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EGO

MEANING MAKING
5th / 6th Grade
MELINDA DOSS

BROOKE MATHEWS

JORDAN THOMPSON

KELLY HUANG

INSPIRATION ARTIST:

Konoka Kitigawa

Japanese artist
Studied at Tama Art University
Graduate School of Fine Arts
Medium: Oil Paints
Explores Big Ideas of identity
and ego through portraiture

Konoka Kitigawa

Throughout history and across cultures, people


have been concerned with

EGO

KEY CONCEPTS: Ego

Is a construction of self.

Is developed based on self views.

Can be influenced by social aspects of our lives.

Can be expressed or concealed through art.

Throughout history and across cultures, people


have been concerned with

EGO

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:

What is ego?

How is ego a construction of self?

Does ego change as a person grows/ages?

How is ego influenced by social aspects of our lives?

STUDIO INVESTIGATION:

Who do you think I am?


Lesson

Overview

Construct a small box and use various artistic methods to


create representations of self-perceived ego and peerperceived ego on the inside and outside of the box.

STUDIO INVESTIGATION:

Who do you think I am?


TSW

Be able to assemble images of self-perceived and peer-perceived ego


(Visual Arts)

Be able to discuss the images that they have used in their art making.
(Literacy)

Be able to reflect on the view that they have of themselves.


(Health)

STUDIO INVESTIGATION:

Who do you think I am?


Materials

Boxes

Magazines

Scissors

Newspaper

Mod podge

Brushes

Cups

Paint

Markers

Brayer

STUDIO INVESTIGATION:

Examples

Vocabulary

Collage - artistic composition made of various materials glued on a


surface

Expressive Content images that convey ideas and emotions

PEER REVIEWED READING

Past, Present, Future: Stories of Identity in an


Elementary Art Room
by Jodie Pellish

Knowledge, memory, and experience are important aspects of ego and


identity formations.

Understanding self leads to a unique perception of the world.

Formation and understanding of Story is an essential aspect of self


understanding.

Students as Investigators, teachers as Facilitators.

Connection in art leads to in depth expression Meaning Making

Students celebrate cherished aspects of themselves, learning new things


about understanding others, while finding new ways to see themselves
(Pellish, p. 6).

Ticket Out: GALLERY WALK

After completion of project, clean up materials and tables.

Set completed boxes on table at seat.

Push in chairs and begin walking clockwise around the classroom to


view other students work.

Reflection

Was it difficult to find images or to come up with ideas that you felt
represented yourself?

What new ideas do you have after the Gallery Walk?

Would you add anything to your artwork?

Would you change any aspect of your artwork?