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SES Lesson Plan form

Names: Anthony, Joel, Michelle


Content/Skill Theme: Dribbling (Basketball)
Lesson: 1 of 1
Date: April 19, 2016
Grade: Fifth

Equipment:
15 basketballs
25 cones
6 poly spots
15 Plicker cards

Class Size: 12

National Standards & Outcomes

State Standards & Outcomes

Hand/foot-dribbles with mature patterns in a


variety of small-sided game forms. (S1.E20.5)

Dribble a ball (by hand or foot) while preventing


another person from stealing the ball. (1.1.c)

Applies basic offensive and defensive strategies/


tactics in invasion small-sided practice tasks.
(S2.E5.5a)

Analyze and use basic offensive and defensive


strategies, and apply rules in modified games and
activities. (1.2.f)

Applies safety principles with age-appropriate


physical activities. (S4.E6.5)

Identify safety rules for the activity and area


being used. (4.1.d)

Student Objectives (ESWBAT)


Dribble in a curved pathway successfully using 3 of the 4 cues
during the cone drill and record their performance by answering a
Psychomotor
plicker question at the end of class.
Identify the incorrect term listed as a dribbling cue by answering a
Cognitive
plicker question at the end of class.
Identify how safety was addressed throughout the lesson by
Affective
answering a plicker question at the end of class.
Teacher Objectives
1. Keep instructions short and simple throughout the lesson.
2. Emphasize safety to the students throughout the lesson.
3. Teachers will provide specific feedback to each student at least once.

District Standards & Outcomes


Efficiently and effectively dribble, pass and
receive a ball with hands, while traveling in
small-sided games using simple offensive and
defensive strategies. (5.1.4)
Identify safety rules for the physical activity and
area being used (e.g. climbing apparatuses,
tinikling sticks, outside, gymnasium space, etc.).
(5.4.1)

Assessment
Plicker Q: How many times were you able to successfully dribble
through the obstacle course using at least 3 of the 4
cues?
Plicker Q: Which of the following is not a performance cue for
dribbling?
Plicker Q: How was safety emphasized throughout the lesson?
Assessment
Co-teacher monitors instruction time using a watch.
None of the students are injured during the activities.
Plicker Q: I received specific feedback today? (True/False)

Student Activities

Goal Orientation

(For each task add at least one idea


for intra-task variation or teaching
by invitation)

(Instant Activity, Informing,


Extension, Refinement, Application,
Assessment, Transition, or Closure)

Time
(min)

Standards
Performance
Cues

Objectives

(Memorization Game) - (Instant Activity)

Students will be led through a series of activities by the instructor and


will repeat the pattern. First: Jumping Jack and hop on right foot,
Next: Jumping jack and hop on right foot then hop on left foot, Final
students will do a jumping jack, hop on right foot, then left foot, and
then will proceed to a cross jump. The goal is to get a pattern going
and to memorize the given pattern with added exercises each time.

&

Heads up

(S1.E20.5),
(S2.E5.5a),
(S4.E6.5)

Slow around the


boundaries

(1.1.c), (1.2.f),
(4.1.d)

Organizational
Arrangement
(include Grouping &
SAFETY)
Describe or draw in
detail the layout of
students and equipment.
Include safety
reminders.

(5.1.4), (5.4.1)

Script
Student Activities

Goal Orientation

(For each task add at least one idea


for intra-task variation or teaching
by invitation)

(Instant Activity, Informing,


Extension, Refinement, Application,
Assessment, Transition, or Closure)

Time
(min)

(Basketball Dribbling Cone Drill) - (Application, Refinement,)

10

Script

Each student will use the performance cues to go around the cones in
a curved pathway. Going forward the student will dribble with their
right hand weaving in and out of the cones and will go to the end of
the line across from their starting position. The students on the right
baseline will weave in and out of the cones using their left hand and
then pass the ball to the student at the front of the line and proceed to
the end of that line. The student the ball was passed to will then
dribble in and out of the cones using their right hand. There will be
four lines of cones with a total of eight groups; one group at each end
of the lines.

Standards
Performance
Cues

&
Objectives

Keep ball at your


side for control
Dribble the ball at
no higher than
waist level

(include Grouping &


SAFETY)
Keep eyes up, watch for
surroundings, keep
personal space, soft
passes to the line leaders.

Eyes up
Use your finger
pads not your
fingertips

Organizational
Arrangement

(S1.E20.5)
(S4.E6.5)

Student Activities

Goal Orientation

(For each task add at least one idea


for intra-task variation or teaching
by invitation)

(Instant Activity, Informing,


Extension, Refinement, Application,
Assessment, Transition, or Closure)

Time
(min)

Standards
Performance
Cues

&

Organizational
Arrangement

Objectives

(include Grouping &


SAFETY)

PO, CO, AO

Plicker cards will be


labeled with students
last name and spread out
in a designated area on
the floor; students will
grab their card and
prepare for 3 questions.

Standards

Organizational
Arrangement

(Plicker Cards) - (Assessment)

Students will be given assigned Plicker cards and will be asked the
following questions:
o

How many times were you able to successfully dribble


through the obstacle course using at least 3 of the 4 cues?

Which of the following is not a performance cue for


dribbling?

How was safety emphasized throughout the lesson?

I received specific feedback today (True/False).

Each answer will be associated with a letter and the student's will
have those exact letters on their card. When the students decide the
answer they feel is correct they will hold that letter up on their card as
they are being scanned by the teachers mobile device.

Eyes up
Use your finger
pads not your
fingertips
Keep ball at your
side for control
Dribble the ball at
no higher than
waist level

Script
Student Activities

Goal Orientation

(For each task add at least one idea


for intra-task variation or teaching
by invitation)

(Instant Activity, Informing,


Extension, Refinement, Application,
Assessment, Transition, or Closure)

Time
(min)

Closure

Students will hand in their plicker cards and will proceed to the
middle circle. Students will review on the current lesson and cues
learned. Students will also be informed on the next lesson.

Performance
Cues

Objectives
Eyes Up
Finger Pads
Ball at your Side
Waist Level

Script

&

(include Grouping &


SAFETY)
Students will take a knee
forming a half circle and
attentively participating
in review of cues and the
lesson's activities.

Reflection
1. What technology did you choose to use and what purpose did it INTEND to serve in the lesson
(i.e., was it used for management, assessment, demonstration, delivery, etc.)?
The technology used in this lesson was Plickers and they served as an assessment tool. The
students answered four questions:
o How many times were you able to successfully dribble through the obstacle course
using at least 3 of the 4 cues?
o Which of the following is not a performance cue for dribbling?
o How was safety emphasized throughout the lesson?
o I received specific feedback today (True/False).
After each question was read, students turned their Plicker card so that their answer (A, B, C,
or D) showed at the top. After each student had their answer, they raised their card high for the
teach to scan the classs response.
2. How did you manage the technology (distribution, set-up, collection, etc.)?
The Plicker cards were assigned to each student prior to class as well as the creation of
questions. While students were participating in the activity, the cards were spread out faced
down in a safe space away from the activity, with their last names displaying on the back.
When the activity was finished, students were asked to find their name on the back of a card
and sit to let us know they were ready. After all the questions were answered, students were
then asked to pass their cards forward into a pile.
3. Did the implementation of the technology go as planned? Why or why not?
The implementation did go as planned because each when the lesson came to a close, each
student present was able to use their Plicker card to answer each question. Additionally, by
scanning each students card, it let us know who was absent and who answered each question
correctly or incorrectly.
4. Could you have taught the same content/completed the same task without the technology?
Explain your answer.
Yes, it would be possible to have administered the assessment without Plickers by using paper
and pencil. The differences would be creating the assessment layout and how we would have
administered the assessment. Without Plickers we would have had to create a handout, which
could take more time and use up more resources to print out enough of them for each student.
Then as effective teachers we must reflect on what we have taught. To do so we would have
to grade the handouts, compile the data ourselves, and maybe make a representation if needed
before reflecting. With Plickers it is all done for us so we can go straight into reflection of the
class.

5. How did the technology enhance the lesson, if at all?


Plickers enhanced our lesson greatly to incorporate our assessment into the class. It is quick,
simple, and it saves resources like paper and pencils. Plickers also has some features to compile
and make a representation of the data that was collected from the student's responses. This
makes it easier as a teacher to be able to reflect on the effectiveness of our teaching by seeing
what students know and feel about their performance during the lesson.
6. If you were to teach this lesson again, what would you do differently with regard to the
technology?
The technology ran smoothly when it came to the phone scanning the cards throughout the
lesson. If there was one thing we would do differently it would be to possibly create a slide, or
big poster with the questions and multiple choices. Some students have better memory than
others, so it would be easier for the students to see what they are answering rather than them
asking the teacher for the question to be read again. This allows students to not have to
multitask by trying to remember every choice and answer the provided question.