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MATHEMATICIAN

DATE

BAND

 

CROSSED DIAGONALS

ADV GEOMETRY | PACKER COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE

 

There is a really special property that some quadrilaterals have. Let’s show it to you! When diagonals intersect, they form four mini-line segments, with lengths a, b, c, and d. For some quadrilaterals, (a)(c)=(b)(d). Let’s say if a quadrilateral has this property, it is a blermion.

  • 1. Is this quadrilateral a blermion?

M ATHEMATICIAN D ATE B AND C ROSSED D IAGONALS A DV G EOMETRY | P
  • 2. Is this quadrilateral a blermion?

M ATHEMATICIAN D ATE B AND C ROSSED D IAGONALS A DV G EOMETRY | P
M ATHEMATICIAN D ATE B AND C ROSSED D IAGONALS A DV G EOMETRY | P
  • 3. Use the “Crossed Diagonals” geogebra sheet to make some conjectures for whether the following quadrilaterals are always, sometimes, or never [A/S/N] blermions.

Trapezoid: ______

Rhombus: ______

Square: ______

Isosceles Trapezoid: ______

Parallelogram: ______

Kite: ______

Rectangle: ______

  • 4. Are there any commonalities among the quadrilaterals that you’ve identified as blermions? Make a conjecture about blermions! All blermions are… _____________________________________________________________________

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5. Okay, are you ready for this? You better be! Drag the four points (in order) to P1=(3,9), P2= (2,6), P3=(4,2), and P4=(11,9). Yup. YUP. Was this expected?!?!?!? MIND BLOWN. Maybe? Yes? GOOD!

  • 6. Try to find more blermions that aren’t “nice” quadrilaterals that we have names for… I’m giving you the same three points as above. Keep the same three points, and find different fourth points. (No, you can’t use (11,9) again.) Your points definitely don’t need to be lattice points. Your (a)(c) and (b)(d) should be almost exactly equal (they can be off by a few hundredths if you can’t get it exact).

P1

P2

P3

P4

(3,9)

(2,6)

(4,2)

(3,9)

(2,6)

(4,2)

(3,9)

(2,6)

(4,2)

(3,9)

(2,6)

(4,2)

You have found four blermions. Your group members have found many other blermions. On a single blank geogebra sheet, someone from your group should plot points P1, P2, and P3 as red points. And then plot all the different P4s that your group came up with as green points.

Based on your geogebra explorations, do you have a revised conjecture you feel confident making?

All blermions are…

_____________________________________________________________________

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