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Running head: Security Update Communication Plan

Banner Health Security Update Communication Plan


Larry M. Wolverton
Facilitating Change (AET 560)
January 18, 2016
Gregory Dlabach

Security Update Communication Plan

Banner Health Security Update Communication Plan


Banner Health is instituting new active shooter protocols and training enterprise-wide.
This is in response to soft target live shooter mass murder events in the world and most recently
in California. Additionally, an incident of gun violence occurred in Banner Cordons Childrens
Hospital very recently. In order to limit and correct rumors as well as communicate the facts
about the change, an effective communication has been developed. This communication plan
will deliver the details of the plan including: how the plan affects organizational change, the
technology required to implement the change; how the plan will be launched; how the plan will
be tested for effectiveness and management response; continuous improvement feedback loops;
and mitigation of resistance to the change (Dlabach, 2015).
Communication Plan Effect on Organizational Change
Importance of Organizational Change
Organizations must implement continuous and transformational change to remain
competitiveCommunication is the means by which organizations compete and survive in the
global economy, especially as business environments become more complex (Saruhan, 2014,
pp. 143, 144). With this in mind, organizational change communication planning must be a wellhoned skill of an effective change agent. The fluidity of a company is directly related to the
success of a company with a global economy and frequent changes in consumer demands. The
need for an ongoing communication strategy and change communication plans is ongoing and
essential to survival of companies in the 21 st century.
Purpose of an Effective a Change Communication Plan
Communication plans are, at their core, designed to minimize the effects of rumors, to
mobilize support for the change, and to sustain enthusiasm and commitment (Spector, 2013, p.

Security Update Communication Plan

312, para. 2). This communication plan will communicate the need for the change throughout the
organization, provide individuals with an idea of how the change will affect them personally,
make known any structural, procedural, or operational change to current practices, and keep
every stakeholder updated with the progress of the implementation of the change and any course
corrections in the implementation strategy or plan based on feedback during implementation
(Spector, 2013, p. 312, para. 3).
Technology Required to Implement Security Update Change
The technology required to effectively implement the security update at Banner Health
will include: educational tools such as computer generated simulations, laptop projectors, and
audio systems; security related items such as individual wireless panic buttons linked to security,
improved monitoring cameras and monitoring stations as well as effective non-lethal and lethal
weaponry and personal protective clothing such as close range flak jackets or vests. Additionally,
structural elements may require additional technology such as improved, bullet proof glass in
critical areas and security doors that automatically close on discharge of a weapon. This is not an
extensive list, since as the plan is implemented, other electronic equipment or security
technologies may be required.
Change Launch Plan
The change management team, consisting of members of the security and IT departments,
will be responsible for the communication of the change plan details and the launch
communications. The security update change project launch will occur only after all of the facts
are clear and the implantation plan is fully developed, including the training systems, courses as
well as the educational equipment is in place to effectively provide the necessary training. The
communication at launch is critical in setting the tone and establishing trust with the

Security Update Communication Plan

stakeholders. Launch preparation will include a structural change within the organization,
eliminating unnecessary duplication and building strong alliances within the organization
departments most effected.
The change launch itself will occur in a step-wise, three campaign fashion.
A political campaign creates a coalition strong enough to support and
guide the initiative. A marketing campaign taps into employees thoughts and
feelings and also effectively communicates messages about the prospective
programs theme and benefits. And finally, a military campaign deploys
executives scarce resources of attention and time as well as manages resistance
(Hirschhorn, 2002, para. 3).
The security upgrade must be communicated with clarity and convincingly in order to
gain executive, managerial, and employee level support. This means that within the IT and
security departments the managers must be fully supportive of the initiative and understand fully
its implications for their employees. The change implementation communication plan must
include speaking directly with the individual workers to gain an understanding of their concerns
and explain the new changes as a benefit to the employees and the public who visits the facility.
Finally, executives spend time with managers and employees to show their support for the
change and manage the concerns of resistive employees (Hirschhorn, 2002).
Effectiveness Testing & Manager Response Monitoring
Effectiveness Testing
To ensure that the training and implementation programs instituted are effective, testing
will occur using training exit questionnaires, field surveys as well as and third party observation.
Each quarter every facility will conduct live shooter scenario response practices. These practice

Security Update Communication Plan

sessions will occur on two shifts so that everyone in every department can participate. Each
practice team (administration, health care, IT and security, and support) will be graded on their
appropriate and rapid response to a threat scenario and a third party observer will evaluate the
effectiveness of the new protocols and training. Additionally, security video will be reviewed by
a security professional outside consultant to evaluate any incident that may be identified as a live
shooter event. Third party professionals will then report their findings and recommendations to
the live shooter team for consideration and comparison to key performance indicators (KPI)
previously established (Lane, Villar, Spicer, & Wolverton, 2016).
Manager Response Monitoring
Surveys and interviews held periodically will provide the information necessary to
determine the level of acceptance and promotion of the changes associated with the security
update program. The performance of the teams and their improvement or decline from one live
shooter scenario to another will also provide information on the effectiveness of the department
manager in reinforcing the skills and protocols established for compliance to the KPI. The annual
review of all managers will include a self-evaluation of all aspects of their performance including
compliance with the live shooter protocols (Lane, et.al., 2016).
Continuous Improvement Feedback
Data that will provide continuous improvement feedback will be collected both in the
training and site experience environments. Data will come from pre-training tests, post-training
tests, student exit surveys, and a three-month post training interview and evaluation, and ongoing
from site activities- incident reports, security video review, third party observation reports, and
annual review self-evaluations. The change management team will remain in place as the
monitoring team during the normal operation of the program and their observations and

Security Update Communication Plan

recommendations will provide a higher level of continuous performance feedback to the


executive level (Lane, et.al., 2016).
Mitigation of Resistance to Change
Some communication strategies used to mitigate resistance to change include solicitation
of employee questions and concerns, including resisters in discussions related to decisions during
the implementation process, education of stakeholders on the rationale and benefits of the
change, directly addressing employee concerns, and repeating often the benefits of the change to
help resisters to remember that the benefits outweigh the negative effects of the change (Spector,
2013). Additional strategies that help to mediate resistance are a good communication feedback
channel, a participative and consultative approach to all stakeholders, communicating changes
before they occur, reassurance that the future incudes the stakeholders, and negotiation (Lane,
et.al., 2016). Open communication, knowledge and reassurance eliminate much of the anxiety
associated with change and the most effective tools in preventing and mitigating resistance to
change.
Conclusion
Communication during change is the most important aspect of change management
because it affects the ability of the organization to effectively put in place changes that enhance
the companys survival in the ever-fluid global business environment. This is as true for small
and large business alike with the dependence on foreign import products and equipment present
in every business. Technology and human resources have to be managed with efficiency and
good communication and prevent and mitigate issues during the implementation and ongoing
maintenance of the changes associated with the new programs. The Banner Health Security
Update change program is less likely to experience resistance because of recent live shooter

Security Update Communication Plan


events in soft targets and facilities. The need for the upgrade is easily communicated and with
proper training, monitoring, feedback, adaption will occur in a fluid manner, as well.
Communication that expresses an element of trust, is open and inclusive is effective in bringing
about change effectively.

Security Update Communication Plan

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References

Dlabach, G., (2015), Communication plan. University of Phoenix. AET/560 Facilitating


Change. Retrieved from
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Hirschhorn, L. (2002). Campaigning for Change. Harvard Business Review, 2002, July Issue.
Retrieved from https://hbr.org/2002/07/campaigning-for-change
Lane, T., Villar, A.M., Spicer, N., & Wolverton, L. (2016). Banner Health security update
(student power point presentation). University of Phoenix. AET/560 Facilitating Change.
Retrieved from
https://newclassroom3.phoenix.edu/Classroom/#/contextid/OSIRIS:49615986/context/co/
view/activityDetails/activity/6fb10020-0940-40c9-921f-1ee836825dd1/expanded/False
Saruhan, N. (2014). The role of corporate communication and perception of justice during
organizational change process. Business and Economics Research Journal,5(4), 143-166.
Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/1629935647?accountid=35812
Tupper, C., Deszca, G., & Cynthia, I. (2012). Organizational change: An action-oriented
toolkit (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.