testing\[Calib&Flow Test Forms.xls]f-16

FLOW AND PRESSURE TESTS


SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT
LAGUNA BEACH, CALIFORNIA
12/12/07 3:29 PM
F17
Test Number:
Date & Time:
Zone: 217
FLOWING HYDRANT
F17
Dana Drive, West of Island Way
Model Node:
Location(s):
RESIDUAL HYDRANTS
R1
Dana Drive, West of Island Way
Model Node:
Location(s):
R2
Island Way, South of Dana Point Harbor
Model Node:
AUTOMATIC PRESSURE RECORDERS (TELOGS)
T1
Model Node:
Telog 1508 - South of Ocean Vista Drive at Coast Highway
T2
Model Node:
Telog 1509 - 234 Monarch Bay Drive
T3
Model Node:
Telog 1652 - Niguel Road at Coast Highway (NE corner, 16-inch main)
T4
Model Node:
Telog 1656 - Mediterranean Drive at Baltic Sea Drive
T5
Model Node:
Telog 1738 - Sea Island Drive at Somerset Circle
T6
Model Node:
Telog 1739 - Garibaldi Avenue at Selva Road
T7
Model Node:
Telog 2217 - Tirremia Drive at Monarch Beach Road
T8
Model Node:
Telog 2218 - Acapula Drive at Street of the Golden Lantern
T9
Model Node:
Telog 2485 - Street of the Blue Lantern at Selva Road (NE corner)
T10
Model Node:
Telog 2486 - Selva Road at Street of the Copper Lantern
T11
Model Node:
Telog 2487 - Windham Drive (South End)
T12
Model Node:
Telog 2488 - Coast Highway, East of Street of Copper Lantern
T13
Model Node:
Telog 3143 - Dana Point Harbor, South of Coast Highway
T14
Model Node:
Telog 3144 - Victoria Boulevard, West of Sepulveda Avenue
T15
Model Node:
Telog 3145 - Calle Juanita at Calle Real (NE corner, on 6-inch main)
T16
Model Node:
Telog 3146 - Camino de Estrella at Camino Capistrano
T17
Model Node:
Telog 3646 - Dana Point Harbor, West of Ensenada Place
Nozzle Size
Velocity Pressure
Flow
Hydrant
Static Pressure Residual Pressure
(inches)
(psi)
Device
(psi)
(psi)
4
24
Flowing 1
DIF
Flowing
Flowing 2
Initial
Final
49
Residual 1
77
77
53
Residual 2
73
72
70
Telog 1
70
70
55
Telog 2
55
55
0
Telog 3
0
0
96
Telog 4
96
96
75
Telog 5
75
75
64
Telog 6
64
64
77
Telog 7
77
77
48
Telog 8
48
48
65
Telog 9
65
65
41
Telog 10
45
45
101
Telog 11
106
106
114
Telog 12
120
120
64
Telog 13
75
75
140
Telog 14
140
140
37
Telog 15
37
37
100
Telog 16
100
100
65
Telog 17
75
75
Boundary Conditions

REMARKS:

Flow
(gpm)
1,820
Site Map

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Field Testing\[Calib&Flow Test Forms.xls]f-17

FLOW AND PRESSURE TESTS


SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT
LAGUNA BEACH, CALIFORNIA
12/13/07 2:34 PM
F18
Test Number:
Date & Time:
Zone: 470
FLOWING HYDRANT
F18
Lantern Hill Drive, West End
Model Node:
Location(s):
RESIDUAL HYDRANTS
R1
Lantern Hill Drive, East end
Model Node:
Location(s):
R2
Aalt Vista Drive at Stonehill Drive
Model Node:
AUTOMATIC PRESSURE RECORDERS (TELOGS)
T1
Model Node:
Telog 1508 - South of Ocean Vista Drive at Coast Highway
T2
Model Node:
Telog 1509 - 234 Monarch Bay Drive
T3
Model Node:
Telog 1652 - Niguel Road at Coast Highway (NE corner, 16-inch main)
T4
Model Node:
Telog 1656 - Mediterranean Drive at Baltic Sea Drive
T5
Model Node:
Telog 1738 - Sea Island Drive at Somerset Circle
T6
Model Node:
Telog 1739 - Garibaldi Avenue at Selva Road
T7
Model Node:
Telog 2217 - Tirremia Drive at Monarch Beach Road
T8
Model Node:
Telog 2218 - Acapula Drive at Street of the Golden Lantern
T9
Model Node:
Telog 2485 - Street of the Blue Lantern at Selva Road (NE corner)
T10
Model Node:
Telog 2486 - Selva Road at Street of the Copper Lantern
T11
Model Node:
Telog 2487 - Windham Drive (South End)
T12
Model Node:
Telog 2488 - Coast Highway, East of Street of Copper Lantern
T13
Model Node:
Telog 3143 - Dana Point Harbor, South of Coast Highway
T14
Model Node:
Telog 3144 - Victoria Boulevard, West of Sepulveda Avenue
T15
Model Node:
Telog 3145 - Calle Juanita at Calle Real (NE corner, on 6-inch main)
T16
Model Node:
Telog 3146 - Camino de Estrella at Camino Capistrano
T17
Model Node:
Telog 3646 - Seawind Court at Meridian Drive
Nozzle Size
Velocity Pressure
Flow
Hydrant
Static Pressure Residual Pressure
(inches)
(psi)
Device
(psi)
(psi)
4
8
Flowing 1
DIF
Flowing
Flowing 2
Initial
Final
24/48
Residual 1
59
59
25/49
Residual 2
59
59
70
Telog 1
70
70
55
Telog 2
55
55
0
Telog 3
0
0
95
Telog 4
95
95
75
Telog 5
75
75
61
Telog 6
61
61
73
Telog 7
73
73
45
Telog 8
45
45
33
Telog 9
65
65
43
Telog 10
46
46
105
Telog 11
107
107
117
Telog 12
121
121
75
Telog 13
75
75
140
Telog 14
140
140
37
Telog 15
37
37
100
Telog 16
100
100
30
Telog 17
63
62
Boundary Conditions
Pump Station 3
Flow (gpm)
Suction Pressure (psi)
Discharge Pressure (psi)
40
80-100
Fire Pump: OFF
90

REMARKS:

1500

Fire Pump: OFF

1220

Fire Pump: ON

Flow
(gpm)
1,150
Site Map

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Field Testing\[Calib&Flow Test Forms.xls]f-18

FLOW AND PRESSURE TESTS


SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT
LAGUNA BEACH, CALIFORNIA
12/13/07 1:48 PM
F19
Test Number:
Date & Time:
Zone: 470
FLOWING HYDRANT
F19
Morning Star Lane, East of North Star Way
Model Node:
Location(s):
RESIDUAL HYDRANTS
R1
Morning Star Lane, West of North Star Way
Model Node:
Location(s):
R2
Dana Point Drive, West of Street of the Golden Lantern
Model Node:
AUTOMATIC PRESSURE RECORDERS (TELOGS)
T1
Model Node:
Telog 1508 - South of Ocean Vista Drive at Coast Highway
T2
Model Node:
Telog 1509 - 234 Monarch Bay Drive
T3
Model Node:
Telog 1652 - Niguel Road at Coast Highway (NE corner, 16-inch main)
T4
Model Node:
Telog 1656 - Mediterranean Drive at Baltic Sea Drive
T5
Model Node:
Telog 1738 - Sea Island Drive at Somerset Circle
T6
Model Node:
Telog 1739 - Garibaldi Avenue at Selva Road
T7
Model Node:
Telog 2217 - Tirremia Drive at Monarch Beach Road
T8
Model Node:
Telog 2218 - Acapula Drive at Street of the Golden Lantern
T9
Model Node:
Telog 2485 - Street of the Blue Lantern at Selva Road (NE corner)
T10
Model Node:
Telog 2486 - Selva Road at Street of the Copper Lantern
T11
Model Node:
Telog 2487 - Windham Drive (South End)
T12
Model Node:
Telog 2488 - Coast Highway, East of Street of Copper Lantern
T13
Model Node:
Telog 3143 - Dana Point Harbor, South of Coast Highway
T14
Model Node:
Telog 3144 - Victoria Boulevard, West of Sepulveda Avenue
T15
Model Node:
Telog 3145 - Calle Juanita at Calle Real (NE corner, on 6-inch main)
T16
Model Node:
Telog 3146 - Camino de Estrella at Camino Capistrano
T17
Model Node:
Telog 3646 - Seawind Court at Meridian Drive
Nozzle Size
Velocity Pressure
Flow
Hydrant
Static Pressure Residual Pressure
(inches)
(psi)
Device
(psi)
(psi)
4
10
Flowing 1
DIF
Flowing
Flowing 2
Initial
Final
42
Residual 1
92
91
37
Residual 2
77
78
70
Telog 1
70
70
55
Telog 2
55
55
0
Telog 3
0
0
95
Telog 4
95
95
74
Telog 5
74
74
61
Telog 6
61
61
73
Telog 7
73
73
45
Telog 8
45
45
28
Telog 9
64
64
43
Telog 10
45
45
104
Telog 11
106
106
118
Telog 12
120
120
75
Telog 13
75
75
140
Telog 14
140
140
38
Telog 15
38
38
100
Telog 16
100
100
24
Telog 17
61
61
Boundary Conditions
Before Test
Test
Fire Pump On
PS # 8
2 Pumps
2 pumps
Suction Discharge
Suction Discharge
Suction Discharge
40
90
40
90
40
80
Flow (gpm)
150
REMARKS:

Flow (gpm)
1550

Flow
(gpm)
1,270
Site Map

Flow (gpm)
1200
L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Field Testing\[Calib&Flow Test Forms.xls]f-19

FLOW AND PRESSURE TESTS


SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT
LAGUNA BEACH, CALIFORNIA
12/14/07 9:52 AM
F20
Test Number:
Date & Time:
Zone: 415
FLOWING HYDRANT
F20
Sea Knoll Drive
Model Node:
Location(s):
RESIDUAL HYDRANTS
R1
Ocean Hill Drive at Sea Knoll Drive
Model Node:
Location(s):
R2
Ocean Hill Drive at Marina Vista Drive
Model Node:
AUTOMATIC PRESSURE RECORDERS (TELOGS)
T1
Model Node:
Telog 1508 - South of Ocean Vista Drive at Coast Highway
T2
Model Node:
Telog 1509 - 234 Monarch Bay Drive
T3
Model Node:
Telog 1652 - Niguel Road at Coast Highway (NE corner, 16-inch main)
T4
Model Node:
Telog 1656 - Mediterranean Drive at Baltic Sea Drive
T5
Model Node:
Telog 1738 - Sea Island Drive at Somerset Circle
T6
Model Node:
Telog 1739 - Garibaldi Avenue at Selva Road
T7
Model Node:
Telog 2217 - Tirremia Drive at Monarch Beach Road
T8
Model Node:
Telog 2218 - Acapula Drive at Street of the Golden Lantern
T9
Model Node:
Telog 2485 - Street of the Blue Lantern at Selva Road (NE corner)
T10
Model Node:
Telog 2486 - Selva Road at Street of the Copper Lantern
T11
Model Node:
Telog 2487 - Windham Drive (South End)
T12
Model Node:
Telog 2488 - Coast Highway, East of Street of Copper Lantern
T13
Model Node:
Telog 3143 - Dana Point Harbor, South of Coast Highway
T14
Model Node:
Telog 3144 - Victoria Boulevard, West of Sepulveda Avenue
T15
Model Node:
Telog 3145 - Calle Juanita at Calle Real (NE corner, on 6-inch main)
T16
Model Node:
Telog 3146 - Camino de Estrella at Camino Capistrano
T17
Model Node:
Telog 3646 - Monarch Beach Drive at Marquesa
Nozzle Size
Velocity Pressure
Flow
Hydrant
Static Pressure Residual Pressure
(inches)
(psi)
Device
(psi)
(psi)
2.25
21.5
Flowing 1
FTK
2.25
20.5
Flowing
Flowing 2
Initial
Final
FTK
48
Residual 1
54
54
70
Residual 2
74
75
69
Telog 1
69
69
55
Telog 2
55
55
0
Telog 3
0
0
96
Telog 4
96
96
74
Telog 5
74
74
55
Telog 6
57
57
68
Telog 7
70
70
40
Telog 8
42
42
66
Telog 9
66
66
46
Telog 10
46
46
108
Telog 11
108
108
120
Telog 12
120
120
75
Telog 13
75
75
139
Telog 14
139
139
38
Telog 15
38
38
99
Telog 16
99
99
65
Telog 17
67
67
Boundary Conditions

REMARKS:

Flow
(gpm)
700
680
Site Map

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Field Testing\[Calib&Flow Test Forms.xls]f-20

FLOW AND PRESSURE TESTS


SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT
LAGUNA BEACH, CALIFORNIA
12/14/07 10:23 AM
F21
Test Number:
Date & Time:
Zone: 415
FLOWING HYDRANT
F21
Elisa Drive, North of Acapulco Drive
Model Node:
Location(s):
RESIDUAL HYDRANTS
R1
Elisa Drive, North of Acapulco Drive
Model Node:
Location(s):
R2
Acapulco Drive at Caracas Street
Model Node:
AUTOMATIC PRESSURE RECORDERS (TELOGS)
T1
Model Node:
Telog 1508 - South of Ocean Vista Drive at Coast Highway
T2
Model Node:
Telog 1509 - 234 Monarch Bay Drive
T3
Model Node:
Telog 1652 - Niguel Road at Coast Highway (NE corner, 16-inch main)
T4
Model Node:
Telog 1656 - Mediterranean Drive at Baltic Sea Drive
T5
Model Node:
Telog 1738 - Sea Island Drive at Somerset Circle
T6
Model Node:
Telog 1739 - Garibaldi Avenue at Selva Road
T7
Model Node:
Telog 2217 - Tirremia Drive at Monarch Beach Road
T8
Model Node:
Telog 2218 - Acapula Drive at Street of the Golden Lantern
T9
Model Node:
Telog 2485 - Street of the Blue Lantern at Selva Road (NE corner)
T10
Model Node:
Telog 2486 - Selva Road at Street of the Copper Lantern
T11
Model Node:
Telog 2487 - Windham Drive (South End)
T12
Model Node:
Telog 2488 - Coast Highway, East of Street of Copper Lantern
T13
Model Node:
Telog 3143 - Dana Point Harbor, South of Coast Highway
T14
Model Node:
Telog 3144 - Victoria Boulevard, West of Sepulveda Avenue
T15
Model Node:
Telog 3145 - Calle Juanita at Calle Real (NE corner, on 6-inch main)
T16
Model Node:
Telog 3146 - Camino de Estrella at Camino Capistrano
T17
Model Node:
Telog 3646 - Monarch Beach Drive at Marquesa
Nozzle Size
Velocity Pressure
Flow
Hydrant
Static Pressure Residual Pressure
(inches)
(psi)
Device
(psi)
(psi)
4
9
Flowing 1
DIF
Flowing
Flowing 2
Initial
Final
28
Residual 1
47
47
57
Residual 2
60
60
69
Telog 1
69
69
55
Telog 2
55
55
0
Telog 3
0
0
96
Telog 4
96
96
74
Telog 5
74
74
53
Telog 6
57
57
66
Telog 7
70
70
40
Telog 8
42
42
65
Telog 9
65
65
46
Telog 10
46
46
108
Telog 11
108
108
121
Telog 12
121
121
75
Telog 13
75
75
139
Telog 14
139
139
38
Telog 15
38
38
99
Telog 16
99
99
63
Telog 17
67
67
Boundary Conditions

REMARKS:

Flow
(gpm)
1,210
Site Map

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Field Testing\[Calib&Flow Test Forms.xls]f-21

FLOW AND PRESSURE TESTS


SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT
LAGUNA BEACH, CALIFORNIA
12/14/07 1:07 PM
F22
Test Number:
Date & Time:
Zone: 415
FLOWING HYDRANT
F22
Intera Way at Cortes Road
Model Node:
Location(s):
RESIDUAL HYDRANTS
R1
Cortes Road at Galleon Way
Model Node:
Location(s):
R2
End of De Leon Drive
Model Node:
AUTOMATIC PRESSURE RECORDERS (TELOGS)
T1
Model Node:
Telog 1508 - South of Ocean Vista Drive at Coast Highway
T2
Model Node:
Telog 1509 - 234 Monarch Bay Drive
T3
Model Node:
Telog 1652 - Niguel Road at Coast Highway (NE corner, 16-inch main)
T4
Model Node:
Telog 1656 - Mediterranean Drive at Baltic Sea Drive
T5
Model Node:
Telog 1738 - Sea Island Drive at Somerset Circle
T6
Model Node:
Telog 1739 - Garibaldi Avenue at Selva Road
T7
Model Node:
Telog 2217 - Tirremia Drive at Monarch Beach Road
T8
Model Node:
Telog 2218 - Acapula Drive at Street of the Golden Lantern
T9
Model Node:
Telog 2485 - Street of the Blue Lantern at Selva Road (NE corner)
T10
Model Node:
Telog 2486 - Selva Road at Street of the Copper Lantern
T11
Model Node:
Telog 2487 - Windham Drive (South End)
T12
Model Node:
Telog 2488 - Coast Highway, East of Street of Copper Lantern
T13
Model Node:
Telog 3143 - Dana Point Harbor, South of Coast Highway
T14
Model Node:
Telog 3144 - Victoria Boulevard, West of Sepulveda Avenue
T15
Model Node:
Telog 3145 - Calle Juanita at Calle Real (NE corner, on 6-inch main)
T16
Model Node:
Telog 3146 - Camino de Estrella at Camino Capistrano
T17
Model Node:
Telog 3646 - Monarch Beach Drive at Marquesa
Nozzle Size
Velocity Pressure
Flow
Hydrant
Static Pressure Residual Pressure
(inches)
(psi)
Device
(psi)
(psi)
4
9
Flowing 1
DIF
Flowing
Flowing 2
Initial
Final
44
Residual 1
56
56
30
Residual 2
44
45
69
Telog 1
69
69
55
Telog 2
55
55
0
Telog 3
0
0
96
Telog 4
96
96
74
Telog 5
74
74
57
Telog 6
65
65
70
Telog 7
77
77
47
Telog 8
49
49
65
Telog 9
65
65
46
Telog 10
46
46
107
Telog 11
107
107
121
Telog 12
121
121
75
Telog 13
75
75
140
Telog 14
140
140
38
Telog 15
38
38
100
Telog 16
100
100
68
Telog 17
75
75
Boundary Conditions

REMARKS:

Flow
(gpm)
1,210
Site Map

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Field Testing\[Calib&Flow Test Forms.xls]f-22

FLOW AND PRESSURE TESTS


SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT
LAGUNA BEACH, CALIFORNIA
12/17/07 12:16 PM
F23
Test Number:
Date & Time:
Zone: 415
FLOWING HYDRANT
F23
Matthew Drive at Titus Drive
Model Node:
Location(s):
RESIDUAL HYDRANTS
R1
Titus Drive, West of Matthew Drive
Model Node:
Location(s):
R2
Philemon Drive at Leah Drive
Model Node:
AUTOMATIC PRESSURE RECORDERS (TELOGS)
T1
Model Node:
Telog 1508 - South of Ocean Vista Drive at Coast Highway
T2
Model Node:
Telog 1509 - 234 Monarch Bay Drive
T3
Model Node:
Telog 1652 - Niguel Road at Coast Highway (NE corner, 16-inch main)
T4
Model Node:
Telog 1656 - Mediterranean Drive at Baltic Sea Drive
T5
Model Node:
Telog 1738 - Sea Island Drive at Somerset Circle
T6
Model Node:
Telog 1739 - Garibaldi Avenue at Selva Road
T7
Model Node:
Telog 2217 - Tirremia Drive at Monarch Beach Road
T8
Model Node:
Telog 2218 - Acapula Drive at Street of the Golden Lantern
T9
Model Node:
Telog 2485 - Street of the Blue Lantern at Selva Road (NE corner)
T10
Model Node:
Telog 2486 - Selva Road at Street of the Copper Lantern
T11
Model Node:
Telog 2487 - Windham Drive (South End)
T12
Model Node:
Telog 2488 - Coast Highway, East of Street of Copper Lantern
T13
Model Node:
Telog 3143 - Dana Point Harbor, South of Coast Highway
T14
Model Node:
Telog 3144 - Victoria Boulevard, West of Sepulveda Avenue
T15
Model Node:
Telog 3145 - Calle Juanita at Calle Real (NE corner, on 6-inch main)
T16
Model Node:
Telog 3146 - Camino de Estrella at Camino Capistrano
T17
Model Node:
Telog 3646 - Monarch Beach Drive at Marquesa
Nozzle Size
Velocity Pressure
Flow
Hydrant
Static Pressure Residual Pressure
(inches)
(psi)
Device
(psi)
(psi)
4
19
Flowing 1
DIF
Flowing
Flowing 2
Initial
Final
45
Residual 1
58
59
49
Residual 2
59
59
69
Telog 1
69
69
55
Telog 2
55
55
0
Telog 3
0
0
96
Telog 4
96
96
74
Telog 5
74
74
58
Telog 6
65
65
70
Telog 7
77
77
46
Telog 8
49
49
65
Telog 9
65
65
47
Telog 10
47
47
109
Telog 11
109
109
122
Telog 12
122
122
75
Telog 13
75
75
139
Telog 14
139
139
38
Telog 15
38
38
100
Telog 16
100
100
67
Telog 17
75
75
Boundary Conditions

REMARKS:

Flow
(gpm)
1,660
Site Map

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Field Testing\[Calib&Flow Test Forms.xls]f-23

FLOW AND PRESSURE TESTS


SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT
LAGUNA BEACH, CALIFORNIA
12/13/07 3:39 PM
F24
Test Number:
Date & Time:
Zone: 415
FLOWING HYDRANT
F24
Venezia at Villa Franche
Model Node:
Location(s):
RESIDUAL HYDRANTS
R1
Villa Franche, South of Venezia
Model Node:
Location(s):
R2
Corniche Drive, East of Villa Franche
Model Node:
AUTOMATIC PRESSURE RECORDERS (TELOGS)
T1
Model Node:
Telog 1508 - South of Ocean Vista Drive at Coast Highway
T2
Model Node:
Telog 1509 - 234 Monarch Bay Drive
T3
Model Node:
Telog 1652 - Niguel Road at Coast Highway (NE corner, 16-inch main)
T4
Model Node:
Telog 1656 - Mediterranean Drive at Baltic Sea Drive
T5
Model Node:
Telog 1738 - Sea Island Drive at Somerset Circle
T6
Model Node:
Telog 1739 - Garibaldi Avenue at Selva Road
T7
Model Node:
Telog 2217 - Tirremia Drive at Monarch Beach Road
T8
Model Node:
Telog 2218 - Acapula Drive at Street of the Golden Lantern
T9
Model Node:
Telog 2485 - Street of the Blue Lantern at Selva Road (NE corner)
T10
Model Node:
Telog 2486 - Selva Road at Street of the Copper Lantern
T11
Model Node:
Telog 2487 - Windham Drive (South End)
T12
Model Node:
Telog 2488 - Coast Highway, East of Street of Copper Lantern
T13
Model Node:
Telog 3143 - Dana Point Harbor, South of Coast Highway
T14
Model Node:
Telog 3144 - Victoria Boulevard, West of Sepulveda Avenue
T15
Model Node:
Telog 3145 - Calle Juanita at Calle Real (NE corner, on 6-inch main)
T16
Model Node:
Telog 3146 - Camino de Estrella at Camino Capistrano
T17
Model Node:
Telog 3646 - Monarch Beach Drive at Marquesa
Nozzle Size
Velocity Pressure
Flow
Hydrant
Static Pressure Residual Pressure
(inches)
(psi)
Device
(psi)
(psi)
4
30
Flowing 1
DIF
Flowing
Flowing 2
Initial
Final
49
Residual 1
88
88
72
Residual 2
88
88
70
Telog 1
70
70
56
Telog 2
56
56
0
Telog 3
0
0
96
Telog 4
95
96
75
Telog 5
75
75
50
Telog 6
61
61
62
Telog 7
73
73
42
Telog 8
45
45
65
Telog 9
65
65
46
Telog 10
46
46
108
Telog 11
108
108
122
Telog 12
122
122
75
Telog 13
75
75
140
Telog 14
140
140
38
Telog 15
38
38
100
Telog 16
100
100
58
Telog 17
71
71
Boundary Conditions

REMARKS:

Flow
(gpm)
1,970
Site Map

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Field Testing\[Calib&Flow Test Forms.xls]f-24

FLOW AND PRESSURE TESTS


SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT
LAGUNA BEACH, CALIFORNIA
12/13/07 4:19 PM
F25
Test Number:
Date & Time:
Zone: 415
FLOWING HYDRANT
F25
Forest Hills Court at Tennis Villas Drive
Model Node:
Location(s):
RESIDUAL HYDRANTS
R1
Tennis Villas Drive at Forest Hills Court
Model Node:
Location(s):
R2
Tennis Villas Drive at South End of Centre Court
Model Node:
AUTOMATIC PRESSURE RECORDERS (TELOGS)
T1
Model Node:
Telog 1508 - South of Ocean Vista Drive at Coast Highway
T2
Model Node:
Telog 1509 - 234 Monarch Bay Drive
T3
Model Node:
Telog 1652 - Niguel Road at Coast Highway (NE corner, 16-inch main)
T4
Model Node:
Telog 1656 - Mediterranean Drive at Baltic Sea Drive
T5
Model Node:
Telog 1738 - Sea Island Drive at Somerset Circle
T6
Model Node:
Telog 1739 - Garibaldi Avenue at Selva Road
T7
Model Node:
Telog 2217 - Tirremia Drive at Monarch Beach Road
T8
Model Node:
Telog 2218 - Acapula Drive at Street of the Golden Lantern
T9
Model Node:
Telog 2485 - Street of the Blue Lantern at Selva Road (NE corner)
T10
Model Node:
Telog 2486 - Selva Road at Street of the Copper Lantern
T11
Model Node:
Telog 2487 - Windham Drive (South End)
T12
Model Node:
Telog 2488 - Coast Highway, East of Street of Copper Lantern
T13
Model Node:
Telog 3143 - Dana Point Harbor, South of Coast Highway
T14
Model Node:
Telog 3144 - Victoria Boulevard, West of Sepulveda Avenue
T15
Model Node:
Telog 3145 - Calle Juanita at Calle Real (NE corner, on 6-inch main)
T16
Model Node:
Telog 3146 - Camino de Estrella at Camino Capistrano
T17
Model Node:
Telog 3646 - Monarch Beach Drive at Marquesa
Nozzle Size
Velocity Pressure
Flow
Hydrant
Static Pressure Residual Pressure
(inches)
(psi)
Device
(psi)
(psi)
4
33
Flowing 1
DIF
Flowing
Flowing 2
Initial
Final
61
Residual 1
84
84
67
Residual 2
87
87
70
Telog 1
70
70
55
Telog 2
55
55
0
Telog 3
0
0
96
Telog 4
96
96
75
Telog 5
75
75
48
Telog 6
61
61
60
Telog 7
73
73
42
Telog 8
45
45
66
Telog 9
66
65
47
Telog 10
47
47
109
Telog 11
109
109
122
Telog 12
122
122
757
Telog 13
75
75
139
Telog 14
139
139
38
Telog 15
38
38
100
Telog 16
100
100
57
Telog 17
71
71
Boundary Conditions

REMARKS:

Flow
(gpm)
2,030
Site Map

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Field Testing\[Calib&Flow Test Forms.xls]f-25

FLOW AND PRESSURE TESTS


SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT
LAGUNA BEACH, CALIFORNIA
12/14/07 10:23 AM
F26
Test Number:
Date & Time:
Zone: 415
FLOWING HYDRANT
F26
Capstan Drive, South of Niguel Shores Drive
Model Node:
Location(s):
RESIDUAL HYDRANTS
R1
Capstan Drive, North of Flowing
Model Node:
Location(s):
R2
Halyard Drive at Niguel Shores Drive
Model Node:
AUTOMATIC PRESSURE RECORDERS (TELOGS)
T1
Model Node:
Telog 1508 - South of Ocean Vista Drive at Coast Highway
T2
Model Node:
Telog 1509 - 234 Monarch Bay Drive
T3
Model Node:
Telog 1652 - Niguel Road at Coast Highway (NE corner, 16-inch main)
T4
Model Node:
Telog 1656 - Mediterranean Drive at Baltic Sea Drive
T5
Model Node:
Telog 1738 - Sea Island Drive at Somerset Circle
T6
Model Node:
Telog 1739 - Garibaldi Avenue at Selva Road
T7
Model Node:
Telog 2217 - Tirremia Drive at Monarch Beach Road
T8
Model Node:
Telog 2218 - Acapula Drive at Street of the Golden Lantern
T9
Model Node:
Telog 2485 - Street of the Blue Lantern at Selva Road (NE corner)
T10
Model Node:
Telog 2486 - Selva Road at Street of the Copper Lantern
T11
Model Node:
Telog 2487 - Windham Drive (South End)
T12
Model Node:
Telog 2488 - Coast Highway, East of Street of Copper Lantern
T13
Model Node:
Telog 3143 - Dana Point Harbor, South of Coast Highway
T14
Model Node:
Telog 3144 - Victoria Boulevard, West of Sepulveda Avenue
T15
Model Node:
Telog 3145 - Calle Juanita at Calle Real (NE corner, on 6-inch main)
T16
Model Node:
Telog 3146 - Camino de Estrella at Camino Capistrano
T17
Model Node:
Telog 3646 - Monarch Beach Drive at Marquesa
Nozzle Size
Velocity Pressure
Flow
Hydrant
Static Pressure Residual Pressure
(inches)
(psi)
Device
(psi)
(psi)
4
27
Flowing 1
DIF
Flowing
Flowing 2
Initial
Final
54
Residual 1
74
73
54
Residual 2
70
70
69
Telog 1
69
69
55
Telog 2
55
55
0
Telog 3
0
0
96
Telog 4
96
96
74
Telog 5
74
74
50
Telog 6
65
65
65
Telog 7
76
76
46
Telog 8
49
49
65
Telog 9
65
65
46
Telog 10
46
46
107
Telog 11
107
107
121
Telog 12
121
121
75
Telog 13
75
75
140
Telog 14
140
140
38
Telog 15
38
38
100
Telog 16
100
100
64
Telog 17
75
75
Boundary Conditions

REMARKS:

Flow
(gpm)
1,900
Site Map

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Field Testing\[Calib&Flow Test Forms.xls]f-26

FLOW AND PRESSURE TESTS


SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT
LAGUNA BEACH, CALIFORNIA
12/14/07 2:35 PM
F27
Test Number:
Date & Time:
Zone: 415
FLOWING HYDRANT
F27
Vista del Cielo at Vista D'Onde
Model Node:
Location(s):
RESIDUAL HYDRANTS
R1
Vista del Cielo at Porto Fino
Model Node:
Location(s):
R2
Vista Capri, North of Vista del Cielo
Model Node:
AUTOMATIC PRESSURE RECORDERS (TELOGS)
T1
Model Node:
Telog 1508 - South of Ocean Vista Drive at Coast Highway
T2
Model Node:
Telog 1509 - 234 Monarch Bay Drive
T3
Model Node:
Telog 1652 - Niguel Road at Coast Highway (NE corner, 16-inch main)
T4
Model Node:
Telog 1656 - Mediterranean Drive at Baltic Sea Drive
T5
Model Node:
Telog 1738 - Sea Island Drive at Somerset Circle
T6
Model Node:
Telog 1739 - Garibaldi Avenue at Selva Road
T7
Model Node:
Telog 2217 - Tirremia Drive at Monarch Beach Road
T8
Model Node:
Telog 2218 - Acapula Drive at Street of the Golden Lantern
T9
Model Node:
Telog 2485 - Street of the Blue Lantern at Selva Road (NE corner)
T10
Model Node:
Telog 2486 - Selva Road at Street of the Copper Lantern
T11
Model Node:
Telog 2487 - Windham Drive (South End)
T12
Model Node:
Telog 2488 - Coast Highway, East of Street of Copper Lantern
T13
Model Node:
Telog 3143 - Dana Point Harbor, South of Coast Highway
T14
Model Node:
Telog 3144 - Victoria Boulevard, West of Sepulveda Avenue
T15
Model Node:
Telog 3145 - Calle Juanita at Calle Real (NE corner, on 6-inch main)
T16
Model Node:
Telog 3146 - Camino de Estrella at Camino Capistrano
T17
Model Node:
Telog 3646 - Monarch Beach Drive at Marquesa
Nozzle Size
Velocity Pressure
Flow
Hydrant
Static Pressure Residual Pressure
(inches)
(psi)
Device
(psi)
(psi)
4
23
Flowing 1
DIF
Flowing
Flowing 2
Initial
Final
39
Residual 1
56
55
38
Residual 2
50
50
69
Telog 1
69
69
55
Telog 2
55
55
0
Telog 3
0
0
96
Telog 4
96
96
74
Telog 5
74
74
51
Telog 6
65
65
67
Telog 7
77
77
47
Telog 8
49
49
65
Telog 9
65
65
45
Telog 10
45
45
107
Telog 11
107
107
120
Telog 12
120
120
75
Telog 13
75
75
140
Telog 14
140
140
38
Telog 15
38
38
100
Telog 16
100
100
65
Telog 17
75
75
Boundary Conditions

REMARKS:

Flow
(gpm)
1,790
Site Map

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Field Testing\[Calib&Flow Test Forms.xls]f-27

FLOW AND PRESSURE TESTS


SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT
LAGUNA BEACH, CALIFORNIA
12/14/07 3:16 PM
F28
Test Number:
Date & Time:
Zone: 415
FLOWING HYDRANT
F28
Palm Beach Court, East end
Model Node:
Location(s):
RESIDUAL HYDRANTS
R1
Palm Beach Court, South of Regatta Way
Model Node:
Location(s):
R2
Regatta Way, North of Palm Beach Court
Model Node:
AUTOMATIC PRESSURE RECORDERS (TELOGS)
T1
Model Node:
Telog 1508 - South of Ocean Vista Drive at Coast Highway
T2
Model Node:
Telog 1509 - 234 Monarch Bay Drive
T3
Model Node:
Telog 1652 - Niguel Road at Coast Highway (NE corner, 16-inch main)
T4
Model Node:
Telog 1656 - Mediterranean Drive at Baltic Sea Drive
T5
Model Node:
Telog 1738 - Sea Island Drive at Somerset Circle
T6
Model Node:
Telog 1739 - Garibaldi Avenue at Selva Road
T7
Model Node:
Telog 2217 - Tirremia Drive at Monarch Beach Road
T8
Model Node:
Telog 2218 - Acapula Drive at Street of the Golden Lantern
T9
Model Node:
Telog 2485 - Street of the Blue Lantern at Selva Road (NE corner)
T10
Model Node:
Telog 2486 - Selva Road at Street of the Copper Lantern
T11
Model Node:
Telog 2487 - Windham Drive (South End)
T12
Model Node:
Telog 2488 - Coast Highway, East of Street of Copper Lantern
T13
Model Node:
Telog 3143 - Dana Point Harbor, South of Coast Highway
T14
Model Node:
Telog 3144 - Victoria Boulevard, West of Sepulveda Avenue
T15
Model Node:
Telog 3145 - Calle Juanita at Calle Real (NE corner, on 6-inch main)
T16
Model Node:
Telog 3146 - Camino de Estrella at Camino Capistrano
T17
Model Node:
Telog 3646 - Monarch Beach Drive at Marquesa
Nozzle Size
Velocity Pressure
Flow
Hydrant
Static Pressure Residual Pressure
(inches)
(psi)
Device
(psi)
(psi)
4
16
Flowing 1
DIF
Flowing
Flowing 2
Initial
Final
54
Residual 1
78
77
68
Residual 2
82
81
70
Telog 1
70
70
55
Telog 2
55
55
0
Telog 3
0
0
96
Telog 4
96
96
74
Telog 5
74
74
52
Telog 6
65
65
67
Telog 7
77
77
46
Telog 8
48
48
65
Telog 9
65
65
45
Telog 10
45
45
106
Telog 11
106
106
120
Telog 12
120
120
75
Telog 13
76
75
140
Telog 14
140
140
38
Telog 15
38
38
100
Telog 16
100
100
66
Telog 17
75
75
Boundary Conditions

REMARKS:

Flow
(gpm)
1,550
Site Map

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Field Testing\[Calib&Flow Test Forms.xls]f-28

FLOW AND PRESSURE TESTS


SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT
LAGUNA BEACH, CALIFORNIA
12/17/07 9:10 AM
F29
Test Number:
Date & Time:
Zone: 290
FLOWING HYDRANT
F29
Across from 101 Blue Lagoon
Model Node:
Location(s):
RESIDUAL HYDRANTS
R1
Behind 65 Blue Lagoon
Model Node:
Location(s):
R2
Coast Highway at Blue Lagoon entrance
Model Node:
AUTOMATIC PRESSURE RECORDERS (TELOGS)
T1
Model Node:
Telog 1508 - South of Ocean Vista Drive at Coast Highway
T2
Model Node:
Telog 1509 - 234 Monarch Bay Drive
T3
Model Node:
Telog 1652 - Niguel Road at Coast Highway (NE corner, 16-inch main)
T4
Model Node:
Telog 1656 - Mediterranean Drive at Baltic Sea Drive
T5
Model Node:
Telog 1738 - Sea Island Drive at Somerset Circle
T6
Model Node:
Telog 1739 - Garibaldi Avenue at Selva Road
T7
Model Node:
Telog 2217 - Tirremia Drive at Monarch Beach Road
T8
Model Node:
Telog 2218 - Acapula Drive at Street of the Golden Lantern
T9
Model Node:
Telog 2485 - Street of the Blue Lantern at Selva Road (NE corner)
T10
Model Node:
Telog 2486 - Selva Road at Street of the Copper Lantern
T11
Model Node:
Telog 2487 - Windham Drive (South End)
T12
Model Node:
Telog 2488 - Coast Highway, East of Street of Copper Lantern
T13
Model Node:
Telog 3143 - Dana Point Harbor, South of Coast Highway
T14
Model Node:
Telog 3144 - Victoria Boulevard, West of Sepulveda Avenue
T15
Model Node:
Telog 3145 - Calle Juanita at Calle Real (NE corner, on 6-inch main)
T16
Model Node:
Telog 3146 - Camino de Estrella at Camino Capistrano
T17
Model Node:
Telog 3646 - Coast Highway at Fourth Avenue (SW corner)
Nozzle Size
Velocity Pressure
Flow
Hydrant
Static Pressure Residual Pressure
(inches)
(psi)
Device
(psi)
(psi)
4
40
Flowing 1
DIF
Flowing
Flowing 2
Initial
Final
78
Residual 1
160
106
72
Residual 2
76
76
67
Telog 1
69
69
54
Telog 2
55
55
58
Telog 3
58
58
96
Telog 4
96
96
74
Telog 5
74
74
64
Telog 6
64
64
76
Telog 7
76
76
49
Telog 8
49
49
65
Telog 9
65
65
46
Telog 10
46
46
107
Telog 11
107
107
121
Telog 12
121
121
75
Telog 13
75
75
139
Telog 14
139
139
38
Telog 15
38
38
99
Telog 16
99
99
73
Telog 17
74
74
Boundary Conditions

REMARKS:

Flow
(gpm)
2,160
Site Map

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Field Testing\[Calib&Flow Test Forms.xls]f-29

FLOW AND PRESSURE TESTS


SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT
LAGUNA BEACH, CALIFORNIA
12/17/07 9:51 AM
F30
Test Number:
Date & Time:
Zone: 290
FLOWING HYDRANT
F30
Marilyn Drive, South of Ocean Vista Drive
Model Node:
Location(s):
RESIDUAL HYDRANTS
R1
Marilyn Drive at Ocean Vista Drive
Model Node:
Location(s):
R2
West end of Ocean Vista Drive
Model Node:
AUTOMATIC PRESSURE RECORDERS (TELOGS)
T1
Model Node:
Telog 1508 - South of Ocean Vista Drive at Coast Highway
T2
Model Node:
Telog 1509 - 234 Monarch Bay Drive
T3
Model Node:
Telog 1652 - Niguel Road at Coast Highway (NE corner, 16-inch main)
T4
Model Node:
Telog 1656 - Mediterranean Drive at Baltic Sea Drive
T5
Model Node:
Telog 1738 - Sea Island Drive at Somerset Circle
T6
Model Node:
Telog 1739 - Garibaldi Avenue at Selva Road
T7
Model Node:
Telog 2217 - Tirremia Drive at Monarch Beach Road
T8
Model Node:
Telog 2218 - Acapula Drive at Street of the Golden Lantern
T9
Model Node:
Telog 2485 - Street of the Blue Lantern at Selva Road (NE corner)
T10
Model Node:
Telog 2486 - Selva Road at Street of the Copper Lantern
T11
Model Node:
Telog 2487 - Windham Drive (South End)
T12
Model Node:
Telog 2488 - Coast Highway, East of Street of Copper Lantern
T13
Model Node:
Telog 3143 - Dana Point Harbor, South of Coast Highway
T14
Model Node:
Telog 3144 - Victoria Boulevard, West of Sepulveda Avenue
T15
Model Node:
Telog 3145 - Calle Juanita at Calle Real (NE corner, on 6-inch main)
T16
Model Node:
Telog 3146 - Camino de Estrella at Camino Capistrano
T17
Model Node:
Telog 3646 - Coast Highway at Fourth Avenue (SW corner)
Nozzle Size
Velocity Pressure
Flow
Hydrant
Static Pressure Residual Pressure
(inches)
(psi)
Device
(psi)
(psi)
4
23
Flowing 1
DIF
Flowing
Flowing 2
Initial
Final
38
Residual 1
49
49
64
Residual 2
66
66
68
Telog 1
69
69
55
Telog 2
55
55
58
Telog 3
58
58
96
Telog 4
96
96
74
Telog 5
74
74
64
Telog 6
64
64
77
Telog 7
77
77
49
Telog 8
49
49
65
Telog 9
65
65
46
Telog 10
46
46
108
Telog 11
108
108
121
Telog 12
121
121
75
Telog 13
75
75
139
Telog 14
139
139
38
Telog 15
38
38
99
Telog 16
99
99
73
Telog 17
73
73
Boundary Conditions

REMARKS:

Flow
(gpm)
1,790
Site Map

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Field Testing\[Calib&Flow Test Forms.xls]f-30

FLOW AND PRESSURE TESTS


SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT
LAGUNA BEACH, CALIFORNIA
12/17/07 11:15 AM
F31
Test Number:
Date & Time:
Zone: 290
FLOWING HYDRANT
F31
Wildwood Road at Third Avenue
Model Node:
Location(s):
RESIDUAL HYDRANTS
R1
Fourth Avenue at Fairview Road
Model Node:
Location(s):
R2
Third Avenue at Virginia Way
Model Node:
AUTOMATIC PRESSURE RECORDERS (TELOGS)
T1
Model Node:
Telog 1508 - South of Ocean Vista Drive at Coast Highway
T2
Model Node:
Telog 1509 - 234 Monarch Bay Drive
T3
Model Node:
Telog 1652 - Niguel Road at Coast Highway (NE corner, 16-inch main)
T4
Model Node:
Telog 1656 - Mediterranean Drive at Baltic Sea Drive
T5
Model Node:
Telog 1738 - Sea Island Drive at Somerset Circle
T6
Model Node:
Telog 1739 - Garibaldi Avenue at Selva Road
T7
Model Node:
Telog 2217 - Tirremia Drive at Monarch Beach Road
T8
Model Node:
Telog 2218 - Acapula Drive at Street of the Golden Lantern
T9
Model Node:
Telog 2485 - Street of the Blue Lantern at Selva Road (NE corner)
T10
Model Node:
Telog 2486 - Selva Road at Street of the Copper Lantern
T11
Model Node:
Telog 2487 - Windham Drive (South End)
T12
Model Node:
Telog 2488 - Coast Highway, East of Street of Copper Lantern
T13
Model Node:
Telog 3143 - Dana Point Harbor, South of Coast Highway
T14
Model Node:
Telog 3144 - Victoria Boulevard, West of Sepulveda Avenue
T15
Model Node:
Telog 3145 - Calle Juanita at Calle Real (NE corner, on 6-inch main)
T16
Model Node:
Telog 3146 - Camino de Estrella at Camino Capistrano
T17
Model Node:
Telog 3646 - Coast Highway at Fourth Avenue (SW corner)
Nozzle Size
Velocity Pressure
Flow
Hydrant
Static Pressure Residual Pressure
(inches)
(psi)
Device
(psi)
(psi)
4
18
Flowing 1
DIF
Flowing
Flowing 2
Initial
Final
50
Residual 1
54
54
56
Residual 2
60
60
69
Telog 1
69
69
55
Telog 2
55
55
58
Telog 3
58
58
95
Telog 4
95
95
74
Telog 5
74
74
65
Telog 6
65
65
77
Telog 7
77
77
49
Telog 8
49
49
65
Telog 9
65
65
47
Telog 10
47
47
109
Telog 11
109
109
122
Telog 12
122
122
75
Telog 13
75
75
139
Telog 14
139
139
38
Telog 15
38
38
100
Telog 16
100
100
74
Telog 17
74
74
Boundary Conditions

REMARKS:

Flow
(gpm)
1,630
Site Map

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Field Testing\[Calib&Flow Test Forms.xls]f-31

FLOW AND PRESSURE TESTS


SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT
LAGUNA BEACH, CALIFORNIA
12/17/07 11:45 AM
F32
Test Number:
Date & Time:
Zone: 290
FLOWING HYDRANT
F32
Portola at Encino
Model Node:
Location(s):
RESIDUAL HYDRANTS
R1
Portola at Calle Cita
Model Node:
Location(s):
R2
Encino at Vista del Sol
Model Node:
AUTOMATIC PRESSURE RECORDERS (TELOGS)
T1
Model Node:
Telog 1508 - South of Ocean Vista Drive at Coast Highway
T2
Model Node:
Telog 1509 - 234 Monarch Bay Drive
T3
Model Node:
Telog 1652 - Niguel Road at Coast Highway (NE corner, 16-inch main)
T4
Model Node:
Telog 1656 - Mediterranean Drive at Baltic Sea Drive
T5
Model Node:
Telog 1738 - Sea Island Drive at Somerset Circle
T6
Model Node:
Telog 1739 - Garibaldi Avenue at Selva Road
T7
Model Node:
Telog 2217 - Tirremia Drive at Monarch Beach Road
T8
Model Node:
Telog 2218 - Acapula Drive at Street of the Golden Lantern
T9
Model Node:
Telog 2485 - Street of the Blue Lantern at Selva Road (NE corner)
T10
Model Node:
Telog 2486 - Selva Road at Street of the Copper Lantern
T11
Model Node:
Telog 2487 - Windham Drive (South End)
T12
Model Node:
Telog 2488 - Coast Highway, East of Street of Copper Lantern
T13
Model Node:
Telog 3143 - Dana Point Harbor, South of Coast Highway
T14
Model Node:
Telog 3144 - Victoria Boulevard, West of Sepulveda Avenue
T15
Model Node:
Telog 3145 - Calle Juanita at Calle Real (NE corner, on 6-inch main)
T16
Model Node:
Telog 3146 - Camino de Estrella at Camino Capistrano
T17
Model Node:
Telog 3646 - Coast Highway at Fourth Avenue (SW corner)
Nozzle Size
Velocity Pressure
Flow
Hydrant
Static Pressure Residual Pressure
(inches)
(psi)
Device
(psi)
(psi)
4
19
Flowing 1
DIF
Flowing
Flowing 2
Initial
Final
40
Residual 1
52
52
39
Residual 2
51
69
Telog 1
69
69
50
Telog 2
55
55
58
Telog 3
58
58
95
Telog 4
95
95
74
Telog 5
74
74
65
Telog 6
65
65
78
Telog 7
78
78
49
Telog 8
49
49
65
Telog 9
65
65
47
Telog 10
47
47
108
Telog 11
108
108
121
Telog 12
121
121
75
Telog 13
75
75
139
Telog 14
139
139
38
Telog 15
38
38
100
Telog 16
100
100
74
Telog 17
74
74
Boundary Conditions

REMARKS:

Flow
(gpm)
1,660
Site Map

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Field Testing\[Calib&Flow Test Forms.xls]f-32

FLOW AND PRESSURE TESTS


SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT
LAGUNA BEACH, CALIFORNIA
12/17/07 1:27 PM
F33
Test Number:
Date & Time:
Zone: 290
FLOWING HYDRANT
F33
128 Monarch Bay Drive
Model Node:
Location(s):
RESIDUAL HYDRANTS
R1
117 Monarch Bay Drive
Model Node:
Location(s):
R2
101 Monarch Bay Drive
Model Node:
AUTOMATIC PRESSURE RECORDERS (TELOGS)
T1
Model Node:
Telog 1508 - South of Ocean Vista Drive at Coast Highway
T2
Model Node:
Telog 1509 - 234 Monarch Bay Drive
T3
Model Node:
Telog 1652 - Niguel Road at Coast Highway (NE corner, 16-inch main)
T4
Model Node:
Telog 1656 - Mediterranean Drive at Baltic Sea Drive
T5
Model Node:
Telog 1738 - Sea Island Drive at Somerset Circle
T6
Model Node:
Telog 1739 - Garibaldi Avenue at Selva Road
T7
Model Node:
Telog 2217 - Tirremia Drive at Monarch Beach Road
T8
Model Node:
Telog 2218 - Acapula Drive at Street of the Golden Lantern
T9
Model Node:
Telog 2485 - Street of the Blue Lantern at Selva Road (NE corner)
T10
Model Node:
Telog 2486 - Selva Road at Street of the Copper Lantern
T11
Model Node:
Telog 2487 - Windham Drive (South End)
T12
Model Node:
Telog 2488 - Coast Highway, East of Street of Copper Lantern
T13
Model Node:
Telog 3143 - Dana Point Harbor, South of Coast Highway
T14
Model Node:
Telog 3144 - Victoria Boulevard, West of Sepulveda Avenue
T15
Model Node:
Telog 3145 - Calle Juanita at Calle Real (NE corner, on 6-inch main)
T16
Model Node:
Telog 3146 - Camino de Estrella at Camino Capistrano
T17
Model Node:
Telog 3646 - Coast Highway at Fourth Avenue (SW corner)
Nozzle Size
Velocity Pressure
Flow
Hydrant
Static Pressure Residual Pressure
(inches)
(psi)
Device
(psi)
(psi)
4
11
Flowing 1
DIF
Flowing
Flowing 2
Initial
Final
52
Residual 1
68
68
54
Residual 2
68
68
69
Telog 1
69
69
48
Telog 2
55
55
58
Telog 3
58
58
95
Telog 4
95
95
74
Telog 5
74
74
66
Telog 6
66
66
78
Telog 7
78
78
50
Telog 8
50
50
65
Telog 9
65
65
46
Telog 10
46
46
108
Telog 11
108
108
122
Telog 12
122
122
75
Telog 13
75
75
139
Telog 14
139
139
38
Telog 15
38
38
100
Telog 16
100
100
74
Telog 17
74
74
Boundary Conditions

REMARKS:

Flow
(gpm)
1,330
Site Map

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Field Testing\[Calib&Flow Test Forms.xls]f-33

FLOW AND PRESSURE TESTS


SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT
LAGUNA BEACH, CALIFORNIA
12/17/07 2:01 PM
F34
Test Number:
Date & Time:
Zone: 290
FLOWING HYDRANT
F34
Montessori Academy
Model Node:
Location(s):
RESIDUAL HYDRANTS
R1
Southeast of CVS Pharmacy, North of Flowing Hydrant
Model Node:
Location(s):
R2
Southeast of Starbucks
Model Node:
AUTOMATIC PRESSURE RECORDERS (TELOGS)
T1
Model Node:
Telog 1508 - South of Ocean Vista Drive at Coast Highway
T2
Model Node:
Telog 1509 - 234 Monarch Bay Drive
T3
Model Node:
Telog 1652 - Niguel Road at Coast Highway (NE corner, 16-inch main)
T4
Model Node:
Telog 1656 - Mediterranean Drive at Baltic Sea Drive
T5
Model Node:
Telog 1738 - Sea Island Drive at Somerset Circle
T6
Model Node:
Telog 1739 - Garibaldi Avenue at Selva Road
T7
Model Node:
Telog 2217 - Tirremia Drive at Monarch Beach Road
T8
Model Node:
Telog 2218 - Acapula Drive at Street of the Golden Lantern
T9
Model Node:
Telog 2485 - Street of the Blue Lantern at Selva Road (NE corner)
T10
Model Node:
Telog 2486 - Selva Road at Street of the Copper Lantern
T11
Model Node:
Telog 2487 - Windham Drive (South End)
T12
Model Node:
Telog 2488 - Coast Highway, East of Street of Copper Lantern
T13
Model Node:
Telog 3143 - Dana Point Harbor, South of Coast Highway
T14
Model Node:
Telog 3144 - Victoria Boulevard, West of Sepulveda Avenue
T15
Model Node:
Telog 3145 - Calle Juanita at Calle Real (NE corner, on 6-inch main)
T16
Model Node:
Telog 3146 - Camino de Estrella at Camino Capistrano
T17
Model Node:
Telog 3646 - Coast Highway at Fourth Avenue (SW corner)
Nozzle Size
Velocity Pressure
Flow
Hydrant
Static Pressure Residual Pressure
(inches)
(psi)
Device
(psi)
(psi)
4
26
Flowing 1
DIF
Flowing
Flowing 2
Initial
Final
50
Residual 1
60
60
59
Residual 2
64
64
69
Telog 1
69
69
53
Telog 2
55
55
57
Telog 3
57
57
95
Telog 4
95
95
74
Telog 5
74
74
65
Telog 6
65
65
78
Telog 7
78
78
50
Telog 8
50
50
64
Telog 9
64
64
47
Telog 10
47
47
108
Telog 11
108
108
122
Telog 12
122
122
75
Telog 13
75
75
140
Telog 14
140
140
38
Telog 15
38
38
100
Telog 16
100
100
74
Telog 17
74
74
Boundary Conditions

REMARKS:

Flow
(gpm)
1,870
Site Map

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Field Testing\[Calib&Flow Test Forms.xls]f-34

FLOW AND PRESSURE TESTS


SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT
LAGUNA BEACH, CALIFORNIA
12/17/07 2:41 PM
F35
Test Number:
Date & Time:
Zone: 290
FLOWING HYDRANT
F35
30 Ritz Cove
Model Node:
Location(s):
RESIDUAL HYDRANTS
R1
Empty lot, North of 35 Ritz Cove
Model Node:
Location(s):
R2
62 Ritz Cove
Model Node:
AUTOMATIC PRESSURE RECORDERS (TELOGS)
T1
Model Node:
Telog 1508 - South of Ocean Vista Drive at Coast Highway
T2
Model Node:
Telog 1509 - 234 Monarch Bay Drive
T3
Model Node:
Telog 1652 - Niguel Road at Coast Highway (NE corner, 16-inch main)
T4
Model Node:
Telog 1656 - Mediterranean Drive at Baltic Sea Drive
T5
Model Node:
Telog 1738 - Sea Island Drive at Somerset Circle
T6
Model Node:
Telog 1739 - Garibaldi Avenue at Selva Road
T7
Model Node:
Telog 2217 - Tirremia Drive at Monarch Beach Road
T8
Model Node:
Telog 2218 - Acapula Drive at Street of the Golden Lantern
T9
Model Node:
Telog 2485 - Street of the Blue Lantern at Selva Road (NE corner)
T10
Model Node:
Telog 2486 - Selva Road at Street of the Copper Lantern
T11
Model Node:
Telog 2487 - Windham Drive (South End)
T12
Model Node:
Telog 2488 - Coast Highway, East of Street of Copper Lantern
T13
Model Node:
Telog 3143 - Dana Point Harbor, South of Coast Highway
T14
Model Node:
Telog 3144 - Victoria Boulevard, West of Sepulveda Avenue
T15
Model Node:
Telog 3145 - Calle Juanita at Calle Real (NE corner, on 6-inch main)
T16
Model Node:
Telog 3146 - Camino de Estrella at Camino Capistrano
T17
Model Node:
Telog 3646 - Coast Highway at Fourth Avenue (SW corner)
Nozzle Size
Velocity Pressure
Flow
Hydrant
Static Pressure Residual Pressure
(inches)
(psi)
Device
(psi)
(psi)
4
25
Flowing 1
DIF
Flowing
Flowing 2
Initial
Final
60
Residual 1
82
82
61
Residual 2
67
67
69
Telog 1
69
69
55
Telog 2
55
55
57
Telog 3
57
57
95
Telog 4
95
95
74
Telog 5
74
74
66
Telog 6
66
66
78
Telog 7
78
78
50
Telog 8
50
50
66
Telog 9
66
66
46
Telog 10
46
46
108
Telog 11
108
108
121
Telog 12
121
121
74
Telog 13
74
74
140
Telog 14
140
140
38
Telog 15
38
38
100
Telog 16
100
100
74
Telog 17
74
74
Boundary Conditions

REMARKS:

Flow
(gpm)
1,850
Site Map

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Field Testing\[Calib&Flow Test Forms.xls]f-35

FLOW AND PRESSURE TESTS


SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT
LAGUNA BEACH, CALIFORNIA
12/17/07 3:38 PM
F36
Test Number:
Date & Time:
Zone: 290
FLOWING HYDRANT
F36
15 Breakers Isle
Model Node:
Location(s):
RESIDUAL HYDRANTS
R1
9 Breakers Isle
Model Node:
Location(s):
R2
Niguel Shores Drive at Nauticus Isle
Model Node:
AUTOMATIC PRESSURE RECORDERS (TELOGS)
T1
Model Node:
Telog 1508 - South of Ocean Vista Drive at Coast Highway
T2
Model Node:
Telog 1509 - 234 Monarch Bay Drive
T3
Model Node:
Telog 1652 - Niguel Road at Coast Highway (NE corner, 16-inch main)
T4
Model Node:
Telog 1656 - Mediterranean Drive at Baltic Sea Drive
T5
Model Node:
Telog 1738 - Sea Island Drive at Somerset Circle
T6
Model Node:
Telog 1739 - Garibaldi Avenue at Selva Road
T7
Model Node:
Telog 2217 - Tirremia Drive at Monarch Beach Road
T8
Model Node:
Telog 2218 - Acapula Drive at Street of the Golden Lantern
T9
Model Node:
Telog 2485 - Street of the Blue Lantern at Selva Road (NE corner)
T10
Model Node:
Telog 2486 - Selva Road at Street of the Copper Lantern
T11
Model Node:
Telog 2487 - Windham Drive (South End)
T12
Model Node:
Telog 2488 - Coast Highway, East of Street of Copper Lantern
T13
Model Node:
Telog 3143 - Dana Point Harbor, South of Coast Highway
T14
Model Node:
Telog 3144 - Victoria Boulevard, West of Sepulveda Avenue
T15
Model Node:
Telog 3145 - Calle Juanita at Calle Real (NE corner, on 6-inch main)
T16
Model Node:
Telog 3146 - Camino de Estrella at Camino Capistrano
T17
Model Node:
Telog 3646 - Coast Highway at Fourth Avenue (SW corner)
Nozzle Size
Velocity Pressure
Flow
Hydrant
Static Pressure Residual Pressure
(inches)
(psi)
Device
(psi)
(psi)
4
30
Flowing 1
DIF
Flowing
Flowing 2
Initial
Final
62
Residual 1
96
96
63
Residual 2
71
71
69
Telog 1
69
69
55
Telog 2
55
55
57
Telog 3
57
57
95
Telog 4
95
95
74
Telog 5
74
74
66
Telog 6
66
66
78
Telog 7
78
78
50
Telog 8
50
50
66
Telog 9
66
66
46
Telog 10
46
46
108
Telog 11
108
108
121
Telog 12
121
121
75
Telog 13
75
75
139
Telog 14
139
139
38
Telog 15
38
38
100
Telog 16
100
100
74
Telog 17
74
74
Boundary Conditions

REMARKS:

Flow
(gpm)
1,970
Site Map

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Field Testing\[Calib&Flow Test Forms.xls]f-36

FLOW AND PRESSURE TESTS


SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT
LAGUNA BEACH, CALIFORNIA
12/18/07 3:05 PM
F37
Test Number:
Date & Time:
Zone: 490b
FLOWING HYDRANT
F37
Marilyn Drive, North of Ocean Vista
Model Node:
Location(s):
RESIDUAL HYDRANTS
R1
Driveiftwood Drive at Ocean Vista
Model Node:
Location(s):
R2
Driveiftwood Drive at Wesley Drive
Model Node:
AUTOMATIC PRESSURE RECORDERS (TELOGS)
T1
Model Node:
Telog 1508 - South of Ocean Vista Drive at Coast Highway
T2
Model Node:
Telog 1509 - 234 Monarch Bay Drive
T3
Model Node:
Telog 1652 - Niguel Road at Coast Highway (NE corner, 16-inch main)
T4
Model Node:
Telog 1656 - Mediterranean Drive at Baltic Sea Drive
T5
Model Node:
Telog 1738 - Sea Island Drive at Somerset Circle
T6
Model Node:
Telog 1739 - Garibaldi Avenue at Selva Road
T7
Model Node:
Telog 2217 - Tirremia Drive at Monarch Beach Road
T8
Model Node:
Telog 2218 - Acapula Drive at Street of the Golden Lantern
T9
Model Node:
Telog 2485 - Street of the Blue Lantern at Selva Road (NE corner)
T10
Model Node:
Telog 2486 - Selva Road at Street of the Copper Lantern
T11
Model Node:
Telog 2487 - Windham Drive (South End)
T12
Model Node:
Telog 2488 - Coast Highway, East of Street of Copper Lantern
T13
Model Node:
Telog 3143 - Dana Point Harbor, South of Coast Highway
T14
Model Node:
Telog 3144 - Victoria Boulevard, West of Sepulveda Avenue
T15
Model Node:
Telog 3145 - Calle Juanita at Calle Real (NE corner, on 6-inch main)
T16
Model Node:
Telog 3146 - Camino de Estrella at Camino Capistrano
T17
Model Node:
Telog 3646 - Ocean Vista Drive, East of Driftwood Drive
Nozzle Size
Velocity Pressure
Flow
Hydrant
Static Pressure Residual Pressure
(inches)
(psi)
Device
(psi)
(psi)
4
30
Flowing 1
DIF
Flowing
Flowing 2
Initial
Final
80
Residual 1
90
89
103
Residual 2
107
112
69
Telog 1
69
69
55
Telog 2
55
55
58
Telog 3
58
58
96
Telog 4
96
96
75
Telog 5
75
75
66
Telog 6
66
66
78
Telog 7
78
78
50
Telog 8
50
50
65
Telog 9
65
65
46
Telog 10
46
46
107
Telog 11
107
107
121
Telog 12
121
121
75
Telog 13
75
75
140
Telog 14
140
140
38
Telog 15
38
38
100
Telog 16
100
100
0
Telog 17
70
70
Boundary Conditions

Flowing
R1
R2

REMARKS:

Flow
(gpm)
1,970
Site Map

No Fire Pump
7psi
16 psi
40 psi

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Field Testing\[Calib&Flow Test Forms.xls]f-37

FLOW AND PRESSURE TESTS


SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT
LAGUNA BEACH, CALIFORNIA
12/18/07 9:40 AM
F38
Test Number:
Date & Time:
Zone: 490
FLOWING HYDRANT
F38
Scenic Drive at Fourth Avenue
Model Node:
Location(s):
RESIDUAL HYDRANTS
R1
Scenic Drive at Third Avenue
Model Node:
Location(s):
R2
Scenic Drive at Eagle Rock Way
Model Node:
AUTOMATIC PRESSURE RECORDERS (TELOGS)
T1
Model Node:
Telog 1508 - South of Ocean Vista Drive at Coast Highway
T2
Model Node:
Telog 1509 - 234 Monarch Bay Drive
T3
Model Node:
Telog 1652 - Niguel Road at Coast Highway (NE corner, 16-inch main)
T4
Model Node:
Telog 1656 - Mediterranean Drive at Baltic Sea Drive
T5
Model Node:
Telog 1738 - Sea Island Drive at Somerset Circle
T6
Model Node:
Telog 1739 - Garibaldi Avenue at Selva Road
T7
Model Node:
Telog 2217 - Tirremia Drive at Monarch Beach Road
T8
Model Node:
Telog 2218 - Acapula Drive at Street of the Golden Lantern
T9
Model Node:
Telog 2485 - Street of the Blue Lantern at Selva Road (NE corner)
T10
Model Node:
Telog 2486 - Selva Road at Street of the Copper Lantern
T11
Model Node:
Telog 2487 - Windham Drive (South End)
T12
Model Node:
Telog 2488 - Coast Highway, East of Street of Copper Lantern
T13
Model Node:
Telog 3143 - Dana Point Harbor, South of Coast Highway
T14
Model Node:
Telog 3144 - Victoria Boulevard, West of Sepulveda Avenue
T15
Model Node:
Telog 3145 - Calle Juanita at Calle Real (NE corner, on 6-inch main)
T16
Model Node:
Telog 3146 - Camino de Estrella at Camino Capistrano
T17
Model Node:
Telog 3646 - Mar Vista Avenue, South of Third Avenue
Nozzle Size
Velocity Pressure
Flow
Hydrant
Static Pressure Residual Pressure
(inches)
(psi)
Device
(psi)
(psi)
4
32
Flowing 1
DIF
Flowing
Flowing 2
Initial
Final
72
Residual 1
109
109
60
Residual 2
101
101
69
Telog 1
69
69
55
Telog 2
55
55
58
Telog 3
58
58
96
Telog 4
96
96
75
Telog 5
75
75
65
Telog 6
65
65
78
Telog 7
78
78
50
Telog 8
50
50
65
Telog 9
65
65
47
Telog 10
47
47
109
Telog 11
109
109
121
Telog 12
121
121
75
Telog 13
75
75
139
Telog 14
139
139
38
Telog 15
38
38
99
Telog 16
99
99
75
Telog 17
110
110
Boundary Conditions

REMARKS:

Flow
(gpm)
2,010
Site Map

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Field Testing\[Calib&Flow Test Forms.xls]f-38

FLOW AND PRESSURE TESTS


SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT
LAGUNA BEACH, CALIFORNIA
12/18/07 10:54 AM
F39
Test Number:
Date & Time:
Zone: 490
FLOWING HYDRANT
F39
Vista Orvieto, North end
Model Node:
Location(s):
RESIDUAL HYDRANTS
R1
Vista Mentona at Vista Orvieto
Model Node:
Location(s):
R2
Vista Mentona at Vista Cordova
Model Node:
AUTOMATIC PRESSURE RECORDERS (TELOGS)
T1
Model Node:
Telog 1508 - South of Ocean Vista Drive at Coast Highway
T2
Model Node:
Telog 1509 - 234 Monarch Bay Drive
T3
Model Node:
Telog 1652 - Niguel Road at Coast Highway (NE corner, 16-inch main)
T4
Model Node:
Telog 1656 - Mediterranean Drive at Baltic Sea Drive
T5
Model Node:
Telog 1738 - Sea Island Drive at Somerset Circle
T6
Model Node:
Telog 1739 - Garibaldi Avenue at Selva Road
T7
Model Node:
Telog 2217 - Tirremia Drive at Monarch Beach Road
T8
Model Node:
Telog 2218 - Acapula Drive at Street of the Golden Lantern
T9
Model Node:
Telog 2485 - Street of the Blue Lantern at Selva Road (NE corner)
T10
Model Node:
Telog 2486 - Selva Road at Street of the Copper Lantern
T11
Model Node:
Telog 2487 - Windham Drive (South End)
T12
Model Node:
Telog 2488 - Coast Highway, East of Street of Copper Lantern
T13
Model Node:
Telog 3143 - Dana Point Harbor, South of Coast Highway
T14
Model Node:
Telog 3144 - Victoria Boulevard, West of Sepulveda Avenue
T15
Model Node:
Telog 3145 - Calle Juanita at Calle Real (NE corner, on 6-inch main)
T16
Model Node:
Telog 3146 - Camino de Estrella at Camino Capistrano
T17
Model Node:
Telog 3646 - Mar Vista Avenue, South of Third Avenue
Nozzle Size
Velocity Pressure
Flow
Hydrant
Static Pressure Residual Pressure
(inches)
(psi)
Device
(psi)
(psi)
4
30
Flowing 1
DIF
Flowing
Flowing 2
Initial
Final
73
Residual 1
86
86
85
Residual 2
95
95
69
Telog 1
69
69
55
Telog 2
55
55
58
Telog 3
58
58
91
Telog 4
96
96
75
Telog 5
75
75
66
Telog 6
66
66
78
Telog 7
78
78
50
Telog 8
50
50
64
Telog 9
64
64
47
Telog 10
47
47
108
Telog 11
108
108
121
Telog 12
121
121
75
Telog 13
75
75
139
Telog 14
139
139
38
Telog 15
38
38
99
Telog 16
99
99
109
Telog 17
109
109
Boundary Conditions

REMARKS:

Flow
(gpm)
1,970
Site Map

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Field Testing\[Calib&Flow Test Forms.xls]f-39

FLOW AND PRESSURE TESTS


SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT
LAGUNA BEACH, CALIFORNIA
12/18/07 11:29 AM
F40
Test Number:
Date & Time:
Zone: 490
FLOWING HYDRANT
F40
Caribbean Drive at Caspian Sea Drive
Model Node:
Location(s):
RESIDUAL HYDRANTS
R1
Caribbean Drive, North of Caspian Sea Drive
Model Node:
Location(s):
R2
Caribbean Drive, South of reservoir
Model Node:
AUTOMATIC PRESSURE RECORDERS (TELOGS)
T1
Model Node:
Telog 1508 - South of Ocean Vista Drive at Coast Highway
T2
Model Node:
Telog 1509 - 234 Monarch Bay Drive
T3
Model Node:
Telog 1652 - Niguel Road at Coast Highway (NE corner, 16-inch main)
T4
Model Node:
Telog 1656 - Mediterranean Drive at Baltic Sea Drive
T5
Model Node:
Telog 1738 - Sea Island Drive at Somerset Circle
T6
Model Node:
Telog 1739 - Garibaldi Avenue at Selva Road
T7
Model Node:
Telog 2217 - Tirremia Drive at Monarch Beach Road
T8
Model Node:
Telog 2218 - Acapula Drive at Street of the Golden Lantern
T9
Model Node:
Telog 2485 - Street of the Blue Lantern at Selva Road (NE corner)
T10
Model Node:
Telog 2486 - Selva Road at Street of the Copper Lantern
T11
Model Node:
Telog 2487 - Windham Drive (South End)
T12
Model Node:
Telog 2488 - Coast Highway, East of Street of Copper Lantern
T13
Model Node:
Telog 3143 - Dana Point Harbor, South of Coast Highway
T14
Model Node:
Telog 3144 - Victoria Boulevard, West of Sepulveda Avenue
T15
Model Node:
Telog 3145 - Calle Juanita at Calle Real (NE corner, on 6-inch main)
T16
Model Node:
Telog 3146 - Camino de Estrella at Camino Capistrano
T17
Model Node:
Telog 3646 - Mar Vista Avenue, South of Third Avenue
Nozzle Size
Velocity Pressure
Flow
Hydrant
Static Pressure Residual Pressure
(inches)
(psi)
Device
(psi)
(psi)
4
35
Flowing 1
DIF
Flowing
Flowing 2
Initial
Final
67
Residual 1
76
76
31
Residual 2
33
33
69
Telog 1
69
69
54
Telog 2
54
54
58
Telog 3
58
58
93
Telog 4
96
96
75
Telog 5
75
75
66
Telog 6
66
66
78
Telog 7
78
78
50
Telog 8
50
50
65
Telog 9
65
65
46
Telog 10
46
46
108
Telog 11
108
108
121
Telog 12
121
121
75
Telog 13
75
75
139
Telog 14
139
139
38
Telog 15
38
38
99
Telog 16
99
99
110
Telog 17
110
110
Boundary Conditions

REMARKS:

Flow
(gpm)
2,070
Site Map

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Field Testing\[Calib&Flow Test Forms.xls]f-40

FLOW AND PRESSURE TESTS


SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT
LAGUNA BEACH, CALIFORNIA
12/18/07 11:57 AM
F41
Test Number:
Date & Time:
Zone: 490
FLOWING HYDRANT
F41
End of Ascension Road
Model Node:
Location(s):
RESIDUAL HYDRANTS
R1
Ascension Road, East of Crete Road
Model Node:
Location(s):
R2
Crete Road, North of Sea Island Drive
Model Node:
AUTOMATIC PRESSURE RECORDERS (TELOGS)
T1
Model Node:
Telog 1508 - South of Ocean Vista Drive at Coast Highway
T2
Model Node:
Telog 1509 - 234 Monarch Bay Drive
T3
Model Node:
Telog 1652 - Niguel Road at Coast Highway (NE corner, 16-inch main)
T4
Model Node:
Telog 1656 - Mediterranean Drive at Baltic Sea Drive
T5
Model Node:
Telog 1738 - Sea Island Drive at Somerset Circle
T6
Model Node:
Telog 1739 - Garibaldi Avenue at Selva Road
T7
Model Node:
Telog 2217 - Tirremia Drive at Monarch Beach Road
T8
Model Node:
Telog 2218 - Acapula Drive at Street of the Golden Lantern
T9
Model Node:
Telog 2485 - Street of the Blue Lantern at Selva Road (NE corner)
T10
Model Node:
Telog 2486 - Selva Road at Street of the Copper Lantern
T11
Model Node:
Telog 2487 - Windham Drive (South End)
T12
Model Node:
Telog 2488 - Coast Highway, East of Street of Copper Lantern
T13
Model Node:
Telog 3143 - Dana Point Harbor, South of Coast Highway
T14
Model Node:
Telog 3144 - Victoria Boulevard, West of Sepulveda Avenue
T15
Model Node:
Telog 3145 - Calle Juanita at Calle Real (NE corner, on 6-inch main)
T16
Model Node:
Telog 3146 - Camino de Estrella at Camino Capistrano
T17
Model Node:
Telog 3646 - Mar Vista Avenue, South of Third Avenue
Nozzle Size
Velocity Pressure
Flow
Hydrant
Static Pressure Residual Pressure
(inches)
(psi)
Device
(psi)
(psi)
4
11
Flowing 1
DIF
Flowing
Flowing 2
Initial
Final
36
Residual 1
80
80
69
Residual 2
80
80
69
Telog 1
69
69
55
Telog 2
55
55
58
Telog 3
58
58
95
Telog 4
96
96
75
Telog 5
75
75
66
Telog 6
66
66
78
Telog 7
78
78
50
Telog 8
50
50
65
Telog 9
65
65
46
Telog 10
46
46
108
Telog 11
108
108
121
Telog 12
121
121
75
Telog 13
75
75
139
Telog 14
139
139
38
Telog 15
38
38
99
Telog 16
99
99
110
Telog 17
110
110
Boundary Conditions

REMARKS:

Flow
(gpm)
1,330
Site Map

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Field Testing\[Calib&Flow Test Forms.xls]f-41

FLOW AND PRESSURE TESTS


SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT
LAGUNA BEACH, CALIFORNIA
12/18/07 1:55 PM
F42
Test Number:
Date & Time:
Zone: 690
FLOWING HYDRANT
F42
North end of Azores Road
Model Node:
Location(s):
RESIDUAL HYDRANTS
R1
Azores Road, North of Crete Road
Model Node:
Location(s):
R2
Palawan Circle, East End
Model Node:
AUTOMATIC PRESSURE RECORDERS (TELOGS)
T1
Model Node:
Telog 1508 - South of Ocean Vista Drive at Coast Highway
T2
Model Node:
Telog 1509 - 234 Monarch Bay Drive
T3
Model Node:
Telog 1652 - Niguel Road at Coast Highway (NE corner, 16-inch main)
T4
Model Node:
Telog 1656 - Mediterranean Drive at Baltic Sea Drive
T5
Model Node:
Telog 1738 - Sea Island Drive at Somerset Circle
T6
Model Node:
Telog 1739 - Garibaldi Avenue at Selva Road
T7
Model Node:
Telog 2217 - Tirremia Drive at Monarch Beach Road
T8
Model Node:
Telog 2218 - Acapula Drive at Street of the Golden Lantern
T9
Model Node:
Telog 2485 - Street of the Blue Lantern at Selva Road (NE corner)
T10
Model Node:
Telog 2486 - Selva Road at Street of the Copper Lantern
T11
Model Node:
Telog 2487 - Windham Drive (South End)
T12
Model Node:
Telog 2488 - Coast Highway, East of Street of Copper Lantern
T13
Model Node:
Telog 3143 - Dana Point Harbor, South of Coast Highway
T14
Model Node:
Telog 3144 - Victoria Boulevard, West of Sepulveda Avenue
T15
Model Node:
Telog 3145 - Calle Juanita at Calle Real (NE corner, on 6-inch main)
T16
Model Node:
Telog 3146 - Camino de Estrella at Camino Capistrano
T17
Model Node:
Telog 3646 - Morobe Circle, East of Sea Island Drive
Nozzle Size
Velocity Pressure
Flow
Hydrant
Static Pressure Residual Pressure
(inches)
(psi)
Device
(psi)
(psi)
4
25
Flowing 1
DIF
Flowing
Flowing 2
Initial
Final
82
Residual 1
117
117
76
Residual 2
107
117
69
Telog 1
69
69
55
Telog 2
55
55
58
Telog 3
58
58
96
Telog 4
96
96
55
Telog 5
75
75
66
Telog 6
66
66
78
Telog 7
78
78
50
Telog 8
50
50
66
Telog 9
66
66
46
Telog 10
46
46
108
Telog 11
108
108
121
Telog 12
121
121
75
Telog 13
75
75
140
Telog 14
140
140
38
Telog 15
38
38
100
Telog 16
100
100
110
Telog 17
110
110
Boundary Conditions

REMARKS:

Flow
(gpm)
1,850
Site Map

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Field Testing\[Calib&Flow Test Forms.xls]f-42

FLOW AND PRESSURE TESTS


SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT
LAGUNA BEACH, CALIFORNIA
12/18/07 1:26 PM
F43
Test Number:
Date & Time:
Zone: 690
FLOWING HYDRANT
F43
Balearic Circle, South of Azores Road
Model Node:
Location(s):
RESIDUAL HYDRANTS
R1
Balearic Circle, South of flowing hydrant
Model Node:
Location(s):
R2
Azores Road, South of Crete Road
Model Node:
AUTOMATIC PRESSURE RECORDERS (TELOGS)
T1
Model Node:
Telog 1508 - South of Ocean Vista Drive at Coast Highway
T2
Model Node:
Telog 1509 - 234 Monarch Bay Drive
T3
Model Node:
Telog 1652 - Niguel Road at Coast Highway (NE corner, 16-inch main)
T4
Model Node:
Telog 1656 - Mediterranean Drive at Baltic Sea Drive
T5
Model Node:
Telog 1738 - Sea Island Drive at Somerset Circle
T6
Model Node:
Telog 1739 - Garibaldi Avenue at Selva Road
T7
Model Node:
Telog 2217 - Tirremia Drive at Monarch Beach Road
T8
Model Node:
Telog 2218 - Acapula Drive at Street of the Golden Lantern
T9
Model Node:
Telog 2485 - Street of the Blue Lantern at Selva Road (NE corner)
T10
Model Node:
Telog 2486 - Selva Road at Street of the Copper Lantern
T11
Model Node:
Telog 2487 - Windham Drive (South End)
T12
Model Node:
Telog 2488 - Coast Highway, East of Street of Copper Lantern
T13
Model Node:
Telog 3143 - Dana Point Harbor, South of Coast Highway
T14
Model Node:
Telog 3144 - Victoria Boulevard, West of Sepulveda Avenue
T15
Model Node:
Telog 3145 - Calle Juanita at Calle Real (NE corner, on 6-inch main)
T16
Model Node:
Telog 3146 - Camino de Estrella at Camino Capistrano
T17
Model Node:
Telog 3646 - Morobe Circle, East of Sea Island Drive
Nozzle Size
Velocity Pressure
Flow
Hydrant
Static Pressure Residual Pressure
(inches)
(psi)
Device
(psi)
(psi)
4
24
Flowing 1
DIF
Flowing
Flowing 2
Initial
Final
83
Residual 1
147
147
74
Residual 2
120
120
69
Telog 1
69
69
55
Telog 2
55
55
58
Telog 3
58
58
96
Telog 4
96
96
54
Telog 5
75
75
66
Telog 6
66
66
78
Telog 7
78
78
50
Telog 8
50
50
66
Telog 9
66
66
46
Telog 10
46
46
107
Telog 11
107
107
121
Telog 12
121
121
75
Telog 13
75
75
140
Telog 14
140
140
38
Telog 15
38
38
100
Telog 16
100
100
110
Telog 17
110
110
Boundary Conditions

REMARKS:

Flow
(gpm)
1,820
Site Map

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\Field Testing\[Calib&Flow Test Forms.xls]f-43

APPENDIX B
CALIBRATION ADJUSTMENTS FOR REVIEW

N
OW
KN

UN

VIC

TOR

IA B

!!

LVD!

DO

HE

NY

PA
R

RD

!
!
! !

!
!
!

!
!

CONFIRM WATER
MAIN DIAMETER

! !!

!
!
!

BL
VD

LE
! !
! !

!
! !

!!

SA
V

!!!!

! !
!

!
!

!
!

RD

PU

DO
HE

SE

LEGEND
FLOW TEST LOCATIONS

CO
A

FLOWING HYDRANT

PRESSURE MONITORING

!
HWY PRESSURE RECORDER

ST

SYSTEM APPURTENANCES

150

300

450

NA
UF
FS

!
! !

6-INCH
!
8-INCH
10-INCH

FIRE HYDRANT

12-INCH

SYSTEM VALVE

14- AND16-INCH

FIGURE
CALIBRATION ADJUSTMENTS
VI
EFLOW
AND PRESSURE TEST F-09
W

BL

!
4-INCH
AND LESS

D
TA
VIS

DA

HW

F08 F

!
!

ST

WATER MAIN DIAMETER

18-INCH AND GREATER

FEET

CO
A

LV
E

NY

DA

PA
R

CONFIRM NO WATER MAIN


ACROSS DOHENY PARK ROAD
!

AV

L:\work\Projects\103163\gra\Figures\Figure Calibration Adjustments.mxd

IA

AL

Friday, March 7, 2008 - 1:31:49 PM

LA!
S
VE
GA

VI
CT
OR

! !
! !

NY

PA
R

AL L

!!
!
!!

HE

AV

DO

GO

EY

! !
!!
!

F09!F DOM
IN

RD

!
MAR
2008

PO

SOUTH
COAST WATER DISTRICT
IN
T !D
R

103163

GRANADA DR

! !!

LA CRESTA DR

STREET OF THE AMBER LANTERN

Y!!

!
!

! !

CONFIRM VALVE
POSITION

ALLE
!

TH
COAS

WY

!
!

ALLEY
!

LEGEND
WATER MAIN DIAMETER

FLOW TEST LOCATIONS

DEL PRADO

0
ALLEY

4-INCH AND LESS

FLOWING HYDRANT

PRESSURE MONITORING
!
PRESSURE RECORDER
STREET OF THE AMBER LANTERN

STREET OF THE RUBY LANTERN

L:\work\Projects\103163\gra\Figures\Figure Calibration Adjustments.mxd

!
!
!

F14 F

! !

>

Friday, March 7, 2008 - 1:35:59 PM

EL ENCANTO AV

GRANADA DR

ALLEY

LA SERENA DR

SEVILLE PL

SYSTEM APPURTENANCES

150
!

300

FEET

450

FIRE HYDRANT

SYSTEM VALVE

6-INCH
DEL PRADO

8-INCH

10-INCH
12-INCH
14- AND16-INCH

18-INCH AND
GREATER
!
!

FIGURE
CALIBRATION ADJUSTMENTS
FLOW AND
! PRESSURE TEST F-14

STA CLARA AV
!

MAR 2008

SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT


!
!

F13 F

103163
!

HAR

!
!

!
!

SE

!!

!!

!
!

HIL

ACAPULCO DR

HT

RIG

LD

!!
!! !

AN

!
!

DR

NOTTINGHAM WY

M WY

CONFIRM PIPE DIAMETERS


AND PIPE GEOMETERY
IN THESE SPECIFIC AREAS

!!!
!SHERWOOD WY

!
!

EHIL
STON

!!

STONEH
! ! ILL DR!

!
!!

!!

LEGEND

!!

E G O LD
T OF TH
STREE

!!!

!
!

!! !

!!

DANA POINT DR

SUNSTAR LN

8-INCH

SYSTEM APPURTENANCES
!

!
!
!

!!

PRESSURE RECORDER

!
FIRE HYDRANT

VALVE

SYSTEM

!!
!

CATHERIN
E

WY

SELVA RD

!! !

!! !

12-INCH

PERCH
DR
!

14- AND16-INCH
!
!

!
!!

18-INCH AND GREATER

!
!

DISTRICT

!
SOUTH COAST WATER
!

!!
!

!!!
2008
MAR

!
!
!! !! !

10-INCH

FIGURE
CALIBRATION
ADJUSTMENTS
!

FLOW AND PRESSURE TEST F-20

! !!
!

!
!

TOS
MA R

FEET

!
!

6-INCH

S
GO

!WAVE CREST LN

PRESSURE MONITORING

LA

! 450
150 300!

!!
!

!!

SEA CREST DR

VIA

!!!!

! !

! !

4-INCH AND LESS


!!

FLOWING HYDRANT

VI

EN L AN

!R
N !D
D IA
I
R
E

!
!
!! !

STARFISH W
Y

SUNDOWN CT

T ER N

WATER MAIN DIAMETER

FLOW TEST LOCATIONS

!! !

HOLTZ HILL RD

SEA POINT DR

PEQUIT
O DR

!!

SEAGA
T E DR
!!
!!

!!

L DR

BIG SUR ST

!!

!
!
!

AB

Friday, March 7, 2008 - 1:41:19 PM

!!

A
CHELT

L:\work\Projects\103163\gra\Figures\Figure Calibration Adjustments.mxd

E
OC

ST

F20 F

SE

STREET OF THE GOLDEN LANTERN

RILLO

!!! !

!
!

T
BRIGH

CAMA

!!
!

!
!

!
!!
!

! !!!
!! !

!
!!

N
OCEA

CONFIRM PIPE DIAMETERS


AND PIPE GEOMETERY
IN VICINITY OF TEST

!!
!

!!
!

!!
!
!

!!

UM

DG
RI

!
!!
!

IN
!D
!
RW! !
E
M

SEA KNOLL DR

BO R

N
EA
OC

C
AT
AW
SE

SEA VISTA DR

BIG SUR ST

! IRE

MARINA VISTA DR

SEA A

SUN

!
!!

MESA VISTA DR

DR

!!
!

! !!

AL
IO N

!!

!!!!

!!
DANA
!!
VIEW103163
LN
!

PR

DANIEL DR

!!
!

ISC
ILL

R
AD

CH
TIN
R IS

!
!

AD

IS A
EL

PU

DR

A
AC

LC
OD

IA
NT
SA

GO

!
!
!
!

ST

AC
AS
!

!!

ST
A

CAMARILLO ST

Q
UE

>
!

L:\work\Projects\103163\gra\Figures\Figure Calibration Adjustments.mxd

CA
R

Friday, March 7, 2008 - 1:46:23 PM

DR
!

F21 F

CONFIRM VALVE
POSITION

! !

LEGEND
FLOW TEST LOCATIONS

FLOWING HYDRANT

4-INCH AND LESS

PRESSURE MONITORING

6-INCH

PRESSURE RECORDER

8-INCH

SYSTEM APPURTENANCES

150

300

450

WATER MAIN DIAMETER

10-INCH

FIRE HYDRANT

12-INCH

SYSTEM VALVE

14- AND16-INCH
18-INCH AND GREATER

FEET

FIGURE
CALIBRATION ADJUSTMENTS
FLOW AND PRESSURE TEST F-21
SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT
MAR 2008

103163

!
!

!!
!

NIC
HE

F24
! F
!

CO

>

M ON A

VE
NE
Z

IA

CO
R

!
!

DR

!
!
!

!
!

CONFIRM VALVE
POSITION

>

!
!

CO
R

VILLA FRANCHE

N IC
HE

!!
!

!
!!

!!

NA

NI
G

RE
I

OL
E

UE
L

NA

RD

LU

!
TA
S

VI
A

VIS

NA
A
RC

ON
ARC
A

!
!

LEGEND
WATER MAIN DIAMETER

FLOW TEST LOCATIONS

PRESSURE MONITORING

6-INCH

PRESSURE RECORDER

8-INCH

SYSTEM APPURTENANCES

300

450

FIRE HYDRANT

SYSTEM VALVE

12-INCH
14- AND16-INCH
!
!

WIGHTMAN CT !! !

18-INCH!
AND GREATER!

LEDO
WIMB

FEET

LLS
CT

150

N CT

FIGURE
CALIBRATION
ADJUSTMENTS
TENNIS
!

VILLAS
!
FLOWDRAND PRESSURE
TEST F-24
!
!
!

ST H
I

10-INCH

FOR
E

4-INCH AND LESS

FLOWING HYDRANT
EL

NIG
U

VIA
M

MO

L:\work\Projects\103163\gra\Figures\Figure Calibration Adjustments.mxd

!
!

VIA

Friday, March 7, 2008 - 1:51:42 PM

!
DISTRICT
!
SOUTH COAST
WATER
!

MAR 2008

103163

TH
RS
OU

ILL

DR
!
!

!!

!!

!!

!
!

!
!

CO

! 300

450

AC
NT

KN
UN

MA

N !
OW150 !!
!

VE

VALVE
SYSTEM

FEET

A
CO

!AN

!
SH

NY

AV

!
!

ST

!
!

!
!!

MARLINSPIKE DR

8-INCH
!!

PORTO FINO
10-INCH
!

!!

12-INCH
!

14- AND16-INCH
!
!

18-INCH AND GREATER


!!

F27 F
!
!
FIGURE
!

!
!!
ADJUSTMENTS

!
!CALIBRATION

FLOW AND PRESSURE TEST


F-26
PORTO
VERDE

!
SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT

HW

U
N
KN

!!

!
6-INCH
!

!!

FA
E

PORTO CHRISTO

PRESSURE
! RECORDER

FIRE HYDRANT

!
!

!
4-INCH
AND LESS
!

PRESSURE MONITORING

!!

SYSTEM APPURTENANCES

WATER MAIN DIAMETER

VISTA D'ONDE

! !

FLOWING HYDRANT

RO
E

TA D

!!

OU
FLOWGTEST
LOCATIONS

E
CAP

! !
!
!

AY

!!

DE

RA

B
MI

G R AN

LEGEND

!
!!

V
IA

D
AR
ELV

!
!
!

VISTA

PORTO ALLEGRO

AY

R ES
LA C

RA

D
AR
W
D

LD
BA
RI

DR

CO

!
!

R
GA

N
WI

!
!!

VIA CAPRI

VIA DEL CIELO

!
!
!
!

!
AY!
LB !

!!

!
!

!!!

!
!

VISTA D'ORO

!
!

!
!

BA
Y

Friday, March 7, 2008 - 1:55:26 PM

AY

B
A! N
M

S
A
T

!
!

TIC

L:\work\Projects\103163\gra\Figures\Figure Calibration Adjustments.mxd

NB
SE
!

DR

AN
ATL

ND
MU

R
SD
AS

DR

R
RD

!
!

L
ND

INE

ME
J AM

NT

ND

WI

IGA
BR

WI

!
!

BAY

R
N D !!
EE

FLYINGJIB DR

LAT

D
AR
LY
HA

CROSSJACK DR

!
!

CONFIRM WATER
MAIN DIAMETER

IG
! Z
D AN

!
!

!
!

CHULA VISTA AV

VIA CORVALIAN

BINNAC

M O ONS A

!
!

EH

SEXTANT D
R

DR

!!

SPI
N

!
!

RES D

ST
ON

!!

IL DR

L E DR

!
! !

L SHO

!!!

ER
D

DR

NIGUE

LE
EW
AR

NAK

ED

IN A

N
LO

S
DO

A
AB

!!!

VISTA COLINA

!
!!

MAR 2008

103163
!

N
O

KN
UN

NT
AC

!
!

!!
!

VIA DEL CIELO

MA

VISTA D'ONDE

F27 F

!
!

!
!!
!

! DR
LA CRESTA

!!
!!
!

>

CONFIRM VALVE
POSITION !! !

ST
AN
FR
S
CI

W
NE
CT
RK

TTA
GA

WY
!!

AS
TH

Friday, March 7, 2008 - 1:57:32 PM

! !

CO

YO

RE

CT

WY

UL
CH

!!
!

!
!

LM
PA
F28 F

CT

!
!

!
!
!

SEL
VA R
D

AV

!
!! !

!
!

LEGEND

WATER MAIN DIAMETER

FLOW TEST LOCATIONS

!!!

!
!!

!!!

!!
!

FLOWING HYDRANT

4-INCH AND LESS

PRESSURE MONITORING

6-INCH

PRESSURE RECORDER

8-INCH

SYSTEM
APPURTENANCES
!

150

!
!!

300

450

FIRE HYDRANT

SYSTEM VALVE

10-INCH
12-INCH
!

14- AND16-INCH

!
!

ALLEY
!

18-INCH AND GREATER


!
!

FEET

STREET OF THE BLUE LANTERN

STREET OF THE GREEN LANTERN

L:\work\Projects\103163\gra\Figures\Figure Calibration Adjustments.mxd

>

CONFIRM VALVE
POSITION

CH
EA

TA
IS

FIGURE
!
!

!
CALIBRATION ADJUSTMENTS
!
STA CLARA AV
!
FLOW AND PRESSURE TEST F-28
!

SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT

MAR 2008

103163

HIGHLAND RD

ALLEY
!!

!!

!!!!!!
!
!
! !!

LEGEND

!!

FLOW TEST LOCATIONS

!
!

CONFIRM INTERCONNECTION

BETWEEN
24-INCH
AND 10-INCH
!
!!
WATER
MAINS
ACROSS
PCH.
!

PRESSURE MONITORING

6-INCH

PRESSURE RECORDER

8-INCH
10-INCH

FIRE HYDRANT

12-INCH

SYSTEM VALVE

14- AND16-INCH

N
OW

ST

LA

K ST

!!

KN

HS

A
D

ST

ST

ST

ST
T H

!
!
!

ST

ST

!
!!

!!
!!

LA

VI

ST
A

N DR

PL

EV

SU !

N
SE
PAC
IF IC
T

R
IE

!
!!

! !

ME R
M A ID

N
O
O
LA
G

BL
UE

!
!
!

EL
AT

!!

!!!

! !

!
!

VI
!
E
W

!
!

VIE
WD !
R!!

VI
ST
A

VI

EW

CONFIRM ALL CONNECTIONS TO 24-INCH WATER MAIN


AND CONNECTIONS ACROSS PACIFIC COAST HIGHWAY.

F30 F

SE

!!

LA

!
!

DR

DR

!
!

!
!

ISLA
ND

PA
CI
FI

DR

TH
AS

PACIFIC

STICK
LEY !!
!

HO
RI
ZO
N

AN VISTA

OC
E
!

CO

Monday, March 10, 2008 - 9:41:00 AM

F29 F

F37 F

R
SH

L:\work\Projects\103163\gra\Figures\Figure Calibration Adjustments.mxd

ST

ST

!
!
!

ST

D
TA

UN

ST

NI

GU

18-INCH AND GREATER

T
LS

! M

ST

P ST

4-INCH AND LESS

MARILY

FLOWING HYDRANT

SYSTEM APPURTENANCES

!
O!W
KN !!
UN

WATER MAIN DIAMETER

H ST

!
!

!!

!
!

DR

DR
PI
R

AT
E

!!!

RU

N!

CONFIRM 10-INCH WATER MAIN DOES NOT


CROSS PCH AND TEE INTO 8-INCH WATER MAIN.

!
!
!

!!

150

300

450

FEET

FIGURE
CALIBRATION ADJUSTMENTS
FLOW AND PRESSURE TEST F-29
SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT
MAR 2008

103163

NE

E A N DR
CARIBB

CA
AN

!
! !!

!!

CO

WY

T
AS
!

UI
!
LO!!

V
XI

CO

NN CT

RO
N

RE
DE
RIC
KL

O
M

CH
R
A
N !!

D
Y
BA !

R
!

!!
!
!

KIN

WI
LL
I AM

GF

G
KI N

! !!

!!!

! !!!

III LN

ES
KING CHARL

D A PL

CT

!
!
!

!!

F33 F

!
!

KING
! JOHN LN

!
!!

I
AT

CROWN COAST DR

HW

A
QUEEN

!
!!

LA S E N

Friday, March 7, 2008 - 2:07:40 PM

RA

ER
D IT
ME
R

!!

L:\work\Projects\103163\gra\Figures\Figure Calibration Adjustments.mxd

!!!

S
ES

RR

PR

BA

F40 F

AS

! !

DR

!
!!

!
!

!
!!

DA
EN

AN

R IA
T IC

!!
!

DR

DR

>

!!
!
!

!!!
!

>

CONFIRM VALVE
POSITION

AD

AS
SE

CABRILLO WY

SE
V!A!
A
J !!

N
VE
SE

EM

QUEEN CATHERINE CT

BA
YD
R

!
!

!
!!

LA SENDA DR

N
TO
EN

!!!

A
VI

!
! !!

AD

!!
!

!!!

!!!

LEGEND
FLOW TEST LOCATIONS

FLOWING HYDRANT

4-INCH AND LESS

PRESSURE MONITORING

6-INCH

PRESSURE RECORDER

8-INCH

SYSTEM APPURTENANCES

150

300

450

WATER MAIN DIAMETER

10-INCH

FIRE HYDRANT

12-INCH

SYSTEM VALVE

14- AND16-INCH
18-INCH AND GREATER

FEET

FIGURE
CALIBRATION ADJUSTMENTS
FLOW AND PRESSURE TEST F-33
SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT
MAR 2008

103163

IA
IO N

G
TE

ILL

EB
AN

AY! !

R
MA

UN

R
ATO

AY!!

LL

OW

RC

E
ISL

AY
!

CA

KN

ME

!! !

B
TH
ER

B
RA
MA

SO
RT
PO

ISL

DR

WY

BR

ISB
B
R

BA

!! !

!
!

AY
AB

TH

N
MO

! !

AY

N
SA
!
S

A
C

AS

ISL
ON
ET

!
!

NB

CO

IS L

KL

! !!Y

Friday, March 7, 2008 - 2:05:10 PM

NT K
IC
! D
! R

!
!
!

H
O

!! !

B
RT
BA

AY!!

!
!

SA

!!!

RB
DO
A
LV

!Y
A

!
!

!
!

!
WATER !MAIN
!
! MATERIAL

300

PRESSURE MONITORING

CONCRETE

PRESSURE RECORDER

CAST IRON

!
!

SYSTEM APPURTENANCES

!FIRE HYDRANT

DUCTILE IRON
!!

!!

PVC

STEEL

SYSTEM VALVE

R
LVA
SE

ND R

ASBESTOS CEMENT

!!
!

STRA

FEET

450

!!
!!

FLOWING HYDRANT

DANA

150

!!

CH
E

ISLE

FLOW TEST LOCATIONS


!
!

EA

!!

!!!
!
!

LEGEND

LS

CONFIRM WATER MAIN


MATERIAL AND DIAMETER

PO
IN
TE

NAUTICUS

FIGURE
!
!

!
CALIBRATION ADJUSTMENTS
FLOW AND PRESSURE TEST F-36

! !

L:\work\Projects\103163\gra\Figures\Figure Calibration Adjustments.mxd

Y
BA

! !

A
AR

AN

AC

CA

! !!!

Y
BA

!
!!

LL

SH

DR
S

Y
NE
SID

GE

AT
LA

!
!

MA

AR

W
A
SE

LE
IS! !

LL
CA

!
!

!!
!

WN

! !

!
!

NO

TA

Y
BA

K
UN

ICO
MP

TI

Y
BA

R
MO

HO
RE

!!
! !

!
!!

S
RT

!!

!
!

LS

!!

PO

!!

!
RR
E

AN
AZ

Y!
BA

NO

NI
GU
E

SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT


MAR 2008

103163

MA
!! TAS

!
!

CIR

IA!
N

!!

!!! !!!
!!

!
!

CIR
AWAN
P
!AL
!

L
SEA IS

RD

AND D

O
AZ

MEDIT

S
RE !

!!
!

ERRA

!!

DR

BALEARIC RD

NEAN

RD

!
!
!

!!
!!

E
B

RO!
MO

CIR

CRETE

!!
!!
!!
!

CONFIRM PIPE
DIAMETER
!!
!

F43 F

!!

OW

!
!
!
!

AN
PI
A
SE

CR

!!!

!
!

!
!!

R
!!

LEGEND

SE VEN

PRESSURE MONITORING
!

PRESSURE RECORDER
!

FLOWING HYDRANT

LU

SE AS D

150

300

450

FEET

FIRE HYDRANT
!!

T
AS
HW

PO

MP
SYSTEM VALVE
EII
!
! D
R

!!

! ATL

4-INCH AND LESS


6-INCH
8-INCH
10-INCH
12-INCH
14- AND16-INCH
18-INCH AND GREATER
A NA

IA

SYSTEM APPURTENANCES
!
!

!
!

ER

!
!
!

!
WATER

!
MAIN DIAMETER

FLOW TEST LOCATIONS

NT
IS

VIA TUSC

FIGURE
WY
CALIBRATION
ADJUSTMENTS

!
!
FLOW AND PRESSURE
TEST F-41
!

CO
Y

L:\work\Projects\103163\gra\Figures\Figure Calibration Adjustments.mxd

YP

F40 F

LE

NV
AL

KW
Y

CA
R

IBB

EA
N

DR

S
CA

Friday, March 7, 2008 - 2:00:00 PM

!
!
!

SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT


!
!

!
MAR 2008

103163

APPENDIX C
HYDRAULIC MODEL DEMAND PATTERNS

0.0

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

0.5

0.6

0.6

0.7

1.1

1.4

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\TOD\[SCWD_Patterns.xls]290

Demand Factor

1.7

10

1.9

11

1.5

13

0.9

Time

12

1.0

14

1.1

2.0

2.1

15

0.9

17

0.7

18

0.6

19

0.7

20

0.6

21

0.6

22

0.8

23

0.7

SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT

TIME OF DAY DEMAND PATTERN


SOUTH COAST WATER SYSTEM
290 PRESSURE ZONE
APR 2008

16

0.8

103163

24

0.7

0.0

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

0.6

0.5

0.4

0.7

0.9

1.8

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\TOD\[SCWD_Patterns.xls]490

Demand Factor

2.0

1.8

10

1.3

11

1.1

13

0.9

Time

12

0.9

14

0.8

2.1

15

0.7

17

18

19

1.2

20

1.1

21

0.9

22

0.8

23

0.7

SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT

TIME OF DAY DEMAND PATTERN


SOUTH COAST WATER SYSTEM
490 PRESSURE ZONE
APR 2008

16

0.6

0.8

1.1

103163

24

0.6

0.0

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

0.6

0.5

0.5

0.7

0.9

2.5

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\TOD\[SCWD_Patterns.xls]690

Demand Factor

2.2

1.4

10

1.2

11

1.1

13

0.9

Time

12

1.0

14

0.9

1.5

15

0.8

17

18

19

1.1

20

0.9

21

0.8

22

0.8

23

0.7

SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT

TIME OF DAY DEMAND PATTERN


SOUTH COAST WATER SYSTEM
690 PRESSURE ZONE
APR 2008

16

0.7

0.9

1.1

103163

24

0.7

0.0

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

0.4

0.3

0.3

0.4

0.6

0.8

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\TOD\[SCWD_Patterns.xls]415

Demand Factor

1.1

10

11

2.1

13

1.5

Time

12

1.9

14

1.1

1.9

2.1

2.5

15

0.8

17

0.6

18

19

1.1

20

0.7

21

0.6

22

0.6

23

0.5

SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT

TIME OF DAY DEMAND PATTERN


SOUTH COAST WATER SYSTEM
415 PRESSURE ZONE
APR 2008

16

0.7

1.2

103163

24

0.5

0.0

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

0.6

0.6

0.5

0.4

0.7

0.9

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\TOD\[SCWD_Patterns.xls]DP

Demand Factor

1.1

10

1.6

11

1.3

13

1.0

Time

12

1.1

14

0.9

1.2

2.0

15

0.9

17

18

1.0

19

0.9

20

1.1

21

22

1.1

23

1.1

SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT

TIME OF DAY DEMAND PATTERN


DANA POINT WATER SYSTEM
217, 390, 470 PRESSURE ZONES
APR 2008

16

0.9

1.0

1.4

103163

24

0.8

0.0

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

2.5

3.0

0.6

0.4

0.4

0.5

0.6

0.8

L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\TOD\[SCWD_Patterns.xls]CB

Demand Factor

1.2

10

1.5

11

1.3

13

0.9

Time

12

1.2

14

0.9

1.6

1.9

15

0.8

18

1.1

19

20

21

1.3

22

1.1

23

0.9

24

0.7

SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT


103163

TIME OF DAY DEMAND PATTERN


CAPISTRANO BEACH WATER SYSTEM
345 PRESSURE ZONE

17

APR 2008

16

0.9

1.0

1.2

1.4

APPENDIX D
HYDRAULIC MODEL CONTROL STRATEGY

70
78
66
0.76
0.93
0.8
0.9
74
425
694.44
0
0

AIM-WCV-409
No
0
0: Closed
AIM-WCV-409
No
1
2: Setting
AIM-WCV-411
No
0
0: Closed
AIM-WCV-411
No
1
2: Setting
AIM-WCV-412
No
0
0: Closed
AIM-WCV-412
No
1
2: Setting
AIM-WP-1
No
2
0: Closed
AIM-WP-1
Yes
3
0: Closed
AIM-WP-1
No
1
1: Open
AIM-WP-1
Yes
0
1: Open
AIM-WP-10
Yes
0
1: Open
AIM-WP-10
Yes
1
0: Closed
AIM-WP-11
No
0
1: Open
AIM-WP-11
No
1
0: Closed
AIM-WP-12
Yes
0
1: Open
AIM-WP-12
Yes
1
0: Closed
AIM-WP-13
No
0
2: Setting
AIM-WP-13
No
1
0: Closed
AIM-WP-15
No
0
2: Setting
AIM-WP-15
No
1
0: Closed
AIM-WP-16
Yes
0
1: Open
AIM-WP-16
Yes
1
0: Closed
AIM-WP-2
Yes
1
0: Closed
AIM-WP-2
Yes
0
1: Open
AIM-WP-5
No
0
2: Setting
AIM-WP-5
No
1
0: Closed
AIM-WP-9
No
0
1: Open
AIM-WP-9
No
1
0: Closed
U-PS09
Yes
0
2: Setting
U-PS09
Yes
1
0: Closed
V-COVERDPRV-02
No
0
0: Closed
V-COVERDPRV-02
No
1
2: Setting
V-FCMV01-PRV
No
1
0: Closed
V-FCMV01-PRV
No
0
2: Setting
V8014
No
0
2: Setting
V8014
No
1
0: Closed
AIM-WPM-12603
No
0
0: Closed
AIM-WPM-12603
No
1
1: Open
L:\work\Projects\103163\eng\TOD\[SCWD_Patterns.xls]Controls

SEQ

SETTING

DISABLED

STATUS

ID
2: By Link Flow
2: By Link Flow
2: By Link Flow
2: By Link Flow
2: By Link Flow
2: By Link Flow
4: By Clock Time
1: By Node Level
4: By Clock Time
1: By Node Level
1: By Node Level
1: By Node Level
1: By Node Level
1: By Node Level
1: By Node Level
1: By Node Level
2: By Link Flow
2: By Link Flow
1: By Node Level
1: By Node Level
1: By Node Level
1: By Node Level
1: By Node Level
1: By Node Level
2: By Link Flow
2: By Link Flow
1: By Node Level
1: By Node Level
2: By Link Flow
2: By Link Flow
2: By Link Flow
2: By Link Flow
4: By Clock Time
4: By Clock Time
4: By Clock Time
4: By Clock Time
1: By Node Level
1: By Node Level

CONTROL METHOD
AIM-WPM-11094
AIM-WPM-11094
AIM-WPM-11496
AIM-WPM-11496
AIM-WPM-11496
AIM-WPM-11496
AIM-WNS-6
AIM-WNS-6
AIM-WNS-17
AIM-WNS-17
AIM-WNS-14
AIM-WNS-14
AIM-WNS-14
AIM-WNS-14
AIM-WPM-11497
AIM-WPM-11497
AIM-WNS-12
AIM-WNS-12
AIM-WNS-12
AIM-WNS-12
AIM-WNS-6
AIM-WNS-6
AIM-WPM-9255
AIM-WPM-9255
AIM-WNS-17
AIM-WNS-17
AIM-WPM-8242
AIM-WPM-8242
AIM-WPM-11094
AIM-WPM-11094
AIM-WNS-8
AIM-WNS-8

CONTROL ID

HYDARULIC MODEL CONTROLS


SOUTH COAST WATER DISTRICT

1: Below
0: Above
0: Above
1: Below
1: Below
0: Above
0: Above
1: Below
0: Above
0: Above
1: Below
0: Above
1: Below
0: Above
0: Above
0: Above
0: Above
1: Below
1: Below
0: Above
1: Below
0: Above
1: Below
0: Above
0: Above
1: Below
1: Below
0: Above
0: Above
1: Below
0: Above
1: Below
0: Above
0: Above
0: Above
0: Above
0: Above
1: Below

CONTEXT
450
450
450
450
450
450
18
19.5
17
22
16.5
19
14
19
800
800
14
16
12
16
18
19.5
800
800
18.75
20.75
1200
1200
450
450
31
24.5

0:00
0:00
0:00
0:00
8:45
16:30

CONTROL VALUE CONTROL CLOCK

Appendix B-2
Demand Loading for Water Model

Appendix B-2 Demand Loading for Water Model


Address

City

Zip

Landuse

Avg Daily
Flow 100s
Cu Ft

NODE 3460
33990 Doheny Park Rd

Capistrano Beach

NODE AIM-WCV-1
32731 Johnathan Cir
32732 Johnathan Cir
32742 Johnathan Cir
32745 Johnathan Cir
32762 Johnathan Cir
32765 Johnathan Cir
32771 Johnathan Cir
32772 Johnathan Cir

92624
7. Commercial/Office
NODE 3460 Total

0.09
0.09

67.32467505
67.32467505

Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point

92629
92629
92629
92629
92629
92629
92629
92629

NODE AIM-WCV-10
33052 Esther Ct
33061 Esther Ct
33062 Esther Ct
33072 Esther Ct

1. Single-Family Residential
1. Single-Family Residential
1. Single-Family Residential
1. Single-Family Residential
1. Single-Family Residential
1. Single-Family Residential
1. Single-Family Residential
1. Single-Family Residential
NODE AIM-WCV-1 Total

0.72
0.48
0.62
0.87
0.97
0.65
0.62
0.5
5.43

538.5974004
359.0649336
463.7922059
650.8051922
725.6103867
486.2337643
463.7922059
374.0259725
4061.922061

Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point

92629
92629
92629
92629

NODE AIM-WCV-100
92 Ritz Cove Dr
93 Ritz Cove Dr
94 Ritz Cove Dr
95 Ritz Cove Dr
97 Ritz Cove Dr
98 Ritz Cove Dr
99 Ritz Cove Dr
100 Ritz Cove Dr
101 Ritz Cove Dr

1. Single-Family Residential
1. Single-Family Residential
1. Single-Family Residential
1. Single-Family Residential
NODE AIM-WCV-10 Total

1
0.56
0.9
0.61
3.07

748.051945
418.9090892
673.2467505
456.3116865
2296.519471

Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point

92629
92629
92629
92629
92629
92629
92629
92629
92629

NODE AIM-WCV-11
33162 De Soto Way
33171 De Soto Way
33172 De Soto Way
33181 De Soto Way
33192 De Soto Way

1. Single-Family Residential
1. Single-Family Residential
1. Single-Family Residential
1. Single-Family Residential
1. Single-Family Residential
1. Single-Family Residential
1. Single-Family Residential
1. Single-Family Residential
1. Single-Family Residential
NODE AIM-WCV-100 Total

0.08
0.4
0.67
0.43
0.18
1.64
0.06
0.59
0.76
4.81

59.8441556
299.220778
501.1948032
321.6623364
134.6493501
1226.80519
44.8831167
441.3506476
568.5194782
3598.129855

Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point

92629
92629
92629
92629
92629

NODE AIM-WCV-170
1 Saint Francis Ct
3 Saint Francis Ct
5 Saint Francis Ct
7 Saint Francis Ct
11 Saint Francis Ct
15 Saint Francis Ct
17 Saint Francis Ct
19 Saint Francis Ct
23 Saint Francis Ct
25 Saint Francis Ct
27 Saint Francis Ct
29 Saint Francis Ct
31 Saint Francis Ct
33 Saint Francis Ct
2 Saint Francis Ct
2 Saint Francis Ct

1. Single-Family Residential
1. Single-Family Residential
1. Single-Family Residential
1. Single-Family Residential
1. Single-Family Residential
NODE AIM-WCV-11 Total

0.26
1.08
0.57
0.46
0.19
2.56

194.4935057
807.8961006
426.3896087
344.1038947
142.1298696
1915.012979

Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point

92629
92629
92629
92629
92629
92629
92629
92629
92629
92629
92629
92629
92629
92629
92629
92629

NODE AIM-WCV-174
22 Chelsea Pointe
23 Chelsea Pointe

1. Single-Family Residential
1. Single-Family Residential
1. Single-Family Residential
1. Single-Family Residential
1. Single-Family Residential
1. Single-Family Residential
1. Single-Family Residential
1. Single-Family Residential
1. Single-Family Residential
1. Single-Family Residential
1. Single-Family Residential
1. Single-Family Residential
1. Single-Family Residential
1. Single-Family Residential
5. Rec/Public Use Facilities
10. Irrigation
NODE AIM-WCV-170 Total

0.6
0.37
0.28
0.23
0.42
0.26
0.39
0.55
0.22
0.4
0.36
0.33
0.46
0.64
0.97
1.81
8.29

448.831167
276.7792197
209.4545446
172.0519474
314.1818169
194.4935057
291.7402586
411.4285698
164.5714279
299.220778
269.2987002
246.8571419
344.1038947
478.7532448
725.6103867
1353.97402
6201.350624

Dana Point
Dana Point

92629
92629

1. Single-Family Residential
1. Single-Family Residential

0.22
0.29

164.5714279
216.9350641

GPD

Avg Daily
Flow 100s
Cu Ft

Address

City

Zip

Landuse

24 Chelsea Pointe

Dana Point

92629

NODE AIM-WCV-24
1 Vista Sole
5 Vista Sole
6 Vista Sole
7 Vista Sole
9 Vista Sole
11 Vista Sole
13 Vista Sole
15 Vista Sole
17 Vista Sole
19 Vista Sole
21 Vista Sole

1. Single-Family Residential
NODE AIM-WCV-174 Total

0.43
0.94

321.6623364
703.1688283

Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point
Dana Point

92629
92629
92629
92629
92629
92629
92629
92629
92629
92629
92629

NODE AIM-WCV-255
25151 Terrace Lantern
25151 Terrace Lantern
25151 Terrace Lantern

1. Single-Family Residential
1. Single-Family Residential
1. Single-Family Residential
1. Single-Family Residential
1. Single-Family Residential
1. Single-Family Residential
1. Single-Family Residential
1. Single-Family Residential
1. Single-Family Residential
1. Single-Family Residential
1. Single-Family Residential
NODE AIM-WCV-24 Total

0.74
0.73
0.6
0.9
0.49
0.43
0.37
0.12