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Assignment 4: Planning STEM Lessons - Final Draft

Task:

You will work in groups to plan an innovative way of integrating technology into teaching STEM workshops in an after-school setting at the Boys and Girls Club of Long Beach. As background information, you will visit the Boys and Girls Club on 5 occasions on 5 weeks.

Week 1: Orientation (1-2 hours) - June 17, 2:30 - 4 Week 2: Lesson One - Building the V2 Robot.

Students will learn to assemble the V2 Arduino Robot. They will learn various parts and basic code to turn LED On and OFF using the following directions.

Week 3: Lesson Two - Making the Robot move. Coding Process to make robot go forward, back, turn left and right.

Week 4: Lesson Three - Students will learn how to make the robot react based on infrared and contact sensor. Scoop Robot Challenge, at end of class show remote control function. Students will bring any materials and attach to the robots to work on the challenge. The challenge is to have the robot scoop as many items as much as possible.

Week 5 - What is the purpose of learning this and possible careers in the future with these skills. Share and discuss videos about Robot Wars. Possible end of class activity will be to create a Voicethread or Adobe Voice presentation/ reflection. What will the students take away from the class?

I. Topic of the Lesson

Learning how to create and code a robot. Once this process is established, implementing the functions of the robot for a competition among the groups of students

II. EiE Unit or another source you plan to draw upon.

This lesson plan is based upon the website Robotics++ and Educational Kit

When students and teachers first access this website they will see a lesson plan designed for a higher level, college appropriate course that could easily be completed in one to two semesters. The program consists of three parts:

Step 1: Setup and Getting Started Step 2: Hands-on experiments Step 3: Lectures, Homework and Theory

For the level, time and commitment with the Boys and Girls Club this lesson was simplified and adapted so that it was mostly Step 1 of building the robot and Step 2 of programming the robot. If this were a semester or year long class more experiments from Step 2 in addition to the Lectures, Homework and Theory from Step 3 would be included. It was determined that given the short amount of time, building and programming were the most active “hands on” activities that would spark an interest in STEm for the students.

III. Linkages to relevant Common Core and Next Generation Science Standards

California Common Core State Standards Connections:

ELA/Literacy –

RST.11-12.7 - Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., quantitative data, video, multimedia) in order

RST.11-12.8 - Evaluate the hypotheses, data, analysis, and conclusions in a science or technical text, verifying the data when possible and corroborating or challenging conclusions with other sources of information. (HS-ETS1-1),(HS-ETS1-3)

RST.11-12.9 - Synthesize information from a range of sources (e.g., texts, experiments, simulations) into a coherent understanding of a process, phenomenon, or concept, resolving conflicting information when possible.

Mathematics –

(HS-ETS1-1),(HS-ETS1-3)

MP.2 - Reason abstractly and quantitatively. (HS-ETS1-1),(HS-ETS1-3),

(HS-ETS1-4)

MP.4 - Model with mathematics. (HS-ETS1-1),(HS-ETS1-2),(HS-

ETS1-3),(HS-ETS1-4)address a question or solve a problem. (HS-

NGSS

ETS1-1),(HS-ETS1-3)

  • HS-ETS1- Design a solution to a complex real-world problem by breaking it down

    • 2. into smaller, more manageable problems that can be solved through engineering.

IV. Learning objectives

Students will demonstrate how to follow complex multiple step instructions. Students will be able to assemble, evaluate, and problem solve using a small Arduino robot to a point where it is moveable and ready for programming. Students will manage and plans steps necessary to create additions to the robot that will help it and them to solve future challenges.

Differentiation strategies to meet diverse learner needs:

Students will work in pairs and have a facilitator available to assist for every pair. Printed directions and digital directions will be provided. The iPad will allow for directions to be selected and read aloud using the text to voice integrated software.

V. Technologically-based Pedagogies Incorporated

This lesson will be implemented in regards to the 5E lesson plan of: Engage, Explore, Explain, Elaborate, and Evaluate. This is based more on the constructivist approach to learning in that students will use preconceived information to develop new ideas and strategies.

ENGAGEMENT

· Beginning with the preprogrammed robot, the students will watch a demonstration of how the robot runs a program. Immediately following this, students will be given the opportunity to ask questions about the robotics challenge they will be working toward.

· Do we get to work on our own? How does it move? Can we make adjustments to it to give us an advantage in the challenge?

EXPLORATION

· Students will be assembling a robot using tools and precut materials that come with the kit. They will follow instructions and have a preassembled model to use as a guide.

· Teachers will share examples of robots currently in use today, from exoskeleton adaptations for the physically disabled to manufacturing tools to artificial intelligence. We will discuss movie clips from past and recent movies.

EXPLANATION

· The focus of the teachers is inquiry based. We are set on asking students questions to get them to share ideas about how they might implement robotic technologies into their lives and the lives of others. We have print and digital resources that will help students to imagine possibilities. These include TED talks, Science and Tech magazines, and website links that show robots in action.

ELABORATION

· Vocabulary development is introduced during the assembly of the robot with words like Servos, calibrate, Arduino, sensor, switches, feelers, syntax, etc. being explained and discussed throughout the lessons.

· Students can apply this knowledge to nearly every aspect of their lives. This is a background experience that can be drawn upon as life skills and as 21 st century learning skills.

EVALUATION

· By the end of the lesson, students will be able to tell us how far they have gotten on their robot assembly. In this description they will be able to evaluate issues that arose from the assembly and within the instructions. They will be able to plan ahead for their next steps including adding on to the robot for the future challenges. They will add photos and descriptions to a portfolio folder as well as create some type of video presentation.

VI. SAMR levels

This lesson is R, redefinition in that the technology allows the creation of building and programming a robot. This lesson is more hands-on and applicable to real life applications.

VII. Lesson Plans written with a level of clarity that another teacher could follow them.

Step 1 / Lesson 1 Look at all the parts, assemble the robot according to the downloadable instructions, and download the Arduino program onto a computer for programming the robot.

1A - Downloadable file to make sure all the parts are there for building the robot. Very Important! Make sure all the materials are there before your first lesson and start building the robot

1B - Downloadable file showing how to build the robot. Again, a good idea is to try and build the robot before presenting to students. If needed, have some parts already attached, or separated into smaller bags to speed up the process of building.

___

1C - Finally, make sure the Arduino Programming Environment is downloaded onto a computer so that you can begin programming the robot once it is completed. This is for PC, there is another link for Mac and Linux

Arduino Programming Environment: Download this program by right-clicking on top of the Download File link and select Save Target As or Save Link As. This is the free open source software from Arduino we will use to program this robot. Installation instructions are included in Experiment 1 Instructions. All Experiments have been tested on ver 1.0.5 R2

VII. Lesson Plans written with a level of clarity that another teacher could follow them. Stephttp://www.roboticscity.com/uploads/6/5/5/7/6557763/ v2_kit _________________ _parts_list.pdf 1B - Downloadable file showing how to build the robot. Again, a good idea is to try and build the robot before presenting to students. If needed, have some parts already attached, or separated into smaller bags to speed up the process of building. http://www.roboticscity.com/uploads/6/5/5/7/6557763/ how_to_build_the_v2_ ___ robot.pdf 1C - Finally, make sure the Arduino Programming Environment is downloaded onto a computer so that you can begin programming the robot once it is completed. This is for PC, there is another link for Mac and Linux Arduino Programming Environment: Download this program by right-clicking on top of the Download File link and select Save Target As or Save Link As. This is the free open source software from Arduino we will use to program this robot. Installation instructions are included in Experiment 1 Instructions. All Experiments have been tested on ver 1.0.5 R2 arduino-1.0.5-r2-windows.exe Download File Step 2/ Lesson 2 and 3: Hands-on experiments " id="pdf-obj-6-31" src="pdf-obj-6-31.jpg">

arduino-1.0.5-r2-windows.exe

Step 2/ Lesson 2 and 3: Hands-on experiments

From the website, there is a list of experiments labeled 1 - 7. Each experiment has a downloadable file with instructions to program the robot. For example Experiment 1 states:

The purpose of this experiment is to help you install and run the Arduino software, test your robot and create your very first programs. You will learn programming basics, making the robot move, motor control and sound. “

Although there are 7 experiments, the goal of our lessons with the Boys and Girls Club is to get a basic lesson of turning on and off the LED light functions, then proceed to the Experiment 1 of making the robot move. Once students are comfortable programming, then they can vary the movements to work toward the next lesson’s goal, which is Experiment 2, introductions to sensors and Experiment 3, sonar sensors and autonomous navigation.

For the Week 3/ Lesson 3 the students will program the robots to perform the “Scoop Robot Challenge”. During the previous week students will be told to bring any materials and attach to the robots to work on the challenge. The challenge is to have the robot scoop as many items as much as possible.

Step 4/ Lesson 4

End of class activity will be to create a Voicethread or Adobe Voice presentation/ reflection about what they have learned and accomplished in building and programming a robot. Students will first take pictures or videos with ipads and write down information and ideas learned from these activities. They will then storyboard their ideas in a way that conveys 4 or 5 significant lessons learned. In closing the lesson will be a presentation of all groups explaining what they learned from the Robotics STEM lessons.

VIII. Description of careers that your topic links to, and how you will convey that in your lessons.

Our lessons are set up as design challenges and act as introductions to real world tasks. In general robotics engineers will be designing and maintaining robots, including the operational software and hardware, and finishing new way to implement them. Students that learn to build, program, and troubleshoot robots could find themselves working

In the manufacturing industry, for NASA as a robotics engineer or “rover” pilot or satellite engineer, or for private companies like Space X government defense programs as drone engineers surveillance engineers or contractors like Persistent Surveillance Systems

Here are some links that share the impacts and types of jobs that could come from studying robotics. Most jobs that are found in these links would be available at the time these high school students graduate. Their careers may be far different as the job market grows due to technological advancements. In today’s job climate it’s possible they could start their own innovative company. The job descriptions from

engineering job finders states that “creativity and a knack for invention and thinking outside the box can give an engineer a significant advantage in this profession.” When we

help students get an early start on creative problem solving, we are helping build an advantage in this profession, and in any other profession they choose. Either way jobs that stem, no pun intended, from learning robotics are bound to be plentiful.

Robotics and coding skills will be learned and can be used in the future for careers in various fields of engineering such as robotics, mechanical and electrical engineering, as well as computer engineering careers.

IX. Assessment methods

Students will design a multimedia presentation that shows what they have learned and how they will apply the skills to future careers. This video will serve as a learning portfolio.

Should a rubric be needed for further assessment, this example from the website K-12 Robotics might provide some needed feedback for grading purposes.

IX. Assessment methods Students will design a multimedia presentation that shows what they have learned andK-12 Robotics might provide some needed feedback for grading purposes. From the pdf file - http://www.k- 12robotics.org/uploads/5/6/3/3/5633548/pdf_introduction_to_robotics.pdf " id="pdf-obj-10-10" src="pdf-obj-10-10.jpg">

From the pdf file - http://www.k-

Modifications can be made for pairs, or larger groups, but the focus on development of teamwork and logical thought processing is what is evaluated in this rubric.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES: