Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 12

Separator

An intrinsic requirement for test separators is the capacity to handle exploration 
wells where the nature of the fluid is not known beforehand. Consequently, test 
separators must be able to treat gas, gas condensate, light oil, heavy oil, foaming oil, 
as well as oil containing water and impurities such as mud or solid particles.

On account of the versatility necessary, test separators are not expected to achieve 
as perfect a separation as production station separators, but rather to separate in 
such a way that the separated elements can be reliably metered.

The separator unit is skid mounted with an integral inlet and bypass manifold. 
The skid contains an orifice meter for measuring gas flow rate, a positive 
displacement meter and a vortex meter for measuring oil flow rate, and a positive 
displacement meter for measuring water flow rate.

The separator pressure is maintained at a preset level by an automatic control 
valve on the gas outlet. The liquid level is maintained by an automatic control valve 
on the oil outlet. The liquid level can be monitored through sight glasses.

The vessel is protected from overpressure by both a relief valve and a rupture disc 
system. The outlet to the relief valve can be vented to the gas line or to an 
independent line. A second relief valve can replace the rupture disc, if required.

A separator­mounted shrinkage tester is available to measure the oil volume 
change from separator conditions to atmospheric pressure and temperature.

Sampling points for taking pressurized oil and gas samples are standard on each 
separator.

Standards Test separators are available in 1,440 psi, 720 psi and 600 psi versions, 
but the 1440 psi version is by far the most common.

1
Separator

The separator is the principal part of the process system. It manipulates the 
stream of produced fluid to take advantage of the density differences that exist 
between gas, oil and water, and that causes these phases to separate.

Because of the relative densities of gas and liquid, their separation is quick, 
usually a few seconds. Some liquid may remain for a time in the gas in a fine mist. 
Densities of oil and water, however, are closer and can take a few minutes to 
separate.

Inside the separator are several pieces of equipment to help the process.

A flow breaker or deflector plate is placed in front of the inlet. The gas flows 
round the breaker and the liquid falls to the bottom of the vessel.

Dixon or coalescing plates arranged in an inverted V­shape group small droplets 
of oil into bigger drops which under the action of gravity, trickle down into the 
liquid. Gas leaving the coalescing plates may not yet be dry.

Before leaving the separator, the gas will pass through a mist extractor composed 
of a mass of wire mesh. It is designed to stop tiny oil droplets down to 10 microns 
from leaving the separator out of the gas line.

A wire mesh foam breaker prevents waves of foam passing along the separator 
and being carried away with the gas.

If the level of the water is controlled, a weir placed in the bottom of the vessel will 
allow only oil to overflow and spill into the oil compartment.

Oil and water pass through vortex breakers on the outlets to prevent gas flowing 
out these lines.

Equipment to be RITE maintained as per the Separator maintenance manual are 
the following :

2
Ball valves

A ball valve is a quick opening valve with a spherical core, a ball with a full bore 
port that fits and turns in a mating cavity in the valve body.

Ball valves open or close by a quarter turn (90 degrees) of the valve handle 
attached to the spherical core.

Mapegaz or others ball valves in various sizes are used in the separator manifold 
and in the gas  oil and water outlets.

Plug valves

This is a quick opening valve constructed with a central core or plug.

The valve is opened or closed with one quarter turn (90 degrees) of the handle 
attached to the central core

Texsteam valves are fitted to some separators and are found in the manifold, oil, 
water and gas lines.

Swing Check valve

A check valve has a free swinging clapper that permits fluid in a pipeline to flow 
in one direction only.

A  swing check valve is placed in the line inlet separator, just upstream valve inlet.

This prevents gas pressure from affecting the bellows in the safety valve.

The seal is metal to metal, although a teflon seal can be fitted.

3
Safety relief valve (pressure safety valve or PSV)

The Farris safety relief valve prevents overpressure of the separator vessel. Set 
pressure is controlled by the force of a large calibrated spring on a sealing disc.

A special bellows, the Balan seal, seals off the top of the disc carrier from the valve 
outlet so that the top disc surface is always exposed to atmospheric pressure. This 
keeps any internal fluid away from the working parts and ensures that the opening 
pressure is always independent of any back pressure in the outlet.

The safety valve is normally removed periodically from the separator and its 
pressure setting certified.

It is normally set at 100% of the separator working pressure but due to 
temperature influence and calibration tolerences, it is safer to consider a range of 
pressures for which the valve will open. This can be considered as plus or minus 5% 
of the nominal set point pressure.

The valve is positioned on top of the separator vessel with the outlet connected to 
the gas outlet line, so upon opening the gas is bled to the flare.

Some clients request that a special vent line is rigged up from the safety valve 
outlet instead of the normal gas line configuration.

New Pilot­operated Safety relief valves (two) are on all new Separators.

4
Rupture disk

The rupture disc is a fine convex metal diaphram designed to rupture in the event 
of an excess of pressure in the separator. 

They are completely torn apart when ruptured leaving a large diameter hole 
through which the gas and liquid can escape.

Rupture discs are chosen to be 10% greater than the separator working pressure, 
and are tightened in a special holder.

They should be changed 

after opening safety valve during operations

if tag is missing

during Q­check

after long job at maximum temperature

after job with hostile conditions ­ high temperature, maximum working 
pressure, sand, H2S

In some locations, clients request that the rupture disc be replaced by a second 
safety relief valve.

5
Liquid flow meters

The oil and water leaving the separator is measured by means of meters on the 
outlet lines.

The oil line has a manifold with a choice of two meters, a Rotron and a Floco, and 
which one is used depends on the flow rate. The Rotron can measure the higher flow 
rates.

The water line has only a Floco meter as this is normally adequate for any water 
rate encountered.

These meters can be calibrated in the field by the volumetric method using the 
gauge tank. Do not attempt to change the Rotron calibration plug setting.

­ Floco oil/water meter

The Floco is a positive displacement or volumetric liquid flow meter.

The liquid passing through the Floco is separated into segments and counted by 
means of a register.

Liquid enters the meter, strikes the bridge and is deflected downward to hit the 
blades and turn the rotor. Bridge seals prevent liquid passing to the outlet port 
without being measured. The rotor movement is transfered to the register by a 
magnetic coupling.

The 2" Floco used on the separator has a rating of 6 to 60 gallons per minute. That 
is 200 to 2000 bbl/day. It has been tested to 3400 bbl/day (the lower limit of the 
sleeve­bearing type Rotron) and is still very accurate over several hours. It tends to 
heat up if used to long at this high rate.

6
­ Rotron oil meter

The Rotron is a ball vortex liquid flow meter. It consists of a body with an offset 
chamber, and a rotor mounted transverse to the flow stream.

When liquid flows through the meter, a vortex is created in the offset chamber. 
The rotational velocity of the liquid vortex is proportional to the rate of flow. The 
rotor movement is transfered to the register by a magnetic coupling.

Our separators use 2" and 3" sizes. The rating of the Rotron depends not only on 
the size but also on the type of bearings used.

  Meter          Rating with         Rating with


   Type          Ball bearing       Sleeve bearing
gal/min bbl/day gal/min bbl/day

2" Rotron 25 to 200 850 to 6800 50 to 250      1700 to 8500


3" Rotron 60 to 500       2000 to 17000            100 to 650    3400 to 22000

Below its minimum rating the Rotron is very inaccurate.

7
Gas Flow Meters

Gas leaving the separator is measured by means of a meter on the gas outlet line. 
Typically there is only one meter used for this purpose  ­  a Daniel orifice meter, 
which comes in different diameters depending on the separator.

A 1440 psi separator is normally fitted with a 6" Daniel, with a 5.761" internal 
diameter.

Straightening vanes, in the form of a bundle of tubes fitted inside the pipe, are 
installed in the meter run upsteam of the Daniel orifice meter to reduce any 
disturbance to the streamlined flow.

The meter installed on the separator can be used accurately in a wide range of 
flow rates. Rangeability is achieved through selection from a large choice of orifice 
plate sizes.

In tests with an extremely low gas flow rate, however, it has been known to rig up 
a domestic type gas meter to the gas outlet. This is very, very rare.

­ Daniel orifice meter

A differential pressure meter is one of the easiest ways of measuring gas flowrate. 

The Daniel orifice meter is composed of a dual chamber that allows orifice plates 
to be changed safely and conveniently under pressure, and without interruption of 
the flow.

This is an inferential type of meter which obtains measurement not by measuring 
the weight or volume of the fluid but by measuring another phenemenon that is a 
function of the quantity of fluid passing through the meter.

Flange taps are located 1" each side of the orifice plate position. In our separators, 
static pressure is measured from the downstream tap and the differential pressure is 
measured between the upstream and downstream tap. The flow rate is a function of 
the square root of the static pressure  times the differential pressure.

These pressures are measured by a Barton flow recorder.

8
 Sight glasses

Sight glasses on the separator allow monitoring of the fluid interfaces. The gas­oil 
interface is seen on the oil sight glass, and if water is present, the oil­water interface 
is seen on the water sight glass. There is also a sight glass on the shrinkage tester.

Two models are available. One has front and back glasses allowing the passage of 
light to give a clear indication of the level. The other model, with only one glass is 
usually found on older equipment. This glass has longitudinal bevels on the inside 
which refracts the light to distinguish the level.

On top and at the bottom of the sight glass is a sight glass safety valve.

The valve stem has a bevelled shutter which can effectively isolate the separator 
from the sight glass. In the event of the glass breaking, a ball checks into a seat, 
sealing off the separator and preventing fluid venting from the broken sight glass. 
The ball can be pushed back into its groove by turning the stem +/­ a half turn 
clockwise.

9
Pressure regulators

Pressure regulators are generally composed of a body, a diaphram, a calibration 
spring and a plug and seat assembly

The downstream gas pressure against a diaphram causes a force that is counter­
balanced by the calibration spring.

If the downstream pressure is reduced, the spring force is greater than the force 
exerted by the gas pressure on the diaphram. consequently the plug moves away 
from its seat and the downstream pressure increases until the desired value is 
reached.

If the downstream pressure is increased, the spring force is then less than the force 
exerted by the gas against the diaphram . Consequently the plug approaches its seat 
and the downstream pressure falls until the desired value is reached.

Pilot gas circuit

Clean separator gas (No H2S) or compressed air is required to supply the Fisher 
oil, water and gas controllers. Normally, compressed air is used, but in remote 
locations, rigless jobs and during long tests, sweet separator gas may be more 
convenient.

Separator gas is reduced in pressure (Fisher FS 1301 regulator), scrubbed and 
enters the pilot gas circuit.

Compressed air is normally taken from the rig supply.

Before being supplied to each instrument, the pressure must be reduced once 
again (Fisher 67FR regulators).

­ Fisher 1301 regulator

This is used to reduce separator gas from separator pressure down to around 75 
psi for the gas scrubber.

­ Fisher 67 FR regulator

This is used to reduce separator gas or air from scrubber down to around 30 psi 
for the Fisher controller. There is one 67 FR on each controller.

10
Pressure controller system

The separator pressure is regulated by a pressure controller system which 
comprises the Fisher Wizard controller and a normally open Fisher automatic 
control valve.

The pressure to be controlled, that is the separator pressure, is applied directly to 
the bourdon tube.

A change in the controlled pressure deforms the bourdon tube, moving the 
flapper away from or closer to the nozzle. This leak of air from the nozzle is 
converted by the regulation equipment to  open or close the control valve to regulate 
the pressure in the separator.

Oil level trol controller system

The oil­gas interface level controller comprises a Fisher type 2500 level trol and a 
normally closed Fisher automatic control valve.

Operation of the level trol is based on the apparent weight of the plunger when it 
is placed in the oil.

When the oil level changes, according to the principle of Archimedes, the plunger 
will be bouyed up by a force equal to the weight of the displaced fluid.

This apparent change in weight is converted through a torque tube assembly into 
an angular displacement of the flapper in the level trol regulation equipment, which 
in turn opens or closes the control valve to regulate the level.

Water level trol controller system

The oil­water interface level controller comprises a Fisher type 2900 level trol and 
a normally closed Fisher automatic control valve.

Operation of the level trol is based on the displacement principle in the detection 
of liquid level or specific interface.

The controller can be adjusted for throttling action if there is a steady flow of 
water, or for snap action if the water is to be drained at one time.

11
Shrinkage Tester

The shrinkage factor describes the amount of dissolved gas in the separator oil 
which will become free when the pressure of the oil drops from the separator 
pressure to atmospheric.

In the field this can be measured using a shrinkage tester which is normally 
attached to the oil sight glass of the separator.

A measurement entails filling the shrinkage tester to the zero level with oil at 
separator conditions. The tester is then isolated from the separator, and gas bled off 
slowly from a needle valve at the top, till the pressure reaches atmospheric pressure. 
This normally should take around 30 minutes.

The shrinkage is read directly from the scale and the final shrinkage tester oil 
temperature is noted.

12