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UCLA UniCamp

Games Guidebook

Table of Contents

Facilitating 101

Table of Contents

Game Theory…………………………………………………

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I

Introduction ……………………………………………….….………

Pg.

II

Practice

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II

Planning

III

Facilitating …………………………………………………

V

Debriefing …………………………………………………

VII

Game Categories

Warm-Up ……………………………………….………….…………Pg. IX Name ………………………………………………….……….…………Pg. IX Get to know ya …………………………………….…….…………Pg. IX Fun ………………………………………………………….…….………Pg. X

Teambuilding ………………………………………………….….……

Pg.

X

Unity ……………………………………………………………

………Pg.

X

Communication …………………………………………….….……Pg. XI Consensus Building …………………………………………….…….…Pg. XI Closing ……………….…………………………………….………Pg. XI

Warm-Up Games

1,2,3,4 ……………………………………………………………………

Boop …………………………….……………………………………….Pg. 2

Do What I Do/ Do What I Did

Human Scrabble ….…………….……………………………………Pg. 4 Imaginary Object Juggle ….……….…………………………………Pg. 6 Joining …………………….……….………………………………Pg. 7

Lemonade

Little Sally Walker …………………….…….…………………………Pg. 9

My Bonnie Lies Over the Ocean ……….…….………………………Pg. 10 Name Exchange ……………………….……….……………………Pg. 11

12

Quick Cards ……………………………….………….…………………Pg. 13

Quick Line-Up …………………………………….……….………Pg. 14 Ride that Pony ……………………………………….…….………Pg. 15 Shoes …………………………………………………………….……….Pg. 16

Number Up ……………………………………………………………

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Pg.

1

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3

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Pg.

Striker …………………………………………………

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17

Switch, Change & Rotate ……………………………………

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18

Tag – Asst. Variations …………………………………….….……Pg. 19 Team Poker ……………………………………….…………….………Pg. 25

Toe Tag ………………………………………….………….………Pg. 26

Name Games

Bumpity-Bump-Bump-Bump

…………………….……….………Pg. 27 ……………….…….………Pg. 28

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30

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Group Juggling/ Toss a Name Game

Name Impulse

That Person over There

The Blanket Game

Womp-Em

………Pg.

……………………………………

Table of Contents

Get to know ya Games

1 Word

3-D Commonalities

Categories

Guess Who… ……………………….……………………………………Pg. 36 Human Bingo………………………….…………………………………Pg. 37

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Known & Unknown ……………………….……………………………Pg. 39

Ring Tones… ………………………………….…………………………Pg. 40

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Speed Dating ……………………………………….……………………Pg. 42

Spice of Life Timeline Worst Day

Personality Tree

Interview Introductions

…………………….………………………………………Pg. 35

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Fun Games

Ah-So-Ko …………………………………….………………………Pg. 47 Big Booty ……………………………………….……………………Pg. 48 Bunny Bunny Bunny ………………………….…………………Pg. 49 Evolution …………………………………………….………………Pg. 51 Frogger …………………………………………………………….Pg. 52 Human Foosball …………………………………………………….Pg. 53

Moded, Coroded, your Booty Exploded ……………….……………Pg. 54 Roll 6 ………………………………………………………….…………Pg. 55 Salute the Captain …………………………………………….………Pg. 56 Screaming Feet …………………………………………………….Pg. 57

War ………………………………………

58

Whoosh Ball ……………………………………………………….……Pg. 60 Wizards, Elves & Giants ………………………………………….…Pg. 61

Pg.

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Team Building Games

3 Tarp Games

Appendages

.……………………………………………………Pg. 65 ….…………………………………………………Pg. 66

…….………………………………………………Pg. 67

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Don’t Drop that Ball ………….…………………………………………Pg. 69

Electric Fence Everybody Up Group Jump Rope

Helium Stick ……………………………….……………………………Pg. 73

Crossing the Great Divide

…………………………………………………….Pg. 62 …….………………………………………………………Pg. 64

Balloon Frantic Birthday Line-Up Circle the Circle

…………….………………………………………Pg. 70 ……………….……………………………………Pg. 71 …………………….………………………………Pg. 72

Human Knot ………………………………….…………………………Pg. 74

Knot Ties

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Lap Sit

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Lava Pit

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Reach ……………………………………………………….……………Pg. 79

Pass

Table of Contents

Skin the Snake The Clock The Web Traffic Jam Zig-Zag

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…………………………………………………….………Pg. 81 …………………………………….………………………Pg. 82 …………………………………….………………………Pg. 83 .……………………………………………………………Pg. 84

Unity Games

4 of a Kind

Agenda Wall ….…………………………………………………………Pg. 86 Exchanging Knots.………………………………………………….……Pg. 87

Frenzy……………….……………………………………………………Pg. 88

….…………………………………………………Pg. 89 …….………………………………………………Pg. 90

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The Prisoner’s Dilemma

Marble Movers Sort the Cards

.……………………………………………………………Pg. 85

Communication Games

A What? ………………….…………………………………………Pg. 93 Back 2 Back Art …………….………………………………………Pg. 94 Blind Polygon ……………….……………………………………Pg. 95 Blind Seek & Find ………………….…………………………………Pg. 96

Communication Corridor …………….………………………………Pg. 98 Count Off ……………………………….……………………………Pg. 99 Hog Call ………………………………….…………………………Pg. 100

Line-Up …………………………………….……………………

101

Positive & Negative ……………………………….……………………Pg. 102

Problem Pit ………………………………………….…………………Pg. 103 Telephone Charades ………………………….…………………………Pg. 104

Pg.

Consensus Building Games

…………….………………………………………………Pg. 106 …………………………………………………………….Pg. 108

Lost on the Moon Plane Crash Survival Newspaper Bridge Penny Pondering

The Great Egg Drop …………………………………………………….Pg. 119

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Islands Lost At Sea

…………………………………………………….Pg. 116 …………………………………………………….Pg. 118

Closing Games/ Activities

Cinnamon Roll Hug ……………………………………………………Pg. 120

Cup of Dreams/ Life ……………………………………………………Pg. 121

Highs & Lows Holy Cups Leaners

……………………………………………………Pg. 122

……………………………………………………………Pg. 123 ……………………………………………………………Pg. 124

Noodle Trust Run Shoulder Touch

Vortex……………………………………………………………………Pg. 128

Web of Life

Wind in the Willows ……………………………………………………Pg. 130

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Yarn Bracelets

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Why Games???

Game Theory

Facilitating 101

We are of two minds. Popular cognitive theory suggests that we have an experiential mind and a rational mind. Our experiential mind learns quickly, thinks quickly, pays attention to the outcome, and forgets slowly. Our rational mind learns indirectly, thinks deliberately, pays attention to the process, and forgets rapidly. The theory suggests that you need both minds. Games and interactive exercises appeal to the experiential mind, and when combined with debriefing discussions they provide a balanced approach to teaching the whole brain.

We have Seven Intelligences. Another popular concept is that of multiple intelligences. According to this theory, you have at least seven types of intelligence: linguistic (using words), logical-mathematical (working with hypotheses), kinesthetic (physical), spatial (3-D thinking), musical (pitch, rhythm, tone), interpersonal (interacting with others) and intrapersonal (understanding one’s self). Traditional learning caters to the first two intelligences while games and experiential activities tap into all of your intelligences and get you ready for the real world. (P.S. – when planning activities, incorporate as many of these intelligences as possible.

Challenge by Choice. This is another important concept associated with games. The concept means that everyone chooses their own level of challenge and no one is forced to do anything that they don’t want to do. This doesn’t mean that people don’t have to participate; rather it means no one will be forced to do anything that they don’t feel safe doing. You should explain at the beginning that everyone has the right to pass during an activity. If they choose not to participate do not let them sit out, instead find another way for them to be involved, whether keeping score or helping to referee. Many times the reluctant player will see how much fun everyone else is having and eventually decide to play.

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Facilitating 101

Intro

Before you begin to lead any of these games and activities it is important to go over some tips on leadership to make sure the games are more meaningful, fun and educational. There is a lot to think about before, during and after doing any of these games with groups. For example: you will learn that some activities work best with a specific number of people, a particular time in the program, or with a certain age group.

The main goal of this chapter is to get you started on learning to be a good facilitator. To help the process the chapter is broken up into different categories:

Practice

Planning

Facilitating

Debriefing

Practice

Before you play any of these games with anyone else you need to practice how to facilitate and how the game itself is going to run. Training and practice will do several things:

- make you more comfortable presenting the rules to the group

- make you more confident that you can handle difficult situations or questions

- make your program go more smoothly

- make sure the game you picked actually runs the way you thought it would

- allows you to have more fun when you are leading the activity

The main reason that you need to practice any of these games is because each one of them is different based on who is facilitating them. The games all have guidelines that mention the group size, target group, time and space needed. These are all guidelines that any experienced facilitator can look at and change in a heartbeat. That is exactly why you need to practice the games and see how you want to play them. Besides just practicing the game you can practice the goals and concepts that you want this game to have. This is a good time to think about how you are going to debrief the game and how you are going to fashion it so that they participants understand the point you are making during the game without you having to spell it out for them. You should also practice your own leadership style – how you present the activities, the rules and the safety reminders. An easy-going, interested, knowledgeable, humorous style will make a big difference on how the group reacts to you and the activities.

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Facilitating 101

Planning

Once you’ve become confident with the games you have to figure out what games you want to play with the group. Here are some things to think about before you choose games:

- group goals

- age of participants in the group

- size of the group

- sequencing of the games

- location available to you

- length of time you have with the group

Group Goal will help determine what games you choose. With a group that is just meeting one another and needs to get to know each other better, you should select lots of Warm-up and Get to know ya games. Another group may know each other well but wants to work together and communicate better. In this case you would use more communication and consensus building games. Age of participants in the group is important because what can be fun and interesting for a younger group might bore an older group. You can probably use the same activities with both groups but you are going to have to alter how you facilitate the game. Sometimes making the game more difficult by giving fewer rules, giving fewer supplies, limiting the time etc will make the game more suitable for an older group. Size of the group will help you decide what types of activities you will use and also if you are going to need any help to facilitate. A lot of games can be played in multiple groups if you wanted to go beyond what the book has listed as a game’s number of participants. Some games really do require smaller groups to be effective while on the other hand, some games you can push the number that is listed and still have an effective game. This is where the practice comes into handy. Hopefully you’ll do your homework and be able to figure out if your group is too small, too big or just right for each game. Sequencing of the games is very simple but possibly one of the most important concepts to think about when you’re choosing which games to play. Depending on the age, size and goals of the group, you will be playing certain games in a certain order. If it’s a new group that doesn’t really know each other yet then you want to start off with some Warm-Up Games and then jump into Name Games and then a few of the lighter level Get to know ya games. Once the group knows each other a little bit better then you can play a few team building and communication games to really solidify their new bond. You have to get a good mixture of games that suits what your outcome for the session is and how well the people in your group know one another. If you are working with a group that has had a lot of time together but is having a hard time really bonding with one another you would probably start off with some Warm- Up Games or Fun Games and then jump straight into team building games that emphasize the team versus the individual and then continue with some consensus building games. On the other hand, if you play games that are too high level, too soon, before the group members know each other well enough or are used to working with one another then they may struggle and become overly frustrated with the games.

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Facilitating 101

Location is an obvious factor to consider but always something you have to think about. Knowledge of the game will help you utilize the space the best. Some of the games that say they require a large space can probably be played in smaller spaces. Some games need flat area while others can be played anywhere. Once again, practice makes perfect. Amount of time is going to be the last huge factor you have to take into account when deciding what games to play. Most of these games hover from 10 to 25 minutes but some of them really do take the hour listed. You will need to factor in how many games you want to play and how much overall time you have. Also take into account that most games that are longer require much more thought and group sharing, this may not be suitable for younger kids.

It’s always smarter to over plan rather than under plan. Write down the order of

games you plan on playing and have contingencies in case you finish early, or in case the group just doesn’t get a game. Here is a good final checklist:

- Do I have all the props that I need?

- Do the facilitators all understand the agenda for the day?

- Is the weather what I had hoped it to be? Do I have a contingency plan?

- Have I reviewed the site and made sure it is up to standards?

- Do I know what activities I want to do and in what order and why?

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Facilitating

Facilitating 101

Tone setting is vital to your success. Start the day off with a quick introduction to the group. If it is the first time you are meeting this group then you may want to introduce yourself quickly and tell them why you are doing what you are doing. After that jump into the day and let them know that they’ll be having fun playing different types of games today but part of the fun will be overcoming group challenges together. It is important to show enthusiasm during this opening. If you show enthusiasm and excitement then this will spread to the group and they will develop a sense of enthusiasm as well.

Participating with the group is going to be a personal preference for each facilitator. There is no reason why the facilitator can’t play with the group as long as you don’t reveal the tricks or become disruptive. Pick your games carefully, some games are designed to really test the group and its dynamic, you’ll want to stay away from those games. But more low level games and more fun games are perfect for you to facilitate and participate.

Giving Direction is also a vital part of leading games. You don’t want to read cue cards with the rules on them. Rather you should know the game and then add your personal flare to the instructions. Make the instructions as fun as the game is itself. Here is a rule to follow when giving directions:

D)

Describe the activity – an intro & rules

A)

Ask if there are any questions

D)

Demonstrate – some games are more easily understood if you demonstrate the basic movements.

D)

Do it

A)

Adapt it if needed – add more rules, safety instructions or add a new twist to it.

Trust the group. A novice facilitator can panic easily. When something doesn’t appear to work, they conclude the sky is falling. Seconds later the facilitator rushes with an alternative, only to get caught in a vicious circle. When something doesn’t appear to work, you should conclude that the group is still working things out. The experienced facilitator waits until things fall in place and the activity flows smoothly.

Three pieces of advice to help you leap from novice to the expert state:

o

Trust the team. Most teams are self-correcting systems. For example, they will bring a disruptive member under control without your having to throw a temper tantrum.

o

Trust the process. Focus on the overall results and not on the temporary glitches. Sooner or later, the bad things will be swamped by the good things.

o

Always stay positive. It is the job of the facilitator to encourage the group while they are working out the problems. Keep the mood light and always remember Positive Reinforcement!

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Facilitating 101

Flexing is an important aspect of being a leader. Flexing means that no matter what you have planned ahead of time, you always observe what is happening in front of you and you modify your plans accordingly. With all that has been said about preparing and not changing rules and restrictions in the middle of a game and allowing the team to work through the game, sometimes it becomes evident that it would be better for the team’s experiential learning experience if a guideline was changed. By this we are not talking about changing the complete structure of the game, rather slight variances assigned to a participant that may be: controlling the conversation and being the only leader (person is now a mute), someone who is bearing most of the physical load in a physical activity (this person now has two broken arms). This should only be done if you feel the group will benefit from creating the variation of the game, and these changes should also be planned or at least anticipated for before you start the activity.

Ending an activity before it gets boring is also vital. Every activity has a high point, quickly followed by a low point. End a game while it’s still fun and before it gets to a low point. Always be ready to play another game or jump straight into the next activity.

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Facilitating 101

Debriefing

Any game or activity that has an intended outcome needs to be debriefed immediately following the conclusion of the activity. It is best to debrief right after the activity so people are honest with their answers and everything is still fresh in their mind. You can do a later debrief of the whole day if you want to see how they feel about the activity after they have had some time to think about it.

How Do You Feel? A sample debriefing model begins with this question:

How do you feel about the activity and the results?

The purpose of this question is to give an opportunity for the participants to get their feelings and emotions off their chest and get ready for the intellectual analysis in the latter phases of debriefing. Skipping this step can be hazardous:

The participants can be so preoccupied with their own internal conversations about their feelings that they do not mindfully participate in the external conversation. Also, their responses to other questions (such as what happened during the activity? Or what did you learn from the activity?) are likely to involve emotional outbursts or griping comments.

This does not mean that you should overemphasize the discussion of feelings. Explain that your aim is just to give people an opportunity to briefly vent their frustrations or share their elations and move on to the other phases of debriefing. Treat the statements as bits of information and not as personal attacks. Don’t get defensive.

When an exercise/ game Bombs… What if your game fails miserably? What if the participants behave in an unusual fashion and produce unexpected results?

Don’t worry. There is no failure or success of an activity. It just gives you data to debrief. You now have interesting data to discuss during the debriefing of the activity. You can confess that the results are a little atypical and then ask for explanations of what happened. Say something like.

Usually, when I conduct this game, the top bid is $6. Your top bid was only $1. What do you think made the difference?

You may find that this actually makes it easier for the participants to see the outcome of the activity.

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Other Tips on Debriefing

Facilitating 101

Give group members the ability to pass during discussions. Allowing passing helps the members to trust the facilitator and allows them to process at their own pace.

Create a safe and positive environment. It’s risky for people to share their ideas in an environment where they feel unsafe or exposed.

Silences are okay. Allow time for the group members to think and formulate ideas.

Empower them take responsibility for their learning.

The facilitator does not have to hear the reflection for it to be effective. Try breaking into small groups and have the group debrief amongst themselves.

Let participants know why they are reflecting. Talk about the value of a reflective practice.

Close up discussion and make sure to be positive and make sure the group feels good about what they accomplished. Participants; do not force your own agenda upon them. Go with the flow - be flexible. Let the group decide what they re comfortable talking about.

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Game Categories

Warm-Up

Game Categories

Objective: These activities are fun and allow group members to get comfortable with one another. These activities are primarily fun and group-based. Features:

Fun is the major component

They are success-oriented and can be done with little frustration – challenge is not a big part.

They require little decision-making or problem-solving skills

Most require fast walking or other movement to get blood flowing.

Name

Objective: To help group members learn each other’s names and a little more about each other. Features:

Fun is the major component

Group members focus on learning about each other

As group members learn more about each other, they start to see that they have a lot in common. This helps break down cliques.

Names can be learned in a fun and fast manner.

Get to know ya…

Objective: To help group members learn more about themselves and each other and start to acknowledge differences and similarities that make up the unique group dynamic. Features:

Group members focus on learning about each other

As group members learn more about each other, they start to see that they have a lot in common. This helps break down cliques

Some of these games will be very personal, helping the individual participant examine themselves introspectively

Some of these games require very serious tone setting

Group sharing is a major component

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Fun

Game Categories

Objective: These are games that don’t have much of an educational component but are great for keeping energy up and fun to play. These are great to dovetail in with more intense games because it will loosen everyone up and keep the mood light. These can also be used as warm-up games but are much less physically active. Features:

Fun is the major component

Group members interact with one another in a silly manner

Great for energizing a group, especially after a very frustrating team building activity

Similar to warm-up games but with a much less physical component

Teambuilding

Objective: Building on the opening activities, these provide an opportunity for group members to work together as a team and learn to value all the different members of the group. Features:

Once again, fun is the major component. Having fun helps to pull people together as a team. Since the activities involve problem-solving, the group begins to face challenges.

Because of these challenges, the group needs to use all of its members well.

Leadership tends to change hands during each activity.

As leadership role changes, group members can see the strengths that different members have and that the usual leaders can’t do it alone.

Unity

Objective: To make participants question what is more important, their personal growth and gain or that of the group. Features:

Competition is used to incite the stereotypical ideal of victory

Usually involves something physical

The truest form of victory is working as a team so everyone achieves the goal

They allow leadership to come from the group.

Most activities are done in pairs or small groups.

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Communication

Game Categories

Objective: To provide an opportunity for group members to get better at communicating thoughts, ideas and feelings and to improve listening skills. Features:

Require precise, descriptive words to solve the problem.

Involve physical activity, talking and listening, and discussion.

Require sharing ideas with others to help make group decisions.

Solving a problem is the goal of the group.

They allow leadership to come from the group.

Most activities are done in pairs or small groups.

Consensus Building

Objective: To provide an opportunity for group members to communicate and cooperate with each other through activities that require the group to make create an object collectively. Features:

The problems require the group to listen to one another before the collectively make a decision

Often times the group will be building something together

People may get frustrated but 99% of participants must be ok with the answer.

Closing

Objective: To end the day’s activities with fun group activities. Features:

They build on the day’s activities

They can be talked about in relation to the theme of the day (cooperation, communication, having fun together, etc…)

Participants leave the program with an up-beat attitude, feeling good about themselves and the other members of the group.

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Warm-Up Games

Objective: These activities are fun and allow group members to get comfortable with one another. These activities are primarily fun and group-based. Features:

Fun is the major component

They are success-oriented and can be done with little frustration – challenge is not a big part.

They require little decision-making or problem-solving skills

Most require fast walking or other movement to get blood flowing.

Warm-Up Games

1,2,3,4…

1,2,3,4… is really a series of four different warm up games that in the end will leave you with a very good opportunity to split into smaller groups.

Group Size: Any Time Range: 20 to 25 minutes (for all four of these activities – about 5 – 6 minutes each) Space Needs: Indoor or Outdoor Props: none

Procedure:

Ask your group of players to each choose a number (to themselves) from one to four. Once they have a number they are not allowed to change that number.

Now ask them to mingle around the room (without talking) shaking hands with each person. The catch is that they must shake their hand the number of times equal to the number that they picked. Example, if Player A was “2” then Player A will shake twice but if Player B was “4” then Player B will shake four times. When Players A & B shake hands with one another – there will be a very odd exchange. (very fun to watch and be a part of)

If players shake the same number of times, they stay together and move around to try to find others with shakes like theirs. If the player’s shakes are different then they go on trying to find more of their kind.

The large group should end up in four smaller groups. Ask everyone to share their shake, especially if there are more than four groups.

Now ask them to choose a different number and repeat the activity using Winks/ Blinks and Belly Laughs (HA,HA,HA,HA)

The final option is to assign animals to the numbers that they have selected. It’s fun to select animals that don’t have distinctive sounds or movements. I.e. Iguana, Manatee, Flying Squirrel, Perch, Armadillo. They are only allowed to make the animal sounds or move like the animal.

Things to Think About:

This activity is a lot of fun but if the group you are working with isn’t into the activity then do not try to use all four segments. Always remember to end things while they are fun. This is also a great way to break up into smaller groups but it will not yield equal size groups so if you need your larger group to be in four exact smaller groups, this is not the activity to do it with. For Animals you may want to tailor the activity so it’s fitting for an appropriate age group. For instance, if you are working with younger players you may want to have animals that are more recognizable and allow them to make sounds. But if you were working with an older crowd its fun to throw in more obscure animals and if you want, don’t allow them to make sounds and only allow them to make movements. Always have the groups share with everyone else what their movement or sound was.

1

Warm-Up Games

Boop

Boop is a great indoor activity. It works with any size group because you are splitting them into groups of three anyway.

Target Group: A group that doesn’t mind physical contact Group Size: Any Time Range: 10 minutes Space Needs: Indoor Props: Balloons (Blown Up)

Procedure:

Begin by splitting the large group up into groups of three or four

Have the players in these groups join hands. Give each group a balloon. Make sure that the groups spread out enough to allow for some moving around.

Each group tries to keep the balloon up in the air. They must keep their hands joined during the entire game. Give the groups a minute or so to practice. During this time let them use any body part that they’d like to keep the balloon up.

Rules:

1)

After a short practice time, you (the leader) call out a body part and that’s what

2)

each group must use to keep the balloon off the ground You’ll want to change about every fifteen to twenty seconds during the activity.

3)

For example, you could start with hand only, move to heads and then elbows, knees, etc. We like to move on to combinations after that, say head-hand-elbow. What this

4)

means is that a head shot must be followed by a hand and then an elbow shot. Have fun making up your own sequence Remind the groups that their hands must be joined at all times and that the balloons should never stop moving, even as you call out new body parts.

Other Ideas:

A fun way to end the game is to tell the groups to do the next command for as long as possible to see who the “winners” are and then yell “No body parts at all.” There is a solution for this; they just need to figure it out within the next few seconds. Blow the balloon up in the air with their mouths!!!

2

Warm-Up Games

Do What I Do/ Do What I Did

This is a very fun way to get a large group warmed up. As with most warm-ups, there is no debriefing for this activity.

Group Size: Any, as long as everyone can see you – The larger the better Time Range: 5 minutes Space Needs: Indoor Props: none

Procedure:

Have the group stand up scattered around the room, facing you.

Stand in front of the group and have them mirror the body movements that you show them. For example, touching your head, arms out to the side, one leg up, leg down, arm up, and finger on your nose. Try to integrate some funny poses to break the ice.

Once they have gotten this down, switch it up on them. Now they need to start mirroring what you did, not what you are doing.

The group will perform the action you did prior to the one you are doing. For example, everyone starts with their hands at their sides, and then you put your hands on your head, then around your ankles. When you put your hands on your ankles, the rest of the group puts their hands on their head. The next time you switch they put their hands on their ankles.

Variation:

You can play this game in groups of 8 to 12 and have the group pass the movement down the circle. This game is known “Saggity, Saggity Oom Pa Pa.”

Have the group chant: saggity saggity oom pa pa over until there is a consistent beat.

Then have a pre-selected player create a movement to the chant.

After the chant is said once, that person creates a new movement.

The person to the right now copies the movement that the person to their left has just performed during the previous turn.

This goes all the way around the circle.

You can set the number of moves your group needs to complete to be successful. Or let

them set a goal.

3

Warm-Up Games

Human Scrabble

This is a really fun indoor or outdoor activity for large groups. Human Scrabble is also a great way for people to learn a few things about each other. Human Scrabble works best with a group of at least 30 people and is great for people ages 10 – 62. Its one of the most successful activities performed with adults.

Target Group: Any Group Size: 30 to 75 + Time Range: 10 to 15 minutes Space Needed: Indoor

Props: Note cards with a letter on them (see below)

A Watch

Procedure:

Before your training begins, you need to make enough note cards so that each person gets one. It’s a good idea to make a few extras. Once you’ve made them, stash the cards somewhere so they can be used again.

Put one letter of the alphabet on each of the cards. If you are making thirty cards, you may want to make one card for each of the letters A to Z and four with * on them. The * is a wild card that can be used as any letter. For larger groups, make more cards with vowels and other letters that are frequently used [s, d, m, l].

Give each player a card. This is their letter for the duration of the activity. Once everyone has a letter, give the following rules:

Rules:

1)

After “Go!” each player has one minute to find at least three other players who

2)

have letters that spell out a word. These words must be clean, no profanity. Any * card represents a wild card and can be used as any letter.

3)

Once people have formed a word have them raise their hands silently but don’t

4)

make noise so that other groups can continue to work on forming a word. After one minute yell, “stop!” – at which time everyone should stop where they

5)

are. Go around and ask for some of the words that were created.

6)

Yell “Go!” again and continue on like this for a couple of rounds. Five to eight rounds is usually a good amount of time.

Thing to think about:

If this activity is being used with a group of people that don’t know each other

very well, give them a minute to meet everyone in their group after you have gone around asking for the words that they have made up. Then tell them that the next group they are a part of cannot have anyone in the group that they were just a part of. This game can also be played with a limit of people per group. This means you only allow for four person teams. This will insure that more teams are successful in creating a word in the minute given to them. You can also make this into more of a game and assign point values to each letter and create note cards based on the numbers that are in a scrabble set.

4

Warm-Up Games

Human Scrabble Pg. 2

Debrief Ideas:

If you are playing the original version without a cap on players per group, some groups may try to form a very large word and be unsuccessful in the time given. Ask them why they were unable to finish and if their goal was unrealistic in the amount of time given.

5

Warm-Up Games

Imaginary Object Juggle

Target Group: 12 and older Group Size: 10 to 15 players Time Range: 10 to 15 minutes Space Needs: Enough room to form a mid size circle Props: None

Procedure:

Have the group form a circle.

The facilitator begins the process by approaching someone in the circle carrying an imaginary red ball (their actions should portray that they have a ball - the more dramatic the more fun it tends to be!!) When the facilitator reaches that person she/he says, "JODI (person's name) RED BALL!" and Jodi will say, "RED BALL, THANK YOU."

Then Jodi (who has the red ball) takes the ball to someone else in the circle (don't forget to encourage the DRAMA here!!) following the same procedure.

As the red ball is going around the facilitator starts carrying another object across the circle. "BILL, ONE BIG BLUE BAG OF CEMENT!" (You can imagine the acting here?!). Bill says, "ONE BIG BLUE BAG OF CEMENT, THANK YOU!" Then Bill takes his cement to someone else.

It's often up to the facilitator to keep the pantomime energy going; however, some groups get right into it.

Some other objects:

Stinky Socks, Cranky Critter by the tail, and three twisted thorny twigs, a hot coal - you get the idea.

6

Warm-Up Games

Joining

Joining is a really simple activity for ice-breakers and team introductions, and great for demonstrating the need for communications and team-working when developing teams and a 'joined up' approach.

Group Size: Any – The game is played in smaller groups of 3 to 10 players Time Range: 5 to 15 minutes Space Needs: Indoor or Outdoor Props: None

Procedure:

The facilitator calls out (and displays on a flip-chart) an instruction by which each team's members should join with each other, for example: twelve fingers, three thumbs, two elbows, one shoulder and two knees.

Each team must then work out as quickly as possible how to achieve the 'joining instructions'. When properly joined the team can shout out 'joined' for the facilitator to check they've won the round.

Scores can be kept and the game played over several rounds.

Obviously, different joining instructions will create different pressures on the teams to think and adapt. The facilitator should think about joining instructions to use, mindful of the likely group and team sizes. Ensure the joining instructions given are physically possible, and enable all team members to be involved (which is generally ensured by including lots of fingers in the instructions).

It's preferable to state that joined solutions should involve all team members.

Joining Examples: (Depending on team sizes)

Six knees and twenty five fingers.

Three hands, three wrists, ten fingers and two ankles.

Twenty three fingers, three shoulders, three noses and a chair.

Three toes, a thigh, a forehead, thirty fingers, a wall and a table.

Ten fingers, ten thumbs, two elbows, two knees, and three credit cards.

Six fingers, six thumbs, two ankles, a mobile phone and a calculator.

Things to think About:

For the avoidance of (additional) confusion, a hand is just a hand, and cannot also be counted as four fingers and a thumb. Inclusion of inanimate objects is absolutely fine, in which case it's best to confirm that body parts connected to inanimate objects count towards the solution. Extra points for creative solutions can be awarded at the facilitator's discretion. Stipulation of bare skin contact is also at the facilitator's discretion but if in doubt do not insist on this or even offer the option (we live in a litigious world). And unless using the activity for very intimate gatherings it's advisable to exclude tongues

7

Warm-Up Games

Lemonade

Lemonade is a fun tag style game that’s similar to Wizards, Elves and Giants

Target Group: Any Group Size: 20 + Time Range: 10 to 15 minutes Space Needs: Requires a large enough space to have your teams’ line up and have running room also. Props: None

Procedures:

Split the larger group into two teams and have them get on opposite ends of the playing field.

Each team has a home base and have them select a team captain.

Then 1 team is selected to present the charade first. This team then decides what to profession they are going to be: (i.e.: Cop, Teacher, Waiter, Chef, Race Car Driver, etc.)

Once this has been done and the actions for the charade have been discussed, the teams each need to design a walk to get up from their home base to the center of the playing area.

Once the teams get to the middle they begin the game. The call and response is listed below.

Once the call and response is completed, the acting team shows their charade.

The guessing team then yells out what they think the group is acting out. The team captain answers by saying yes or no or you’re getting warm, you’re getting closer etc.

Once the guessing team has guessed the trade, the acting team has to run as fast as they can to their home bases.

The guessing team then tries to tag as many of them as possible. Whoever is tagged joins the other team. Play this game until people are tired or until there is only one team left.

8

Warm-Up Games

Little Sally Walker

This is a game that has its origins on slave plantations from the south. This song began as a way for African American children to poke fun at their “masters”. Now it has been modified to be a great warm-up game.

Target Group: Any Group Size: 20 + Time Range: 10 to 15 minutes (can go longer with more people) Space Needs: Outdoors or a large enough area to circle up in Props: None

Procedure:

Have your group circle up

Select one person to be in the middle of the circle. Have the circle close-in when that person steps out.

The people that are still standing in the circle begin to sing the “Little Sally Walker” song while the person in the middle of the circle begins to walk or dance around the circle walking in a clockwise or counter clockwise motion.

There is a part in the song when the lyrics are: “Go Girl/Boy do your thang do your thang, do your thang - Go Girl/Boy do your thang do your thang - STOP” – During this time the person walking around the circle stops and dances with the person that they stop in front of.

Now the person that was just dancing that was part of the circle jumps into the circle and begins to prance around on a horse while the person that was just in the middle takes the empty spot.

Song:

Little Sally Walker walking around the street ( hey hey). She didn’t know what to do so she stopped in front of me. Go Girl/Boy do your thang do your thang, do your thang - Go Girl/Boy do your thang do your thang - STOP “

Things to think about:

This game is a lot of fun but make sure if you are playing this game with kids that they are watching their lewdness. Also, as the game progresses push in one or two extra people each round so that there are many people prancing around the circle each round.

9

Warm-Up Games

My Bonnie Lies Over the Ocean

This is a very fun game to start things off a little whacky. This well help you get your group loosened up and acting silly. You may want to make this the final warm-up activity in your sequence.

Group Size: Any Time Range: 5 minutes Space Needs: Indoor or Outdoor Props: none

Procedure:

Teach the song: “My Bonnie Lies Over the Ocean” Lyrics Below

Sing the song and clap on every “B” word/ sound.

Sing, clap and then add a dip and stand to the “B” word/ sounds. For example, on the first Bonnie the group claps and dips down (bends at the knees slightly). On the second Bonnie the group claps and stands back up again. Proceed with the dips and stands throughout the song (you should end up standing at the end of the song).

Lyrics:

My Bonnie lies over the ocean, My Bonnie lies over the sea, My Bonnie lies over the ocean, So, bring back my Bonnie to me.

Bring Back, Bring Back Oh, bring back my Bonnie to me, to me. Bring Back, Bring Back, Oh, bring back my Bonnie to me.

10

Warm-Up Games

Name Exchange

Don’t expect anyone to know anyone’s name after the activity but this is a fun and quick way to get the group to mingle with one another and get the energy up.

Group Size: Any Time Range: 5 minutes Space Needs: Indoor room Props: none

Procedure:

Have people go up to someone they don’t know, shake their hand, introduce themselves and tell the person a fact about yourself.

Make sure they listen closely to all the information that they are told because they are now going to take that person’s identity and introduce themselves and that person to the next person that they meet.

Identities are exchanged during each introduction. Players are allowed to sit down when they get their own identity back or the facilitator ends the game.

Variation:

You can have people create their own handshake and exchange handshakes, but keep their own name and introduction information.

11

Warm-Up Games

Number Up

This game is a watered down Salute the Captain but its so much fun.

Group Size: Any Time Range: 10 minutes Space Needs: Any open area Props: none

Procedure:

Have everyone that is playing stand and cluster amongst one another

When your ready call out a number. 1 through however many people are playing.

Players must then get into groups of that number and hug as one giant group. Tell them to hug one another as if their life depended on it.

Those that can not find a group are out of the game.

Play until there are only two people left of stop whenever you see people are getting tired.

Variation:

Salute the Captain is this game on drugs.

12

Warm-Up Games

Quick Cards

This is a very fast paced game that can get out of control if you aren’t careful. Make sure the group you are working with is capable of physical movement and doesn’t mind close physical contact.

Target Group: Any Group Size: 30 to 52 people Time Range: 10 to15 minutes Space Needs: Large indoor space Props: Deck of cards 4 Chairs

Procedures:

Have the group circle up.

Hand out a single card to each player. Do not allow the players to look at their cards until the game starts.

When you say “GO”, each player can look at their card and then each group must line up in sequence based on the ace through king order. Each of the aces must sit in the chairs and then the two’s sit on their lap etc.

First group to get in order raises their hand shouting “DONE!”

As the facilitator you should do some spot checking just to make sure no one is cheating. If there are missing numbers then the team has to figure that out. There is a possibility if you have a smaller group that some suits may only have 1 or 2 players on its team.

Have people blindly trade cards with one another until you say stop.

Then have everyone circle up once again without looking at their card and wait for you to say “GO!”

Things to think about:

You can start this game in smaller groups and then combine it into a larger group. A couple of rounds should be good enough, this is however a very addictively entertaining game so the participants may want to play longer. If you have a smaller group you may want to remove higher value cards so that teams that are sitting on each others laps are equal. Otherwise people will complain that it isn’t fair.

13

Warm-Up Games

Quick Line-Up

Quick line up is a very fun, action oriented, large group, team building activity. You’ll want to be in a gym or large room. This game works best with large groups – 30 to 200 people!

Target Group: Any Group Size: 30 to 200 people Time Range: 10 to 15 minutes Space Needs: A large outdoor area or a gym Props: None

Procedures:

The leader has the group form a square with an equal number of people on each of the four sides. Players should be standing should-to-shoulder and facing the inside of the square. The leader is in the middle and is facing one of the sides.

Each side of the square represents a team, therefore there are four teams.

For the first part of the activity, all players in the square need to remember who is on their right and who is on their left. Give the group ten seconds to check out who is beside them – if it’s a group member they don’t know too well then have them introduce themselves.

The teams must also remember how they are lined up in relation to the leader in the middle of the square. As the leader you want to make it obvious which way you are facing – no angles or anything, just straight on so that one team is directly in front of you, one on your left, one on your right and one behind you.

Now that you are all set up, the game goes like this; you (the leader) spin around in the middle of the square and stops facing a new direction. When you stop yell, “Quick Line-Up”

Each team must now line upon the same side of you that they began on. For example, the team that started behind you has to be behind you again; left on the left of you etc.

Not only do the teams have to line up in relation to you but the players must also be lined up in the same order as they were to begin with.

When a group is in the right place have all the members lift their hands in the air and yell “Quick Line-Up!”

Things to think about:

Forget trying to referee this game. If a fight begins to break out, just spin around and begin another round.

Debrief Suggestions:

How did you work out the orders? Did everyone participate? What happens if you don't participate? Who won? Was winning important? Is winning important? Did you have fun?

14

Warm-Up Games

Ride that Pony

This is a great game for large groups, small groups and any group. I have seen 100 kids spontaneously break out and play this game for up to an hour. It gets the blood flowing and is so much fun!

Target Group: Any Group Size: 20 + Time Range: 10 to 15 minutes (can go longer with more people) Space Needs: Outdoors or a large enough area to circle up in Props: None

Procedure:

Have your group circle up

Select one person to be in the middle of the circle. Have the circle close-in when that person steps out.

The people that are still standing in the circle begin to sing the “Ride My Pony” song while the person in the middle of the circle begins to prance around the circle like they are riding a horse.

There is a part in the song when the lyrics are: “Front to front to front my baby…”, “Side to side to side my baby…”, “Back to back to back my baby” – During this time the person prancing in the middle jumps in front of someone standing in the circle and dances with them. Front to front for the first part, back to back for the second part and side to side for the last line.

Now the person that was just dancing that was part of the circle jumps into the circle and begins to prance around on a horse while the person that was just in the middle takes the empty spot.

Song:

Here we go… ride that pony… ride around that big fat pony… here we go… ride that pony… this is how we do it… front to front to front, my baby, side to side to side, my baby… back to back to back my baby… this is how we do it. “

Things to think about:

This game is a lot of fun but make sure if you are playing this game with kids that they are watching their lewdness. Also, as the game progresses push in one or two extra people each round so that there are many people prancing around the circle each round.

15

Warm-Up Games

Shoes

This is a great outdoor activity for medium size groups. This game helps energize the group and is very fun. This game is best done indoors because they will be running around without their shoes on. You can also stretch this game and play it on a day when you talk about communication and talk about how important eye contact is…

Target Group: Any Group Size: 20 to 30 Time Range: 5 to 10 minutes Space Needs: Large indoor space where people can circle up and run around Props: none Procedure:

1)

Select 1 person to stand in the center of the circle.

2)

Have all other participants circle up and take off their shoes and place them in

3)

front of themselves. Players on the outside of the circle are not allowed to talk from this point on.

4)

They must use their eyes to communicate with others on the edge of the circle. When two players have made contact, when they’re ready they run and change

5)

spots with one another. The person in the center of the circle tries to run and take a vacated spot.

6)

If someone has their spot taken by the person in the center, then they become the new person in the center of the circle.

Rules:

1)

When you switch places with someone, it cannot be with the person that is right

2)

next to you. When you switch places with someone, you must move within the circle and not outside of it.

16

Warm-Up Games

Striker

This is a great outdoor activity for larger groups. This game can get very tiring

and

also make sure that the bigger kids are not dominating the game if you have a big

mix

of younger and older kids.

Target Group: Any Group Size: 20 to 40 Time Range: 10 to 20 minutes Space Needs: Outdoors preferred or a very large indoors room. Props: 1 beach ball per 15 to 20 people Procedure:

7)

Split the group into two even team

8)

A goal line for each team should be marked off using cones or other markers. The size of the goals and distance between them is up to you, taking into consideration the size of the group, age and ability

9)

The object is for each team to try to score goals against one another

Rules:

3)

The game is started by having a member from each team jump for the ball at

4)

“center court” – like in basketball. The ball is passed down the field/ gym by the team mummers, each team heading

5)

towards the other team’s goal line. No intentional body contact is allowed and striking the ball can only be down

6)

with a flat palm Points are earned each time one team gets the ball over the other teams goal

7)

After a goal has been scored, the team that has just been scored on gets the ball

and starts from their own goal. Things to think about:

This is a very active game with no penalties or time-outs. You need to watch the level of the group and end the game when it is no longer fun or until people begin to show fatigue.

17

Warm-Up Games

Switch, Change & Rotate

Switch, Change & Rotate is a great game that gets people working closely with one another. It’s very fun, engaging and builds teamwork all at once.

Group Size: Any (Split into groups of 3 to 4) Time Range: 10 to 15 minutes Space Needs: Dependant on group size Props: none

Procedure:

Ask your players to get into groups of 3 to 4 and stand in a line facing in the same direction, one behind the other.

When you say “Switch”, the front and back players change places – practice.

When you say “Change”, the line of players turns 180 degrees to face the opposite direction – practice.

When you say “Rotate”, the player at the front of the line peels off and goes to the back of the line, the second player in the line is now the leader – practice.

Spend some time having the teams practice while standing still. Add two more directions: “Freeze” – meaning to stop, and “Move” meaning to walk (not run) forward.

Then ask the groups to start walking (indicate this with a “move” call) around the room in their line formation – the head of the line being the leader.

Now call “Switch, Change or Rotate” as the groups are walking around.

When they have mastered this ask them to close their eyes and try to do it without being able to see. Make sure that they walk very cautiously and that they use “bumpers.”

Things to Think About:

If you have music it helps to play it while they are walking and then you can turn it off when you call “Freeze.” Have facilitators present if you are going to have the groups do this activity with their eyes closed. “Bumpers” means walking with their hands out so that they don’t run into any walls or other groups.

18

Warm-Up Games

Tag - Asst

Below we are going to list a wide variety of Tag games. Tag games are great for any group, large or small. Just be aware of fatigue and boredom if the game only has two people running around.

Group Size: Any Time Range: 1 to 10 minutes Space Needs: Outdoor – or a large gym to run around in. (Most “designated areas” should be a good enough size for people to run around in comfortably, but you don’t want to make it too large because the people that are “IT” will get tired and the game will take too long. Some games work better with a more intimate “designated area.”) Props: None – unless you want to use a long rope to set the “designated area.”

Variations:

Name: Blob Tag Props: None Procedure:

Players must stay in designated area.

Select one person to be “IT”

"IT" chases players until someone is tagged, once tagged, that player grabs the hand of "IT". They become a blob.

The blob runs together after another player until that player gets tagged. Once tagged, that player grabs the hand of the second person and the blob grows.

Play continues until everyone has become part of the blob.

Name: Clothespin Tag Props: 5 Clothespins for each player Procedure:

Players must stay in designated area.

Players hook 5 clothes pins to the back of their shirts.

The object of the game is to pull off as many clothes pins from other people without losing your own. You can only pull off the clothes pins, without pulling clothes or pushing.

Once a player loses all of their pins, they are out of the game. They can not grab anymore clothespins

Play continues until only one player remains. At that point have everyone count up the clothespins that they were able to grab. The person with the most wins. (This may not always be the last person standing.

You can also play this game in a certain time limit and count the number of clothespins that each player has after the time has expired.

19

Warm-Up Games

Tag – Asst, Pg. 2

Name: Dragon Tag Props: None Procedure:

Players stand in a line

Players put their hands on the shoulders of the player in front of them forming one long dragon. The player in the front is the head of the dragon, the player at the back is its tail. The head tries to catch the tail and the tail end tries not to be caught.

If the head catches the tail, the head links onto the tail and the next person in line becomes the new head of the dragon. Line Up again or give the tail 5 seconds to get away and then the head and begin chasing.

Play continues until all players have had a chance to be the head and the tail.

Name: Dinosaur Tag Props: None Procedure:

Designate one area, called "home" that is "safe" for the plant-eating dinosaurs to run to in order to avoid being eaten by Tyrannosaurus Rex (“IT”).

T. Rex is “IT” He closes his eyes and counts to 15 while the other players hide or scatter. T. Rex wanders around and tries to find the plant-eating dinosaurs (the other players).If the head catches the tail, the head links onto the tail and the next person in line becomes the new head of the dragon.

If T. Rex sees a player, then he can chase after him.

If the plant-eater “freezes” (doesn't move), then the T. Rex can't catch him (because T. Rex is drawn by movement).

If the plant-eating dinosaur does move, however, then the T. Rex can try and catch him. The player is only safe if he outruns the T. Rex or gets to "home". If the T. Rex catches the plant-eater, then the caught player becomes the new T. Rex.

Name: ECPT (Eye Contact Partner Tag) Props: None Procedure:

Everyone must stay within the designated area

Have everyone pair up with a partner. Have them decide who is going to be “IT” first.

When you say go the partners that are “IT” must run after their partner and try to tag them. The only way to tag your partner is to make eye contact with that person.

All players must keep their eyes open (aside from the occasional blink) and continuously scan the room making eye contact with people. For a higher tag ratio limit their eye contact time to 5 seconds.

Once tagged, the player becomes “IT”, turns around three times and then tries to find and tag their partner again.

There is no winner for this game so set a time limit or play until people seem to be getting tired.

20

Warm-Up Games

Tag – Asst, Pg. 3

Name: Everybody’s It Tag Props: None Procedure:

Everyone must stay within the designated area

On “Go”; everyone is it and tries to tag everyone else.

If you are tagged you must sit down. This game goes VERY fast so no one is really out for a long time.

When it’s down to the last two, the rule is: No Backing Up. See if someone can win in the count of 10. Otherwise call it a draw.

Name: Frogger Props: cones and flags Procedure:

Use cones to outline your out-of-bounds area.

The area should form a rectangle about 30 yards long by 20 yards wide.

One width of the field will have four or five cones spaced out evenly. While the other side should have one cone in the middle.

Make four or five lines, making sure each line is behind a cone and the lines are even. These people are cars.

Select about four people to be frogs.

Each frog is to where a flag belt

They are to line up single file behind the side with one cone.

When they hear the whistle the frog is going to try and run from one end of the field to the other without the cars running them over (pulling off their flag).

The first car from each cone is to run after the same frog (4 or 5:1 ratio).

If the frog steps out of bounds (beyond the cones laid out) or if their flag gets pulled they automatically become cars and the car that ran them over or the person that is closest to them when the step out-of-bounds becomes a frog.

Once either action has occurred the game stops for that round.

If the frog can pass the cones on the other side without getting run over they remain a frog and get a free walk back to the end of the frog line.

If the cars are unsuccessful at running over the frog they go back to the end of their line and wait for their next turn.

21

Warm-Up Games

Tag – Asst, Pg. 4

Name: Hospital Tag Props: None Procedure:

Everyone must stay within the designated area

On “Go”; everyone is it and tries to tag everyone else.

Everyone starts the game with two invisible band-aids, one in each hand.

If someone is tagged they need to use one of those band-aids to cover up the spot where they were tagged. They cannot remove that hand for the remainder of the game.

Players can still use their free hands to tag others until they are tagged a second time. Now the second band aid must cover up the spot where they were tagged and they can no longer tag anyone.

Since they have no hands left to tag people, these injured people must run around trying to avoid being tagged for a third time. If they do then they must kneel down and are not out of the game.

Name: Link Tag Props: None Procedure:

Everyone must stay within the designated area

Have everyone in the group find a partner

Have each player hook elbows with their partner

Choose one pair to begin the game.

Of these two people, have one person be “IT” and the other is running from “IT”.

The other pairs remain stationary throughout the game and the players put their outside hands on their hips so that their elbows stick out.

The chasee wants to avoid being tagged by the person who is it. The way that the chasee can get to safety is to Link Up with another pair by linking arms with one of them.

When the chasee links on to another pair, the person on the opposite side of this pair must now release because there cannot be more than two people in a pair. This person is now the chasee and can only avoid becoming “IT” by linking up somewhere else, and so on, and so on.

If the chasee is tagged before linking up, that person becomes “IT”. This person then needs to spin around once to give the old “IT” a chance to get away and/or link up.

The game ends when the facilitator calls it to a stop. (five or ten minutes is good – watch the fatigue factor of the people running around)

22

Warm-Up Games

Tag – Asst, Pg. 5

Name: Partner Tag Props: None Procedure:

Everyone must stay within the designated area

Have everyone pair up with a partner. Have them decide who is going to be “IT” first.

Once they have their partner, have the larger group mingle for a few minutes.

When you say “Go” the partners that are “IT” must run after their partner and try to tag them.

Once tagged, the player becomes it, turns around three times and then tries to find and tag their partner again.

There is no winner for this game so set a time limit or play until people seem to be getting tired.

Name: Sharks, Eels, Sea Crustaceans Props: Rope for line markers Procedure:

Set up two lines with borders on either side (cones work also).

Depending on the size of the group, 1 – 3 start out as sharks, “IT”.

The other participants are behind one of the lines. They choose what species of

fish they’d like to be

the shark calls out a species, those participants have to run from one line to the other, staying within the boundaries.

giving them options, tuna, octopus, mackerel, etc… When

If they are tagged by a shark then they become stationary kelp. They are planted, but can wave about and help the sharks tag others by holding onto them. Eventually, the sharks are “hunting” through a kelp forest.

The game ends when the sharks win!

Name: Slow Tag Props: None Procedure:

Everyone must stay within the designated area

Ask everyone to get their own personal space within the designated area – no one should be able to touch anyone at this point.

The facilitator not calls: “Step.”

Each player can take one step – one foot in any direction. (If the player moves two feet then he or she must sit)

If you can now touch someone you can tag them. If you get tagged you must sit.

The facilitator yells: “Step” again. This time players may take a step with their other foot. If they can tag someone this time then that person also must sit.

When you are sitting you are not out of the game. You can still tag players who are in the game, but you must be in the sitting position and not moving around.

You can not tag the person that tagged you

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Warm-Up Games

Tag – Asst, Pg. 6

Name: Team Tag Props: None Procedure:

Everyone must stay within the designated area

Split your big group into teams of 4 or 5. Give ach team a different “soft” object as their “orb”.

When the facilitator says “Go”; everyone goes to tag everyone else. Don’t tag your own teammates.

If you get tagged you have to kneel down.

To get back up you need the orb passes to you. Hold onto the orb until another team member needs it.

If you have the orb and you need it then you must pass it to another team member and have them pass it to you.

Teams cannot steal or interfere with the passing of orbs from one person to the next.

Name: Toilet Bowl Tag Props: None Procedure:

Everyone must stay within the designated area

Select one person to be “IT”

"IT" chases players until someone is tagged, once tagged, that player has to put one knee down and have one arm up. The arm should be displayed so that the elbow is bent and wrist is bent over the elbow. (Like a toilet bowl)

They are to stay in that position until someone else frees them.

To be freed, another player has to sit on their knee and push their hand down as if they were flushing a toilet. The tagged player must also make the sound of a toilet flushing while doing this.

If they are caught in the act then the person who was sitting on the toilet is now a toilet and the person that was a toilet becomes another “IT” player

You can play this game until everyone has been it, or just call the game after a short period of time and switch the “IT” players

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Warm-Up Games

Team Poker

This is listed as a warm up game but is also great for team-building, problem solving, consensus building and decision-making skills.

Target Group: Any Group Size: 10 or more Time Range: 10 to 15 minutes Space Needs: Indoor Props: Deck of cards

Procedures:

Hand out a single card to each player. Do not allow the players to look at their cards until the game starts.

The aim of the exercise is for each person to get make the best three-card hand by joining with two other players. (You can make this five if you’d like. This offers more of a challenge)

Card hands are to be ranked according to poker rules.

Set a time limit for them to get into group.

Variations:

Each delegate receives two cards; requiring three players to create a six card hand (clarify rules accordingly).

Instruct the group to find three or four other players, making four- or five- card hands.

Allow each player to change their card once with a card from the top of the remainder of the deck, face down of course (exchanged cards go to the bottom of the deck).

Upturn the card at the top of the remainder of the deck and stipulate that each hand must include that card.

For very large groups use two decks.

You can substitute Poker with Blackjack, or many other card games.

Debrief Suggestions:

Facilitator and players can review various behaviors after the activity - e.g., leadership, teamwork, negotiating, and decision making under pressure. This simple game will break the ice, and get people out of their seats with minimal input from the facilitator. Follow up with a group discussion about aspects of the exercise relevant to the main session or purpose.

25

Warm-Up Games

Toe Tag

This fun, fast action game is not for every group. Use your judgment on whether or not to use it based on the concern for safety that the group has shown in other activities.

Target Group: People that understand boundaries. This game can get out of hand if uncontrolled or played with people that goof off too much. Group Size: Any even number of people Time Range: 5 to 10 minutes Space Needs: Enough room so each pair has room to rumble around and not be concerned with slamming into objects. Props: None

Procedure:

Divide the group into pairs

Have each group find a sizable spot to call their own. They’ll probably be moving around a lot.

The object of the activity is for the players to use their feet to tag (step on lightly) their partners feet. Players who tag their partner’s feet first are the winners.

Start the activity by having the partners stand back to back.

Players are not allowed to turn around until you say start.

Rules:

1)

If players begin to become too violent (stomping another players feet or kicking other player’s shins) then they must be removed from the game immediately.

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Name Games

Objective: To help group members learn each other’s names and a little more about each other. Features:

Fun is the major component

Group members focus on learning about each other

As group members learn more about each other, they start to see that they have a lot in common. This helps break down cliques.

Names can be learned in a fun and fast manner.

Name Games

Bumpity-Bump-Bump-Bump

Bumpity-Bump-Bump-Bump offers a fun alternative to the normal name game. This is probably a game that you would have to wait until the second meeting or so to play since it requires players to already be familiar with the names of those around them.

Group Size: Any Time Range: 10 to 15 minutes Space Needs: An area large enough for your group to circle up Props: none

Procedure:

Gather your group together in a large circle. Select one person to come into the middle of the circle.

This person is to close their eyes, put their hands together (palm to palm) while extending their arms horizontally, and spin in a circle. The person will spin until he/she stops and opens their eyes.

When they stop, they look at whoever they are pointing at and say: “Left”, “Right” or “Center” and follow it with “Bumpity Bump Bump Bump.”

If the person in the middle says: “Left”, the person they are pointing at must say the name of the person to their left, “Right”, they must say the name of the person to their right and “Center” is themselves.

If “Bumpity Bump Bump Bump” is said before the person being pointed at says the name of the person they are supposed to say, they are put in the middle of the circle and they repeat the process.

If the name is said on time, the person in the middles stays in the middle and continues the process.

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Name Games

Group Juggling/ Toss a Name Game

Group Juggling is an excellent introduction to team building activities while allowing everyone to learn each others names.

Group Size: 10 to 15 people Time Range: 10 to 20 minutes Space Needs: Indoor Props: Several Soft Balls Rubber Deck Rings Other small, soft objects

Procedure:

Have the group circle up.

The leaders should join the circle as well and should be the starter (at least for the first run).

The first part of the activity involves establishing a pattern where one object will be passed around the circle so that each group member gets it once and it ends up back at the leader. The first person to go is the leader who throws it to someone else in the circle but they cannot toss it to someone right beside them. It must go at least two people away.

Everyone must remember who threw them the object and who they threw the object to.

Now that you have the pattern established, you will begin the actual Group Juggling.

Begin by throwing the object to the same person you threw to in the first round. As soon as that person has passed it on to the next player, add another object. And another. And another. Continue adding objects to the circle.

As soon as an object gets back to the first person, have that person put it on the ground in front of them.

Many objects will go sailing by players and get dropped or collide in mid air- just keep adding more. The group may want to decide what to do when someone drops one. Will they all stop and regroup? Give them several tries at it. Luck is the main factor here, but there are definite ways to strategize.

Variant:

If you want to use this as a name game then have each player call out the name of the person that they are throwing the object to before the throw it. Have this variant go a lot slower and introduce items at a much slower pace. Let the group go through at least once or twice without adding objects. Three more variations to make the game more exciting: You can reverse the throwing order half way through the game. Time the group and challenge them to complete the circle as fast as possible. Have the group scatter themselves around the circle so everyone has changed spots, but they still have to throw to the same people as before.

28

Name Games

Name Impulse

Name Impulse is a good game to start things off in your first meeting. No one will really learn anybody’s name from this exercise, that’s why it’s a warm up, but it gets everyone talking and excited. As with most warm-ups there is no debrief along with this activity.

Group Size: Any Time Range: 5 minutes Space Needs: Indoor or Outdoor Props: none

Procedure:

Gather the group in a circle.

Ask for a volunteer to start the activity.

Ask this player which way the impulse should go (left or right).

To start the activity, have this person say their name.

As soon as the starter has said their name, the next person will continue.

This continues around the circle with players saying their own name as soon as the players beside them have said theirs.

Time how long it takes for the impulse to get around the circle and have them decide how fast they can do it next time.

29

Name Games

That Person over There

That Person over There is actually two games. One game is a little more like a warm-up game while the variant is an actual name game. Look under the “Variant” section to see the nice quick warm-up game. If you are going to use this game don’t give out name tags until the end of this activity.

Group Size: Any Time Range: 12 to 15 minutes Space Needs: Indoor or Outdoor – You’ll need ample space to move around. Props: none

Procedure:

Gather your group together in a large circle. When you say “Go” each player should go and introduce themselves to another player in the group that they do not know – shake hands, say your names – make sure you emphasize that they should REALLY learn the person’s name.

Then, each player leaves that person and goes off to find another person that they haven’t met yet. (Players can raise their hands if they need a partner.)

This time, greet this new person (remember the name) and introduce yourself (both players do the same.) Now, one at a time each player will point out the last person that they met and tell them their name. The pairs may need to move around to find that person. After both players point out “that person over there” they go off to find another player that they haven’t met.

Repeat this cycle always have the players introduce themselves and then that last person that they met, “that person over there”.

Variation:

As promised above there is a warm-up version of this game. This time scatter everyone around the room so that they can not touch anyone else. Tell the players that they are stuck in that position and that they are not allowed to move their feet. Then tell them that they need to introduce themselves to 10 other people and at least one of them has to be on the other side of the room. Shouting and waving will ensue. This is a very fun quick game good for larger groups.

30

Name Games

The Blanket Game

The Blanket Game is a high energy name game. It is best done with groups of fifteen to twenty five so that everyone gets a chance to play, but can be done with more.

Group Size: 15 to 25+ people Time Range: 10 to 20 minutes Space Needs: Indoor or Outdoor Props: Large Blanket or Tarp that you cannot see through

Procedure:

Divide the group in half. Have two people hold up the blanket. Put half of the group on one side of the blanket and half on the other side. Make sure everyone is sitting two or three feet back from the blanket, and be sure that nobody can see anyone on the other side.

Each team chooses one person to go forward to the blanket. These players should face the screen and be very close to it. Choosing this person silently is best.

On the count of three, the people holding the blanket drop it to the ground and the two chosen players try to correctly name the person across from them. They can receive no help from their teammates or the other team gets the point.

Whoever names the opponent first wins that person for their team.

The first team to have everyone on its side wins. With a larger group this may never happen so you may just want to put a time limit on the game.

Variants:

Have the two chosen people sit with their backs to the blanket. This time, when the blanket drops, they cannot see each other and the only way of guessing the other person’s name is by using information that their teammate provide. Make sure they use positive descriptions of each other. Another variant could have more than one person behind the blanket. Have five per side lined up behind the blanket and have a five person battle at once. This would be good with larger groups.

31

Name Games

Womp-Em

Womp-Em is an activity that helps a group to check in with names.

Group Size: 8 - 15 Time Range: 10 to 15 minutes Space Needs: Indoor or Outdoor Props: A Boffer – something you can use to hit people that won’t hurt.

Procedures:

Have the group for a tight circle

Have players sit down with their legs straight out in front of them and their feet towards the center of the circle. If you are outside you can have them stand in a close circle.

One player is selected to be in the middle and is given the boffer. You, as the leader, may want to be the first person in the middle if you think it will help to demonstrate the game.

Start by going around the circle having all the players say their names.

One of the players in the circles starts the game by calling the name of another player in the circle. The person in the middle then tries to whack – on the foot – the player whose name was called before that player can call someone else’s name. If the player in the middle taps the person whose name is called before that person can call out another name, then the player who go tapped goes into the center. This person now takes over the boffer.

Other ways players can be put in the middle include pulling their feet back to avoid being hit or calling the name of someone not in the group.

The game begins when the person who was in the middle calls out the name of someone in the circle.

As the leader, monitor the time and the group’s energy level. Some groups will love this activity while others will be done after ten minutes.

Things to Think About:

This game can get violent if you have the wrong group. Make sure you only allow the person in the middle to go for the feet of those in the circle. This game is a lot of fun as long as it is not allowed to get out of control.

32

Get to know ya Games

Objective: To help group members learn more about themselves and each other and start to acknowledge differences and similarities that make up the unique group dynamic. Features:

Group members focus on learning about each other

As group members learn more about each other, they start to see that they have a lot in common. This helps break down cliques

Some of these games will be very personal, helping the individual participant examine themselves introspectively

Some of these games require very serious tone setting

Group sharing is a major component

Get to know ya Games

1 Word

This is a simple activity - which contributes to many and various positive outcomes.

Target Group: A more mature group Group Size: Any – (if you plan on having them present then you may want to break into smaller groups – at least for the presentations) Time Range: 10 to 20 minutes Space Needs: A comfortable place to sit and share information. Props: Different Spices (Optional) – Cardamom pods, aniseed, cloves, etc…

Procedures:

Ask individuals to clear their minds; close their eyes and to think of 1 word – just 1 word – which they feel best describes or encapsulates living a good life. A 1 word maxim for life.

The facilitator might be required to explain what is meant by 'living a good life'. Use your imagination so as to relate the concept to the situation and the participants. Think about: force for good; civilized society; leaving the world a better place than when you entered it.

Of course words mean different things to different people, and many people will find it quite difficult to pick just one word, but this is the point: One word concentrates the mind in a way that five or six words, or a longer sentence tends not to. For participants who find it impossible to decide on one word, encourage them to use as few words as possible - but still aiming to focus on the essence, or a central concept, rather than a catch-all or list. It's easy for people to think of a list - one word is a lot more thought- provoking.

Ask people to write down their chosen 1 word, plus a brief explanation as to what it means.

Then in turn ask people to tell or present their word to the group.

Debrief Ideas:

Are your ideals much different from how people behave in societies (local, national, religious and global communities?) Why is this? Where does individual responsibility begin and end? Are we part of the problem? Part of the solution? What is the solution? What keeps us from living to achieve that one goal? Would there be any problems if the world achieved to live by the standards of your 1 word?

Variations:

You can apply this to sessions, work, life, certain programs etc. Just mold your questions in the end to include whether this is about programming etc. This could also be a good starter for a group or individual to figure out an outcome for their own group.

33

Get to know ya Games

3-D Commonalities

This is a very simple yet fun game designed for smaller groups because a presentation aspect is present and with a large group, it would just take too long.

Group Size: 10 to 20 Time Range: 10 to 20 minutes Space Needs: Indoor Props: none

Procedure:

Have participants form groups of five to six people.

Each group must figure out what all of the members of that group have in common. Then they must figure out a way to present it 3-dimentionally (like a skit) to the rest of the group.

When everyone is ready, each small group presents to the larger group who shouts out guesses of what they have in common.

Mix up the players into different small groups for another round. Two to three rounds should workout well.

34

Get to know ya Games

Categories

Categories is a great large group activity where members can get a sense of what they have in common and also how different they are. It can also be used as a way to get people talking and learning each others names.

Group Size: Any Time Range: As long as you want it to run Space Needs: Indoor room Props: none

Procedure:

You will call out categories and, as quickly as possible, they then need to get together with everyone else who belongs in the same category. It’s as simple as that.

Some Categories you may want to use:

1)

Get together with everyone born in the same month

2)

Left or right handed?

3)

Get together with everyone who has the same number of children in their family.

4)

Which leg do you put in your pants first?

5)

Same color eyes.

6)

Same fast food restaurant.

7)

Uses a comb or brush or nothing to fix your hair.

8)

Get together with everyone who has the same favorite color.

Things to think about:

This activity can accomplish two things at the same time. Give the group a couple of minutes between categories for people to meet each other, say “hi,” or answer a question you’d like them to think about.

35

Get to know ya Games

Guess Who…

This is a great activity for a group just getting to know one another. This game should be played during the first few meetings the group has together. You have to find the right time where they may know some details of each other but not too well yet.

Target Group: 12 and older Group Size: 15 to 18 people Time Range: 20 to 30 minutes Space Needs: A comfortable place to sit and share information Props: One index card and something to write with for each player

Procedure:

Have each person write down 4 or 5 facts about themselves on their card – things about themselves that no other person would know. Tell the students not to get too personal right away. Things like the places they have been, favorite movie, something they to be when they grow up, things like that.

Ask them not to sign their cards and then collect them.

One-by-one read the cards to the group. Have each person guess who they think the person is.

After everyone guesses, ask the person to raise their hand or stand up.

Things to think about:

The extent to which discussion and feedback among the group is encouraged is at the discretion of the facilitator, depending on the group composition and whether the activity is used simply as an ice-breaker, or for more involved discussion, which could easily be linked with developing mutual awareness. Ring tones are for many people an expression and extension of personality, as is handwriting, which is also interesting to compare when discussing personality.

36

Get to know ya Games

Human Bingo

Human Bingo is a great way for people to meet other people and see what they have in common.

Group Size: Any Time Range: 15 to 20 minutes Space Needs: Indoor Props: Printed Bingo Sheets

Procedure:

Before the training begins create a sheet that has a bingo grid on it that is filled with categories. These categories may be: “Is left handed”, “Is from out of state”, and “Drives a car”, etc…

When a player finds someone who fits a category, they have that player sign their name next to the statement. Each player can sign someone else’s paper just once. This prevents players from meeting just one person who they have a lot in common with.

This of course is black out bingo so you want to try to get as many players as possible.

Things to Think About:

You should tailor this activity to suit the group that you are going to be working with.

More Bingo Categories:

born as the same month as you

can speak a foreign language

has been on TV or radio

has performed on stage anywhere

has been elected to a position

has been in a parade

has the same number of siblings as you

has gone on a road trip

can play an instrument

has lived outside of the US for more than a year

is from a different state

is an only child

37

Get to know ya Games

Interview Introductions…

This is a very low level game good for warming up and getting to know one another. Whether the participants know each other or not (surprisingly this is often more fun when people do know each other – and if they don’t they’ll appreciate the opportunity to meet and get to know one another early on).

Target Group: Any Group Size: Any Time Range: 1 to 2 minutes per person Space Needs: A comfortable place to sit and share information. Props: None

Procedures:

Ask the participants to pair up – You can simply suggest the person sitting next to themselves, yell out a random characteristic pairing or this is also a great game to follow up Known and Unknown.

Then ask each person briefly to interview the other person (say three minutes each), and then everyone to present the other person to the audience, again briefly, say a minute each.

If necessary give people pointers as to what they should be finding out about the other person (e.g. - job, home-life, likes, dislikes, hobbies, why they are there, etc).

Things to think about:

You can also say that after the exercise that everyone will have achieved useful experiences and developed useful skills, i.e., questioning, listening, interpreting and then (scary for some) speaking to an audience of strangers. These aspects of communicating are usually consistent with at least one theme of the day, so is a relevant and helpful way to start any training session.

38

Get to know ya Games

Known & Unknown

Many people fear the unknown to varying degrees. The unknown may represent failure, loss, betrayal, being wrong, emotional discomfort, abandonment, or rejection. Simply knowing that the unknown is present can set in motion the building of trust.

Group Size: Any – The larger, the better Time Range: 5 to 10 minutes Space Needs: Indoor or Outdoor (just make sure it’s a large area, free of obstacles) Props: none

Procedure:

Follow this script: What are some things we know about today’s program? (people give answers) What are some things we don’t yet know about this program? (people give more answers)

Next, have the participants look around the group and find a person who is unknown to you. If you know all the people there then pick the person who you have known the least amount of time. Don’t make it obvious who you pick.

Now, once again in secret, pick the person that you have known the longest or at least the person that you know best.

Let the participants know that these two people represent the “Known” and the “Unknown”

The participant’s task for the next three minutes is to keep the “known” person between you and the “unknown” person at all times. Ready? GO!!! (absolute chaos ensues as people struggle to maintain alignment)

Debrief Ideas:

Debrief afterwards on how difficult it was to protect oneself from the unknown by using the known as their shield. Have people take a risk and identify themselves to their unknown: Ask them to tell you something you don’t know about them. Feel free to share with them something they don’t know about you.

39

Get to know ya Games

Ring Tones…

This is a simple warm-up ice-breaker activity, or can be used as an exercise to provoke discussion about self-image and mutual perceptions within teams. As an ice-breaker the activity adds variety and interest to the normal personal introductions at the start of a training course or session

Target Group: Any Group Size: Any Time Range: 1 to 2 minutes per person Space Needs: A comfortable place to sit and share information. Props: Cell Phones of each Participant

Procedures:

When introducing themselves to the group, participants must demonstrate their ring tones and (here’s the important part) must explain the reason for their choice of that ring tone. Or lack of interest in having a personal ring tone.

If they do not have a cell phone then have them share what they would use as their ring tone and why.

Offer some comment as to what this might suggest about their personality and style.

Things to think about:

The extent to which discussion and feedback among the group is encouraged is at the discretion of the facilitator, depending on the group composition and whether the activity is used simply as an ice-breaker, or for more involved discussion, which could easily be linked with developing mutual awareness. Ring tones are for many people an expression and extension of personality, as is handwriting, which is also interesting to compare when discussing personality.

40

Get to know ya Games

Personality Tree

This is a high to medium level Get to know you game. It is best reserved for groups that have shown a maturity level to be able to at least listen to one another without talking or making any jokes.

Target Group: A more mature group Group Size: Any Time Range: 30 to 60 minutes Space Needs: A comfortable place to sit and share information. Props: Large sheets of paper (A4 or larger) Markers, Crayons, Pens etc…

Procedures:

Split the group into teams of 3 to 5 people.

This is a very high level activity so it is wise to set the tone of the event. Sample Speech: “The purpose of the activity is to develop personal self-awareness and to develop mutual awareness among the teams’ members. This however can only be achieved if this activity is taken with seriousness and respect. Please be true to yourself and be true to us also. Only put things that you are comfortable or at least willing to