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Media-Rich Project Lesson Plan EDTC 615

Name: Jon Reader


Date: 4/11/2010
Lesson Plan Title: My Diet at MyPyramid.gov
Learning Audience: This online lesson is designed for 7th grade students whom are
required to take Health education in the 6th, 7th and 8th grades. The objectives for this
lesson are intended for 7th graders, but closely align with and are appropriate for 6th and
8th graders as well. Nutrition & Fitness is a unit in the middle school comprehensive
Health education curriculum in Montgomery County Public Schools (MCPS).

Description of Lesson Plan


Lesson Topic: Comprehensive Health Education: Nutrition & Weight Management
Web Quest: http://polaris.umuc.edu/~jreader/edtc/mypyramidhome.html
Rationale:
1. A nutrient rich diet and physical activity are vital for weight management and
lifelong wellness (MCPS K-12 HECF, 2007, 7th Grade, p.136).
2. At the end of the lessons, students will be able to explain the relationship among
food intake, physical activity and weight management after using the program
MyPyramid.gov to assess their food intake levels and individual eating plans.
MyPyramid.gov is an interactive Web site that offers personalized eating plans
and interactive tools to help you plan and assess your food choices based on the
Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Students will access the program and complete
the lesson using a Web Quest.
3. Roblyer and Doering (2007) found that the obesity rates among adolescents
remind us of the ever-increasing problem of inactivity and the prevalence of Type
II diabetes among teens today. Low and declining levels of physical activity are a
major concern among adolescent girls and this inactivity certainly does not
improve their body image. Inactivity can also lead to an increase in blood
pressure, a decrease in bone-mass and a decrease in psychological well-being. Its
imperative that adolescents understand the relationship among food intake,
physical activity and weight management in order to promote their health and
future wellness. Wellness is a very important idea to understand. Wellness means
living your life to its fullest potential and acting in ways that reduce the chances
for acquiring a disease and/or illness. And because of medicine and regular
medical advancements, those people who suffer from a disease and/or illness can
be treated and live life productively. Would you tell a newly diagnosed diabetic
that he or she would never be healthy again? In 1909 you could, because the life
expectancy was just a few years. But in 2009, if you make positive decisions and
closely monitor your status and progress, you can expect to live a very healthy
and productive life even with diabetes. However, the purpose of this lesson is to
give adolescents the tools necessary to make positive decisions about nutrition

and food choices in order to prevent them from being diagnosed with a disease
and/or an illness.
A Web Quest is an inquiry-oriented lesson format in which all or nearly all the
information that learners examine and interact with is online. Web Quests start
with a central question, and in this lesson the question students need to realize is
how to maintain a healthful weight given the relationship among food intake,
physical activity and weight management because a nutrient rich diet and
physical activity are vital for weight management and lifelong wellness. This
is an authentic task because it doesnt only carry meaning in the classroom.
Students motivation levels are increased when they are confronted with a realworld issue that needs solving. Additionally, motivation is amplified when
students are given the Internet and online software as resources to work with and
discover the answer (Brooks & Byles, 2002). Web Quests inspire higher-order
thinking. Scaffolding techniques, whereby the information in the lesson is
presented in chunks, the students thinking process is supported, permitting
more advanced level thinking processes to occur and consequently increases
student motivation and learning. When students are in small or large groups,
research has shown that the collaboration required in online learning
environments using a Web Quest motivates students to produce high-quality work
and/or projects.
Brooks and Byles (2002) also state the following about Web Quests:
Research has shown that the most important factor related to student learning
and technology use is how teachers relate the technology-based activity to other
learning activities. Therefore, it's important to clearly link your Web Quest to
previous and subsequent activities, so that the Web Quest is not an isolated
experience disconnected from the rest of your curriculum.
Technology Standards Integrated into Lesson:
Maryland State Content Standard VI: Students will demonstrate the ability to use
nutrition and fitness knowledge, skills and strategies to promote healthy lifestyles
(MCPS K-12 HECF, 2007, 7th Grade, p.136).
Maryland Technology Literacy Standards for Students: Standard 3.0 Technology
for Learning and Collaboration: Students will use a variety of technologies for learning
and collaboration (MTLSS, 2007, p.12).
Learning: 1. Select and use technology tools to enhance learning.
a.) Use technology tools, including software and hardware, to learn new
content or reinforce skills (MTLSS, 2007, p.12).
Increase Productivity: 1. Select and use technology tools to increase
productivity.
f.) Collect, manipulates, analyze, and display data and information using
tools, such as calculators and computers (MTLSS, 2007, p.14).
2

Learning for the 21st Century - Critical Elements for Creating 21st Century Skills:
#3: Use 21st Century Tools to Develop Learning Skills (A Report and Mile Guide
for 21st Century Skills, 2002, p.6).

In a digital world, students need to learn to use the tools that are essential
to everyday life and workplace productivity.

#4: Teach and Learn in 21st Century Content. (A Report and Mile Guide for 21st
Century Skills, 2002, p.6).

Students need to learn academic content through real-world examples,


applications, and experiences both inside and outside the school.

Curriculum Standards Integrated into Lesson:


Enduring Understanding:
A nutrient rich diet and physical activity are vital for weight management and
lifelong wellness (MCPS K-12 HECF, 2007, 7th Grade, p.136).
Essential Questions:
How is a healthful weight maintained?
How are the Dietary Guidelines and Food Safety Standards used to help
individuals make healthy and safe food choices?
How is weight managed through healthy eating and physical activity? (MCPS K12 HECF, 2007, 7th Grade, p.136).
Mastery Objective:
6.7. A.2. Explain the relationship among food intake, physical activity and weight
management (MCPS K-12 HECF, 2007, 7th Grade, p.118).
Lesson Objectives:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Describe how to maintain a healthful weight.


Identify the Dietary Guidelines for Americans.
Apply the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA) in meal planning.
Apply the Dietary Guidelines for Americans in making healthy food choices.
Assess a healthy eating plan based on the Dietary Guidelines for Americans
(MCPS K-12 HECF, 2007, 7th Grade, p.118).

Materials/Featured Technologies:
1. Overhead Projector or Promethean Board
2. Computer: MyPyramid.gov Web site
3. Nutrition & Fitness Unit Packet (supplemental packet)
3

Prerequisite Student Skills: Montgomery County Public Schools (MCPS) Health


Education Curriculum Grade: 6
1. Identify and define the 6 major nutrients.
2. Define and discuss what constitutes a healthful weight based on the Body Mass
Index (BMI).
3. Apply the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA) in meal planning.
4. Describe the basic principles of meal planning.
5. Explain how to create a healthy meal plan using the Food Guide Pyramid and the
DGA (MCPS K-12 HECF, 2007, 6th Grade, p.62-63).
Brief Overview of Lesson:
This is a lesson that uses an indirect method of instruction. Students will complete all of
the lesson exercises using a Web Quest in order to understand the relationship among
food intake, physical activity and weight management. Students will visit the computer
lab on 4 consecutive days. Students will access the link to the Web Quest in my teacher
folder titled; Reader. Class periods are approximately 45 minutes long. However, because
the class has to walk to the computer lab, sign on to the computer and listen to my
instructions, Im hoping that they actually work for at least 30 to 35 minutes.
Remember, students have to pack up and be ready to leave when the bell rings. This
means students need to finish their work 2 to 3 minutes early. At the end of the 1st lesson,
students will have learned how their daily diet (a typical days diet) compares
nutritionally to that of a diet in which all the essential nutrients and the appropriate
amount of calories consumed from each of the food groups is represented. At the end of
the 2nd lesson, students will have reviewed the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and
applied those guidelines to a specific meal plan. At the end of the 3rd lesson, students will
have learned how to maintain a healthful weight by examining the relationship among
food intake, physical activity and weight management.
At the end of the three (3) lessons, students will be able to explain the relationship
amongst food intake, physical activity and weight management after using a Web Quest
and the program MyPyramid.gov to assess their food intake levels and individual eating
plans. MyPyramid.gov is an interactive Web site that offers personalized eating plans
and interactive tools to help you plan and assess your food choices based on the
Dietary Guidelines for Americans.
Teacher to Teacher:
There are only three health teachers at my school. I would tell the other health teachers
that although this lesson is designed for 7th graders, aspects of this lesson can be used for
6th and 8th graders as well. The standards and objectives of the curriculum units are
similar amongst all three grade levels. The Web Quest is simply a link of instruction that I
have provided to the students and MyPyramid.gov is a simple site and program to use.
Students must be prepared to enter their personal information into the program. They will
need to ascertain their height and weight before they can use the features of the program.
Entering the personal information takes just a few seconds. Students will need to enter a
username and password as well. I like this feature because it secures ones privacy. It may
be that additional time is needed to complete the lessons. I have allotted a maximum of
four days for these lessons. Its also necessary to review serving sizes before using the
Web site. Students need to understand how to estimate food and beverage serving sizes.
4

Procedures/Daily Activities:
Day 1 Students come to class and complete the Activator exercise. The Activator
exercise is a series of questions on the screen (overhead projector) which students answer
in the spaces provided in their unit packets. The Activator questions relate to the topic of
study and the current lesson objectives. The unit packet for this particular topic of study
includes three (3) separate and distinct worksheets. Students complete one (1) worksheet
per class period. The unit packet also includes a response area for the daily Activator
questions. After reviewing the class responses to the Activator, the students will go the
computer lab.
Remember that the Mastery Objective is that students be able to explain the
relationship among food intake, physical activity and weight management.
Lesson #1 Objective(s):
1. Identify the Dietary Guidelines for Americans.
2. Assess a healthy eating plan based on the Dietary Guidelines for Americans
(MCPS K-12 HECF, 2007, 7th Grade, p.118).
Maryland Technology Literacy Standards for Students: Standard 3.0 Technology
for Learning and Collaboration: Students will use a variety of technologies for learning
and collaboration.
Learning: 1. Select and use technology tools to enhance learning.
a.) Use technology tools, including software and hardware, to learn new
content or reinforce skills. (MTLSS, 2007).
Learning for the 21st Century - Critical Elements for Creating 21st Century Skills:
#4: Teach and learn in 21st century content.
Students need to learn academic content through real-world examples,
applications, and experiences both inside and outside the school. (A
Report and Mile Guide for 21st Century Skills, 2002)

The students were instructed to create a food log for one day over the weekend. The
directions were to list all the items which the students ate and drink and how much of
those items they ate and drank for that particular day. The students were also instructed
to weigh themselves and to ascertain their height over the weekend. Students are asked to
access their food log and then sign on to a computer and work individually (except for
those that I have paired) on the Web Quest. The link to the Web Quest can be found in my
teacher folder titled; Reader. As I move around the room and assess the progress of the
students, I will be available for questions and assistance. I may also stop the class and
review specific steps of the Web Quest or MyPyramid.gov that may be causing some
confusion, as formative assessment. Students have to turn in the requirements listed in the
Web Quest on the final day in the lab. The Web Quest includes step-by-step directions
and students are required to turn in two (2) documents by the end of class for lesson #1.
When the students arrive at the computer lab, as a class we will review the webpage
titled; My Diet at My Pyramid.gov. And specifically well review the first task,
completing the activities for My Pyramid Tracker, an online dietary and physical
activity assessment tool that provides information on your diet quality, physical activity
status, and related nutrition messages, and provides links to nutrient and physical
activity information. The Food Calories/Energy Balance feature automatically calculates
your energy balance by subtracting the energy you expend from physical activity from
your food calories/energy intake. Use of this tool helps you better understand your energy
balance status and enhances the link between good nutrition and regular physical activity.
A very important note is that when the students utilize the MyPyramid.gov Web site they
have to enter personal information. This information includes their age, gender, height,
weight and level of daily physical activity. The program takes all that information into
account and personalizes the data in the program for you. This means that when the
students enter their food log into the program, the technology in the program displays the
results of their entry. What food group? How many servings? And the program illustrates
how the information just entered by the student compares to that of a nutritionally
appropriate diet in regards to that students personal information.
In this exercise, the students will learn to assess how their daily diet compares to that of
a diet in which all the essential nutrients and the appropriate amount of calories
consumed from each of the food groups is represented.
Students are told to go home and create a diet (in their food log) for one day, which
they think will satisfy the nutritional requirements for someone of their age, gender,
height, weight and level of physical activity, based on their experiences and the
objectives in this lesson.
Day 2 Students come to class and complete the Activator exercise in their unit packets.
After reviewing the class responses to the Activator, I will then review the objectives
from the previous day. I will illicit responses from the students regarding their
experiences in the computer lab the prior day. How did your daily diet compare to that of
what is nutritionally considered to be a high-quality diet for someone your age, gender,
height, weight and level of daily physical activity? Teacher and students then go to the
computer lab and examine the objectives for the next lesson in the Web Quest.
Lesson #2 Objective(s):

1. Apply the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA) in meal planning.


2. Apply the Dietary Guidelines for Americans in making healthy food choices
(MCPS K-12 HECF, 2007, 7th Grade, p.118).
Maryland Technology Literacy Standards for Students: Standard 3.0 Technology
for Learning and Collaboration: Students will use a variety of technologies for learning
and collaboration.
Learning: 1. Select and use technology tools to enhance learning.
a.) Use technology tools, including software and hardware, to learn new
content or reinforce skills. (MTLSS, 2007, p.12).
Learning for the 21st Century - Critical Elements for Creating 21st Century Skills:
#3: Use 21st Century Tools to Develop Learning Skills.
In a digital world, students need to learn to use the tools that are essential
to everyday life and workplace productivity. (A Report and Mile Guide
for 21st Century Skills, 2002, p.6)
The second lesson is titled; My Pyramid Menu Planner Lesson Step-by-Step Directions
@MyPyramid.gov. My Pyramid Menu Planner is an online interactive, technological
tool that can help you make healthy food choices. You can choose the food and drink you
want to consume and then compare the results of those entries to current nutritional
guidance. This online dietary assessment provides information on your potential diet
quality. Students go to the computer lab and sign on to a computer and work individually
(except for those that I have paired) on the lesson. Students enter all the food and
beverage that they think will be nutritionally appropriate and satisfy the DGA for their
particular age, gender, height, weight and amount of daily physical activity. The Menu
Planner Bar Graph begins to show how the item they just entered affects the
Recommended Daily Allowances (RDA) for that particular food group. Students have to
turn in the requirements listed in the lesson on the final day in the lab. The Web Quest
lesson includes step-by-step directions and students are required to turn in three (3)
documents by the end of class for lesson #2.
By the end of class students will have reviewed the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and
applied those guidelines to a meal plan.
Day 3 Students come to class and complete the Activator exercise in their unit packets.
After reviewing the class responses to the Activator questions, students go to the
computer lab and access the link for the Web Quest and lesson #3, Students then review
the objectives for lesson #3.
Lesson #3 Objective:
1. Describe how to maintain a healthful weight (MCPS K-12 HECF, 2007, 7th
Grade, p.118).
Maryland Technology Literacy Standards for Students: Standard 3.0 Technology
for Learning and Collaboration: Students will use a variety of technologies for learning
and collaboration.
7

Increase Productivity: 1. Select and use technology tools to increase


productivity.
f.) Collect, manipulates, analyze, and display data and information using
tools, such as calculators and computers. (MTLSS, 2007, p.14).
Teacher and students review the final Web Quest lesson titled; Maintaining a Healthy
Weight The Relationship between Food Intake, Physical Activity and Weight
Management. Students are verbally given the following instructions: When you sign on
to MyPyramid.gov home page, you need to look at the links on the left-hand column of
the page and click on the link titled, Steps to a Healthier Weight in order to complete the
worksheet and achieve the lesson objective. Or, use the links provided in the Web Quest
lesson. PRINT the pdf document titled; MyPyramid Healthy Weight to document your
research. Students turn in this worksheet at the end of class.
By the end of class, students will have reviewed and learned how to maintain a healthful
weight by examining the relationship among food intake, physical activity and weight
management.

Lesson Worksheets
My Pyramid Tracker Lesson Step-by-Step Directions
@MyPyramid.gov Lesson #1
1.
2.
3.
4.

www.Mypyramid.gov
Under Subjects in the left column, click on My Pyramid Tracker.
Click on Assess Your Food Intake.
Click on new user to register. Enter a username and

password.
5. Enter your personal information in the New User Registration
Profile. Click on Save Todays Changes and then click on
Proceed to Food Intake.
6. On the left side of the page under, Enter Food Item, enter all
the food and beverage that you consumed. Then, select the
quantity and number of servings consumed for that particular
food or beverage. When you are done with one item, click Enter
Foods to continue. Do this for all the food and beverage that you
ate for that one day.
7. When you are complete, click on Save and Analyze.
8. On the Analyze Food Intake page, click on Calculate DG
(Dietary Guidelines) Comparison. Choose one of the options
regarding weight, and PRINT THE PAGE (1). Review the
page.
8

9. At the top of the page, click on Analyze Your Food Intake and
click on Calculate Nutrient Intakes from Foods and REVIEW
AND PRINT THE PAGE (2).
10.
Turn in both pages stapled with your name on each
page.
My Pyramid Menu Planner Lesson Step-by-Step Directions
@MyPyramid.gov Lesson #2
1. www.Mypyramid.gov
2. Look to the left and inside the shaded blue box, under Subjects,
click on My Pyramid Menu Planner.
3. Enter the personal information on the left and click on Submit.
4. The Menu Planner displays the 5 food groups and their RDAs
(Recommended Daily Allowances). Click on each colored food
group and review the Ideas, Remember and What Counts
Information tabs. Also, review the Calories, Sugar and Oils Bar
graphs under the food groups labels. REVIEW AND PRINT THE
PAGE (1).
5. Look to the left, under Start Menu Planning, type in the name of
a food or beverage in the search box to begin planning your daily
meals. Then click on Search.
6. Enter the amount and meal time and then click on Add.
7. The Menu Planner Bar Graph begins to show you how the item
you just entered affects your RDA for that particular food group.
8. Enter all the foods and beverages to be consumed in 1 day that
you think would be a healthy diet and would satisfy the Dietary
Guidelines for Americans. When you are done adding all the
foods and beverages, REVIEW AND PRINT THE PAGE (2).
9. Click on Reports, click on Food Details and REVIEW AND
PRINT THE PAGE (3).
10.
Turn in the 3 pages stapled with your name on each
page.

Name _____________________________
_____

Date

Maintaining a Healthy Weight The Relationship between Food


Intake, Physical Activity and Weight Management Lesson #3
Instructions: Answer the following questions.
1. Why is it important to be healthy? What risks are associated with
being overweight?

2. Explain the secret to reaching a healthy weight.

3. Look at the Energy Balance Chart, which box is right for you?
Explain.

4. List the 5 food groups.


1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
5. Place the letter of the definition below in front of the
component of the My Pyramid Diagram it identifies or
illustrates.
A. Indicates the amount of food that should be eaten from
each food group on a daily basis.

10

B. Indicates that foods with added fats and sugars should only
be consumed relative to a persons amount of daily
physical activity.
C. Suggests that small steps are needed and are most
effective for improving ones diet and lifestyle.
D. Indicates the importance of daily physical activity.
E. Accomplished by visiting MyPyramid.gov
F. Illustrated by a variety of colors indicating that a healthy
meal plan includes adding foods to your diet from each of
the food groups on a daily basis.
_____ Activity
_____ Moderation
_____ Personalization
_____ Proportionality
_____ Variety
_____ Gradual improvement
Look at the My Pyramid Plan for gender and age. Complete the
following charts.
6. What amounts from each food group should be eaten on a daily
basis for a 12 yr. old male of average height and weight and who
is physically active for less than 30 minutes a day?
FOOD
GROUP

GRAINS

VEGETABLE
S

FRUITS

MILK

MEAT &
BEANS

AMOUNT

7. What amounts from each food group should be eaten on a daily


basis for a 12 yr. old female of average height and weight and
who is physically active for more than 30 minutes a day?
FOOD
GROUP

GRAINS

VEGETABLE
S

AMOUNT
11

FRUITS

MILK

MEAT &
BEANS

8. What amounts from each food group should be eaten on a daily


basis for a 13 yr. old male of average height and weight and who
is physically active for less than 30 minutes a day?
FOOD
GROUP

GRAINS

VEGETABL
ES

FRUITS

MILK

MEAT &
BEANS

AMOUNT

9. What amounts from each food group should be eaten on a daily


basis for a 13 yr. old female of average height and weight and
who is physically active for less than 30 minutes a day?
FOOD
GROUP

GRAINS

VEGETABLE
S

FRUITS

MILK

MEAT &
BEANS

AMOUNT

10.
What amounts from each food group should be eaten on a
daily basis for a 13 yr. old male of average height and weight and
who is physically active for more than 30 minutes a day?
FOOD
GROUP

GRAINS

VEGETABLE
S

FRUITS

MILK

MEAT &
BEANS

AMOUNT

11.
What amounts from each food group should be eaten on a
daily basis for a 13 yr. old female of average height and weight
and who is physically active for more than 30 minutes a day?
FOOD
GROUP

GRAINS

VEGETABLE
S

AMOUNT

12

FRUITS

MILK

MEAT &
BEANS

12.
What amounts from each food group should be eaten on a
daily basis for a 14 yr. old male of average height and weight and
who is physically active for more than 30 minutes a day?
FOOD
GROUP

GRAINS

VEGETABLE
S

FRUITS

MILK

MEAT &
BEANS

AMOUNT

13.
What amounts from each food group should be eaten on a
daily basis for a 14 yr. old female of average height and weight
and who is physically active for less than 30 minutes a day?
FOOD
GROUP

GRAINS

VEGETABLE
S

FRUITS

MILK

AMOUNT

14.
Analysis: Do males or females seem to need more
calories? Does the amount of food considered necessary increase
or decrease with increasing age for males? Does the amount of
food considered necessary increase or decrease with increasing
age for females?

Inherent Value of Lesson


Technology Integration Planning (TIP) Model: Teachers need a planning approach
when using technology in the classroom and according to Roblyer (2007) the
Technology Integration Planning (TIP) Model benefits teachers by giving them a general
approach to address the challenges involved in integrating technology into teaching. The
six (6) phases of the model outlines the planning and implementation steps that help
ensure technology use will be meaningful, efficient, and successful in meeting needs.
Phase 1: What is my technological pedagogical content knowledge?
Phase 2: Determine Relative Advantage Why use technology?
Phase 3: Objectives and Assessments How will I know students have learned?
Phase 4: Design What teaching strategies and activities will work best?
Phase 5: Instructional Environment Are conditions ripe for technology integration?
Phase 6: Evaluation What worked well? What needs to be improved?
Phase 2: Determine Relative Advantage Why use technology?
13

MEAT &
BEANS

The mastery objective, being the most important educational objective, is what you want
the students to know and be able to do in the end and for the rest of their lives. The
enduring understanding is the essential piece of cognitive information students need to
store away in their memory banks. The essential questions are the questions that have to
be answered in order for the students to reach the mastery objective. In these series of
lessons, I ultimately wanted the students to be able to explain the relationship among
food intake, physical activity and weight management.
Analysis of MyPyramid.gov and Technology Enhancement: How does the use of a
Web Quest and MyPyramid.gov enhance student learning?
I enjoy and believe that Im most effective when I teach directly. Im very practical and I
like to relate all the topics in health class to events in students real lives. I enjoy telling
stories of my own experiences as well. My philosophy of teaching is different than my
teaching methods. PowerPoint, I have always thought, is the greatest invention ever.
PowerPoint transformed my teaching style. I normally give students unit packets and I
use PowerPoint and the overhead projector to display notes so that students can copy the
information onto their packets in the spaces provided. I sometimes insert short videos and
pictures and as they write, I will read the information, say some things about it and then
allow for class discussion. But in this lesson, with the use of technology, Im only
giving the students directions and guidance in order to allow them to discover the
learning objectives indirectly or on their own. This type of lesson (indirect or
discovery) is new to me. I normally would just list and discuss the learning
objectives via PowerPoint and the unit packet, but instead, in this lesson, Im
allowing students to discover or achieve the objectives on their own.
In these lessons, I used the computer, the MyPyramid.gov interactive Web site and an
overhead projector. The MyPyramid.gov Web site is entertaining and Im sure the
students will enjoy using all the features of the program. The program assesses each of
the students individually and they will enjoy watching how the food and beverage data
they entered into the program affects their overall diet and health. The instructional
problem that I solved through technology was off-task behavior and lack of focus in the
classroom. Instead of staring at Mr. Reader and listening to him explain all those things;
Im going to allow them to discover the objectives on their own, but with my guidance
and assistance.

14

A Web Quest is an inquiry-oriented lesson format in which all or nearly all the
information that learners examine and interact with is online. Web Quests start with a
central question, and in this lesson the question students need to realize is how to
maintain a healthful weight given the relationship among food intake, physical activity
and weight management because a nutrient rich diet and physical activity are vital for
weight management and lifelong wellness. This is an authentic task because it doesnt
only carry meaning in the classroom.
Students motivation levels are increased when they are confronted with a real-world
issue that needs solving. Additionally, motivation is amplified when students are given
the Internet and online software as resources to work with and discover the answer
(Brooks & Byles, 2002). Web Quests inspire higher-order thinking. Scaffolding
techniques, whereby the information in the lesson is presented in chunks, the students
thinking process is supported, permitting more advanced level thinking processes to
occur and consequently increases student motivation and learning. When students are in
small or large groups, research has shown that the collaboration required in online
learning environments using a Web Quest motivates students to produce high-quality
work and/or projects.
Brooks and Byles (2002) also state the following about Web Quests:
Research has shown that the most important factor related to student learning and
technology use is how teachers relate the technology-based activity to other learning
activities. Therefore, it's important to clearly link your Web Quest to previous and
subsequent activities, so that the Web Quest is not an isolated experience disconnected
from the rest of your curriculum.
The technologies used in this lesson will transform student learning by giving
students a visual representation of their diet and then allowing them to individually
assess the quality of their diet. Most people just think that they eat too much of this or
that, or they eat well or dont eat well. I mean, how would you describe the quality of
your own diet? MyPyramid.gov is an interactive Web site and dietary assessment tool that
provides information on ones diet quality and provides links to nutrient and physical
activity information. So students can actually input their diet and see the results. Thats
effective!
Technology allows me to account for all the differences in learning styles because it
attracts the audio, visual and kinesthetic learner. Technology also encourages the students
to focus and stay on task. In my lesson, the use of technology will allow students to
work at their own pace and in their own learning environment. Students who learn
by listening or seeing feeling can all be successful if they are allowed to utilize
technology to learn. The added value of this lesson, which I devised, using a Web
Quest and the MyPyramid.gov program, is the possibility that I could be saving
thousands of lives in the future. Technology can play a vital role in lessening the number
of diagnosed cases of diabetes each year in adolescents. Obesity will get you! Thats my
message!
What are the Web Quest disadvantages or cons? For most teachers accessing
technology can be a major issue. Its difficult for teachers who normally dont use the
computer lab to access the lab, and usually there are never enough computers. This is a
challenge when it comes to implementing Web Quests as instructional lessons. And not
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all computers are equipped with the technology to make efficient use of the Internet as an
online learning tool. So teachers may have to adapt to classroom circumstances and these
obstacles can usually be overcome with some teacher ingenuity and diligence.
Phase 3: Objectives and Assessments How will I know students have learned?
In lesson #1 the students complete the My Pyramid Tracker Lesson. I grade the
worksheet for accuracy and completion. The students turn in two (2) printed documents
for this lesson. I check to see if the students entered their personal information in the new
user registration profile. The first printed document should reveal all the food and
beverage which the students consumed in one day and after a computer analysis, the
program compares their food and beverage input relative to the Dietary Guidelines for
Americans. On the second printed document, the program analyzes students food intake
and then individually calculates nutrient intakes from those foods. The students cannot
complete this page without first entering their food logs.
By completing the lessons in the Web Quest, the students will be examining how the
results of their food logs precisely compare to nutritionally appropriate diets for people of
the same age, gender, height, weight and level of physical activity as themselves. In the
process, students will review the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Students use the
technology tool, MyPyramid.gov to enhance learning. Using a Web Quest as an
interactive learning tool, students learn academic content through real-world examples by
entering the results of their own eating habits into a computer program (MyPyramid.gov)
that analyzes the data.
In lesson #2 the students complete the My Pyramid Menu Planner. I grade the
worksheet for accuracy and completion. The students turn in three (3) printed documents
for this lesson. I check to see if the students printed the Menu Planner. The Menu Planner
displays the 5 food groups and their RDAs (Recommended Daily Allowances). Students
will be able to use this document (page 1) to complete the rest of the assignment. I check
to see if the students entered all the foods and beverages for one (1) day that they thought
would be a healthy diet and would satisfy the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (page 2).
I check to see if the students accessed the link, Reports, and printed the Food Details
(page 3). I examine this page. Students cannot print page 3, the Food Details page, unless
they have completed the exercises for pages 1 and 2.
By completing the worksheet, the students will be examining how each food and
beverage (meal planning) entered in the program affects the Dietary Guidelines for
Americans. Students will begin to understand how they can use and apply the Dietary
Guidelines for Americans to make healthy food choices. Students use the technology tool,
MyPyramid.gov to enhance learning. And in a digital world, students are able to
complete the instructional activities in the Web Quest and use the technology tool,
MyPyramid.gov, to learn a strategy that can be used to make healthy food choices.
Nutrition is essential to everyday life and workplace productivity and the connection
between the use of MyPyramid.gov (as a tool) and health is made apparent.
In lesson #3 the students complete the Maintaining a Healthy Weight The
Relationship between Food Intake, Physical Activity and Weight Management
worksheet. I grade the worksheet for accuracy and completion using a master copy of the
worksheet.
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As students complete this final worksheet, they begin to examine the concept of energy
balance and how to maintain a healthful weight. What is the relationship between energy
in and energy out? How is weight maintained, gained and/or lost? Students then examine
the recommended amounts of food which are considered nutritionally appropriate for 12,
13 and 14 year old boys and girls who are of average height and weight and exercise
more and/or less than 30 minutes per day. Students access and use online technology
tools to analyze data.
Phase 4: Design What teaching strategies and activities will work best?
I selected these activities because students dont necessarily enjoy me as much as I enjoy
myself. I love direct instruction. I enjoy standing in front of them and talking directly to
them. But I have also come to realize that using educational technology tolls, like a Web
Quest for instruction, whereby the students can interact with the information via
manipulating technology, rather than just absorbing it from me, may be necessary in
order to increase student learning and success. My lessons, when completed in
sequential order, allow the students to achieve the objectives and standards because
the lessons account for audio, visual and kinesthetic learners. Students can work at
their own learning pace and in their own environment.
Phase 5: Instructional Environment Are conditions ripe for technology integration?
The computer lab needs to be reserved for three (3) or four (4) days at the minimum.
Several students will need to be paired in order to have access to enough computers and
several students will need to be paired with other higher level and computer savvy
students. Class periods are approximately 45 minutes long. However, because the class
has to walk to the computer lab, sign on to the computer and listen to my instructions,
Im hoping that they actually work for at least 30 to 35 minutes. Remember, students
have to pack up and be ready to leave when the bell rings. This means students need to
finish their work 2 to 3 minutes early. Each computer has access to high speed Internet
and students will go to my folder in Outlook to access the Web Quest link titled; My Diet
at MyPyramid.gov in order to begin the lesson. The link needs to be checked before the
lesson to ensure its working correctly. The lab is used throughout the day. When arriving
to the lab, its necessary to make sure there is adequate paper in the printer.
Phase 6: Evaluation What worked well? What needs to be improved?
One issue right away when we arrived into the lab was that a few students could not
remember their passwords for their student account. I had to spend a minute logging each
of them into the computer. The pairings worked well and I was not surprised. But how
well would the students who needed help have performed alone? One major issue was
Serving sizes. I had not reviewed the serving sizes adequately enough with the students
before the lesson began. In MyPyramid.gov the students must enter the number of
servings for each of the food and beverage items they had inserted into the Tracker and
Menu Planner. This was an issue because some of the students knew the serving sizes and
others needed assistance. The link to the Web Quest worked fine and most of the students
seemed to understand the operation of the online lesson and only briefly complained
about the amount of reading in the introduction. The printer worked fine and this
surprised me. The software program itself worked very well. Almost all of the students
were able to efficiently navigate the site. An interesting note was that some students
didnt seem to need the step-by-step tutorial for the site but mostly everyone seemed to
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use and appreciate the tutorial. In my opinion, due to the easy navigation and step-by-step
directions that I provided I feel that the objectives were achieved by all the students.
Almost all of the students finished their work on time. The students were expected to turn
in six (6) worksheets. Five (5) of the worksheets are printed directly from the
MyPyramid.gov site and the sixth (6th) is printed directly from the Web Quest.
Summarily, I thought that the students were focused and on-task most of the time while
using these particular technology learning tools. The students want immediate
information and/or feedback and this software program provided instantaneous data and
the Web Quest allowed the students to work interactively and independently from me.
Future Explorations:
I might want to determine if there is a better class to teach this lesson in for the first
time. Maybe I should pick my smartest class or the class with the fewest number of
students. I would do this in order to ease into this type of teaching method. Find out what
works best before I teach the crazy kids. No doubt I would make some mistakes early
on and I could correct those mistakes easier if I did that in a better class. Also, I need to
make sure there are 35-40 computers in the lab so that each student can individually
complete the assignment. Finally, I might want to research other comparative interactive
tools that can be used to educate adolescents about nutrition and weight management.
I want to be able to ultimately create dynamic and visually appealing Web Quests while
at the same time maintaining curriculum integrity. I want the bells and whistles and all
the icing on the cake. I still feel boring and like Im underachieving. When I evaluate
my site(s), at times I feel as if Im trapped, like Im in a hole in the ground and the more
work that I do the deeper the hole I create for myself, because I use the same tool for the
job every time.

Peer Review:

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Great lesson - very thorough. Amazing amount of detail. Your website looks great. You
cite a source at the beginning of your lesson plan - do you want to include the source at
the beginning of the web quest. You speak to factual information regarding obesity - it
might lend more credibility and serve as a model to include it here.
In your lesson objectives, you might think about switching item three with item two
(identifying the Dietary Guidelines, then applying). It might flow a little better in terms of
progression of concept if Im understanding it correctly.
I really like your links both on your site and in the lesson with the "real-world" concept
of diet and health. I like your connection to practical, life-long issues, beyond middle
school. This connection is great for middle-schoolers.
You mention girls specifically with body image issues in your intro. Do you want to
include something specific with boys? The stereotype is that girls have body image
issues, but don't boys as well? I could be wrong - you'd be the expert there - but the
thought came to me.
Good connections with the standards (Health, Tech Ed). You might also have links with
standards in 7th grade Life Science and English, too.
For materials, you mention a computer. But you will really need one computer per
student (though you do mention this in your lesson, it might be good to state "computer
lab" or something here).
You have nice use of time in your lesson. Good breaking it up into days. For your "crazy"
classes, you might consider extending time (would that help, or hurt??). I like how you
note that your time would be shortened b/c of set-up at a lab; and the cues to wrap up a
few minutes early.
Great tie-in with your lesson and the packet materials. Having the graphic organizers will
be amazingly helpful. The step-by-step instructions are well-done.
On page 15, you have a typo with Lesson #2 - stating "Tracking Lesson" instead of
"Menu Planner"
Your Inherent Value response is really great - very thorough and detailed. Awesome job. I
think this lesson will go over really well with your middle-school students.
Jon- I also thought your webquest was great...very important topic and I like the
interactive site. I'm sure you've seen Michelle Obama's Let's Move site, I like that one
too. One of the local high schools near me was actually recognized for their efforts in
improving their school food, just a side comment. Anyway, I don't have any suggestions
for improvement for you either...sorry.

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Your lesson was very detailed and provided a grade deal of information for any teacher or
substitute.
However, the actual lesson plan could be difficult for a substitute or teacher to follow
because of the length and supplementary information. To condense it a bit, some of the
information might be better suited for the analysis portion of the assignment.
Also, it's great that you have so many thoughtful objectives, but in your actual lesson
plan, it might be better to highlight 3 to make it easier to follow. Then, if additional
objectives are addressed, they could be mentioned in the paper as well.
I really enjoyed your WebQuest and I plan to use one or two of your links with my
second grade students in our Healthy Heart Cluster.
Annotated References:
1. MyPyramid.gov. (2009). Retrieved March 30, 2010, from http://mypyramid.gov/
MyPyramid.gov is an interactive Web site that offers personalized eating plans and
interactive tools to help you plan and assess your food choices based on the Dietary
Guidelines for Americans. I specifically used the following features: My Pyramid
Tracker, Menu Planner and Steps to a Healthier Weight.
2. Cooney, F. (2007). Montgomery county public schools k-12 health education
curriculum framework (K-12). MCPS.
The Department of Curriculum and Instruction (DCI) supports the strategic alignment of
standards-based curriculum, instruction, and assessment that provides a meaningful
grading and reporting system that communicates clearly with all stakeholders about
student achievement.
3. Maryland Technology Literacy Standards for Students. (2007).
a. Retrieved March 30, 2010, from:
http://mdk12.org/instruction/curriculum/technology_literacy/v
sc_technology _literacy_standards.pdf
Technology literacy is considered to be the ability of an individual, working
independently and with others, to responsibly, appropriately and effectively using a
variety of technologies for learning and collaboration. The Maryland Technology
Literacy Standards for Students in 2007 is accepted by the Maryland State Board of
Education.
4. A Report and Mile Guide for 21st Century Skills. (2002). Retrieved March 30,
2010, from:
http://www.21stcenturyskills.org/downloads/P21_Report.pdf
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This is a report that illustrates the findings of a comprehensive effort to identify the
essential skills that people need today. Educators, employers, parents, community
members and even students were consulted in order to develop a collective vision for the
future of education and a framework for action.
5. Roblyer, M.D., & Doering, A.H. (2007). Technology in physical education and
health education. In K.V. Canton (Ed.), Integrating educational
technology into teaching (5th edition, chap. 14, p.390). Boston, MA: Allyn
& Bacon.
6. Brooks, S., & Byles, B. (2002). Why WebQuests? Retrieved March 30, 2010,
from Internet4Classrooms:
http://www.internet4classrooms.com/why_webquest.htm
Internet 4 Classrooms ("i4c"), a free web portal designed to assist anyone who wants to
find high-quality, free Internet resources to use in classroom instruction, developing
project ideas, reinforcing specific subject matter areas both in the class and at home and
even for online technology tutorials. The portal is used by teachers, parents and students
of all ages on six of the seven continents (there are not many classrooms in Antarctica)
and is available to anyone with an Internet connection.

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