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Lesson

Title/Focu
s

Naming and Writing Formulas


Continued

Date

Apr. 22, 2016

Group

Science 10

Time
Durati
on

160 mins

OUTCOMES FROM ALBERTA PROGRAM OF STUDIES


General
Learning
Outcome
s:
Specific
Learning
Outcome
s:

2.k Explain, using the periodic table, how elements combine to form
compounds, and follow IUPAC guidelines for naming ionic compounds and
simple molecular compounds
2.2k explain the importance of and need for the IUPAC system of naming
compounds, in terms of the work that scientists do and the need to
communicate clearly and precisely
2.3k explain, using the periodic table, how and why elements combine to
form compounds in specific ratios
2.4k predict formulas and write names for ionic and molecular compounds
and common acids (e.g., sulfuric, hydrochloric, nitric, ethanoic), using a
periodic table, a table of ions and IUPAC rules
2.5k classify ionic and molecular compounds, acids and bases on the basis of
their properties; i.e., conductivity, pH, solubility, state

LEARNING OBJECTIVES
Students will:
1. Understand why we are studying the IUPAC rules (that naming is like a language
that is necessary for scientists)
2. Differentiate between ionic and molecular compounds
3. Name ionic and molecular compounds and know how to convert them into formulas
4. Understand why elements bond in the ways that they do
5. Relate periodic table position to reactivity and bonding
6. Classify properties of ionic and molecular compounds

ASSESSMENTS
Observations:

Key Questions:
Products/Perfor
mances:

SMART board team game involvement take note of which students


are not participating in game, may be due to not knowing or not
getting along with group. Try to find out which it is.
Ability to answer questions when called on
How do electrons move within atomic systems?
How do ionic compounds differ from molecular compounds?
Self-reflections of student practice problems
Ability to answer questions correctly in SMART board activities
Log book

LEARNING RESOURCES CONSULTED


Alberta Education Program of Studies
Videos:
Chemical bonding
http://www.learnalberta.ca/content/sec20/op
enMovie.html?
title=&movie=smil/chemicalbonds_woc_che
mical.smil
Covalent bonding video
http://www.learnalberta.ca/content/sec20/op
enMovie.html?

MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT

Notes for examples


SMART board
presentation
Dry erase markers
Log books

title=&movie=smil/chemicalbonds_woc_cova
lent.smil
H2O example
https://www.youtube.com/watch?
v=QqjcCvzWwww
SF6 video
https://www.youtube.com/watch?
v=Kvr9LFzOo50

PROCEDURE
Prior to lesson

Introduction to
Class

Learning Activity
#1
Break
Tell and Show #1

Set up presentation on board


Check if sound is working
Have both versions of the test printed
Lesson
Today will be the Chapter 1 test
Take any last questions
Set up expectations for test writing
They will separate they may sit at the bench but they
cannot sit next to each other, they may also separate
their desks
When finished, you may work on your log book or read
through your notes/textbook to see what we will be
doing next
You may not talk during or after the test until everyone is
finished

Time

12:0612:15

Chapter 1 Test

12:1512:45

Watch a video vote between some

12:4512:50

Review
What is the difference between an anion and a cation?
Which subatomic particles are nucleons?
What is an isotope?
Name Cr2S3 on your own call on students for each of
the three steps and then one to give the name
Write the formula for aluminium sulfate do the same as
above

12:501:00

What is the requirement for an ionic bond? metal and


non-metal (cation and anion)
What happens when two non-metals come together?
They form a molecular compound using covalent bonds
For this reason they are often called covalent compounds
What is a covalent bond?
Sharing of electrons rather than giving and receiving like
in ionic
Watch the video on covalent bonds tell them to watch
for differences between covalent and ionic
Ask for some properties of covalent bonds

1:001:10

Reflection Notes

Tell and Show #1

Reflection Notes

Tell and Show #1

Since covalent bonding is a sharing of electrons, how


does this differ from the ionic bonding that we were
talking about before?
The electrons dont actually leave the atom to go to
another, instead the two atoms share their electrons
Lets see how this looks when applied to a real life
example
Show an example of H2O
If hydrogen gives up an electron it has none and isnt
happy but if oxygen gives up an electron it is still left
without a full valence so neither can be happy by giving
them up
Instead they cut a deal and H helps out O while O helps
out H
Now they share their electrons in order to fill both
valences
Show video to reinforce this idea watch from 53 secs

1:101:15

Reflection Notes

Student Practice
#4

Have them try to draw out the electron movement for


CCl4 on their own
Allow them to have 1 min to solve this question
If you got it incorrect turn to your partner to help you. I
will be calling people to help me through it so make sure
you understand
1. C makes a deal with Cl to fill its valence
Make sure to explain the importance of drawing these
out in ordered ways
Suggest drawing as e- followed by box followed by e- makes them begin thinking about these in pairs
2. Show the movement of electrons

Tell and Show #4

Student Practice
#5

With covalent compounds, more than one electron pair


can be shared between atoms, Lets look at O2 as an
example
Draw out as shown on sheet
2 e- from each O is shared, allowing each to have a full
valence and they are both happy now

Have them try to draw out the electron movement for


CO2 on their own
Allow 1 min to solve

1:151:20

1:201:25

1:251:26

If you got it incorrect turn to your partner to help you. I


will be calling people to help me through it so make sure
you understand
Have students walk you through it
1. C makes a deal with the Os to fill its valence
Make sure to explain the importance of drawing these
out in ordered ways
Suggest drawing as e- followed by box followed by e- makes them begin thinking about these in pairs
2. Show the movement of electrons
Break

Introduction #2
Go over the CO2 example
Tell and Show #5

1:341:40

These nonmetal-nonmetal compounds have a whole new


system for naming. When you are about to name make
sure to look at the type of bond first when naming! - First
thing to look at is, is it a metal and non-metal or is it two
non-metals? You cannot emphasize this enough
We will begin by looking at the rules for naming a
molecular compound
1. Name the first element
2. Name the second element with ide
3. Add prefixes to both unless the first element is
monoShow all 10 prefixes on the SMART board and where to
find them in data booklet
We will work through the example of SF6
First check if it is actually a molecular compound
because they use different naming techniques yes it is
so continue
1) sulfur
2) fluorine fluoride
3) sulfur (no mono) hexafluoride

1:401:50

Lets watch a video on SF6


Reflection Notes

Student Practice
#6

Have them try N2O3 individually for 30 seconds


Have dinitrogen trioxide labeled as 1), nitrogen oxide
labeled as 2), and nitrogen trioxide as 3) on board and
use the 1,2,(3) fist assessment
If you got it incorrect turn to your partner to help you. I
will be calling people to help me through it so make sure
you understand
Have students tell you the steps using popsicle sticks
1)Nitrogen
2)Oxygen Oxide

1:501:55

3)di for N and tri for O


Dinitrogen trioxide
Reflection Notes

Practice
Extension

Practice on line master 12 first page in logbook

1:552:05

Reflection Notes

Tell and Show #6

How do we write the formulas from names?


We can work through a similar process as writing the
names
1. Identify symbol for first element
2. Identify symbol for second element
3. Use prefix to see how many of each will be
involved

2:052:10

Show example of tetraphosphorus decaoxide


1. First is phosphorus so P
2. Second is oxide oxygen so O
3. Tetra is 4 so 4 N and deca is 10 so 10 O
P4O10
Reflection Notes

Student Practice
#7

Write the formula for dichlorine heptoxide in 30 seconds


Have students tell you the steps by calling on them
1)Chlorine is Cl
2) Oxide Oxygen is O
3)di for Cl is 2 and hept for O is 7
Cl2O7

2:102:15

Practice in log book on line master 12 second page

2:152:25

Matching game that includes ionic and covalent


compounds as formulas and as names
Students will be separated into two teams
They will take turns trying to match the right name to a
compound and classify that compound as ionic or
molecular
If all three are correct, they receive a point, if not next
teams turn

2:252:54

Reflection Notes

Practice
Extension
Reflection Notes

Smart Board
Game

Reflection Notes