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ETE 335

Elementary Social Studies Lesson


deBonos Thinking Hats

ETE 335

Elementary Social Studies Lesson


deBonos Thinking Hats
Rachel Bauer
US History/Civil War
5th Grade
Battles and the Outcome of the Civil War

ETE 335

Elementary Social Studies Lesson


deBonos Thinking Hats
Goals:
The students will gain a better sense of what life was like during the Civil War.
The students will better understand how the battles of the Civil War affected the society.
The students will comprehend how the outcome of the Civil War affects the future.
Objectives:
Content/Knowledge:
Students will be able to recall the major battles of the Civil War.
Students will be able to write about the outcome and major battles of the Civil War.
Students will be able to explain how the generals of the Civil War played an important role.
Process/Skills:
Students will be able to determine how the Civil War affected society, both past and present.
Students will be able to evaluate the major battles and generals of the Civil War.
Students will be able to compose a newspaper about the outcome of the Civil War.

Values/Dispositions:
Students will be able to express their thoughts on the Civil War.
Students will be able to discuss their opinions on the Gettysburg Address.
Students will be able to notice why certain battles were turning points of the Civil War.

ETE 335

Elementary Social Studies Lesson


deBonos Thinking Hats
Rationale:
In this lesson, student will learn about the battles that shaped the Civil War. This is important to know
because these battles outcomes lead to the changing of American History.
Standards:
State Illinois Common Core or Learning Standards
SS.IS.3.3-5. Determine sources representing multiple points of view that will assist in answering
essential questions.
SS.IS.5.3-5. Develop claims using evidence from multiple sources to answer essential questions.
SS.IS.6.3-5. Construct and critique arguments and explanations using reasoning, examples, and
details from multiple sources.
SS.H.1.5. Create and use a chronological sequence of related events to compare developments that
happened at the same time.
SS.H.3.5. Explain probable causes and effects of events and developments in U.S. history.
National NCSS Themes
Culture
Time, Continuity, and Change
People, Places, and Environments
Individuals, Groups, and Institutions
Science, Technology, and Society

Objective

Objective

This activity will focus on the facts about each major battle of the Civil War. The main
battles in this one will be the Battle of Gettysburg, Vicksburg, and the First Battle of Bull
Run. In this, lesson students will be able to identify the main generals, strategies, and the
outcomes of the battles. To do this students will fill out a note sheet on the generals and
strategies listing which battle they were in and how they played a role in the battle. This
information will be found on a information sheet about each battles.

Resources needed for this station:


Note sheet with the generals and strategies and outcomes listed and space to
write the facts down
Sheet of the information of the battles
Visuals for the students to see the battles in pictures
VISUALS Needed:
Gettysburg:
Vicksburg:

First battle of Bull Run:

Intuitive

Intuitive
In this activity, the students will listen to the Gettysburg Address given
by President Abraham Lincoln. They will listen to it 2 times. The first
time they will just listen to it. While they are listening to it the second
time, they will write down key words or phrases that stuck out to them.
After this, the class will discuss the address. The class will create a
mind map on the board (white or smart whichever the classroom has)
about what stood out in the address. Lastly, the students will write a
reflection about how they would have felt if they were in the audience
the day of the address and how they could see the address affecting the
citizens of the era.

Resources needed:
Rubric for grading paper (on next slides)
Link to Gettysburg Address:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BvA0J_2ZpIQ

Category

Focus on
Assigned
Topic

The entire story is related


to the assigned topic and
allows the reader to
understand much more
about the topic.

Most of the story is


related to the
assigned topic. The
story wanders off at
one point, but the
reader can still learn
something about the
topic.

Some of the
story is related
to the assigned
topic, but a
reader does not
learn much
about the topic.

No attempt has
been made to
relate the story to
the assigned topic.

Creativity

The story contains many


creative details and/or
descriptions that
contribute to the reader\'s
enjoyment. The author
has really used his
imagination.

The story contains a


few creative details
and/or descriptions
that contribute to the
reader\'s enjoyment.
The author has used
his imagination.

The story
contains a few
creative details
and/or
descriptions,
but they
distract from
the story. The
author has tried
to use his
imagination

There is little
evidence of
creativity in the
story. The author
does not seem to
have used much
imagination.

Grammar

There are no spelling or


punctuation errors in the
final draft. Character and
place names that the
author invented are
spelled consistently
throughout.

There is one spelling


or punctuation error
in the final draft.

There are 2-3


spelling and
punctuation
errors in the
final draft.

The final draft has


more than 3
spelling and
punctuation errors.

Organizatio
n

The story is very well


organized. One idea or
scene follows another in a
logical sequence with
clear transitions.

The story is pretty


well organized. One
idea or scene may
seem out of place.
Clear transitions are

The story is a
little hard to
follow. The
transitions are
sometimes not

Ideas and scenes


seem to be
randomly
arranged.

Category

Organization

The story is very well


organized. One idea or
scene follows another in
a logical sequence with
clear transitions.

The story is pretty


well organized.
One idea or scene
may seem out of
place. Clear
transitions are
used.

The story is a little


hard to follow. The
transitions are
sometimes not
clear.

Ideas and scenes


seem to be
randomly arranged

Neatness

The final draft of the


story is readable, clean,
neat and attractive. It is
free of erasures and
crossed-out words. It
looks like the author
took great pride in it.

The final draft of


the story is
readable, neat and
attractive. It may
have one or two
erasures, but they
are not distracting.
It looks like the
author took some
pride in it.

The final draft of


the story is
readable and some
of the pages are
attractive. It looks
like parts of it
might have been
done in a hurry.

The final draft is


not neat or
attractive. It looks
like the student
just wanted to get
it done and didn\'t
care what it looked
like.

Writing
Process

Student devotes a lot of


time and effort to the
writing process
(prewriting, drafting,
reviewing, and editing).
Works hard to make the
story wonderful.

Student devotes
sufficient time and
effort to the writing
process
(prewriting,
drafting, reviewing,
and editing). Works
and gets the job
done.

Student devotes
some time and
effort to the writing
process but was
not very thorough.
Does enough to
get by.

Student devotes
little time and
effort to the writing
process. Doesn\'t
seem to care.

Writing
Paragraphs

The story has at least 4


paragraphs with at least
5 complete sentences
each.

The story has at


least 3 paragraphs
with at least 5
complete

The story has at


least 2 paragraphs
with at least 3
complete

The story has at


least a paragraph
with at least a
couple complete

Positive/Strength
s

Positive/Strength
In this activity the students will present
on the
s
different strengths of the main generals in the Civil
War. For the Confederacy, the students will look at
Robert E. Lee, Stonewall Jackson, George Pickett, and
P.T. Beauregard. For the Union, the students will look at
Ulysses S. Grant, George McClellan, William Tecumseh
Sherman, and George Meade. The students will
research the generals. They will come up with at least 5
strengths of the general and present them in a
Historical Role Play/ Short skit.
Resources:

http://www.historynet.com/civil-war-generals
http://www.history.com/topics/american-civil-war
Visuals of the generals (found on next slide)
Rubric for role play/skit (found two slides from this one)

Historical Role Play : Civil War Generals

Teacher Name: R Bauer

Student Name: ________________________________________


CATEGORY
Historical Accuracy

4
All historical information
appeared to be accurate
and in chronological order.

3
2
Almost all historical
Most of the historical
information appeared to be information was accurate
accurate and in
and in chronological order.
chronological order.

1
Very little of the historical
information was accurate
and/or in chronological
order.

Role

Point-of-view, arguments,
and solutions proposed
were consistently in
character.

Point-of-view, arguments,
and solutions proposed
were often in character.

Point-of-view, arguments,
and solutions proposed
were sometimes in
character.

Point-of-view, arguments,
and solutions proposed
were rarely in character.

Knowledge Gained

Can clearly explain at least Can clearly explain 3 ways


5 ways in which his
in which his character was a
character was strong person strong person for their
for their position.
position.

Can clearly explain one way


in which his character was a
strong person for their
position.

Cannot explain one way in


which his character was a
strong person for their
position.

Date Created: Jun 03, 2016 12:55 am (CDT)

Negatives/Weaknes
ses

Negatives/Weaknes
ses

In this activity, the students will be able to discuss the negatives and weaknesses of two
battles that were won by the Union and the Confederacy respectively. The main two battles
that they will focus on is the Battle of Gettysburg and the first Battle of Fort Sumter. The
students will review both battles through lecture and studying the visuals and maps of both
places. The class will then discuss in groups the weaknesses of winning each battle for both
the winning and losing side. The students will split into groups of 3 to 4 and be assigned if
they are looking at it from a winning or a losing side. In their groups, the students will
compile a graphic organizer of their choice to present their findings.
Resources:
Examples of graphic organizers. (found on next slide)
Paper
Poster board
Coloring and writing utensils
Slideshow on the Battle of Gettysburg and first Battle of Fort Sumter
Visuals and Maps (found two slides after this)

Creative

Creative
In this activity, the students will work in groups to create a replica of a
battleground and/or battle. The students will split into groups of 3 or 4 and
work together to create their own battleground that will be a replica of a battle
in the Civil War. The teacher will describe some of the battlegrounds using the
visuals and talking about what they were like. The students can draw/paint or
use materials found in a section of the classroom to create their battleground.
They will also name the battleground and write up a short declarative for the
battleground and the battle that might have happened there.
Resources/materials needed:
Glue
Paper
Coloring utensils (markers, paints, crayons, colored pencils)
Scissors
Poster board
Construction paper
Rubric for grading ( On the second slide after this)
Visuals of different battlegrounds during the Civil War: Found on next
slide

06/03/16

Making A Poster : Civil War Battlegrounds

Teacher Name: R Bauer

Student Name: ________________________________________


CATEGORY
Graphics -Clarity

4
Graphics are all in focus and the
content easily viewed and identified
from 6 ft. away.

3
Most graphics are in focus and the
content easily viewed and identified
from 6 ft. away.

2
1
Most graphics are in focus and the
Many graphics are not clear or are too
content is easily viewed and identified small.
from 4 ft. away.

Graphics - Relevance

All graphics are related to the topic


and make it easier to understand. All
borrowed graphics have a source
citation.

All graphics are related to the topic


and most make it easier to
understand. All borrowed graphics
have a source citation.

All graphics relate to the topic. Most


borrowed graphics have a source
citation.

Labels

All items of importance on the


Almost all items of importance on the Several items of importance on the
Labels are too small to view OR no
battleground are clearly labeled with battleground are clearly labeled with battleground are clearly labeled with important items were labeled.
labels that can be read from at least 3 labels that can be read from at least 3 labels that can be read from at least 3
ft. away.
ft. away.
ft. away.

Attractiveness

The battleground is exceptionally


attractive in terms of design, layout,
and neatness.

Use of Class Time

Used time well during each class


Used time well during each class
Used some of the time well during
Did not use class time to focus on the
period. Focused on getting the project period. Usually focused on getting the each class period. There was some
project OR often distracted others.
done. Never distracted others.
project done and never distracted
focus on getting the project done but
others.
occasionally distracted others.

06/03/16
Date Created: Jun
02, 2016 08:56 pm (CDT)

The battleground is attractive in


The battleground is acceptably
terms of design, layout and neatness. attractive though it may be a bit
messy.

Graphics do not relate to the topic OR


several borrowed graphics do not
have a source citation.

The battleground is distractingly


messy or very poorly designed. It is
not attractive.

Thinking About
Thinking

Thinking About
Thinking

In this activity, the students will produce a


newspaper about what the world would be like
if the outcome of the Civil War had been
different, or in other words if the Confederacy
had won the war. In this project, the students
will review their notes about the Civil War and
work in groups of 4 to come up with a
newspaper that shows the Confederacy
winning and what that might mean for the
future. The students will be graded following
the rubric provided.

Resources:
Rubric for the newspaper (found on
next slides)
Visuals of different scenes of the war
Visual of a newspaper of the time period
Notes taken on the Civil War
Additional research can be done at
http://www.civilwar.si.edu/timeline.html

Category

Who, What,
When, Where &
How

All articles
adequately
address the 5 W\'s
(who, what, when,
where and how).

90-99% of the
articles
adequately
address the 5
W\'s (who, what,
when, where and
how).

75-89% of the
articles
adequately
address the 5
W\'s (who,
what, when,
where and
how).

Less than 75%


of the articles
adequately
address the 5
W\'s (who,
what, when,
where, and
how).

Layout Headlines &


Captions

All articles have


headlines that
capture the
reader\'s attention
and accurately
describe the
content. All articles
have a byline. All
graphics have
captions that
adequately
describe the
people and action
in the graphic.

All articles have


headlines that
accurately
describe the
content. All
articles have a
byline. All
graphics have
captions.

Most articles
have headlines
that accurately
describe the
content. All
articles have a
byline. Most
graphics have
captions.

Articles are
missing bylines
OR many
articles do not
have adequate
headlines OR
many graphics
do not have
captions.

Spelling and
Proofreading

No spelling or
grammar errors
remain after one or
more people (in
addition to the
typist) read and

No more than a
couple of spelling
or grammar
errors remain
after one or more
people (in

No more than 3
spelling or
grammar errors
remain after
one or more
people (in

Several spelling
or grammar
errors remain in
the final copy
of the
newspaper.

Category

Graphics

Graphics are in focus, are


well-cropped and are
clearly related to the
articles they accompany.

Graphics are in
focus and are
clearly related to
the articles they
accompany.

80-100% of the
graphics are clearly
related to the
articles they
accompany.

More than 20% of


the graphics are
not clearly related
to the articles OR
no graphics were
used

Articles Purpose

90-100% of the articles


establish a clear purpose
in the lead paragraph and
demonstrate a clear
understanding of the topic.

85-89% of the
articles establish a
clear purpose in the
lead paragraph and
demonstrate a
clear understanding
of the topic.

75-84% of the
articles establish a
clear purpose in the
lead paragraph and
demonstrate a
clear understanding
of the topic.

Less than 75% of


the articles
establish a clear
purpose in the lead
paragraph and
demonstrate a
clear understanding
of the topic.

Articles Interest

The articles contain facts,


figures, and/or word
choices that make the
articles exceptionally
interesting to readers.

The articles contain


facts, figures,
and/or word
choices that make
the articles
interesting to
readers.

The article contains


some facts or
figures but is
marginally
interesting to read.

The article does not


contain facts or
figures that might
make it interesting
to read.

Contribution
s of Group
Members

Each person in the group


has contributed to at least
two article and one graphic
without prompting from
teachers or peers.

Each person in the


group has
contributed at least
one article and one
graphic with a few
reminders from
peers.

Each person in the


group has
contributed at least
one article with
some minimal
assistance from
peers.

One or more
students in the
group required
quite a lot of
assistance from
peers before
contributing one
article.

ETE 335

Elementary
Social
Studies
Lesson
Visual Learning, Assessment, and Online
deBonos Thinking Hats

deBonos
Resources:

Visual Learning:
There is a visual for each activity
found on the slide about the activity or after
the slide.
Assessment:
The students will be assessed based on the
rubrics found for the activities. Additionally,
the students will be assessed based on
participation and engagement through class
questions and the activities.
Online Resources:
Delicious bookmarks site was down, so
this section could not be done.