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Enzyme (Lactase) Inquiry

Group Members names: Brooke Bruder, Ana Pacheco, Maggie Boyer


Problem: Does temperature affect the effectiveness of the lactase
enzyme?
Research Hypotheses: (include at least 2 with a prediction) If
lactase enzyme becomes denatured at extreme temperatures, then
its function of digesting lactose will worsen, resulting in a greater
trace of glucose at very extreme temperatures.

Procedure:
1. Retrieve 8 test tubes.
2. In the first test tube add 2 mL of glucose solution
(positive control).
3. In the second test tube add 2 mL of whole milk (control).
4. In the third test tube add 2 mL of fat free milk (control).
5. In the fourth test tube add 1 mL of lactase (negative
control).
6. In the fifth test tube add 1 mL of lactase and 2 mL of
whole milk mix at room temperature.
7. In the sixth test tube add 1 mL of lactase and 2 mL of fat
free milk mix at room temperature.
8. In the seventh test tube add 1 mL of lactase and 2 mL of
lactose (positive control).
9. Let solution sit for 3 minutes.
10.
Take the temperature of all 8 solutions and record.
11.
Test each solution for glucose by dipping paper into
the solution.
12.
Test each solution for protein by dipping paper into
the solution.
13.
Test each solution for pH by dipping paper into the
solution.
14.
Record initial color of paper.
15.
Let each paper sit for 2 minutes.
16.
Record final color of paper.
17.
Gather new test tubes with solutions of test tubes 7
and 8.
18.
Heat each solution on a hot plate in boiling water
100 degrees C.

19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
and 8.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.

Record temperature of solutions.


Test for glucose, protein, and pH.
Record initial color of paper.
Wait 2 minutes.
Record final color of paper.
Gather new test tubes with solutions of test tubes 7
Put beakers in refrigerator for 10 minutes.
Place test tubes in for 5 minutes.
Record temperature of solutions.
Test for glucose, protein, and pH.
Record initial color of paper.
Wait 2 minutes.
Record final color of paper.

Data: (include a table with observations and a Graph)


Lactase at Room Temperature
Test
Tube

Contents Final
Glucose
Levels

Presence of lactase
enzyme

Temperature of
Solution

glucose

++

room

whole
milk

room

fat free
milk

room

lactase

room

lactase
and
whole
milk

++

room

lactase
+++
and fat
free milk

room

Lactase at 100 degrees C

test
tube

contents

final glucose
levels

presence of
lactase enzyme

temperatur
e of
solution

glucose

++

boiling 100
degrees C

whole
milk

boiling 100
degrees C

fat free
milk

boiling 100
degrees C

lactase

boiling 100
degrees C

lactase
and
whole
milk

boiling 100
degrees C

lactase
and fat
free milk

boiling 100
degrees C

Lactase at 0 degrees C
test
tube

contents

final glucose
levels

presence of
lactase enzyme

temperatur
e of
solution

glucose

++

30 degrees
C

whole
milk

30 degrees
C

fat free
milk

30 degrees
C

lactase

30 degrees
C

lactase
and
whole
milk

30 degrees
C

lactase
and fat
free milk

30 degrees
C

Conclusion/Recommendations: (Can be bulleted)


At boiling, the enzyme did not break down the lactose,
and there was no glucose. This probably happened because
the enzyme was denatured.
At cold, the enzyme broke down the lactose a little bit
better than at boiling. The glucose had an average level of
about 2.5.
At room temperature, the enzyme broke down the lactose
very well, leaving a high amount of glucose.
Enzyme works best at room temperature.
If the enzyme is exposed to extreme temperatures, hot
and cold, the enzyme will denature.

Shape is key to function, and when it is denatured, the


lactase cannot do its job, which is turning lactose into glucose
and galactose.

Photos
Room temperature

Boiling

Cold

Boiling the solutions

solutions

Commercial:
https://www.wevideo.com/hub/#media/ci/538917900

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