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Running Head: COMPREHENSIVE READING PLAN EVALUATION NARRATIVE

Comprehensive Reading Plan Evaluation Narrative


April Padalino, Bridget Bender, & Laurie Wangerin
Viterbo University
EDUC 639
August 21, 2015

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COMPREHENSIVE READING PLAN EVALUATION
Questions to Consider

Evident

Somewhat
Evident

Curriculum
Does the school have a vision and
mission for the reading program?
Has the school / district
established goals and standards
(prek-12)?

Not
Evident

Notes

There is a philosophy that


could use some updating
into a vision and mission.
There is a school
improvement plan for
reading and language, but
it is not reading plan.
There is currently some
confusion over whether
the diocese is following
the CCSS or the draft
created by the diocese.
Clarification is needed.

Has it considered:
The amount of time for

reading instruction at the


primary and intermediate
level?

The relationship between

Balanced Literacy is
addressed.

reading and the other


language arts?

The role of content area

Literacy is encouraged to
be integrated into content
areas. Grades 3-6 are
implementing The
Comprehension Tool Kit.

teachers at all levels, but


especially at the middle
school / high school levels, in
helping students handle the
literacy demands of their
classroom?

x
Do the standards address the need
for developmental continuum that
considers the reader at all stages:
emergent, beginning, transitional,
intermediate, and skilled reading
and writing?

Since I work there, I


know time is built into the
schedule, but not listed in
the reading plan.

All K-8 classrooms utilize


the Fountas and Pinnell
continuum of literacy as a
guide.St. Johns does not
have a high school.

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COMPREHENSIVE READING PLAN EVALUATION
Questions to Consider

Evident

Somewhat
Evident

Curriculum Continued
Do they recognize the needs of
learners at the middle school and
secondary levels?

Are the standards based on what


is known about effective reading
instruction and assessment, that is,
are the evidence- based?

Do they address the essential


elements of effective reading
instruction ( fig 1.2)
Have materials, print and nonprint, been selected that enable
teachers to address the goals?
Do these materials address the
needs of all learners (struggling
readers, ELL students, etc?
Do they provide for the varying
reading levels of students?

Is a variety of materials available


(narrative, informational, poetry,
etc)?

Not
Evident

Notes

This school did not have a


plan at all when I started.
This plan is what I have
been creating for the
school as I learn better
practices. I had not stated
the information about
Middle school since I was
trying to figure out middle
school.
There is currently
question whether the
school is suppose to be
using common core or
diocesan standards.
Clarification is needed.
CCSS is evidence based.
I am unsure of how the
diocesan standards were
created.

x
X
X
X

This is not addressed


explicitly in the plan.
Teachers do have a variety
of materials available to
them in an elementary
bookroom and a middle
school bookroom.
I believe materials are
available, but it is not
listed in the plan.

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COMPREHENSIVE READING PLAN EVALUATION
Questions to Consider

Evident

Somewhat
Evident

Do they provide students with


opportunities to understand their
own backgrounds and that of
others?
Is there a written framework or
guide that makes the curriculum
visible and usable?
Questions to Consider

Not
Evident
x

Notes

Evident

Somewhat
Evident

Not
Evident

Notes

Instruction
Has consideration been given to how reading instruction will be organized , including:
Allocation to time reading at
X
It is apparent in the
different levels?
schedules of the teachers
but should be explicit in
the plan.
How differing needs of students
X
It is alluded to in the
will be met?
plan but not stated
explicitly.
X
This needs more
Grouping options?
information.
X
Some resources are
Materials?
listed, but there are more
being used.
X
This is not explicitly
Additional time?
stated in the plan
Additional support of specialized
X
IE schedule allows time
professionals?
for intervention, but is
not stated in the plan
Is there coordination and
x
Fundations double dose,
coherence among all the reading
CAF, The
programs in the school( the core,
Comprehension Toolkit
the programs for struggling
readers, ELL students, etc)?
Are teachers given opportunities to
x
Fundations workshop
gain knowledge and understanding
and coaching 4 times in
of the current research and
a group
literature about effective reading
Not a lot of coaching in
instruction?
other areas

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COMPREHENSIVE READING PLAN EVALUATION
Questions to Consider

Evident

Is there coherence between the


written curriculum of the school
and actual classroom practices?

Questions to Consider

Evident

Assessment
Is there an assessment system
(pre-K-12) that is coordinated
across the grades?

Is there provision for outcome


measures?
Screening measures?
Is there alignment between the
standards of the district and the
assessment system, i.e., is the
assessment system measuring
what is being taught?
Do your assessment measures
address high-level cognitive
thinking?
Do the classroom assessment
measures assist teachers in
instructional decision making?

Somewhat
Evident
x

Somewhat
Evident
x

Not
Evident

Notes
The expectations are
only partially laid out so
they are only partially
being observed in
classrooms There is a
lack of consistency.

Not
Evident

Notes

MAPS is coordinated
across grades.
Spelling inventoriesK-7, F&P K-5 and
really used in middle
school
? Data meetings
monthly

x
x

There is a need for


improvement that may
be addressed by
creating an assessment
committee.
I think we need to dig
deeper especially
when it comes to
SMV for Fountas and
Pinnell Benchmark
assessments. Possibly
need to consider using
more skill groups
instead of leveled
reading groups.

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COMPREHENSIVE READING PLAN EVALUATION
Questions to Consider

Evident

Do they assist teachers in


identifying the needs of the
struggling readers, ELL students,
and high achievers?

Questions to Consider
Process for Change
Is the committee or group
assigned the task of developing
the reading comprehensive plan a
representative one, that is, does it
include constituents at all levels,
etc?
To what extent are teachers
involved in the curriculum
development process?
Have they had opportunities to
discuss their beliefs and
understandings and learn more
about how reading can be taught
effectively?
Is there leadership support for the
development of the
comprehensive reading plan?

Is time provided for meeting and


are the necessary resources
available to members of the
group?
Do leaders encourage and support
the work of the members of the
group?

Evident

Somewhat
Evident

Not
Evident

Somewhat Not
Evident
Evident
x

Notes

Notes
Not working on a
comprehensive reading
plan at this time.

x
x

Unit meetings, lead


teacher meetings, staff
meeting, data meetings,
Principal has an open door
policy
She is always in support
of bettering student
achievement and staff
performance. They are
just not working on this at
this time.
If it was started; time
would be provided
Work would be
encouraged and supported

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COMPREHENSIVE READING PLAN EVALUATION
Questions to Consider

Evident

Is there a process for sharing the


plan with all those in the school
and for obtaining feedback from
those not directly involved in the
development of the plan?

Somewhat Not
Evident
Evident
x

x
Have teachers been provided with
the professional development
(PD) they need to implement the
program effectively?

Questions to Consider
Process for Change
Does the PD include opportunity
for support and feedback, e.g.
literacy coaching?
Does PD provide teachers with
opportunities to learn from one
another, to collaborate?
In other words are teachers
working together so that change
can occur at the school level?
Are administrators supportive and
involved in the change effort?
Do they understand what is
required of their teachers so that
they can provide the necessary
support?

Evident

Somewhat
Evident

Not
Evident

Notes
The plan is shared each
year at the initial staff
meeting. Feedback has
been by informal
conversation only.
Consider survey in the
future.
When new initiatives are
started professional
development has been
provided. Coaching has
not been consistent with
all programs initiated.

Notes

Needs more of coaching

Usually this is built in to


in service time or during
unit meetings.
Not toward a reading plan

x
x
x

I believe the principal


would support a change to
the reading plan.
They need to be informed
and made part of the
process.

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COMPREHENSIVE READING PLAN EVALUATION
Introduction
The reading plan being evaluated is from St. John the Baptist Catholic School. This
school is one of nine kindergarten through grade eight schools establishing the Green Bay Area
Catholic Education School District. The district does not have a reading or assessment plan.
Sometimes the principals agree to use the same curriculum, but the schools often have different
goals and visions when it comes to literacy.
`

Four years ago the St. John the Baptist School created the position of Literacy Specialist.

April Padalino filled this position. As she completed classes and attended workshops, she
implemented best literacy practices. The first literacy and assessment plans went into place in
2012. The literacy specialist created them after doing research, having conversations with
teachers, and conferring with specialists from the local public school system. Each year, the
plans have been revised based on best practices. April Padalino, Bridget Bender and Laurie
Wangerin have evaluated the current reading plan based on figure 1.3 Developing a
Comprehensive Reading Plan: Questions to Consider (Wepner, Strickland, and Quatroche,
2014, p.23). Using the knowledge we have acquired through our reading specialists journey, we
have identified the strengths and are offering some suggestions to improve the comprehension
reading plan.
Curriculum
The current philosophy of the St. John the Baptist Literacy Plan (2015) statement is, All
students have the ability to learn with the appropriate instruction, motivation and
encouragement. This year a definition of literacy taken from the Howard-Suamico School
District was added to the plan as a guide and it states:

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COMPREHENSIVE READING PLAN EVALUATION
Literacy encompasses all forms of communication, both oral and written, and
incorporates traditional formats of reading, writing, speaking and listening, and language,
as well as newer, evolving formats using technology for accessing, using, and creating
information. (HSSD, 2015)
There is a school improvement plan for reading and language, but it is not identified
within the current reading plan. The school improvement plan is reviewed and updated each
year by the data team consisting of the principal, literacy specialist, supportive consultant, a
teacher from the primary unit, and two from the middle school.
Currently, there is some confusion over whether the school system is following the
Common Core State Standards (CCSS) or the draft created by the Green Bay Diocese. Most
teachers are still following the CCSS but clarification is needed. The Bishop does not want to
follow the CCSS, but they have not committed to the new standards the last time it was checked.
Time is built into the schedule for literacy, but time requirements are not listed in the reading
plan. During the revising of the plan this year, the following additions were made, (a) balanced
literacy, (b) gradual release of responsibility, (c) personalized learning, and (d) integrating
literacy into the content area.
Middle school literacy elements are not currently addressed in the comprehensive reading
plan. The reading plan does not address reading levels specifically, although it does address
personalizing and differentiating instruction in small groups. It currently states, groups may be
established by level, skill, or mixed ability for collaboration. Tier 1 students will meet one or
two times a week and for the more intense Tier 2 & 3, the students will be meeting with a teacher
three to five times a week. Tier 3 students will meet with the specialist.

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COMPREHENSIVE READING PLAN EVALUATION
Teachers have a variety of print and non-print materials available to meet literacy plan
expectations. All new materials purchased have all levels of readers in mind. These materials
are available but are not listed in the plan. They include:
Elementary and middle school bookroom
One iPad per elementary classroom
Six Google tablets per elementary classrooms
One Chromebook for each middle school student and teacher
SMARTboards in every classroom
A Comprehension Toolkit for each teacher in grades three through six and the literacy specialist
Fundation kits and classroom supplies for teachers in Kindergarten through third grade
Words Their Way manuals for teachers in first through eighth grade
Classroom Libraries in Kindergarten through fifth grade
Middle School teachers share the Middle School bookroom for individuals to borrow.
School-wide library
Orange, green, and blue Leveled Literacy Intervention (LLI) kits
Kidney tables for each classroom for small group instruction
RAZ kids subscription for grades Kindergarten through third grade

Recommendations for Curriculum

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COMPREHENSIVE READING PLAN EVALUATION
We recommend that the St. John the Baptist School explicitly state a vision and mission
for literacy in the comprehensive reading plan. After the vision and mission has been
established, we suggest deciding between CCSS or the Diocesan Standards. Standards chosen
will act as a guide for instruction. An outline for recommended time spent on literacy should be
included in the comprehensive reading plan for grades kindergarten through eight. We suggest
creating a PLC using the The Comprehension Toolkit by Harvey and Goudvis to guide
discussion and implement instructional strategies with nonfiction texts. We like this program
because it incorporates active learning strategies to teach students to comprehend and use
informational text. It also teaches students to collaborate and communicate in a variety of ways
as expected in the CCSS. Revisiting the Fountas and Pinnell Continuum of Literacy is also
recommended to assist with vertical alignment. Serious consideration should be given to
purchasing the remaining LLI kits (red, gold, purple, and teal) to utilize for students with reading
difficulties.
The literacy plan should be revised to include the nine essential elements (Appendix A).
A visible, written framework of the comprehensive reading plan, using culturally responsive
practices needs to be provided in order to carry out the expectations of the district. A list of
available materials should be included as well as any materials specifically required to be used to
address the district goals.
Instruction
The current reading plan addresses grouping students in whole group and small groups
using a variety of methods. There is a dedicated intervention block for each grade level focusing
on pre-teaching, re-teaching, and enriching the literacy curriculum but it is not stated in the plan.

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COMPREHENSIVE READING PLAN EVALUATION
During the intervention block, the literacy specialist works with selected students using programs
that are in coherence with the classroom curriculum such as (a) Fundation (double dose), (b)
Caf strategies, (c) LLI, (d) Wilson Reading System, or (e) The Comprehension Toolkit
intervention.
In order for teachers to gain knowledge about the various literacy programs, teachers are
expected to attend professional development opportunities that are offered by the district.
Opportunities for professional development are not addressed in the current plan. In-services are
conducted throughout the year in the district to support current trends and best practice but are
not listed in the plan. Coaching for the Fundation curriculum after the initial workshop is
offered within the district several times a year. Fundations is an Orton Gillingham approach to
teaching reading and spelling.
Recommendations for Instruction
Many expectations are assumed as part of the culture of the school and have not been
written down as an actual expectation. We recommend adding these expectations as a first step
to improving the instruction portion of the reading plan. The reading plan should have in writing
how reading instruction will be organized, such as allocation of time for literacy, how student
needs will be met, such as grouping, materials, and additional support. This K-8 school does
have a block dedicated to each grade for intervention and enrichment time, but it is not stated in
the plan. The plan should address the specific instructional strategies expected such as the Daily
5 to be utilized by all the teachers to create consistency across grades K-8.
Assessment

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COMPREHENSIVE READING PLAN EVALUATION
An extensive assessment system has been put in place for all grades within the school and
is attached to the comprehensive reading plan (Appendix B). The third Tuesday of each month
teachers from each unit (primary, intermediate and middle school) meet to discuss the data they
have collected. These meetings focus heavily on the MAP data, but efforts have been made to
try to guide teachers to discuss all data they are collecting at these meetings. There has been an
effort to make sure the assessments being used are aligned with the curriculum being taught. For
example the Fountas and Pinnell benchmark assessment is used to measure the effectiveness of
the Fountas and Pinnell Continuum. Teachers are encouraged to use pre-assessments whenever
possible to guide instruction and personalize learning. This plan could do a better job of
assessing high-level cognitive thinking. The assessments are used to assist teachers in
instructional decision making when establishing guided reading and skill-based groups. Perhaps
coaching provided by the literacy specialist could help teachers understand the data and become
even more effective in their teaching. The literacy specialist does use the assessments over
multiple data points to identify struggling and high achievers.
Recommendations for Assessments
Follow through on all assessments needs some reinforcement from administration. An
assessment to consider is Phonological Awareness Literacy Screening (PALS) because the public
schools throughout the state utilize this assessment and it would create consistency vertically
with kindergarten through second grade. We consider the assessment portion of the
comprehensive reading plan to be the strongest aspect. Minor revisions may be needed as
situations arise.

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COMPREHENSIVE READING PLAN EVALUATION
Process of change
Currently, there is not a committee assigned to the task of developing a comprehensive
reading plan so time has not been allotted. In general, teachers are given the opportunity to
provide input toward curriculum development. The teachers are also highly involved in
discussions of how reading can be taught more effectively. When change or a new curriculum is
implemented, teachers are encouraged and supported by the leaders and professional
development has been provided. For example, when Fundations was implemented, teachers
were provided with a professional development workshop followed by four coaching sessions
and individual contact throughout the year. The literacy plan has always been shared at the
initial staff meeting in the past, but no feedback on the plan has been collected other than
informal conversation. None of this is documented in the comprehensive reading program.
Recommendations for Process for Change
Researchers have documented the best way to establish and create change is through
distributed leadership, teachers learning from each other and a culture of collaboration (Bean and
Dagen, 2012). Bean & Dagen put emphasis on leadership distribution. Leadership should be
distributed across individuals in the school. It is important to call upon individuals according to
their expertise and experiences for the benefit of the students and staff. Therefore, we
recommend the team members for the committee include the principal, reading specialist, grade
level teacher representatives, parents and community leaders.
This committee should first look to educate themselves as to what a comprehensive
reading plan should encompass. One resource could be The Administration and Supervision of

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COMPREHENSIVE READING PLAN EVALUATION
Reading Programs fifth edition by Wepner, Strickland and Quatroche 2014. This book would
serve as a guide of what should be considered when implementing a reading program. Other
resources provided by Dr. Melinda Langeberg Ed.D from Viterbo University include:
http://www.marylandpublicschools.org/NR/rdonlyres/22DF6F65-9763-44EF-B086

B91687EE39A2/35468/Research_Based_Programs_.pdf
https://app1.fldoe.org/Reading_Plans/
http://www.dpi.state.nc.us/docs/k-3literacy/achieve/plan.pdf
http://www.westbrowardhigh.org/04_2014-15%20Broward%20K12%20Reading%20Plan.pdf
http://www.westbrowardhigh.org/04_2014-15%20Broward%20K12%20Reading%20Plan.pdf
Katzenmeyer and Moller (2001) stress the importance of building relationships among
followers in order to influence them and gain trust. It is also important to create hope and
optimism with followers (Rath & Conchie, 2008). By providing teachers opportunities to give
feedback and ideas, one gains trust and followers. A survey is a great way to collect this
information.
Another way to gain trust and establish relationships amongst colleagues is to provide
teachers with support. Offering professional development opportunities along with coaching
helps teachers become less overwhelmed through the process of change. There needs to be
more effort put into coaching teachers across most areas. Bean and Dagen (2012) stress the
importance of having principals attend professional development with the teachers and coaches,
in order to provide instructional guidance that reflects knowledge about reading and instruction.
Principals have been almost entirely overlooked with regards to coaching, yet without their
leadership, coaching would fail to show the result we are hoping for (Routman, 2014, p.1).

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COMPREHENSIVE READING PLAN EVALUATION
Trainings have been provided, but most implementations in the past have only included a
workshop with no additional support.
Professional Learning Communities (PLC) are recommended to replace the unit meetings
to provide collaboration. The principal should consider presenting the concept of the PLCs to
the staff as a guideline to create the change that is needed. Before implementing the PLC, norms
should be established and a timeline should be created.
Our input is focused on elementary literacy due to our trainings, experience and
expertise. We recommend receiving input from middle school teachers.

References
Bean, R. M., & Swan, D. A. (2012). Best practices of literacy leaders: Keys to school

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COMPREHENSIVE READING PLAN EVALUATION
improvement. New York, NY: Guilford Press.
Howard Suamico School District, (2015). Literacy Roll Out Plan.
https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1oWpbYnD5LHlmAABYREeKRKPU1J1H34qI
FYVno3teICc/edit#slide=id.g8fde90809_8_0
Katzenmeyer, M., & Moller, G. (2001). Awakening the sleeping giant: Helping teachers develop
as leaders. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.
Rath, T., & Conchie, B. (2008). Strengths based leadership: Great leaders, teams, and why
people follow. New York: Gallup Press.
Routman, R. (2014). Read, write, lead: Breakthrough strategies for schoolwide literacy
success. Alexandria: ASCD.
Wepner, S. B., Strickland, D. S., & Quatroche, D. J. (2014). The administration and supervision
of reading programs (5th ed.). New York: Teachers College Press.

Appendix A
PreK

10

11

12

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COMPREHENSIVE READING PLAN EVALUATION
Concepts of
print
Alphabet
recognition
Phonemic
Awareness
Decoding: Phonics, Structural Analysis, Latin
Roots, Greek Combining Forms
Fluency
Motivation to read
Writing (Spelling and Composing)
Vocabulary
Comprehension of Narrative and Informational Text
Oral Language Development

Adapted from figure 1.2 Components of Reading Programs (pre-k-12) from The Administration
and Supervision of Reading Programs written by Wepner, Strickland and Quatroche 2014.

Appendix B

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COMPREHENSIVE READING PLAN EVALUATION
St. Johns School Assessment Plan
Date
Needed
As
completed
September
30th

October
16th

January
29th
May 13th

Assessment

Expectation
Record Unit Test data into Google doc
Reteach if less than 80% of the class scores below 80%.
Copy tests for students below 80% and give to the
Literacy Specialist.
Complete inventories and record data on summary
sheet in google docs.
Fountas and Pinnell Benchmark Use Fountas and Pinnell Benchmarks assessment
Assessment 1-5 not at Z
System. Test to Frustration Level for every student
Fountas and Pinnell Benchmark Complete summary including Instructional,
Independent and Frustration level in google docs
Assessment 8 as needed
selected radar and at risk
Update the Fountas and Pinnell File folder inside and
students
out.
Words Their Way Spelling
Inventory
Complete inventories and record data on summary
1-8 of students that have not
sheet in google docs.
completed the Upper Inventory Will be reviewed at February data day
in Fall
Use Fountas and Pinnell Benchmarks Assessment
System. Test to Frustration Level for select Radar
and at risk students
Complete summary including Instructional,
Independent and Frustration level in google docs.
Fountas and Pinnell Benchmark Update the Fountas and Pinnell File folder inside and
Assessment 1-8 Selected radar out.
and at risk students
WIll be reviewed at February Data day.
This assessment could be from book room books, RAZ
Informal Running records
kids, Reading A-Z assessment, See Literacy Specialist
should be completed by this date if you need support in this area, etc
for all students at or above
Make sure data is recorded so questions about growth
benchmarks
can be supported using this data.
Words Their Way Spelling
Inventory
Complete inventories and record data on summary
1-8 of students that have not
sheet in google docs.
completed the Upper Inventory
in Fall
Fountas and Pinnell Benchmark Use Fountas and Pinnell Benchmarks assessment
Assessment 1-5 not at Z

Fundation Unit Test Grades K-3

Spelling Inventory 1-8

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COMPREHENSIVE READING PLAN EVALUATION
System. Test to Frustration Level for every student.
Complete summary including Instructional,
Independent and Frustration level in google docs.
Fountas and Pinnell Benchmark Update the Fountas and Pinnell File folder inside and
Assessment 8 as needed
out.
selected radar and at risk
Will be reviewed at May Data Day.
students
All documents will be shared in google docs.
Grades 1-3 Add Fundations scores on google docs after each unit test
MAP Assessments will be completed for all students K-8 in Fall and Spring. Radar, at risk,
and low growth students will also be assessed in winter

Spelling Inventory
Use the Inventory from Words Their Way. A copy is in the Appendix of your book and provided
with this document.
Complete a spelling inventory for each student
o 1-2 Primary & Elementary as needed
o 3-4 Elementary & Upper as needed
o 5-8 Upper as needed
Fill out the classroom summary on google docs. Please fill out the document shared with you,
do not create a new one to share.
Examine the data
o Compare last assessment with current
o Note positives ( growth, progress, etc)
o Note concerns lack of growth, negative growth, areas to reteach for individuals as well as group
Determine how to divide your students ( See literacy specialist for help if needed)
Set instructional goals and objectives.

Fountas and Pinnell Benchmark Assessment


For Fall & Spring - Please use the Fountas and Pinnell Benchmark Assessment Kit for all
students
In January students showing below proficiency in the fall should be assessed with the Fountas
and Pinnell kit .
Complete Running Record giving a score for comprehension, Fluency, Accuracy and Word Per
Minute (WPM). This information should be recorded on the front of each running record.
Word Per Minute can be calculated using the information in the running record or using a
Fountas and Pinnell Calculator, which you have been provided.
To determine independent, instructional and Frustration levels please refer to the Fountas and
Pinnell Guide provided. You must test students to the Frustration Level in order to obtain the
highest instructional level.

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COMPREHENSIVE READING PLAN EVALUATION
Fill out the Student Fountas and Pinnell Benchmark Assessment File folder with information
about each students Running records inside and out.
Fill out the summary sheet on google docs.

Informal Running Records


Between Fall and Spring All students should be monitored for growth using informal running
record. These can be completed using any book. More information can be found in the shared
teacher folder on google drive.
Some examples, but not limited to these:
Book room books
Reading A-Z or Raz kids
Roe and Burns Informal Reading Inventory ( provides specific information about comprehension
skills)