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edTPA Lesson Planner

Grade: Kindergarten

Content Area: Science

Group Size: 16

Lesson Length: 30

minutes

Planning for the Lesson

A: Standards

i. Key Content Standard:

LOMARENA DOES NOT USE NEXT GENERATION SCIENCE STANDARDS Science K.LIFE SCIENCE.2.a. Students know how to observe and describe similarities and differences in the appearance and behavior of plants and animals (e.g., seed-bearing plants, birds, fish, insects). K.INVESTIGATION AND EXPERMIMENTATION.4.a. Observe common objects by using the five senses. K.INVESTIGATION AND EXPERIMENTATION.4.e. Communicate observations orally and through drawings.

Art K.CREATIVE EXPRESSION.2.6 Use geometric shapes/forms (circle, triangle, square) in a work of art.

ii. Related ELA and ELD Standards (if applicable):

ELA Standards Kindergarten: Literacy:

L.K.2.a. Capitalize the first word in a sentence and the pronoun I.

Related ELD Standard: Composing/Writing:

K.C.PRODUCTIVE.10.Em- Draw, dictate, and write to compose very short literary texts (e.g., story) and informational texts (e.g., a description of a dog), using familiar vocabulary collaboratively in shared language activities with an adult (e.g., joint construction of texts), with peers, and sometimes independently. K.C.PRODUCTIVE.10.Ex- Draw, dictate, and write to compose short literary texts (e.g., story) and informational texts (e.g., a description of dogs), collaboratively with an adult (e.g., joint construction of texts), with peers, and with increasing independence. K.C.PRODUCTIVE.10.Br- Draw, dictate, and write to compose longer literary texts (e.g., story) and informational texts (e.g., an information report on dogs), collaboratively with an adult (e.g., joint construction of texts), with peers, and independently using appropriate text organization.

ELA Standards Kindergarten: Speaking and Listening:

SL.K.1. Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about kindergarten topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.

SL.K.1.a Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., listening to others and taking turns speaking about the topics and texts under discussion).

Related ELD Standard: Exchanging information and ideas:

K.A.COLLABORATIVE.1.Em- Contribute to conversations and express ideas by asking and answering yes-no and wh- questions and responding using gestures, words, and simple phrases. K.A.COLLABORATIVE.1.Ex- Contribute to class, group, and partner discussions by listening attentively, following turn-taking rules, and asking and answering questions. K.A.COLLABORATIVE.1.Br- Contribute to class, group, and partner discussions by listening attentively, following turn-taking rules, and asking and answering questions.

B.

Objectives

i. Learning Objective/Goal: The students will (DO

)

to (LEARN

).

Students will identify the stages of a butterfly life cycle to understand the changes it goes through in its life span.

ii. Language Objective (transfer this from "Incorporating Academic Language"):

The students will identify different stages of the butterfly life cycle by stating characteristics that

are relevant to each stage of its life.

C. Assessments:

i. Informal assessment strategies you will use during class (What evidence will you see and/or hear and how will you note it?) Informal assessment strategies I will use during this lesson will be monitoring and questioning. I will hear students talking about each stage of a butterfly’s life, naming the egg, caterpillar, chrysalis, and butterfly stage. I will see students communicating with a partner about the different stages of the butterfly and about where to find butterflies in the community.

ii. Written assessment you will use to determine, for each individual student, to what

extent they have met your learning objectives. (What evidence will you collect?) Written assessment I will use will be to have the students write a sentence about each stage of the butterfly’s life. I will have them write two sentences about what the egg stage, the caterpillar stage, the chrysalis stage, and the adult butterfly stage is and why each stage is unique. I will collect this paper at the end of the lesson. I will also collect the students’ butterfly life cycle wheels.

D. Lesson Resources/Materials (e.g., handouts, manipulatives, text pages, special supplies):

1

Live Butterfly Kit (purchased online)

1

Butterfly garden net

5

Painted Lady caterpillars

8

copies of butterfly life cycle printouts (eggs, caterpillars, chrysalis, butterfly)

8

plastic baggies

1

12 x 18 white construction paper

16 Crayon boxes

3 Crayon tubs with various colors

16

Glue sticks

16

Pencils

16

Papers with 4 sentence lines

16

Scissors

8 Sentences frames

Document camera

Instructional Sequence - Engaging Students in the Learning Process

Introduction (2 min.): Describe how you will 1) make connections to prior knowledge, tap into their experiences and interests or use a “hook”, AND 2) let students know what the objective of the lesson is. *Prior to the lesson instruction, meet in a group with five ELL students and three struggling readers to preview the information and stages of the butterfly life cycle. Discuss the information that is unique to each stage and name what each stage is and what each stage can do. Review vocabulary and support the students in ways for them to identify aspects of each stage and how to say them in a correct sentence using the sentence frames.

- Ask students to remember the stages of the frog’s life cycle. Students tell stages to their peanut butter and jelly partner.

- Tell students, “Today we are going to be learning about the butterfly’s life cycle. Let’s see what it looks like and if it looks like the frog’s life cycle!”

Body of the Lesson (26 minutes): Describe step-by-step what the teacher and the students will be doing during the lesson.

Engage:

- Ask students what they remember about the frog’s life cycle and students point to forehead when they can remember a fact about the frog’s life cycle. Teacher call on a student to share then have that student call on a student of the opposite gender. Repeat for 3 students.

- Ask students if they remember seeing how the butterflies grew and changed from a tiny caterpillar, to a big caterpillar, to a chrysalis, to butterflies (butterflies were shipped early and released one week prior to this lesson). Names of each stage were verbalized by teacher as the caterpillars were changing into a butterfly. Review vocabulary related to the different stages (eggs, caterpillar, chrysalis, butterfly) by writing down each stage name on a piece of paper. Tell students when butterflies change from an egg to a butterfly it is called metamorphosis. Explore:

- While on floor, tell students, “Sit next to your peanut butter and jelly partner.” Remind students about norms for partner share, one person at a time, listening, and remembering what our partner says. Pass out baggies with butterfly life stages, 1 per each group. Tell

students to put the life cycle of the butterfly in the correct order. Review order with students. “Backs straight! (Students reply with ‘eyes forward’ and they are sitting facing the teacher) Let’s review the correct order of this life cycle. What comes first? –The egg. What comes next? The caterpillar. What comes after? The chrysalis. What is the last stage? –The butterfly.”

- Review different stages of a butterfly’s life cycle naming each stage again. Tell students that living things grow and change from eggs or babies to adults and that each creature grows and changes differently.

- Name the first stage, “Okay boys and girls, who can tell me what the first stage of a butterfly’s life is? Are they born like mammals? What do you see?” Students reply with, “No! They are born from eggs and I see a round egg. They look clear. They look sticky.”

- Draw a picture of a butterfly egg next to the word ‘egg’ on the construction paper (It has…, it can… chart). Ask students, “What do these eggs look like?” Have students describe the eggs. Write ‘are’ and draw a box around are, and record information students say about what eggs are and what they look like. They are round, they are sticky, they are baby butterflies, they are clear, they are the first stage of the cycle. Teacher writes are round, sticky, baby butterflies, clear, first stage. Under ‘are’ write ‘can’ in blue. Ask “What can eggs do?” Students reply with, “Eggs can stick to a leaf, they can make a butterfly.” Teacher writes can stick to a leaf, make a butterfly. Draw a line under ‘egg’ that separates egg from caterpillar in black marker.

- Ask students what the second stage is called. Students reply with “The second stage is the caterpillar stage.” Draw a caterpillar next to the word caterpillar. Ask students, “What do caterpillars look like?” Have students describe the look of caterpillars. Write ‘are’ in green, draw a box around the word ‘are,’ and record information students say about what caterpillars are and what they look like. They are fuzzy, they are black. Teacher writes are fuzzy, black. Under ‘are’ write ‘can’ in blue. Ask “What can they do?” Students reply with, “They can crawl, they can eat leaves, and they can turn into a chrysalis.” Teacher writes can crawl, eat leaves, turn into a chrysalis. Draw a line under ‘egg’ that separates egg from caterpillar in black marker.

- Ask students what the third stage is called. Students reply with “The third stage is the chrysalis stage.” Draw a chrysalis next to the word chrysalis. Ask students, “What do chrysalis’ look like?” Have students describe the look of chrysalis. Write ‘are’ in green, draw a box around the word ‘are,’ and record information students say about what chrysalis are and what they look like. They are hard, they are shiny, stuck to a leaf or tree. Teacher writes are hard, shiny, stuck to a leaf or tree. Under ‘are’ write ‘can’ in blue. Ask “What can they do?” Students reply with, “They can turn into a butterfly, they can hold the caterpillar.” Teacher writes can turn into a butterfly, hold the caterpillar. Draw a line under ‘egg’ that separates egg from caterpillar in black marker.

- Ask students what the fourth stage is called. Students reply with “The fourth stage is the butterfly stage.” Draw a butterfly next to the word butterfly. Ask students, “What do

butterflies look like?” Have students describe the look of a butterfly. Write ‘are’ in green, draw a box around the word ‘are,’ and record information students say about what butterflies are and what they look like. They are pretty, they are black and orange. Teacher writes are pretty, black and orange. Under ‘are’ write ‘can’ in blue. Ask “What can they do?” Students reply with, “They can fly, eat sweet things.” Teacher writes can fly, eat sweet things.

- Tell students to go to tables. Move chart of a butterfly life cycle to in front of student work tables. Post premade sentence frames on board. Sentence frames include: The eggs

are

chrysalis is

The eggs can

The caterpillars are

The caterpillars can

The chrysalis can

The butterfly is

The butterfly can

The

- Pass out papers with lines, 1 per student. Tell students to write name on back of paper. Tell students to write 2 sentences about each life stage referring to the chart we made together. Model it. “I am going to write, An egg is round. An egg can stick to a leaf.” Write the sentence on paper under document camera. Tell students they need to write 1 sentence on each line. FOR STUDENT WITH IEP- monitor closely to ensure she is correctly writing her letters and that she is writing from left to right. If she is not, remind her how we write. Tell students to pick 2 aspects, are and can, of a caterpillar, chrysalis, and butterfly. Tell students to write their sentences.

- Pass out paper plates, 1 per student. Tell students to flip the plate over when they get it and write their name at the top of the back. Model with plate under document camera. Tell students, “You are going to be making a life cycle model with your paper plate. If you notice the plate is sectioned into four parts. In each of the parts we are going to write the stage and draw a picture of the stage.” Model; write ‘egg’ in the top left box. Have students repeat. Start to draw a picture of the egg on a leaf by drawing a circle. Do not finish the piece, let students finish the picture of how they wish. Repeat for caterpillar. Write ‘caterpillar’ in the box to the right of ‘egg,’ have students repeat. Start to draw a caterpillar using an oval, do not complete. Write ‘chrysalis’ in bottom right box start to draw a chrysalis using an upside down triangle. Students repeat. Write ‘butterfly’ in bottom left box, start to draw a butterfly with an oval body and circular head. Students repeat.

- Allow students to pick aspects from each stage to write about. Tell students to color the pictures they drew of each stage of life of the butterfly. Make sure to remind students that they need to color the pictures realistically.

- Tell students to cut out their sentence of the egg and glue it on the back of the egg. Remind students of safety precautions when working with scissors, Tell students “Scissors are a tool for cutting. They need to be used only for cutting paper. We are not allowed to walk with the blades pointing out, if you need to walk with the scissors hold the scissors so the handles are poking out of your fist (demonstrate).” FOR STUDENT WITH IEP- outline lines in thick black marker and remind her to hold her scissors correctly and try her best to cut on the line. Model for students and walk them through

how to do it. “First I am going to cut on the black lines. Then I am going to put glue on the back of the part I cut out. Next I am going to flip my paper plate over and glue it on the top right.” Repeat for each sentence. Explain:

- Students share with elbow buddy the four stages by pointing to the starting stage, the next stage, the following stage, and the last stage.

- Ask, “Where could we find each butterfly stage outside somewhere? Could we look at the park? Could we look in our backyards?” Have students make connections to where they could possibly look to find butterflies and share with their elbow buddy. Closure (2 minutes): Describe how you will prompt the students to summarize the lesson and restate the learning objective.

- Tell students, “We are going to be comparing and contrasting the stages of a butterfly and frog tomorrow.”

- Collect student life cycle plates Incorporating Academic Language (to be completed after you have planned the content part of your lesson plan)

1. Describe the rich learning task(s) related to the content learning objective.

Students will identify the stages of a butterfly with a partner then share with the whole group. Then, they will identify what each stage is and what each stage can do. After, they are going to write two sentences about each stage naming what it is and what it can do. Then, they are going to draw a picture of each stage on a paper plate and color each stage appropriately. After they are going to cut out their sentences and glue them on the appropriate stage. Last, they are going to share with a partner about each stage and where they could possibly find each stage in the

community.

2. Language Function: How will students be communicating in relation to the content in the learning task(s)? Identify the specific function (purpose or genre) you want to systematically address in your lesson plan that will scaffold students to stronger disciplinary discourse. The language function will always be a verb. Some examples are: describe, identify, explain, justify, analyze, construct, compare, or argue.

Identify

3. Language Demands: Looking at the specific function (purpose or genre) your students will be using, what are the language demands that you will systematically address in this lesson? Vocabulary:

Key to this lesson: egg, caterpillar, chrysalis, butterfly, transformation, metamorphosis. Syntax 1 : Record information of each stage of a butterfly’s life cycle.

1 Use of a variety of sentence types to clarify a message, condense information, and combine ideas, phrases, and clauses.

Discourse 2 : Identify main aspects of each stage, egg, caterpillar, and butterfly, create sentences with proper capitals and punctuation, partner share

4. Language Objective: What is/are the language objective(s) for your lesson?

will (FUNCTION) (LANGUAGE RELATED TO CONTENT) (SYNTAX AND/OR DISCOURSE) For example: The students will compare different types of parallelograms using transition words such as similarly, different from or by contrast. Note: be sure to copy and paste this into the top of the lesson planner. The students will identify different stages of the butterfly life cycle by stating characteristics that are relevant to each stage of life.

(The students

5. Language Support: What instructional strategies will you use during your lesson to teach the specific language skill and provide support and opportunities for guided and independent practice?

Instruction

Guided Practice

Independent Practice

Name each stage.

Showing butterfly chart so every student can see.

Set norms for partner share/interaction.

Remind students of new vocabulary.

Show/model how to write each stage.

Checking sentences, making sure to have a capital letter at the start and a period at the end.

Define then use new vocabulary during lesson.

Use student primary language.

Model how to write each sentence.

Rephrase/re-voice student responses.

 

2 Discourse includes the structures of written and oral language, as well as how member of the discipline talk, write, and participate in knowledge construction.