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RENEW JACKSON

A MASTER PLAN FOR MUNICIPAL SPECIAL SALES TAX-FUNDED INFRASTRUCTURE IMPROVEMENTS

SPECIAL SALES TAX-FUNDED INFRASTRUCTURE IMPROVEMENTS Established and Adopted by the Municipal Special Sales Tax

Established and Adopted by the Municipal Special Sales Tax Commission

As developed by the City of Jackson Department of Public Works

May 2016

FROM THE MAYOR

Greetings,

Delivering the Vision: A Bold New City Transforming the City of Jackson to become a
Delivering the Vision:
A Bold New City
Transforming the City of Jackson to
become a destination city that is a
leader in innovation, education,
infrastructure stability; cultivating an
environment that is safer and
conducive to entrepreneurial
endeavors.

On January 14, 2014, citizens from all over our great city convincingly passed legislation to approve a 1% sales tax increase to address our infrastructure needs. Infrastructure stability is a prime concern across our country. The lack of investment in infrastructure improvements has led to a growing gap between the funding that is needed and what is available to budget. Our infrastructure concerns are no different from other cities. Yet, what we’ve done here in Jackson is take a progressive approach to address the issues that have plagued our city for decades. This approach has put us in the front seat of a national conversation; but reversing a trend of deferred maintenance and curing the issues from years of limited investment doesn’t happen overnight.

In April of 2014, this administration took on the challenge to bring about positive change in Jackson and to provide the best possible quality of life for all its constituents. We see the national trend toward sustainable infrastructure management as an opportunity to solidify Jackson as a leader in innovation and planning throughout our great nation. After assuming office, this administration immediately rolled out initiatives such as our infrastructure listening tours - to involve the community in the process of planning for our infrastructure improvements. Using feedback from those listening tours, a public comment period and input from the commission set in place to monitor expenditures of the 1% sales tax funds; our own Department of Public Works, being the subject matter experts, have developed Renew Jackson; a Master Plan for the municipal special sales tax funded infrastructure improvement program for Jackson, Mississippi: The Bold New City.

The vision of our city can only be accomplished through our collective genius and collective efforts. This administration submits to you that at every level, in every department, in all tasks we will be committed to our citizens, innovative in our thoughts, seamlessly connected in our processes, champions of our vibrant city, diligent in our efforts to assure the progression of our people, and a prosperous city with leaders that exemplify the level of excellence that Jackson deserves. As we push forward to implement Renew Jackson, we welcome continued feedback and ideas to grow the capital city of Mississippi. I thank you for the confidence that you have placed in me to lead this city toward the manifestation of its potential. We are Jackson!

All the best,
All the best,

Tony T. Yarber Mayor of Jackson

Page | 1

CITY COUNCIL

PRESIDENT

Melvin Priester, Jr., Ward 2

VICE PRESIDENT

Tyrone Hendrix, Ward 6

COUNCIL MEMBERS

Ashby Foote, Ward 1

Kenneth I. Stokes, Ward 3

De’Keither Stamps, Ward 4

Charles Tillman, Ward 5

Margaret Barrett-Simon, Ward 7

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

CITY OF JACKSON MUNICIPAL SPECIAL SALES TAX COMMISSION

Tony T. Yarber, Mayor Kishia L. Powell, PE Gail Wright Lowery James “Pete” Perry Michael Boerner

Duane O'Neil, President/CEO Dr. Beverly Wade Hogan Dr. Carolyn W. Meyers Godwin Dafe Ted Duckworth

MASTER PLAN DEVELOPMENT

CITY OF JACKSON DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS

Kishia L. Powell, Director Andrada Butler, Deputy Director Lacey Reddix, IMP Manager Charles Williams, PhD, PE Robert Lee, PE, CFM Leroy Lee

Mary D. Carter Terry Williamson William Miley Anthony Harkless, PE James Caldwell George Ewing

CONSULTANT SUPPORT

Gresham Smith TIGER VII Grant IMS Engineers Program Management Support Kipling Jones Financial Advisor Raftelis/SOL Engineers Infrastructure Master Plan Development

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Infrastructure Master Plan……………………………………………………………………………………………

Tab

1

Executive Summary

Master Plan Development

Infrastructure Systems

Capital Improvement Planning………………………………………………………………

…………………………Tab

2

Appendix A: One Percent Special Sales Tax Legislation……………………………………………

……………

Tab

3

Appendix B: Sales Tax Funded CIP Annual Budget Summary………………………………………………………

Tab

4

Appendix C: Infrastructure Systems Data………………….…………….……………………………………………

Tab

5

Table 1 Streets

Table 2 Drainage

Table 3 Bridges

Table 4 Water Lines

Appendix D: Operation Orange Cone…………………………………………………………………………….…

Tab

6

Appendix E: Program Year 1 Projects …………………………………………………………………………………

Tab

7

Appendix F: Program Year 2 Projects ……………………………….……………………………………………

Tab

8

Appendix G: Public Comments………………………………………………………………………

………

………

Tab

9

INFRASTRUCTURE MASTER PLAN

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Over the last several years the City of Jackson has spent hundreds of thousands of dollars on street resurfacing only to have shifting soils and an escalating number of utility cuts return our roadways to an obstacle course of potholes. State Street, a major gateway into our city, was resurfaced in 2010; however, 26 utility cuts has degraded the condition of the roadway since. The City’s failing water system loses an estimated 40% of treated water through leaking pipes. The corresponding loss of reliability has sent some of our largest users to private wells resulting in a major loss of revenue that would otherwise aid in resolving the water loss problem.

In March of 2013, the City received a federally mandated wastewater consent decree as a result of hundreds of sanitary sewer overflows (SSOs) and prohibited bypasses from the wastewater treatment plants. Severe drainage and flooding issues have had significant impacts on public and private property. Many of the city’s bridges are structurally deficient; the worst case, a bridge with a rating of 9 on a 100- point scale. All of the above are emblematic of the need for an infrastructure overhaul to RENEW JACKSON.

While the continued deterioration of infrastructure in the capital city is frustrating and costly to citizens and businesses alike, this is but a microcosm of a national trend. A trend that has grown out of deferred maintenance and a severe shortage of funding.

Like a growing number of municipalities across the country, the City’s response to this issue was a 1% sales tax specifically dedicated to infrastructure funding.

BUY JACKSON: THE MUNICIPAL SPECIAL SALES TAX

In 2014, the citizens of Jackson voted overwhelmingly to support passage of a 1% sales tax for infrastructure improvements. The sales tax applies to goods and services with the exception of groceries, restaurant food and

with the exception of groceries, restaurant food and STATE OF OUR INFRASTRUCTURE National and State Perspective:

STATE OF OUR INFRASTRUCTURE

National and State Perspective: The City of Jackson is not alone Public infrastructure assets are
National and State Perspective:
The City of Jackson is not alone
Public infrastructure assets are in significant
need of repairs and upgrades just to maintain
current service levels but there is a severe
shortage of capital
 ASCE estimated a needed infrastructure
investment of $3.6 trillion dollars in the
U.S. by 2020
 EPA estimated the 20-year funding gap
for water and wastewater infrastructure
improvements as $534 billion
 FHWA estimated a need of $105.6 billion
annually between 2007 and 2026 just to
sustain current service levels
 According to the State of Mississippi’s
2012 infrastructure report card, 2,274 of
the State’s 17,044 bridges are
structurally deficient
 The State of Mississippi has a combined
drinking water and wastewater need of
$5.1 billion over 20 years to improve
existing infrastructure

beverages, prescription drugs, hotel/motel rooms, large equipment purchases, and subscription television and internet services. The sales tax is collected and accounted for separate from other funds by the Mississippi Department of Revenue and paid to the City of Jackson. The City maintains the sales tax revenue in a special contingency fund until the funds are encumbered for budgeted projects. Based on sales tax revenue projections, the 1% sales tax is expected to generate $13M to $15M annually. The following table shows the sales tax generated since April 2014.

Table 1. Municipal Special Sales Tax Revenue

 

Month

1% Infrastructure Sales Tax

2014

2015

2016

January

 

$1,161,714.36

$1,104,239.29

February

 

$1,399,264.52

$1,344,590.72

March

 

$1,048,261.72

$1,018,120.33

April

$6,223.68

$1,153,801.17

$1,190,878.37

May

$1,161,472.16

$1,210,334.48

$1,425,034.00

June

$1,166,418.76

$1,163,783.03

 

July

$1,125,591.09

$1,276,732.18

 

August

$1,066,070.38

$1,221,542.66

 

September

$1,118,181.12

$1,170,913.42

 

October

$1,147,222.67

$1,133,357.60

 

November

$1,162,734.27

$1,185,893.25

 

December

$1,191,601.54

$1,184,640.39

 

Total

   

$29,538,617.16

Compared to the needed $1.5B identified in needed infrastructure investment, and the cost of infrastructure improvement projects, the sales tax alone will not address the problem. Therefore, the City has strategized to leverage the sales tax in order to fund projects and maximize implementation to stabilize and ultimately improve infrastructure.

INFRASTRUCTURE IMPROVEMENT SPENDING AND CURRENT NEED

The City of Jackson has not had a formal capital improvement program in over ten years; however, capital projects have been completed primarily using funding that is reserved from operating and maintenance expenses and/or grants and loans. In recent years, capital expenditures have increased, largely due to an effort to utilize funds made available through grants and bond proceeds as well as required expenditures for consent decree compliance. The following figure conveys the capital expenditures from 2011 through 2015.

INFRASTRUCTURE INVESTMENTS FY11-15

$40,000,000.00

$35,000,000.00 $30,000,000.00 $25,000,000.00 $20,000,000.00 $15,000,000.00 $10,000,000.00 $5,000,000.00 $- FY11
$35,000,000.00
$30,000,000.00
$25,000,000.00
$20,000,000.00
$15,000,000.00
$10,000,000.00
$5,000,000.00
$-
FY11
FY12
FY13
FY14
FY15
Sewer
$2,440,280.96
$4,280,356.90
$12,168,662.61
$17,591,646.66
$21,339,653.85
Water
$2,478,157.30
$8,975,804.00
$10,764,441.73
$3,278,735.28
$6,511,982.10
Drainage
$870,900.08
$289,752.92
$731,123.42
$844,618.27
$1,645,043.00
Bridges
$308,030.84
$40,000.00
$688,527.89
$265,879.96
$1,144,966.34
Roads
$4,136,722.15
$5,601,979.07
$3,104,656.60
$11,953,839.51
$6,980,191.83

Figure 1. Total of Infrastructure Expenditures FY11-15

FY 13 -15 Water and sewer expenditures include Water Infrastructure Improvement Program costs for meter exchange program, water plant improvements and sewerline replacement projects as well as costs of consent decree program expenditures, leaving very little to address infrastructure in the public right of way.

The limited investment in recent years underscores the reasons for the sharp decline in infrastructure stability in the City. Based upon the most recent estimates the total estimated need for infrastructure spending in Jackson

between now and 2031 exceeds $1.5 billion.

stabilize, while at the same time establish a plan for long-term sustainable improvements that attract other sources of

funding.

Reversing the trend has required the City to develop strategies to

THE MUNICIPAL SPECIAL SALES TAX LEGISLATION

Section § 27-65-241 of the Mississippi Annotated Code lays out the requirements for use of the municipal special sales tax as follows:

Code Section

Requirements

Revenue Collection

 

§

27-65-241 (4)

The revenue collected pursuant to the tax levy imposed under this section may be expended to pay the cost of road and street repair, reconstruction and resurfacing projects based on traffic patterns, need and usage, and to pay the costs of water, sewer and drainage projects in accordance with a master plan adopted by the commission established pursuant to subsection (7).

Segregating Sales Tax Funds

 

§

27-65-241 (5)(b)

The proceeds of the special sales tax shall be placed into a special municipal fund apart from the municipal general fund and any other funds of the municipality, and shall be expended by the municipality solely for the purposes authorized in subsection (4) of this section.

Establishing a Commission

 

§

27-65-241(7)(a)

Any municipality that levies the special sales tax authorized under this section shall establish a commission as provided for in this section. Expenditures of revenue from the special sales tax authorized by this section shall be in accordance with a master plan adopted by the commission pursuant to this subsection.

Establishing a Master Plan and Expenditures of the Revenue

§

27-65-241 (7)(h)

The commission shall, with input from the municipality, establish a master plan for road and street repair, reconstruction and resurfacing projects based on traffic patterns, need and usage, and for water, sewer and drainage projects. Expenditures of the revenue from the tax authorized to be imposed pursuant to this section shall be made at the discretion of the governing authorities of the municipality if the expenditures comply with the master plan. The commission shall monitor the compliance of the municipality with the master plan.

Leveraging Sales Tax Funds

 

§

27-65-241(8)

The governing authorities of any municipality that levies the special sales tax authorized under this section are authorized to incur debt, including bonds, notes or other evidences of indebtedness, for the purpose of paying the costs of road and street repair, reconstruction and resurfacing projects based on traffic patterns, need and usage, and to pay the costs of water, sewer and drainage projects in accordance with a master plan adopted by the commission established pursuant to subsection (7) of this section. Any bonds or notes issued to pay such costs may be secured by the proceeds of the special sales tax levied pursuant to this section or may be general obligations of the municipality and shall satisfy the requirements for the issuance of debt provided by Sections 21-33-313 through 21-33-323.

The legislation for the Municipal Special Sales Tax requires that a master plan be established by the Commission, with input from the Municipality, for road and street repair, reconstruction and resurfacing projects based on traffic

patterns, need and usage, and for water, sewer and drainage projects.

is most knowledgeable regarding the City’s infrastructure improvement needs and the state of the City’s infrastructure assets, the Department, led by the Department Director (a Commission Member), developed the basis for the master plan while facilitating work sessions with the Commission to establish the required master plan for adoption. Stakeholder input from Council Members and public comments have been incorporated in this master plan as well. Once adopted, the Commission’s role will be to monitor compliance with the master plan as expenditures

are made at the discretion of the City of Jackson.

Given the City’s Department of Public Works

AUTHORIZATION FOR EXPENDITURE OF THE REVENUE

The purpose of this document is to establish a master plan for road and street repair, reconstruction and resurfacing projects based on traffic patterns, need and usage, and for water, sewer and drainage projects. Expenditures of the revenue from the 1% sales tax will be made at the discretion of the governing authorities of the City of Jackson for the following:

Costs associated with improvements of all eligible public infrastructure assets

Capital project and equipment expenditures for improvements of all eligible public infrastructure assets and systems

Professional services for project/program implementation

Capital expenditures that achieve policy direction, short and long-term objectives as well as investment priorities for each infrastructure system

To address emergency infrastructure failures

CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PLANNING AND PROJECT DELIVERY

A Capital Improvement Plan is not required by the municipal special sales tax legislation and therefore not subject to

the approval of the Commission. However, the Department of Public Works understood the need to develop both a

master plan for compliance, as well as a Capital Improvement Plan that identifies specific projects, budgeted costs and funding sources including sales tax funds. The goal of the Department’s capital improvement planning process

is to identify and prioritize critical infrastructure needs across the City and to allocate funding to implement those

projects through a process that is logical, transparent, and data-driven.

The Department has elected to utilize a five year planning horizon; however, project priorities will be reviewed annually with emergency and urgent needs being assessed on an on-going basis by the City. The costs of road and street repair, reconstruction and resurfacing projects based on traffic patterns, need and usage, and the costs of water, sewer and drainage projects eligible for use of sales tax funds will be identified in the capital improvement plan; however, expenditures of the revenue from the tax shall be made at the discretion of the governing authorities

of the City of Jackson as long as the expenditures comply with the master plan.

Specific projects and expenditures will be provided as they are determined by the approved by the governing authorities of the City to aid the Commission in fullfilling its role of monitoring compliance.

INFRASTRUCTURE IMPROVEMENT OBJECTIVES

The City of Jackson’s infratructure improvement needs are vast and varied in scope. There are multiple drivers at play and varying perspectives on how the sales tax funds should be spent. It is quite clear that the City’s roads are in a terrible state of disrepair, and this impacts every neighborhood in every Ward across the City. So it would seem an obvious answer to prioritize the use of the sales tax on paving streets, restoring utility cuts and filling potholes. However, for those that are directly impacted by an overflowing sewer due to a collapse, or an eroding drainage channel, live in a neighborhood served by a 2-inch water line, on the other side of a collapsed bridge or for those among us that find it difficult to navigate the City due to disabilities, more has to be done with the sales tax funding.

Early in the master planning process short and long-term objectives were established to build upon needs identified by community stakeholders, in comprehensive plans and in accordance with the City’s economic development priorities.

Table 2. Short-Term and Long-Term Objectives for Infrastructure Improvements

Short-term Objectives

Long-Term Objectives

Public health and safety

Integrated infrastructure improvements to leverage multiple funding sources and implement “Dig Once” philosophy

Stabilize critical infrastructure

Drive econmic development in priority areas

Stabilize streets and facilitate movement in/out of neighborhoods

Draw from a comprehensive capital improvement plan

Address backlog of citizen service requests

Partner with neighborhood associations to implement coordinate improvements

Increase investments around schools and other critical facilities

Set aside annual funding for Operation Orange Cone

Leverage existing external funds to “de-shelve” sitting projects

Set aside funds for urgent need contracts to address emergency infrastructure failures

Leverage available funding opportunities (TIGER and Urban Waters)

Invest in preventive maintenanc projects for rads/bridges, drainage, water and sewer

Facilitate immediate economic development opportunities

Improve walkability of communities and mobility of those with disabilities

The Department of Public Works employed a strategy of moving partially funded projects, near-shovel ready projects and interim maintenance improvements in an effort to jump start infrastructure improvements, maximize implementation and utilize federal dollars that have been sitting unspent for over five years in an effort to stabilize as much of the City as possible. While at the same time, investing in projects requiring design to establish work for the next construction season. In future years the program must involve a mix of projects that maximize implementation of projects while increasing design and construction backlog.

STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT/PUBLIC INFORMATION AND OUTREACH

Stakeholder Engagement is part of any master plan development process. It was important to receive feedback on the issues that are impacting communities across the City. From discussions in the community, review of service requests and feedback from Council Members and Constituent Services; it is evident that the condition of the streets, drainage issues, leaking water pipes and infrastructure failures, such as collapsed bridges, should be prioritized for use of this funding source.

The specific stakeholder engagement methods used during the initial phase of master plan development included:

Seven Wards in Seven Days: The Mayor and city council members toured the city with constituents to observe critical infrastructure issues in each ward. Critical issues were then incorporated in the scope of Year 1 capital imrpvements.

Listening Tour Stops: Citizens help city officials better understand the impacts of deficient infrastructure within their communities.

Local Contractors Roundtable: Contractors/Consultants and city officials brainstormed ideas on local engagement and what works for capacity building as it relates to sales tax funded infrastructure improvements.

Public Comment Period: In March 2015, a draft of the IMP was posted for public comments to be considered for incorporation into the plan. Appendix G includes the list of public comments received and how those comments have been addressed.

The culmination of stakeholder input has resulted in a final master plan that addresses the diverse needs of the City where infrastructure improvements are concerned, the first iteration of a comprehensive capital improvement program for roads, bridges, drainage, water and sewer systems while important projects have gotten underway. Stakeholder engagement will be a continuous process throughout the life of the program.

RENEW JACKSON

INFRASTRUCTURE MASTER PLAN DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION

INFRASTRUCTURE MASTER PLAN DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION Figure 2. Triple Bottom Line Benefits of a Sustainable

Figure 2. Triple Bottom Line Benefits of a Sustainable Infrastructure Improvement Program

A Master Plan is a general plan for achieving an objective, a comprehensive plan that provides for guidance or long-term strategy. In this case, the objective to be achieved is infrastructure improvements through use of sales tax funding. Given the 20-year life of this sales tax, the basis for the long-term strategies expressed in this plan is sustainability.

Because infrastructure plays a vital role in the growth, stability and vitality of any city, it is important to establish policy directiopn for infrastrcuture improvement. This master plan in effect establishes the following policy directions for infrastructure investment in Jackson:

Investment will be fair and equitable across the City to stabilize, improve quality of life and grow all parts of the City of Jackson

Priorities for infrastrcuture improvements will be established by the City of Jackson including improvements that maintain or achive regulatory compliance and alignment with the City’s Economic Development Priorities

Investments will meet current and future required levels of service

The City will maintain a 5-year capital improvement plan to adequately plan funding strategies that leverage the sales tax revenue as well as implementation strategies to keep work moving

Planning infrastructure improvements will account for life-cycle costs (cost of improvement plus furture costs to maintain the infrastructure investment)

Infrastructure improvements will not just improve the structural condition of the assets but also achive compliance where required

Infrastructure systems with limited funding and urgent needs will be prioritized for funding

The Infrastructure Master Plan (IMP) provides an overview of the eligible infrastructure systems, the overall state of the assets in those systems as well as sufficient detail to convey how eligible infrastructure improvement needs will be identified, prioritized and funded for implementation. Additionally, the plan conveys the capital improvement planning process and the project delivery process required for implementation of eligible improvements. Development of the IMP started with review of existing plans.

GAP ANALYSIS

Over the years the City has commissioned several master plans or facilities plans for infrastructure improvements; however, many of the project recommendations have not been implemented due to funding constraints and/or changes in priority, operating conditions and regulatory need. To assist the Commission in establishing a master plan, DPW performed an initial “gap analysis” review of 34 master plan-type documents dating back to the mid- 1960’s to determine improvement needs and to identify what infrastructure projects were planned, completed, or deferred. Through this process, DPW was able to identify and propose critical projects that were close to “shovel- ready” to get the sales tax funded infrastructure improvement program underway for the first program year.

While the “gap analysis” demonstrated a need to gather more data regarding the condition of the City’s infrastructure assets, it was determined that the most recent plans, while not all are comprehensive, provide sufficient detail regarding needed infrastructure improvements to incorporate by reference for eligible infrastructure improvements.

Table 3. Eligible Infrastructure Improvements and Existing Planning Documents

Sales Tax Eligible Infrastructure Improvements

Existing Plan

Road and Street Repair: This would typically refer to maintenance and spot repairs including utility cut restoration and sinkhole repairs; the City would consider bridge maintenance and repairs as part of this category. Work can be performed by properly equipped in-house crews or outsourced to contractors.

DPW utilizes Pavement Assessment Data from the Central Mississippi Planning and Development District (CMPDD), the City’s 311 service request system, and in-house street assessments to identify needed road and street repairs as well as conduct regular inspections.

Reconstruction and Resurfacing Projects Based on Traffic Patterns, Need and Usage: This category refers to roadways with extensive base failures (reconstruction) and those needing an overlay of asphalt (resurfacing). The City would consider bridge replacement as part of this category. The City would consider sidewalk ADA compliance retrofits to be included in this category due to the requirements of federal regulations. Work can be performed by properly equipped in-house crews or outsourced to contractors.

A City specific plan does not exist; however, in 2015, the City provided input for the Jackson Urbanized Area’s Long Range Transportation Plan (Central Mississippi Planning and Development District). The City will also submit requests for inclusion in the next Transportation Improvement Program for the Jackson Urbanized Area, in the Summer of 2016 as a result of the FAST Act. The City also implemented a pavement management system which provided for condition assessment ratings.

Water: This category refers to the City’s drinking water treatment and distribution system.

Water Distribution System Rehabilitation Master Plan Update February 2013

Sewer: This category refers to the City’s sewage collection and treatment system.

The City plans to utilize the existing enterprise fund as the primary funding source for sewer improvement projects as to allow the special sales tax to be prioritized for road, water and drainage improvements.

Drainage: This category refers to the City’s stormwater drainage system.

Capital Reinvestment in Urban Drainage Infrastructure June 2013

IMP DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION

The IMP establsihes a framework of best practices to plan, prioritize, fund and implement infrastructure improvements in the City of Jackson. Such best practices include the use of GIS mapping to identify opportunities for integrated improvements as well as development of a comprehensive infrastructure capital improvement plan that identifies sales tax eligible infrastructure improvements.

PLANNING

sales tax eligible infrastructure improvements. PLANNING The RENEW JACKSON infrastructure master planning effort must

The RENEW JACKSON infrastructure master planning effort must accomodate four major infrastructure systems and meet the needs of a City that has gone without significant infrastructure improvements for more than a decade. Using an integrated planning approach meets the overarching goal of RENEW JACKSON - investment in comprehensive sustainable solutions that meet both short and long- term objectives. Common drivers for integrated planning are regulatory requirements, aging infrastructure, limited funding and affordability; all of which are concerns in the City of Jackson.

As part of the planning process, DPW reviewed data for each infrastructure system which was used to assess the condition of infrastructure assets as well as informing the required scope of infrastructure improvement projects for inclusion in the comprehensive capital improvement program. Following varying levels of field investigation to further assess condition of infrastructure assets, a broad scope of services is used to estimate a cost and establish a priority for the systems. Prioritization of infrastructure improvements are driven by:

Condition of the assets

Evaluation criteria including public health, saftey and welfare

Community demand (service requests)

Need to meet short and long-term objectives

GIS mapping has been used extensively to identify problem areas from service requests and maintenance records, in addition to planning the limits of projects and identifying opportunities for integrated infrastructure improvements.

The results of the planning process has been development of infrastructure improvement initiatives such as Operation Orange Cone, a focused program to address the condition he City’s streets (outstanding utility cuts, potholes, repaving and reconstruction needs); Greening the Gateways, a long-term strategy to improve major gateways into and through the City using green infrastructure and complete streets concepts; and a capital improvement programming strategy which is documented in this IMP. The capital improvement programming strategy has ultimately resulted in a 5-Year Comprehensive Capital Improvement Plan for Infrastructure Improvements. The 5-YR CIP will be the City’s conduit to program and budget sales tax funded projects for each fiscal year.

PRIORITIZATION

Through the planning process, the prioritization of projects happens in three tiers:

1. By Infrastructure System assessing structural condition and criticality to define improvement needs and required level of service or sufficiency of the infrastructure

2. Project development developing specific projects to fund and program in the CIP

3. Based upon evaluation criteria assessing alignment with multiple criteria to determine where project falls in the planning horizon (5-year program)

4. Urgent Need emergencies and high failure risk projects are funded from an urgent need set aside for on-call work

Prioritization of improvement needs, project development and project delivery will utilize an asset management based methodology. The focus of asset management is extending/renewing the service life of public infrastructure at the lowest life-cycle cost. Principles of asset management include:

life-cycle cost. Principles of asset management include:  Identifying the assets – developing a comprehensive

Identifying the assets developing a comprehensive inventory of major assets (roads, bridges, drainage system, water and sewer systems

Understanding the state of the assets achived by performing condition assessment

Understanding the criticality of assets achived by determining how critical the assets are to serving the public, including critical facilities and services

Risk management understanding the consequences and costs of failure and poor service levels

Life-cycle costing understanding the cost of improvements and long-term maintenance

Once priotritized the projects are budgeted in the CIP

based upon funding availability and

required timing.

availability and r e q u i r e d t i m i n g

Figure 3. Condition Assessment Data Analyzed

IMP FUNDING

IMP FUNDING The municipal speacial sales tax is expected to generate $240 million in revenue over

The municipal speacial sales tax is expected to generate $240 million in revenue over the 20-year life of the tax, making it necessary to leverage the tax revenue using other sources of funds including grants, loans or other forms of financing.

Because the City will target external funding opportunities and appropriations for surface transportation, stormwater (drainage), water and sewer program funding, the City’s comprehensive capital improvement plan will allow for opportunities to align projects with external funding source

criteria.

projects based on what has been typically used for past and

current projects.

Several funding sources have been identified for

Table 4. Targeted Funding Sources to Leverage Sales Tax Revenues

Code

Type

1PTax

Municipal Special Sales Tax

W/S

Water and Sewer Revenue

GF

General Funds

CDBG

Community Development Block Grant Funds

DWSRLF

Drinking Water State Revolving Loan Fund

EDWSRLF

Emergency Drinking Water State Revolving Loan Fund

WWSRLF

Wastewater State Revolving Loan Fund

TIGER

Federal Highway Administration TIGER Grant

FEMA

Federal Emergency Management Agency Flood Hazard Mitigation Grants

ACOE

Army Corps of Engineers Grant Programs

USDA

US Department of Agriculture Natural Resource Conservation Grants

RB

Revenue Bond

SA

State Aid for LSBP Bridges

STP

Surface Transportation Funds

GOB

General Obligation Bond

MDA

Mississippi Development Authority Loans or Grants

G

Other Grant Funds

In addition to the external funding sources the City has targeted for capital projects, there is also a need to leverage the sales tax using public or private financing methods. Given the $1.5-2B in infrastructure improvements identified in the CIP thus far, a completely Pay As-You-Go strategy will not work for this program to achive the level of

investment needed. The most appropriate strategies will be vetted by the City’s Municipal Advisor and approved by the governing authorities of the City as provided for in the Municipal Special Sales Tax legislation.

Table 5. Financing Methods

Public Financing

Private Financing

Short-Term, Tax-Exempt Debt

Direct Source

General Obligation Bonds

Public-Private Partnerships (P3)

Revenue Bonds

 

Green Bonds

 

State Revolving Funds

 

Federal and State Grants

 

Government Loans

 

RENEW JACKSON IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY

The municipal special sales tax-funded infrastructure improvements program, RENEW JACKSON, has started implementation in two phases:

Phase 1

JACKSON, has started implementation in two phases: Phase 1  Development and implementation of a Year

Development and implementation of a Year 1 CIP which included projects that were shovel ready as well as projects requiring design that would become the construction program for Years 2 and 3 of the program

Restoring roads under the Operation Orange Cone initiative (utility cut restoration to resolve cuts in backlog since 2007, spot repairs, repaving neighborhood and major streets, pothole blitz)

Purchase of capital equipment for in-house projects identified in the CIP and 2013 Drainage Master to improve eligible infrastructure, implement other asset management measures; this will enable the in-house crews to perform preventive or interim mainteance that improves the condition of infrastructure more readily in response to community demand and urgent needs

Established an URGENT NEED set aside to fund emergency infrastructure repairs

Engagement of a Program Manager to augment the City’s resources and efforts to implement the infrastructure improvement program and get contracts established

Phase 2

Development of final master plan based upon feedback from various stakeholders

Development of a comprehensive CIP, including sales tax eligible projects and expenditures

Finalizing a financing strategy to continue improvements

PROGRAM MANAGEMENT

As part of the implementation strategy for the RENEW JACKSON infrastructure improvement program, the City has elected to utilize the services of a program manager to augment city staff and provide program specific services for eligible infrastructure improvements. Past programs implemented without the proper controls and oversight to protect the interests of the City have proven that program management is necessary when additional expertise is required, the number of on-going projects exceeds the City’s internal management capacity and specific outcomes need to be achieved. The program managers will provide infrastrcuture assessment, project planning and delivery services. They are also tasked with keeping the public informed, assiting to identify and apply for external funding The program manager will also prepare annual CIP project updates; develop a green infrastructure strategy as well as standards and specifications. Estimated program management costs were included in the CIP budget for Year 1 and it is envisioned that program management services will be on-going with the PM’s engagement scalable based upon the program worklload.

COMPLIANCE MONITORING AND REPORTING

Pursuant to Section § 27-65-241 (7)(h) of the Mississippi Annotated Code, the commission shall monitor the compliance of the municipality with the master plan. In order to do so, a process has been established for compliance monitoring and reporting:

Compliance Objective

Process

Eligible Expenditures

This master plan has documented what are to be considered eligible expenditures. Annually the City will provide the updated Capital Improvement Plan with the schedule of planned expenditures to the Commission for compliance monitoring purposes, not approval.

Tracking Revenues and Expenditures

The City will provide a monthly statement of revenues and expenditures and changes in fund balance for tracking purposes. This statement will include related grant funds, debt service and budgeted vs actual expenditures.

Annual Audit

Revenues and Expenditures from the sales tax will be audited annually at the time of the City’s annual audit in accordance with Generally Accepted Government Auditing Standards and in conformance with the International Standards for the Professional Practice of Internal Auditing.

Figure 4. Program Management Role and Responsibilities Page | 19

Figure 4. Program Management Role and Responsibilities

Page | 19

URGENT NEEDS

It is difficult to predict when and where infrastructure will fail. In this year alone, the City has declared several emergencies for infrastructure failures including the collapse of Robinson Road bridge, a 24-inch sewer collapse, loss of a water treatment plant. From a public heath stand point there is no more critical issue than addressing the corrosion control treatment at the water treatment facilities. Citizens repeatedly express concerns regarding the time it takes to address issues. Because expenditures of the revenue are to be made at the discretion of the City, there should be the maximum amount of flexibility to fund emergency contracts for repair or replacement of infrastructure. As part of the program implementation strategy, urgent need contracts have been programmed in the CIP for eligible infrastructure improvements.

Figure 5. Robinson Road Bridge Collapse

been programmed in the CIP for eligible infrastructure improvements. Figure 5. Robinson Road Bridge Collapse Page

INFRASTRUCTURE SYSTEMS

In the following sections, details for each infrastructure system will be provided as follows:

State of Existing Assets

Historical Capital Investments and Typical Funding Sources

Compliance Requirements

Programmatic Initiatives

Investment Priorities

Table 6. Overview of Infrastructure Improvement Needs

Assets Eligible for Sales Tax Funding

Required Improvements

Roads and Bridges

Over 300 miles of roadways identified are in need of resurfacing (milling and overlay); 10% of roadways identified require complete reconstruction; ADA Compliance and Signal Upgrades; MDOT State Aid has evaluated the City’s 150+ bridge structures and recent results show that 19% of the City’s bridges require replacement of critical maintenance.

1200

maintained miles of roadway (2,055 lane miles)

150+ bridges and hydraulic structures

Drainage

Neighborhood flooding, channel erosion and structural failures and upsizing drainage conveyance; estimated need of over $950M over 20 years

14 major drainage channels and tributarys; unknown miles of storm drain pipe and appurtenances

Water

40% system water loss; 8% of the system is over 100 years old; 97 miles of 2 to 4-inch pipe need to be upsized; cast iron pipe replacement and water treatment plant upgrades for total estimated improvement need of over $520M

1100

miles of water main; two water treatment

facilities; 15 storage tanks and water system appurtenances

Sewer

Estimated consent decree program improvements estimated at

$400M

950 miles of sewer main; three wastewater treatment plants and 98 pump stations

ROADS AND BRIDGES The City of Jackson is responsible for maintenance of 2055 lane miles

ROADS AND BRIDGES

ROADS AND BRIDGES The City of Jackson is responsible for maintenance of 2055 lane miles of

The City of Jackson is responsible for maintenance of 2055 lane miles of roadway in the City of Jackson. This includes major gateways, arterials, collector roads and residential neighborhood streets. In addition to responsibility to maintain roads the City is also responsible for maintaining associated signage and the signalization network including above and below ground infrastructure of over 2,000 signals across the City and over 300 intersections. Adjacent sidewalks, where they exist, and other structures in the City’s right-of-way must also be maintained. The Traffic Maintenance Section of the Infrastructure Management Division maintains 324 traffic signals within the city limits. This number includes 47 signals on Mississippi Department of Transportation highways that the City must maintain by statute. Approximately half of the traffic signals are operated by equipment cabinets that are 25 to 40 years old and/or controllers that are over 15 years old. Most signals utilized in-ground loop detectors that are subject to frequent cuts and failures due to poor asphalt and shifting yazoo clay. Traffic maintenance also provides limited maintenance to the traffic monitoring system that is shared with MDOT.

Page | 22

There are over 150 bridge structures throughout the City of Jackson including timber bridges, concrete

There are over 150 bridge structures throughout the City of Jackson including timber bridges, concrete bridges and concrete box culvert structures. The average life of the bridge structures currently in service is 35 years. All bridge structures are inspected every two years by the Mississippi Department of Transportation State Aid Division; however, in-house staff in the Engineering and Infrastructure Management Divisions regularly monitors bridge structures to assess safety concerns. This diligence and use of in-house expertise has resulted in removing bridges from service prior to collapse.

resulted in removing bridges from service prior to collapse. STATE OF EXISTING ASSETS ROADS In 2014,

STATE OF EXISTING ASSETS

ROADS

In 2014, the Central Mississippi Planning and Development District (CMPDD) performed a pavement condition assessment of all the principal and minor arterial streets and collector streets within Hinds County including an assessment of the pavement condition on a scale from 1 Good Condition to 5 Worst Condition (See Appendix C).

The assessment provided maintence recommendations for each street based on its roughness and condition. Streets were either satisfactory, required patching or crack sealing, replacement of a surface coat, an overlay of asphalt, or would need to be rebuilt/ replaced (reconstructed). Street reconstruction i.e. rebuilding or replacing a street is the most costly and has been estimated at approximately $1M per mile to complete. This estimate includes milling, replacement of subbase, new asphalt, restriping and replacement of stom drains. An averag of 3 lane miles per mile of road was used. Overlaying streets is the second most costly maintenance strategy with the cost of resurfacing estimated to be $150,000 per lane mile. This includes milling and leveling (to align with existing curb and gutter systems), overlay of asphalt, and restriping.

The City has used this assessment along with internal data such as possible external funding opportunities, service requests, and upcoming economic development plans to begin programming streets as future Capital Improvement Projects.

and upcoming economic development plans to begin programming streets as future Capital Improvement Projects. Page |
and upcoming economic development plans to begin programming streets as future Capital Improvement Projects. Page |

Page | 23

Analyzing Data to Prioritize Streets

Major Streets (Principal / Minor Arterials & Collectors):

Major Streets selected for improvement are evaluated based on data provided by CMPDD and divided into three categories: little to no work needed, resurfacing, and reconstruction. The main factors taken into consideration are:

Pavement condition index (PCI)

Reconstruction Score

Traffic volumes

1.1 Pavement Condition Index (PCI)

The PCI is a numerical indicator based on a scale of 0 to 100. The PCI measures the pavement’s structural integrity and surface operational condition. Its scale and associated ratings are shown in Table 7 and Table 8. The PCI rating also gives a good indication of the pavement service life and thus an aid in scheduled maintenance operation.

In the analysis of Major Streets using CMPDD data, weighted scores are given to streets based on PCI values (See Table 7). Streets with PCI ratings above 85 are given a score of zero (0). A zero (0) value indicates high service life and good pavement condition. Streets with PCI values above 85 would not require resurfacing, but would instead be considered for possible patching or crack sealing depending on the recommendations from CMPDD. Streets with useable service life, but with ratings below 85 are assigned values for constructability (OVERLAY) as shown in Table 8.

PCI ratings below 37 fall in the poor to very poor range and therefore require some reconstruction. A value of zero is given if the PCI rating is 37 and below. Also, if CMPDD recommendation for maintenance is to rebuild/reconstruct street, a zero (0) value is given.

1.2 Traffic Volumes

Table 7. PCI Rating Scale

PCI

RATING

100

Excellent

85

Very Good

70

Good

55

Fair

40

Poor

25

Very Poor

10 and below

Failed

Table 8. PCI Rating Scale Scoring Values

PCI VALUES

SCORE

<25

100

26-40

80

41-55

60

56-70

40

71-85

20

>85

0

Table 9. Traffic Volume Score

Traffic Volume

Score

Mean

7081

STD

5533

23679

18147

100

12614

75

7081

50

1548

25

Streets with high traffic volumes are given priority based on a weighted scale. Streets with two (2) standard deviation above the mean are given 100 points and streets with one (1) standard deviation below the mean a score of 25.

1.3 Final Analysis

The final score assigned to each street is a summation of values assigned based on PCI, reconstruction score, and score based on traffic volume. The higher the number, the greater the priority for maintenance.

Based upon the analysis performed, some streets had higher priority score but weren’t chosen for Year 2 Operation Orange Cone. Streets with higher traffic volume were given high priority with regards to overlay. Also, priority was given if street was a major gateway to commercial areas and connection to interstate. A representation of major streets from all Wards were selected. Appendix C: Table 1 Streets lists the major streets where condition assessments have been performed.

Neighborhood Streets:

The data provided by CMPDD is useful for tracking the condition of many arterials and collectors; however, there are a number of streets that the City is responsible for maintaining that are not principal or minor arterial streets or collector streets. These are shorter neighborhood streets that connect the identified collector streets to the homes of residents. To have a more comprehensive understanding of the condition of City streets, an additional assessment has begun on neighborhood streets. This assement was done in steps to establish funding priorities.

Step 1: DPW considered all streets with available priority rating ( as of now only those streets that were identified in GIS database are taken into account). These were streets first rated by the Department in 2007. These streets served as a basis for reavaluation and the streets rated the lowest in 2007 were reevaluated first. In addition to this list, recommendations from the Commission Board, City Council, and general public through public outreach were considered.

Step 2: DPW took past resurfacing data to update the compiled list so that streets that were resurfaced since 2007 were given a lower priority rating. This allowed the Department to focus on the most neglected streets.

Step 3: DPW analyzed service request data to determine the impact each street would have on the general public. Streets with mutliple service requests were deemed a higher importance to citizens than streets with no reported service requests.

Step 4: DPW conducted field visits of each street by Ward to assess its current condition and assign a new priority rating ranging from 0-1000. The lower the score, the higher the priority. This process allowed the City to identify streets with the highest priority rating from above group of streets.

Step 5: DPW shared collected data with stakeholders and received feedback on the streets identified. New streets identified through this consultation process were included and evaluated.

Appendix D: Operation Orange Cone for Neighborhood Streets lists condition assessment results where it has been performed for over 400 streets in preparation of the final master plan and prioritization of Program Year 2 street resurfacing program.

Bridges:

The Mississippi Department of Transportation, State Aid Division conducts annual inspections of City owned bridges and assigns each bridge a sufficiency rating. The sufficiency rating formula provides a method of evaluating highway bridge data by calculating four separate factors to obtain a numeric value which is indicative of bridge sufficiency to remain in service. The result of this method is a percentage in which 100 percent would represent an entirely sufficient bridge and zero percent would represent an entirely insufficient or deficient bridge. The formula considers the structural adequacy; functional obsolescence and level of service; and essentiality for public use.

Recent results of the MDOT State Aid inspections show that 19% of the 150 bridge structures are in need of replacement or critical maintenance. Below is a sub-set of the City’s 150 bridges with a suffinciency rating less than

60.

Planned Bridges FY 15-FY 17

60 50 40 30 20 10 0 HANGING MOSS RD ROBINSON RD READY MIX STREET
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
HANGING
MOSS RD
ROBINSON
RD
READY MIX
STREET
COUNTRY
CLUB DR
ALTA WOODS
BLVD
MAYES ST
MCDOWELL
RD
OFC THOMAS
CATCHIN
SOUTH WEST
STREET
GREENWOOD
AVE
COUNTRY
CLUB RD
MONUMENT
ST
S MILL ST
MCCLUER RD
DERRICK ST
CAVALIER DR
HAWTHORNE
ST
ADKINS BLVD
BEASLEY
ROAD
COUNTY LINE
RD
WOODROW
WILSON
WESTBROOK
RD
JAYNE AVE
TERRY ROAD

Figure 6. Bridges Programmed in Comprehensive Capital Improvement Plan for FY15-17

HISTORICAL INVESTMENTS AND FUNDING SOURCES

The City has typically funded roadway improvement projects with General Funds and grant funds including Community Development Block Grant Funds, funding from MDOT and STP funds through the CMPDD. The City has historically committed $1M a year to street resurfacing; which could in no way keep up with the needed investment to resurface streets on a continuous basis. The passage of the 1% sales tax, will allow the City to address more mileage in the street resurfacing program.

Bridge projects have been largely funded by road bond funds, Local System Bridge Program (LSBP) funds and direct Federal appropriations. Recent investments have been made to address deficiencies of the South Street bridge, Forest Hill Road bridge and the Brookwood Drive bridge.

COMPLIANCE PROGRAMS/PRIORITIES

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) law, specifically Titles II and III governs transportation and public accommodations for people with disabilities. The City is in the process of implementing an ADA Transition Plan to remove physical barriers to accessibility and incorporate ADA compliant features in right-of-way improvements including curb cuts and sidewalk modifications during roadway and sidewalk improvement projects.

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), which has oversight of surface transportation programs and sets minimum requirements and standards for transportation infrastructure, has established an asset management focus. To best service and maintain our Bridges, the Engineering Division will adopt the Systematic Preventive Maintenance Program (SPM) that is currently used by FHWA as part of our Department-wide Asset Management Initiative. The AASHTO Subcommittee on Maintenance’s definition of “preventive maintenance” includes the phrase “a planned strategy of cost-effective treatments.” An SPM program is based on a planned strategy that is equivalent to having a systematic process that defines the strategy, how it is planned, and how activities are determined to be cost effective. An SPM program for bridges can be defined as a planned strategy of cost-effective treatments to existing bridges that are intended to maintain or preserve the structural integrity and functionality of elements and/or components, and retard future deterioration, thus maintaining or extending the useful life of the bridge.

PROGRAMMATIC INITIATIVES

Given the magnitude of the investment needed to improve the condition of the City’s streets, upgrade and innovate our signalization and bring the City into full compliance with ADA requirements the City recognizes the need to invest smartly. This means addressing the underlying issues of water and sewer utility failures, drainage issues and flooding that cause standing water. These chronic issues have led to severe degradation of the City’s streets. DPW has therefore initiated a DIG ONCE philosophy requiring utilities are addressed before roadways are resurfaced including a street cut moratorium by third party utilities and curb to curb restoration of cuts to newly resurfaced streets. A review of past roadway resurfacing projects shows that resurfaced streets have been cut repeatedly due to utility failures. This is a major driver for using an integrated planning approach to identify all opportunities for infrastructure investment in a project location. This integrated planning approach will lead to implementation of Complete Streets and Green Streets projects. Implementation of the ADA Transition Plan is also a programmatic initiative.

Infrastructure Management Paved Streets Division CSRs 6000 5500 5000 4500 4000 3500 3000 2500 2000
Infrastructure Management
Paved Streets Division CSRs
6000
5500
5000
4500
4000
3500
3000
2500
2000
1500
1000
500
0
OPEN
CLOSED
Resurfacing/Paving
Curb & Gutter Repair
Driveway Entrance Repair
Leveling Dip/Uneven
Pavement or
Concrete/Patching
Paved Streets/In-house
Work Orders
Pothole Repair
Street Patching
Utility Cut Repair

Figure 7. Open vs. Closed Service Requests (2014- May 2016)

While it is envisioned that major gateways, arterials and collector streets will be addressed as part of planned capital projects; DPW will initiate a renewed 5-year streets resurfacing program called Operation Orange Cone. This program will be driven by condition assessment and pavement management data collected as part of the City’s pavement management system, the number of utility cuts and other data to identify priorities for each Ward of the City. The street resurfacing program will be part of our new asset management initiative where we will be investing money wisely to extend the service life of our streets by using preventive maintenance measures before the roadway reaches a point of deterioration that requires a more sizable investment and planning. As additional data including funding availability are reviewed, goals for city-wide Street resurfacing and maintenance will be established. This program will be implemented using a combination of in-house crews and contract labor starting with the street listed in Appendix C & D. In-house crews will also continue to address pot hole related service requests; however, street resurfacing by contract will address both potholes and street cuts.

POTHOLES vs UTILITY CUTS
POTHOLES vs UTILITY CUTS

In the past, street resurfacing has been prioritized utilizing the City’s Pavement Management System. This system requires all streets to be evaluated every five years and assigned a priority rating from 0 to 1000. Streets rated 300 or below were considered for resurfacing provided there was adequate budget. Ratings under the current system for streets across the City are presented in the Tables in Appendix C and D.

Implementation of a systematic preventive maintenance program (SPM) will assist the City in qualifying for available Federal Funds for bridge replacement or rehabilitation. In addition to developing a formal bridge maintenance and asset management program, the 1% Sales Tax funds will be used toward implementation of a Jackson Safe Bridges program including timber bridge replacement. This program was submitted as a Public-Private Partnership (P3) Program in response to the US Department of Transportation’s Fall 2014 request for P3 pipeline projects and presents a way to leverage the limited revenues being generated by the sales tax.

Also under the 1% Sales Tax program, the Traffic Engineering section will initiate “Operation Green Light” a comprehensive program to make upgrades to the City’s signal network to compliment investments in rebuilding and resurfacing City streets.

INVESTMENT PRIORITIES

As evidenced by the number of service requests for potholes and utility cuts, roadway improvements in the City of Jackson is an investment priority for use of the 1% Sales tax funds. We understand that the condition of the roads in Jackson not only impact public perception of the City, but there are real impacts to vehicles traveling our city streets including service and emergency vehicles. The limited investment in upgrading the City’s roads has been due to limited available funds. The deterioration of roads and the increasing number of utility cuts due to pipe failures has outpaced the production of in-house crews that are responsible for roadway maintenance because many of the roads are beyond a state of repair and instead need complete reconstruction. The investment priorities for our roads are as follows:

Development of gateway improvement projects using Complete Streets or Green Streets concepts that incorporate integrated infrastructure improvements, roadway reconstruction where required, greening, utility work, signal upgrades, ADA compliance measures and right-of-way improvements to draw economic development and improve the vibrancy of communities

Capital projects that address the major streets and neighborhood streets

Projects where grant funding has been identified and allocated to the City for specific roadway projects

Operation Orange Cone: Initiation of an in-house and contractor based roadway resurfacing program to improve the condition of streets while planning for capital projects. This will also require investing in additional and upgraded capital equipment.

Upgrades to the City’s signal network utilizing new technology and implementing measures to sustain signals.

New developments served by bridge or culvert structures

All major arterial bridge crossings

Replacement of all timber bridge structures

or culvert structures  All major arterial bridge crossings  Replacement of all timber bridge structures
DRAINAGE The City of Jackson is responsible for operation and maintenance of a separate stormwater

DRAINAGE

DRAINAGE The City of Jackson is responsible for operation and maintenance of a separate stormwater drainage

The City of Jackson is responsible for operation and maintenance of a separate stormwater drainage system referred to as the Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System (MS4). Stormwater drainage in the City of Jackson is typically collected in roadside ditches, open channels, catch basins and storm drains then conveyed to major drainage channels and ultimately the Pearl River. The City of Jackson’s Stormwater Drainage System is comprised of 15 major drainage channels, over 200 minor tributaries, small streams and roadside drainage ditches. The miles of separate storm drains, number of storm drain manholes, storm catch basins/storm drain inlets must be determined.

Table 10. City of Jackson's Major Drainage Channels

 

White Oak Creek

Belhaven Creek

Lynch Creek

Trahon Creek

Purple Creek

Bogue Chitto Creek

Three Mile Creek

Big Creek

Eastover Creek

Eubanks Creek

Hardy Creek

Smith Creek

Hanging Moss Creek

Town Creek

Cany Creek

 

STATE OF EXISTING ASSETS

The major drainage channels, minor tributaries and streams that flow through the City’s neighborhoods, in many areas adjacent to private property, have degraded over time with heavy rainstorms causing scour and erosion. The erosion of these natural channels and drainage ways has

1200 1000 800 600 400 200 0
1200
1000
800
600
400
200
0

Number of SRs 2011-

2015

Ditch

Maintenance

Drainage

Maintenance

Erosion

Control

led to loss of property and in some cases threats to public health and safety. During heavy or at times moderate rains, the City’s storm drain system becomes public health and safety. During heavy or at times moderate overwhelmed leading to flooded streets and overwhelmed leading to flooded streets and standing water. This issue is attributed to the capacity of the system to handle the amount of rainfall, the condition of the system that inhibiting the proper continuous flow ofthreats to public health and safety. During heavy or at times moderate rains, the City’s storm

drainage and difficulty in proactively maintaining drainage ways and the storm drain infrastructure to keep them clear of debris.of the system that inhibiting the proper continuous flow of While the Bridges and Drainage Section

the storm drain infrastructure to keep them clear of debris. While the Bridges and Drainage Section

While the Bridges and Drainage Section of the Infrastructure Management Division is responsible for maintaining the drainage system and carries out activities including repairing and replacing catch basins, storm drain inlets, storm drain pipes, and removing debris from drainage channels to promote proper drainage flow, limited resources has made it difficult to keep up with service level demands.

This section is responsible for implementing a Pipe Replacement Program. Many of our storm drain pipes are made of corrugated metal which have begun to rust and deteriorate, and the purpose of this program is to replace those storm drain pipes to promote proper drainage. This section is also responsible for trimming and removing dead trees from the City’s right of ways, and also removing trees that have fallen into drainage channels. During adverse weather, Bridges and Drainage is also responsible for removing fallen trees from City streets and responding to areas that are experiencing flooding issues.

COMPLIANCE PROGRAMS/PRIORITIES

COMPLIANCE PROGRAMS/PRIORITIES As part of the Federal Clean Water Act, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (US

As part of the Federal Clean Water Act, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) has developed stormwater management regulations as part of a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permitting program to improve the water quality of surface waters like the Pearl River. Under this program, the City of Jackson is considered a Phase I MS4 NPDES permitted municipality and required to hold a 5-year permit for management of stormwater in the City. The City is on its second generation of the permit and will be required to renew its MS4 Phase I Permit in 2017.

As part of the requirements for the program, the City is required to develop and maintain a stormwater management program that implements best practices to protect surface water quality and prevent high volumes of stormwater runoff, or drainage, from causing flooding. Best practices include structural improvements to address erosion, increase capacity of the storm drainage system and implementation of green infrastructure practices that retain and filter stormwater drainage; or non-structural practices like implementation of routine and preventive maintenance programs. The City is required to track the progress towards these goals, implementation of best practices and the requirements in the MS4 Permit to provide a report to MDEQ on an annual basis. The MS4 program also includes six control measures for which the City is required to implement best practices:

Public Education and Outreach

Public Involvement and Participation

Illicit Discharge Detection & Elimination

Construction Site Stormwater Runoff Control

Post-Construction Stormwater Management in New Development and Redevelopment

Pollution Prevention and Good Housekeeping for Municipal Operations

PROGRAMMATIC INITIATIVES

It is anticipated that the MS4 permit renewal in 2017 will bring with it requirements to use innovative practices including green infrastructure and low impact development to better manage stormwater drainage. This program provides an opportunity to restructure the City’s stormwater management program, update best practices and implement a green infrastructure strategy in the City that meets several goals and objectives including increasing the City’s tree canopy. This program also provides an opportunity to implement green solutions along drainage ways that not only stabilize channels but also provide water quality benefits.

In order to develop comprehensive sustainable solutions to localized drainage issues, the City understands that it must develop a more comprehensive plan, watershed by watershed, to identify opportunities for improvement, solutions to improve the drainage system and protect existing flood prone areas. This will require comprehensive hydraulic and hydrologic modeling as well as identification, characterization and mapping of existing drainage system components.

Based on historical data and the high volume of drainage complaints during and after storm events, DPW recognizes a need to implement a routine and preventive maintenance program that limits the impacts of high frequency rainstorm events. This program will be implemented by in-house staff as part of the Department’s Asset Management Initiative.

as part of the Department’s Asset Management Initiative. USE OF GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE Green infrastructure uses

USE OF GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE

Green infrastructure uses vegetation, soils, and natural processes to manage water and create healthier urban environments. The main objectives of this approach include reducing stormwater runoff, increasing adaptability to extreme weather, minimizing heat stress, increasing biodiversity, encouraging food production, improving air quality, promoting clean water, maintaining healthy soils, and providing recreation, shade, and shelter. Green infrastructure is the ecological foundation for social, economic, and environmental health. Not only does it address regulatory requirements, but it makes communities more vibrant. Building this type of infrastructure will involve projects from restoring Smith Park to increasing the city’s tree canopy.

HISTORICAL INVESTMENTS AND FUNDING SOURCES

The City has typically funded drainage improvements with General Funds, Community Development Block Grant Funds, and Federal Funds allocated by the Natural Resources Conservation Service to provide for open channel stabilization and widening projects. In house crews have implemented a pipe replacement program to address chronic drainage issues and supplement limited capital resources. Completed projects are listed in the table below.

INVESTMENT PRIORITIES

The limited investment in upgrading the City’s drainage system and making much needed improvements throughout the City has been due to not having the available funds or a sustainable dedicated funding source. As evidenced by the number of service requests for drainage related issues, the damage to public and private property caused by repeated flooding; the miles of drainage ways including road-side ditches that need to be assessed and addressed; drainage improvements in the City of Jackson is an investment priority for use of the 1% Sales tax funds. Specific investment priorities include:

Neighborhood drainage improvement projects that will mitigate localized flooding in communities.

Regional stormwater management improvement projects including regional detention systems to control runoff.

Watershed restoration projects incorporating upland stormwater quality and quantity control practices to improve surface water quality; limit sediment erosion and mitigate flooding by controlling stormwater flows to downstream areas.

Drainage channel improvement projects that where feasible, restore the channel to a natural state to improve water quality and stabilize the channel to protect against erosion. Project types include stream restoration, channel stabilization/enhancement and flood control. Priority segments of major drainage channels are presented in the Comprehensive CIP.

TARGETED STREET FLOODING IMPROVEMENTS

This includes culvert replacements, tree and debris removal, outfall cleaning and rip-rap protection along Belhaven Creek, Caney Creekn, Eastover Creek, Eubanks Creek, Hanging Moss Creek, Hardy Creek, Lynch Creek, Purple Creek, Three Mile Creek Trahon Creek, and White Oak Creek as to alleviate surface flooding in these areas. Imrpovement needs over a 20-year program are currently estimated to be over $27M.

NEAR TERM PROTECTION MEASURES

Near term protection measures includes bank stabilization and channel restoration along Belhaven Creek, Big Creek, Bogue Chitto Creek, Caney Creekn, Eubanks Creek, Hanging Moss Creek, Lynch Creek, and Three Mile Creek. Improvement needs are currenty estimated to be approximately $325,688,886M over 20 years.

LONG-TERM CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS

Long-term capital improvements include 100-yr storm channel capacity improvements, capacity retention/detention to hold stormwater and/or slow down the flow of stomrwater to adress flooding and erosion issues as well as green infrastructure projects that provide for water quality and drainage management with more aestectically pleasing vegetated practices. The combined improvement need over 20 years is estimated to be approximately

$642,330,858M.

WATER The City of Jackson supplies high quality drinking water to consumers in the Cities

WATER

WATER The City of Jackson supplies high quality drinking water to consumers in the Cities of

The City of Jackson supplies high quality drinking water to consumers in the Cities of Jackson and Byram. The distribution service area is approximately 150 square miles and provides potable water to about 174,000 people. The City’s water supply system includes two water treatment plants, O.B. Curtis (50 MGD) and J.H. Fewell (32 MGD); one booster pump station; and sixteen elevated and ground storage tanks with a combined storage capacity of 21 million gallons. Drinking water is distributed through 881 miles of water mains ranging in size from 2-inches to 48-inches in diameter. Most of these mains are constructed of cast iron, but some of the larger mains are steel or reinforced concrete. Other system appurtenances include 4,000 valves and 7,000 fire hydrants.

STATE OF EXISTING ASSETS

The ice storm of 2010 highlighted the vulnerabilities of the water system when mass water outages were experienced

across the City, particularly in the Downtown area.

the water we are paying to treat is unaccounted for or lost in water main leaks and breaks as well as leaking valves and hydrants. Consumers are experiencing discolored water due to build-up in the water mains that have been in service for 60 to 100 years. These issues impact the reliability of the existing system and investment in replacing water mains is needs to reduce water loss and improve water quality received at the tap. In some small areas of the City still have 2-inch to 4-inch diameter water mains, adequate fire protection is a concern; these areas are an

investment priority for small diameter pipe replacement.

While the City produces high quality water, an estimated 40% of

The water treatment plants and storage facilities are also in need of upgrades to maintain service levels; however, those improvements will not be included in the scope of the 1% sales tax program.

COMPLIANCE PROGRAMS/PRIORITIES

Operation, maintenance and capital improvement of the water system is governed by the federal Safe Drinking Water Act and the Mississippi Safe Drinking Water Act of 1997 and Mississippi Primary Drinking Water Regulations. The City’s Water and Wastewater Operation is responsible for ensuring that our system meets or exceeds required regulations, standards and the requirements of the State’s Public Water Supply Program including identification and elimination of operational and maintenance problems that may impact water quality. Replacing water mains that are leaking and have build-up of deposits causing discolored water will aid in meeting this objective and cut down on the number and frequency of Boil Water Alerts that are issued.

PROGRAMMATIC INITIATIVES

Given the high percentage of water loss from the system and the repeated water outages; the water system is a primary target for the Department’s Asset Management Initiative. In order to reduce water loss and eliminate water system failures, investment must be made in replacing water lines that are beyond their useful life. Under the scope of the 1% Sales Tax, a water line replacement program will be initiated starting with replacement of 2 to 4-inch water lines as well as cast iron pipeline replacement.

Additional programmatic initiatives include the Water Maintenance Division initiating an overall water system preventive maintenance program to:

Assist the Fire Department with hydrant maintenance and asset management

Valve exercising, maintenance and replacement

Water system flushing and where possible water main cleaning and lining

Water system audit including development of a water system hydraulic and water quality model

Mapping the water system and related appurtenances

These initiatives may result in capital projects or in-house asset program management activities that would qualify for use of the 1% sales tax revenues.

HISTORICAL INVESTMENTS AND FUNDING SOURCES

The City funds water system improvements using water revenues generated from the water charges on consumers’ water bills. Additional funding has been in the form of grants, loans or bond proceeds. While the 2013 water rate increase of 29% has generated additional revenue; it is just covering the cost of service for operation and maintenance and repayment of debt service on completed or on-going projects. Recent on-going and completed projects include:

Water Infrastructure Improvement Program (Siemens) $90M On-going

Prestressed Concrete Ground Storage Tank Contract 1 - $2M

24” Water Transmission Main – Contract II - $1M

Maddox Booster Station Contract III - $2.2M

Fortification Water Tank - $4M

48” Water Transmission Improvements $5M – On-going

INVESTMENT PRIORITIES

Because the water system has a sustainable dedicated funding source, water system related projects recommended for funding by the 1% sales tax revenue are critical improvements to provide adequate fire protection and address emergencies by supplementing water funds. This will include upgrading 2 to 4-inch water lines and emergency repairs for unplanned failures. Water system upgrades that can be integrated with other special sales tax capital projects will utilitize special sales tax funds as well. Projects that facilitate economic development and urgent need improvements to the water system to protect public health will also be eligible to utilize special sales tax funds.

SEWER The City owns and operates three wastewater treatment facilities, plus numerous interceptor and collector

SEWER

SEWER The City owns and operates three wastewater treatment facilities, plus numerous interceptor and collector sewers

The City owns and operates three wastewater treatment facilities, plus numerous interceptor and collector sewers throughout the metropolitan area, and provides sewer services to the City and parts of Hinds County, western Rankin County and eastern Madison County. The primary wastewater treatment facility, Savanna Street Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP), has a 46 million gallons per day (MGD) permitted capacity and was placed in operation in 1975. The Trahon WWTP has a capacity of 4.5 MGD and treats flows from

the Trahon and Big Creek Basins. The City’s third treatment facility is located in the Presidential Hills subdivision in the northwest part of the City. It was recently upgraded to a new facility providing 0.75 MGD of permitted treatment

capacity.

96-inches in diameter.

Wastewater flows to these facilities through a collection system with pipes ranging in size from 4-inches to

STATE OF EXISTING ASSETS

In 2013 the City entered into a federal Wastewater Consent Decree due to repeated sanitary sewer overflows and wastewater treatment plant by-passes. The

COMPLIANCE PROGRAMS/PRIORITIES

Operation, maintenance and capital improvement of the wastewater collection system is governed by the federal Clean Water Act and the Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality WPC1 Regulations. In November 2012, the City reached a settlement with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Department of Justice, and the Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ) to make improvements to the City’s sewer systems to eliminate unauthorized overflows of untreated raw sewage (Sanitary Sewer Overflows or SSOs) and unauthorized bypasses of treatment at the Savanna Street Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP).

The consent decree requires Jackson to implement comprehensive injunctive relief within approximately 18 years, with the majority of the work being done in the first 11 years of the consent decree program. The remedial measures required by the consent decree include:

Early action projects to upgrade the Presidential Hills WWTP and make improvements to Savanna Street WWTP

Evaluation and rehabilitation of the wastewater collection and transmission system

Development and implementation of a performance evaluation and composite correction program for the Savanna Street wastewater treatment plant

Development and implementation of programs to insure proper capacity, management, operations and maintenance of the sewer system

PROGRAMMATIC INITIATIVES

The primary initiatives for the sewer system are implementation of the consent decree programs and asset management to maintain compliance and eliminate sanitary sewer overflows. The consent decree program projects will be considered in conjunction with the stormwater projects in an integrated plan designed to improve water quality through both gray and green infrastructure improvements.

HISTORICAL INVESTMENTS AND FUNDING SOURCES

The City funds wastewater system improvements using sewer revenues generated from the sewer charges on consumers’ water bills. Additional funding has been in the form of grants, loans or bond proceeds. While the 2013 sewer rate increase of 108% has generated additional revenue; it is just covering the cost of service for operation and maintenance and repayment of debt service on completed or on-going projects. Recent on-going and completed projects include:

West Bank Interceptor Flow Monitoring $350K On-going

West Bank Interceptor Condition Assessment $600K On-going

Wastewater Collection System Flow Monitoring $200K On-going

Savanna Street WWTP Influent Pump Station $2.5M On-going

WWTP Comprehensive Performance $700K on-going

Evaluation/Composite Correction Program $1M On-going

WWTP Solids Removal Project $10M On-going

Presidential Hills WWTP Improvements $7M

West Bank Interceptor Rehabilitation Phase 3 $12M On-going

West Bank Interceptor Rehabilitation Phase 4 & 5 $19M On-going

INVESTMENT PRIORITIES

Because the wastewater system has a sustainable dedicated funding source, sewer system improvement projects are a low priority for 1% sales tax funds; with the exception of sewer collapses and other urgent need repairs or where there are integrated infrastructure improvement opportunities. The CIP designates those projects that are sales tax eligible and candidates for sales tax funding.

CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PLANNING

A Capital Improvement Plan (Program), or CIP, is a short-range plan, usually four to ten years, which identifies capital projects and equipment purchases, provides a planning schedule and identifies options for financing the plan. A CIP typically includes:

Listing of capital projects or equipment

Timeline by fiscal year for the planning, design and/or construction/completion of the project or capital purchases

Planned funding sources and financing options

Justification for the project; alignment with established criteria

The City of Jackson has been without a formal CIP for over ten years. The City has elected to develop a five-year Comprehensive Capital Improvement Plan for Infrastructure Improvements which will be updated annually to include new projects, reflect changes in priorities, and program a future year with the first year of the plan being the current fiscal year.

Capital projects/expenditures are those that maintain, enhance, alter or improve an asset or infrastructure and must meet the following criteria:

Program management to provide professional support services (including scope management, cost control, schedule management and quality control), technical expertise and public engagement required for successful projects delivery

New construction, expansion, renovation, or replacement project for an existing facility or facilities having a total cost of at least $10,000 over the life of the project; project costs may be expended in phases and includes planning, condition assessment, cost of land acquisition, architecture/engineering professional services, construction contracts and other related contract services for project delivery such as public information and outreach

Major maintenance or rehabilitation project for existing facilities with a cost of $10,000 or more and an economic life of at least 10 years.

Purchase of major equipment (assets) costing $50,000 or more with a useful life of at least 10 years.

The City’s current 5-Year Comprehensive Capital Improvement Plan lays out the capital improvement needs for Fiscal Years 2016 2020. The FY 2016-2020 Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) is a forward looking program outlining the City of Jackson’s priorities for infrastructure improvements over the next five years. The general CIP Planning process is shown in the following figure.

FIGURE 8. Capital Inprovement Planning Process Infrastructure Improvement & Capital Equipment Needs Identified
FIGURE 8. Capital Inprovement Planning Process
Infrastructure
Improvement &
Capital Equipment
Needs Identified
Project
Development &
Cost Estimating
CIP Expenditure
Requests & Annual
Updates
CIP Annual Budget
Development &
Financing

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

As part of the CIP planning process, all proposed capital expenditures will be aligned with criteria that drive the need for the expenditure. The criteria, including 1% sales tax funding eligibility, is representative of policy directions for infrastructure improvements as well as short and long-term objectives of the City. This is meant to provide an assessment of the relative priority of capital expenditures and resulting funding commitments. The assessment criteria are listed in Table 11.

Table 11. Project Assessment Criteria

Health, Safety & Welfare

An assessment of the degree to which the project improves the health, safety and welfare of the community in which the project is sited, as well as improvements across the City. For example, projects that result in improved fire flows, reduction of accidents, improved structural integrity, and mitigation of health hazards and resolution of exigent circumstances.

Regulatory or

An assessment of the degree to which the project is under a regulatory order or other legal mandate, or meets a federal, State or local regulatory requirement. For example, projects that are required by consent decrees, court orders, and other legal mandates.

Legal Mandates

Integrated

An assessment of the degree to which a project meets multiple infrastructure system improvement needs. For example, a roadway reconstruction project that addresses flooding issues, signals, ADA compliance needs and utility improvements vs a project that just addresses repaving a road.

Improvements

Operational

An assessment of the degree to which the project supports operational efficiency and effective delivery of services. Improves operational functions and services versus Sustaining operational functions and services.

Improvements

Reduction in

An assessment of the life-cycle costs of proposed improvements compared to the current operational costs.

Operational

Costs

External

Projects funded by or with the potential for funding by grants or other external funds including public/private partnership financing opportunities.

Funding

Opportunity

Community

An assessment of the degree to which the project meets a community need or responds to community demand, including resolution of CSR complaints.

Demand

1PTax Eligible

An assessment of the eligibility of the proposed expenditures for municipal special sales tax funding.

PROJECT/EXPENDITURE REQUESTS

On an annual basis CIP request forms will be used to compile information for the proposed expenditures in order to be considered for funding. These request forms identify the proposed capital expenditures which allow for budget planning and forecasting long-term capital funding needs. The project phases include:

Project Planning: Includes the development of the project scope, feasibility study, a design budget, and order of magnitude construction budget.

Design: Includes the development of any environmental documents, legal documents, construction plans and specifications, and a detailed construction budget.

Construction: Includes site preparation, utility and infrastructure placement, equipment installation, construction, and environmental mitigation.

Equipment Purchase: Includes capital equipment purchases for routine, preventive and emergency maintenance and repiar for public infrastructure assets.

FISCAL YEARS 2016 - 2020 CAPITAL PLAN

The City’s Comprehensive Capital Improvement Plan for Infrastructure, FY 2016 - 2020 is a forward looking plan outlining the City of Jackson’s priorities for infrastructure improvements over the next five years. The CIP considers needed improvements that support the assessment criteria as noted above.

The current comprehensive CIP includes over 400 projects with an estimated cost of approximately $530.6 million dollars for the 5-Year period. The table below summarizes the total of programmed capital expenditures included in the FY20162020 Comprehensive Capital Improvement Plan by the Department of Public Works.

Table 12. Capital Improvements Program Summary, FY 20162020

Infrastructure System

Forecasted Program Need (5 to 20-Year)

5-Year CIP Total

Total Proposed Use of Sales Tax Funding

Water

$

229,232,200.00

$ 119,802,200.00

$ 15,600,000.00

Wastewater

$

393,935,725.00

$ 280,739,725.00

$

4,500,000.00

Stormwater (Drainage)

$

1,012,655,033.60

$ 54,149,157.50

$ 54,149,157.50

Roads and Bridges

$

87,630,381.32

$ 75,938,965.32

$ 75,938,965.32

Total

 

$

1,723,453,339.92

$

530,630,047.82

$ 150,188,122.82

Water Breakdown of 5-Year CIP Total Roads and Bridges 14% Water 23% Stormwater (Drainage) 10%

Water

Breakdown of 5-Year CIP Total Roads and Bridges 14% Water 23% Stormwater (Drainage) 10% Wastewater
Breakdown of 5-Year CIP Total
Roads and Bridges
14%
Water
23%
Stormwater (Drainage)
10%
Wastewater
53%
Wastewater
Stormwater (Drainage)
Roads and Bridges