Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 8

ADHD:

ATTENTION
DEFICIT HYPERACTIVITY
DISORDER - ACROSS THE
LIFESPAN
HYPERACTIVE/IMPULSIVE (EARLY YEARS)
INATTENTIVE ( IN ADOLESCENCE)

BY ANA BILLS-GOGGINS

I.D. OF ADHD
ADHD ( psychology) /ADD( U.S. Department of Ed.)usually
begins in early childhood and continues into adulthood.
ADHD affects 4 to 12% of the U.S. school- age children.
Boys are 3 times more likely to be diagnosed than girls.
Poor sustained attention and hyperactivity-impulsivity
Can only be diagnosed by medical professional psychiatrist

Source: Lerner, J.W. & Johns, B.H.(2005). Learning disabilities and related disabilities (13 th ed).
Boston, Ma: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

ADHD/ ADD
SIMULATION
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xfo1tZ95Ypk

PLEASE PAY ATTENTION!!! TODAY you will have to answer


the questions correctly or you will fail!!
--SOUNDS FAMILIAR?

ADHD EARLY
CHILDHOOD
Implications- clinicians do not
diagnose ADHD in infancy

Social usually does not make/keeps friend due to aggression


Academic - disruptive behavior, especially aggression toward
other children, sometimes asked to withdraw from preschool.

Medical- difficult to diagnose because formal assessments are


NOT designed for this age group, have many accidents because
cant sit still

Emotional- have problems sleeping, bonding & intrusive

Source: Friend, M. (2014). Special education contemporary perspectives for school professional
(4th ed). Boston, Ma: Pearson .

ADHD- ELEMENTARY-AGE
CHILDREN I.D. YEARS

Implications
Social -social rejection and criticism by peers, teachers & parents,
leave a trail of unfinished tasks- clothes scattered about the floor of the
bedroom, games started and unfinished, papers everywhere, fighting,
conflicts

Academic- trouble staying focused and organized and may not be


able to keep up academically due to not able to keep information in
working memory, failure or lack of success which leads to defiant and
non-compliant behavior

Medical- diagnosed by physician, multimodal Treatment- 1) Ed.


Instruction 2) behavior management strategies 3) family and child
counseling 4)home management

Emotional-anxiety disorder, depression or oppositional disorder


appear
Source : Parker, H.C. (2002) . ADADHD across the lifespan. Retrieved from
http://www.myadhd.com/adhdacrosslifespan.html

ADHD- ADOLESCENTS
Implications
Social - ignored or rejected by peers due to poor social and
communication skills, victim of bullying, or to bully others = LOW
SELF-ESTEEM

Academic- without support, teenagers with ADHD tend to have


lower grade point averages and scores on standardized achievement
tests, and higher rates of school failure and suspension for problem
behavior

Medical- Prescribe medications & behavior therapy


Emotional- are prone to poor emotion-regulation= Highs & lows,
tend to become involved in high risk behaviors drinking, smoking,
unsafe sex
Source: Rooney, M. (2015). How to help kids handle the new challenges and expectations of
high school. Retrieved from http://www.childmind.org/en/posts/articles/2013-1-7-adhdteenagers.

ADHD- ADULTHOOD
Implications
Social -Twice as likely to have been divorced, disorganization, poor
time management, and failure to plan ahead

Academic- more dropouts, lower occupational achievement,


problems with starting and finishing projects & meeting deadlines

Medical- Adult ADHD more difficult to recognize, which is why


many adults remain undiagnosed

Emotional- risky behaviors continue: depression, anxiety


disorder, substance abuse

Source: Weiss, M. D., & Weiss, J. R. (2004). A guide to the treatment of adults with ADHD.
Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 65, 27-37.

REFERENCES
Friend, M. (2014). Special education contemporary perspectives for
school professional (4th ed). Boston, Ma: Pearson.
Lerner, J.W. & Johns, B.H.(2005). Learning disabilities and related disabilities
(13th ed). Boston, Ma: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.
Parker, H.C. (2002) . ADADHD across the lifespan. Retrieved from
http://www.myadhd.com/adhdacrosslifespan.html
Rooney, M. (2015). How to help kids handle the new challenges and
expectations of high school. Retrieved from
http://www.childmind.org/en/posts/articles/2013-1-7-adhd- teenagers
Weiss, M. D., & Weiss, J. R. (2004). A guide to the treatment of adults with
ADHD. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 65, 27-37