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Conducted by: Travis Bico &

Steve Forster
April 22, 2016

ALGONQUIN
ECO-LODGE
Phase I Environmental Site Assessment

Executive Summary
Travis Bico and Steve Forster were retained by Robin Banerjee (property owner) on behalf of the
Algonquin Eco-Lodge to conduct a Phase I Environmental Site Assessment (ESA) of the property located
at Latitude: 45.211N, Longitude: 78.121W, lot 34 concessions 3 and 4 in Hastings County near the
Halliburton County boundary (referred to hereafter as the site or the site property). The site
currently serves as an off grid tourist resort/destination on the border of the famed Algonquin Provincial
Park. This Phase I ESA is being conducted to provide an evaluation of known and potential
environmental issues at the site and surrounding areas based on its current state and previous history.
The activities included as part of the Phase I investigation include, a review of reasonably ascertainable
public records, a site visit/inspection, an interview of past and present property owners and an
evaluation of the collected information.
Following the evaluation of the historical information gathered and the observations made during the
site visit and interviews, no observable areas of environmental contamination at or surrounding the site
property were observed. However, several potential sources of environmental contamination were
identified to have been present at one point in the propertys history. The potential sources of
environmental contamination at or surrounding the subject property are:

A small above ground storage tank was observed on site. It was determined that the tank was
once used to hold fuel and is currently approximately half full with fuel oil. The tank had no
observable perforations and has remained untouched for a number of years. The risk level of
environmental impact to the site property was determined to be low, but it is recommended to
be properly decommissioned and removed.

Wastewater is managed on site using an open septic tank system. The septic tank is emptied
once a year to ensure no backup or leakage. Barring negligent maintenance practices, the risk
level of environmental impact to the site property was determined to be low.

Historical logging and hunting activity was documented to have taken place at one point in time
on the site property and in the surrounding area. It is difficult to determine the nature of the
environmental impact associated with these activities. Evidence of logging practices was
documented on site at the mouth of Mink Creek and the foundations from a demolished hunt
camp were observed on site. These activities took place decades ago, limiting the likelihood of
any present environmental contamination. The risk level of environmental impact to the site
property was determined to be low.

Based on the nature and timeline of these potential sources of environmental impact, there is an overall
low risk of environmental contamination at the site property or at the adjacent/surrounding land. No
further investigation to the site property is recommended or required.

Table of Contents
1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................................ 1
1.1 Property Information .............................................................................................................................. 1
1.1.1 Site Location ................................................................................................................................. 1
1.1.2 Adjacent/Surrounding Land Uses ................................................................................................ 1
1.1.3 Site Features and Uses ................................................................................................................. 1
1.1.4 Site Services ................................................................................................................................. 1
1.2 Objective ............................................................................................................................................. 1
2.0 Scope of Work ......................................................................................................................................... 2
2.1 Background and Records Review ........................................................................................................ 2
2.2 Interviews............................................................................................................................................ 2
2.3 Site Visit............................................................................................................................................... 2
2.4 Evaluation of Information ................................................................................................................... 3
3.0 Qualifications of Assessors...................................................................................................................... 3
4.0 Records Review ....................................................................................................................................... 3
4.1 Phase I Study Area Determination ...................................................................................................... 3
4.2 Limitations........................................................................................................................................... 3
4.3 Aerial Photographs.............................................................................................................................. 3
4.4 Environmental Reports ....................................................................................................................... 3
4.5 First Developed ................................................................................................................................... 3
4.6 Fire Insurance Plans ............................................................................................................................ 3
4.7 Chain of Title ....................................................................................................................................... 4
4.8 Well Records ....................................................................................................................................... 4
4.9 Permits, Approvals and Regulatory Records ....................................................................................... 4
4.10 Survey Plan........................................................................................................................................ 4
4.11 Topography, Hydrology and Geology ............................................................................................... 4
4.11.1 Geology ...................................................................................................................................... 4
4.11.2 Topography ................................................................................................................................ 4
4.11.3 Hydrology ................................................................................................................................... 4
5.0 Site Visit................................................................................................................................................... 4
5.1 Property Use ....................................................................................................................................... 5
5.2 Limitations........................................................................................................................................... 5
5.3 Unidentified Substances ..................................................................................................................... 5
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5.4 Storage Tanks ...................................................................................................................................... 5


5.5 Storage Containers.............................................................................................................................. 5
5.6 Odours................................................................................................................................................. 5
5.7 Potable Water ..................................................................................................................................... 5
5.8 Hazardous Materials and Designated Substances .............................................................................. 5
5.9 Staining................................................................................................................................................ 5
5.10 Mechanical Equipment ..................................................................................................................... 6
5.11 Wells.................................................................................................................................................. 6
5.12 Sewage Disposal................................................................................................................................ 6
5.13 Pits and Lagoons ............................................................................................................................... 6
5.14 Stressed Vegetation .......................................................................................................................... 6
5.15 Graded and Paved Areas ................................................................................................................... 6
5.16 Fill Materials...................................................................................................................................... 6
5.17 Wastewater....................................................................................................................................... 6
5.18 Roads/Parking ................................................................................................................................... 6
5.19 Adjacent Properties .......................................................................................................................... 6
6.0 Interviews................................................................................................................................................ 6
7.0 Findings ................................................................................................................................................... 7
8.0 Evaluation of Findings ............................................................................................................................. 7
8.1 Current and Past Uses ......................................................................................................................... 7
8.2 Areas of Potential Environmental Concern......................................................................................... 8
9.0 Conclusions ............................................................................................................................................. 8
9.1 Recommendations .............................................................................................................................. 8
10.0 References ............................................................................................................................................ 9
11.0 Appendices.......................................................................................................................................... 10
11.1 Appendix A: Aerial Photographs ..................................................................................................... 10
11.2 Appendix B: Site Photographs......................................................................................................... 13
11.3 Appendix C: Site Maps .................................................................................................................... 15
11.4 Appendix D: Interview Transcripts .................................................................................................. 17
11.5 Appendix E: Site Visit Checklist ....................................................................................................... 20
11.6 Appendix F: Regulatory Documents................................................................................................ 22

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1.0 Introduction
1.1 Property Information
1.1.1 Site Location
The Algonquin Eco-Lodge, located at Moffat Pond, Algonquin Park, Ontario is currently run and owned
by Robin Banerjee. The remote property consists of a large lodging building located on the southern end
of the property, with a storage shed and outhouse to the west. The property also includes an additional
guest cabin and a deck housing a hot-tub and sauna to the northwest. Further east, water empties into
Mink Creek from Moffat pond, where a portion is diverted to operate the micro-hydroelectric generator,
which resides approximately 120m downstream from the rivers source. Directly north of the property,
approximately 10m from the main lodge, lay the remnants of three former building foundations.

1.1.2 Adjacent/Surrounding Land Uses


The surrounding area is made up primarily of crown-forested land used largely for recreation and at one
point in time, selective logging. The southern tip of Algonquin Park is located directly to the west of the
Eco-Lodge property. A network of hiking trails run through the site and surrounding areas.

1.1.3 Site Features and Uses


The site consists of a portion of land totalling approximately 5261m2. The site is made up of mainly
natural landscape, with six buildings and a winding gravel driveway/trail. Specific trees were removed
throughout the property to minimize guest view obstructions. The main property building lies on the
banks of Moffat Pond and Mink Creek. The site also serves as a starting point to a network of hiking
trails throughout the surrounding areas.

1.1.4 Site Services


There are no site services on the site. There is no municipal potable water and sanitary services provided
by Hastings County due to the sites remote location.

1.2 Objective
The information gathered during the Phase I Environmental Site Assessment (ESA) is intended to identify
any actual or potential environmental contamination at the site, or in the direct vicinity of the site,
which may be present as a result of current or historical activities. The subject area is known to have
been impacted from logging as early as the 1800s. Before the main lodge on the property was
constructed, the property housed a hunting camp that was lost in the early 1980s. A full Phase I ESA will
be conducted under CSA Standard Z768-01. The investigation aims:
To assess the potential likelihood that any type of contaminant(s) have affected any land or
water on the site
Provide historical documentation of any potential impacts that may have arisen over the past
and present use of the property
To determine the need and/or basis for carrying out a Phase II ESA
An enhanced investigation will not be needed as the property is not used for any means outlined in
Ontario Reg. 154/04 that require an enhanced investigation.

2.0 Scope of Work


Environmental Consulting Interns were retained by the Algonquin Eco-Lodge to conduct a Phase I
Environmental Site Assessment of the property located at Latitude: 45.211N, Longitude: 78.121W, lot
34 concessions 3 and 4 in Hastings County near the Halliburton County boundary.
The activities completed as part of the Phase I ESA (as per CSA Z768-01) for the site property include:
A review of reasonably ascertainable public records
A site visit
Interviews with relevant personnel
An evaluation of all findings
Recommendations on moving forward

2.1 Background and Records Review


A background and records review will be conducted to obtain information on:
Aerial photographs
Environmental reports
First developed use determination
Fire insurance plans, company records and inspection reports
Chain of title
Well records
Company and regulatory records
Permits and approvals
Survey plan
Topographical, hydrological and geological data

2.2 Interviews
Interviews will be conducted will the following people of interest:
Name
Company
Robin Banerjee
Algonquin Eco-Lodge
Mark Arbogast
N/A

Position
Property Owner & President
Former Owner

A complete record of the interview transcript is presented in Appendix D of this report.

2.3 Site Visit


A site visit will be conducted to observe:
The physical environment of the property and observable characteristics of surrounding
properties
Any structures or utilities that could contribute to contamination
Areas of chemical use or disposal
Waste management operations
Any evidence of potential environmental concern (stressed vegetation, staining or spills, open
pipes or drains, transported debris and unlabeled containers)

2.4 Evaluation of Information


Through the records review, interview and site visit, the composed data accumulated will provide insight
on any environmental impacts that may have occurred over the known history of the property and
provide a historical document for the site.

3.0 Qualifications of Assessors


This report was prepared by Travis Bico and Steve Forster of Niagara College, under the supervision and
guidance of Steve Nemeth. Mr. Bico and Mr. Forster are currently students of the Environmental
Management and Assessment program at Niagara College. If any further information is required, please
feel free to contact aforementioned.

4.0 Records Review


4.1 Phase I Study Area Determination
The Phase I study area comprises the 5261m2 property located at lot 34, concessions 3 and 4, the
surrounding crown land and Algonquin Park. The primary focus of this study is the Eco-Lodge property
itself, while the surrounding property is being reviewed for past impacts that may have had downstream
effects on the property. Moffat Pond is included as part of the study area as it lies partially on the
property and is downstream of a large portion of the Upper Madawaska watershed.

4.2 Limitations
Due to the remote location of the property, much of the historical past relies on records that may no
longer be present or contact information that could not be found. Furthermore, the lumber company,
Martin Bros., who logged in the area, are no longer in business, making access to the activities of their
operations and if they occurred on the Eco-Lodge property, difficult to conclude.

4.3 Aerial Photographs


Aerial photographs were obtained from 1969, 2009 and 2012 and are presented as Figures 1-3
respectively in Appendix A. Through all of the photographed history, the site and surrounding area have
been a dense forested area. In 1969 the Martin Bros. Mill can be seen to the southwest of Moffat Pond
in operation, but it does not appear to extend around the Eco-Lodge property. The only noticeable
nearby activity to the Eco-Lodge area in 1969 is a line of trees that were cut to outline the boundary of
Algonquin Park. Throughout the aerial records obtained, the area remained relatively untouched, other
than the addition of a fire access road to the south of the Eco-Lodge and the Eco-Lodge itself.

4.4 Environmental Reports


There are no records of any previous environmental reports found for the site.

4.5 First Developed


The site property was first developed in the late 1800s and used as a logging camp. As logging moved
away from the area, the property use was transferred to house a hunting camp. The hunt camp later
burnt down in the 1970s and the current lodge building was erected in its place.

4.6 Fire Insurance Plans


No fire insurance plans were provided by the site owner or were reasonably ascertainable.

4.7 Chain of Title


No chain of title was provided by the site owner or were reasonably ascertainable.

4.8 Well Records


There are no potable drink water wells on the site property that have been documented. Although a 10
foot deep pit well exists on site to provide non-potable water for the Eco-Lodges taps, toilets and
showers.

4.9 Permits, Approvals and Regulatory Records


The site owner has a permit to take water from Moffat Pond, which is used to feed the two microhydroelectric generators on site. A copy of the permit was not provided and is therefore not included in
this report.

4.10 Survey Plan


A copy of the original site survey plan and land transfer document was proved by the property owner
and can be found in Appendix F.

4.11 Topography, Hydrology and Geology


4.11.1 Geology
The site is located on a region of soil known as the Rockland soil series. The Rockland series is made up
of a fine-loamy, permeable soil which was formed in loamy colluvium from rotational landslides on
slopes of stream valleys. The soil series map of the site is presented in Appendix A.

4.11.2 Topography
The topography of the site is relatively flat, consisting of small rocky hills with a general slope toward
Moffat Pond and Mink Creek. The relief of the property declines from 390m at the south end to 380m at
the north end approaching Moffat Pond. A topographic map of the property is presented in Appendix A.

4.11.3 Hydrology
Moffat Pond and Mink Creek, are located to the north and west ends of the site, respectively, and are
part of the Mink subwatershed. This subwatershed extends south from Endomink Lake, all the way to
Little Mink Lake, including all of Soaking Lake, McNab Lake, Goulais Lake, Robinson Lake, Big Mink Lake,
Mink Creek and Moffat Pond. The subwatershed is outlined in red in Figure 6 in Appendix A. Mink
subwatershed is included as part of the much larger Upper Madawaska Watershed.
Due to the remote location, groundwater data could not be found for the immediate property.
However, using nearby well depths an approximation was reached. Nearby wells include one on 3301
Elephant Lake Road with a well depth of 160 feet, located approximately 2km south of the Eco-Lodge
property. Also nearby, 3km east on Mcclure, concession 4, lot 27 resides a 260 foot well. Based off these
two nearby wells and the Eco-Lodge being located at a lower elevation than both locations, it is likely
the groundwater is less than 160 feet from the surface.

5.0 Site Visit


The site visit was conducted on December 5th, 2015 at 12pm-1pm with guidance from Robin Banerjee,
the propertys owner. It was a sunny day with little wind and no obstructions due to snow or wet

conditions. The checklist that was used for the site visit can be found in Appendix E. Site photographs
outlining locations of interest on the property can be found in Appendix B.

5.1 Property Use


The site property is currently occupied by the Algonquin Eco-Lodge, operating as a sustainable tourist
resort. There are six buildings located throughout the property along with a 2.3km long gravel driveway,
large wooden deck and network of hiking trails. The six buildings are made up of the main lodge
building, the additional cabin/office building, the storage shed, the sauna, the power generator shed
and outhouse. The southwest portion of Moffat Pond and its downstream river system runs through the
site property, creating a cascading waterfall. A dam was erected at the mouth of the river to control
Moffat Pond water levels during the first property use and was modified to allow for operation of the
downstream micro-hydroelectric power generator when the generator was constructed. A large
diameter tube runs along the river from Moffat Pond, 120m downstream, to the power generator shed.
The tube is used as the water intake for the hydroelectric generator allowing for minimal environmental
impact on the river ecosystem.

5.2 Limitations
Due to the site visit taking place in the late fall, the ground was littered with leaves from the deciduous
trees making any observations of staining and stressed vegetation difficult to ascertain. The focus of the
assessment was on the exterior of the property, therefore, interior observations throughout the visit
were not thoroughly noted.

5.3 Unidentified Substances


There were no unidentified substances found at the location.

5.4 Storage Tanks


There was one aboveground storage tank present on the property between the outhouse and the
storage shed, as can be seen in Appendix A. There were no other storage tanks present on the property.

5.5 Storage Containers


There were multiple propane containers on the property. Four were located on the east side of the main
lodge and two were located on the additional cabin. No other storage containers were located on the
property.

5.6 Odours
There were no unusual or concerning odours present during the site visit.

5.7 Potable Water


Potable water was provided by a water cooler located within the main lodge building.

5.8 Hazardous Materials and Designated Substances


Hazardous materials and designated substances listed under the Ontario Occupational Health & Safety
Act, such as, asbestos, silica, mercury, ozone depleting substances, volatile organic compounds,
polychlorinated biphenyls and urea foam insulation were not found during the site visit.

5.9 Staining
No vegetative or soil staining was observed on the site at the time of the site visit.

5.10 Mechanical Equipment


A gas generator was present in the storage shed and the micro-hydroelectric generator was located by
the entrance of the property. Two snowmobiles were located on the east side of the main lodge.

5.11 Wells
A 10 foot deep pit well was dug behind the main lodge building to provide non-potable water for the
taps, toilets and showers. This water is non-potable and not intended for drinking.

5.12 Sewage Disposal


Sewage is disposed using a septic tank system with a 4500L septic tank. The tank is emptied annually.

5.13 Pits and Lagoons


A pit north of the main lodge is used for campfires. There is no lagoon on the property. The only water
body present on is Moffat Pond, which flows into Mink Creek and is fed by Big Mink Lake. The presence
of Pectinatella Magnifica was found in the Moffat Pond water, which is indicative of good water quality.

5.14 Stressed Vegetation


There were no signs of stressed vegetation during the site visit.

5.15 Graded and Paved Areas


A small portion of land is graded at the base of the lodge entrance and by the dam where Moffat Pond
empties. No areas on the property have been paved.

5.16 Fill Materials


There were no fill materials observed on the property.

5.17 Wastewater
Waste water is disposed through the septic system.

5.18 Roads/Parking
A 2.3km dirt road extends from a parking lot outside the property to the main lodge. At the entrance to
the main lodge there was a space for parking for the property owner, however, guests are prohibited
from parking at the lodge and must leave their vehicles outside the property.

5.19 Adjacent Properties


The property is mostly surrounded by crownland forests. To the north and west lies Algonquin Park. To
the southwest is the abandoned Martin Bros. Mill. South of the property is Peterson Road, a regional
road in the area. To the northeast lies the main tributary to Moffat Pond, Big Mink Lake, whose shores
are sparsely lined with cottages. In the east, lies a disputed road, mostly used by snowmobilers and
ATVers.

6.0 Interviews
An email interview was conducted with Robin Banerjee on January 22nd and a reply was given on
January 23rd and February 10th, providing additional information specific to his ownership and operation
of the property. A copy of the interview transcript can be found in Appendix D. The interview revealed
the following information:

The property size of 1.3 acres.


No mechanical or vehicular activities have been known to have leaked during activity.
The septic tank is emptied annually and water for plumbing is provided by a dug well.
Adjacent land is owned by the crown.
He leased the property from 2000-2003 where he then purchased it to establish the Algonquin
Eco-Lodge.
Survey Plan of the property.

An email interview was also conducted with Mark Arbogast, the previous owner of the Algonquin EcoLodge on February 19th and a reply was given on February 22nd. A copy of the interview transcript can be
found in Appendix D. The interview revealed the following information:

Mark Arbogast owned the site property from 1986 to 2002.


The foundations on site were likely once structures to house loggers.
There has been significant logging activity around the site property in the 80s and 90s.
A wood furnace was used as the only source of heat for the lodge.
Moffat Pond water levels dropped each summer but never as low as seen in the 1969 aerial
photograph.
The nearby Martin Bros. lumber mill was in operation during the time Mark owned the property.

7.0 Findings
Findings compiled from the records review, historical background search, interview and site visit
indicated that there is a very low potential of environmental impact on the property. Although, it is
likely that throughout the propertys history, the area was heavily logged and Moffat Pond was used as a
temporary checking area before logs were sent down Mink Creek. Any impacts would have been left in
the ponds sediment or soil, but because the area drains down into the pond and the pond drains out to
Little Mink Lake, any deposits from past logging activities are likely to have been washed downstream.
From the site visit, the majority of the property showed very little impact on the surrounding
environment. Aside from the buildings foundations, the piping for the hydroelectric generator and the
septic tank, no additional invasive structures existed on the property. An aboveground storage tank was
observed on site containing an unidentified oil. Although the tank is no longer in use, it was determined
that it once functioned as the primary fuel storing container for the lodge. The tank did not appear to
have any perforations, however, it is not known if any fuel leaked from past activities when the tank was
still used. A range of old building foundations were also found on the north side of the property, likely
from as far back as the early 1900s. The areas surrounding the grown over foundations showed no
evidence of vegetative strain, indicating that contamination of any significance is unlikely
The conducted interviews revealed, there appears to be no additional environmental impacts on the
property from any uses while the property was utilized for the Algonquin Eco-Lodge.

8.0 Evaluation of Findings


8.1 Current and Past Uses
The property is currently used as a resort, operating completely off the grid with all waste and
wastewater managed on site. Its network of trails follow off property onto crown land and create
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minimal impacts on the surrounding area. Since the property manages its own wastewater through the
septic system, the water quality of Moffat Pond, appears to be in good standings.
In the past, the property was likely used for logging and a hunting camp previously occupied the site
where the main lodge is now located.

8.2 Areas of Potential Environmental Concern


From the assessment of the property, one APEC has been identified. The fuel oil storage tank, though it
showed no immediate signs of concern, the use and history of it is not known, therefore, any past
contamination cannot be refuted or confirmed. If any contamination had occurred it would likely be
localized around the tank and contain PHCs. Aside from the storage tank, no other areas on the property
appear to have any cause for environmental concern.

9.0 Conclusions
Since ownership and operation by Robin Banerjee of the Algonquin Eco-Lodge, from 2003 to the
present, there has been little activity to cause contamination on the property. The property shows little
evidence of contamination and the need to follow through with a Phase II is not recommended. Little
information could be uncovered about the nature of the foundations on the property, therefore, the
activities that took place cannot be known for certain. The interview with Mark Arbogast revealed that
they likely housed a hunting or logging camp at some point in time. The only APEC identified is the fuel
oil storage tank next to the maintenance shed due to the uncertainty of its use in the past and any
incidents that may have leaked oil into the soil.

9.1 Recommendations
For the APEC identified, it is recommended that the storage tank be emptied and removed. Afterward,
preliminary testing of the soil be conducted to determine if any past contamination occurred and,
because of the small size of the area, it could be easily removed and replaced with fresh soil.
As for the area containing the building foundations, an archeological survey could be completed to
determine what activity may have taken place there and if any environmental impacts were created
from the activity. Any further actions could be determined after more information is found from the
survey.
It is also recommended that the water quality of Moffat Pond be sampled biannually to ensure
compliance with regulatory water quality guidelines, due to the close proximity of the septic system
drainage area.

10.0 References
Algonquin Provincial Park Aerial Photograph Archives (1969). Map 47. Strip no. 4509. Roll 69-8. Photo
no. 104-118/116. Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry. Retrieved January 29, 2016.
Bedrock Geology of Ontario: Southern Sheet [map] (1991). Ministry of Northern Development and
Mines. Retrieved February 5, 2016, from:
http://www.geologyontario.mndmf.gov.on.ca/mndmfiles/pub/data/imaging/M2544/M2544.pdf
Crown Land Use Policy Atlas [map] (2015). Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry. Retrieved
February 12, 2016, from: https://www.ontario.ca/page/crown-land-use-policy-atlas.
Make a Topographical Map [map] (2015). Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry. Retrieved
February 12, 2016, from
http://www.giscoeapp.lrc.gov.on.ca/matm/Index.html?site=Make_A_Topographic_Map&viewer=MAT
M&locale=en-US.
Ontario Flow Assessment Tools III [website] (2015). Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry.
Accessed from: http://www.giscoeapp.lrc.gov.on.ca/web/mnr/wrip/ofat/Viewer/viewer.html.
ROCKLAND SERIES [website] (2007). Retrieved February 5, 2016, from:
https://soilseries.sc.egov.usda.gov/OSD_Docs/R/ROCKLAND.html.

11.0 Appendices
11.1 Appendix A: Aerial Photographs

Figure 1. Aerial photograph taken in 1969 of the study property and the surrounding area.

10

Figure 2. Aerial Photograph taken in 2009 of the study property and the surrounding area.

11

Figure 3. Aerial Photograph taken in 2012 of the study property and the surrounding area.

12

11.2 Appendix B: Site Photographs

Main Eco-Lodge Building

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Above ground storage tank

Micro-hydroelectric generator

14

Piping to micro-hydroelectric generator

11.3 Appendix C: Site Maps

Figure 4. Bedrock geology map of Ontario, presenting the bedrock type of the study site and the
surrounding area.

15

Figure 5. Topographical map presenting land elevations for the site property and the surrounding area.

16

Figure 6. Watershed map outlining the water flow of the Mink Lake Watershed.

11.4 Appendix D: Interview Transcripts


Phase I ESA Interview Form - RE: Algonquin Eco-Lodge
Interviewee: Robin Banerjee (Current Property Owner)
Interviewers: Travis Bico & Steve Forster
Date: January 22, 2016
Question:
Response:
What is the area of the property (m2)?
1.3 acres or 5260.9 m2
Have there been any accidents on the road with
None to my knowledge.
vehicles or heavy machinery that could have
spilled oils?
Where does the water for sinks, toilets and
Water comes from a dug well for all water
showers come from? Where do the drain waters
intake. Waste water goes through a septic
empty to?
system and out through the weeping tile bed.
How often is the septic system emptied?
Once a year.
Who owns the immediate adjacent properties? Is All adjacent land is Crown Land or Algonquin Park
it all crown land with the exception of the park?
Land.
How long has the Eco-Lodge been operating?
16 years. I started leasing it at the end of 2000,
and purchased it in November 2003.

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When did you take over ownership of the


property?
Can you provide any of the following documents:
Chain of Title, Fire Insurance Plans, Geotechnical
Reports (if any were conducted), Permits &
Approvals, and Survey Plan.

I started leasing it at the end of 2000, and


purchased it in November 2003.
Not off the top of my head, but Ill have to check
next week.

Phase I ESA Interview Form - RE: Algonquin Eco-Lodge


Interviewee: Mark Arbogast (Previous property owner)
Interviewers: Travis Bico & Steve Forster
Date: February 12, 2016
Question:
Response:
From what time period did you own the EcoI owned the lodge from 1986 to 2002
Lodge property?
Robin (Banerjee) found some old foundations for The stone foundations that you asking about I
a camp by the lodge (closer towards the pond),
believe would have been structures to house
did you know anything about what they were or
loggers....probably a kitchen and sleeping/living
who may have built structures there in the past?
quarters.......Moffat Pond was man made, a river
ran through it.....the pond was then used to
house logs.....the dam was built to shoot the logs
down......so I think those who worked on the dam
and pond must have lived in the structures, as
well as loggers cutting down trees.....100 years or
more ago?........the guest cabin that is now used
for guests used to be a hunt cabin dating maybe
back to the 40's and 50's....later on was used for
guests, but burnt in late 70's and the existing
cabin built.....
Were there any logging activities that occurred
Yes the area was logged when i owned the
on or around the property when you owned it
place.....the far end of Moffat pond was logged in
and how severe was the logging if they did?
the early 90's, however that land is crown land
and not Algonquin park.....during the late 80's the
west side of the logging road (ski trail that runs
up the middle of the trail system) was logged in
Algonquin park, this effected trail 16and 17 and
also rendered the logging road trail unusable
when they were logging, trucks ran up and down
this road....the logging was all selective cutting
and not clear cutting.....however it does leave
things in a mess, tops of trees left behind, skidder
ruts left behind......however was able to open
those trails again after the logging was
complete....but never looked quite the same for a
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Did you use anything other than wood to heat


the lodge?

Did Moffat Pond have times when the water level


was extremely low (our 1969 aerial photo shows
the pond as more of a stream than a pond)?

Was the Martin Bros. Mill still abandoned when


you owned the property? And if not, how busy
was the operation and the area?

number of years......the Algonquin forestry


association did work with us to do the best they
could to pull trees off the ski trails....but the two
activities rarely go hand in hand...
The main lodge had a wood furnace in the
basement and a wood stove on the main
level.....this heated the lodge.....one weekend the
temperature dropped to -44 and in addition to
the wood heat we also put kerosene heaters
temporarily in the halls to help heat the back
bedrooms......during the week in the winter when
no one was at the lodge to maintain the fires we
would put on a propane heater that was located
in the basement, this would keep the water lines
from freezing when no one was there.......the
cabin was always heated with propane heaters in
the rooms...
Moffat would drop 2 - 3 feet or more each
summer......but never as low as what you saw in
the aerial view......in the summer you could easily
see where the original river flowed but the pond
always had water in it to the sides....would be
Lilly pads and weeds growing up to the surface.....
When I first had the lodge Martin's Mill was still
in full operation (1986)......and ran for a few more
years at full.....then it started to decline.....over
the years different companies have tried to run
some small form of operation.....at one point it
was used just to kiln dry lumber.............in 1986
the county road used to run around the west side
of the mill, this section of highway was owned by
the mill, a km or two in length....this was perfect
for us because the highway ran right past the
parking area for the lodge, so only the parking lot
needed plowing and not the whole
road.......however a few years later the county
built the road around the mill on the east side on
township land, and therefore the highway did not
have to cross any private land......this of course
was a pain for the lodge......for several years we
used the old highway to reach the lodge but we
had to pay for plowing....then the mill had us
park at the hangar and airstrip......eventually had
to move to the road that robin uses....

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11.5 Appendix E: Site Visit Checklist


Algonquin Eco-Lodge Checklist
Property:
Question
Was the property built before 1985?
Are there any storage tanks of any kinds present on site?
Are there any noticeable disruptions to the ground or vegetation?
Are there signs of any spills or cleanup efforts?
Are there areas where chemicals or any potentially hazardous materials are
stored?
Are there noticeable areas of vegetative regrowth or different levels of
growth? (Due to logging)
Notes:

Yes

No

N/A

Septic tank hooked up to the main building on the west side of the property.
Fuel storage tank (1200 gallons/4500L) northwest of the main building.
Six propane tanks identified on site.
Three foundations to the north of the main building.
A few stumps of logged trees present, but no drastic disturbances on property.

Drainage
Question
Are there any wetlands or water bodies present?
Do any streams or rivers run off the property?
Are any wells present?
Is drinking water provided from on-site sources?
Do any adjacent properties drain onto the site?
Are there reasons to suspect the quality of run off from adjacent properties
may carry contamination?
Notes:

Yes

No

N/A

Moffat pond located directly adjacent to Moffat Pond.


Moffat Pond is fed by Big Mink Lake and emptied into Little Mink Lake.

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Utilities:
Question
Does the power generating station contain any harmful chemicals?
Has any water been rerouted for the power generating station?
Is human waste dealt with on site?
Are there any signs of contamination near the utilities?
Are any transformers present?
Is there any gas lines or use on site?
Notes:

Yes

No

N/A

Water levels from Moffat pond were affected by the dam installation, but rerouted water for the
generator empties into the natural watercourse.
Septic system deals with human waste on-site until it requires emptying.
Transformers present to manage hydroelectric energy generated.

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11.6 Appendix F: Regulatory Documents

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