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Level-2 courses in Life Sciences

Course Information Document


2015-16

TABLE OF CONTENTS (FOR GENERAL SECTION)


Table of Contents (for General Section) ........................................................................................................... 1
Table of Contents (for Course Information) ...................................................................................................... 2
I.
Introduction ....................................................................................................................................... 1
Course Information Document ................................................................................................................... 1
Dates for Session 2015-2016 .................................................................................................................... 1
Year 2 Biology Contacts ............................................................................................................................ 1
II.
Information About The Courses ............................................................................................................ 1
Place of the Courses in your Degree Programme .......................................................................................... 1
Overall Aims of the Year 2 Biology courses .................................................................................................. 2
III.
Essential Information About Progress .................................................................................................... 2
Credit Refused......................................................................................................................................... 2
Progress to Year 3 ................................................................................................................................... 2
Attendance at Teaching Sessions ............................................................................................................... 2
Timetables .............................................................................................................................................. 2
Lectures ................................................................................................................................................. 3
Laboratories ............................................................................................................................................ 3
IV.
Assessment........................................................................................................................................ 4
Coursework Assessments.......................................................................................................................... 4
End-of-Course Examinations ..................................................................................................................... 4
Geoffrey Moores Prize .............................................................................................................................. 4
V.
Assessment Regulations ...................................................................................................................... 4
Minimum Requirements for the Award of Credits and Incomplete Assessment ................................................. 4
Absence ................................................................................................................................................. 4
Absence from End-of-Course Examinations ................................................................................................. 5
Illness, or Adverse Circumstances affecting performance during End-of-Course Examinations ........................... 5
Absence from Class Tests.......................................................................................................................... 5
Illness or Adverse Circumstances affecting hand-in of Assessed Coursework ................................................... 5
Replacement assessment for students with Good Cause: .............................................................................. 5
Reassessment for students who fail to achieve an Overall D3 grade for the course:.......................................... 6
Cheating ................................................................................................................................................. 6
Attendance checks at lectures and Labs ...................................................................................................... 6
VI.
Assessment Procedures ....................................................................................................................... 7
How you will be Assessed: Code of Assessment ........................................................................................... 7
End-of-Course Examination Procedures ...................................................................................................... 8
End-of-Course Examinations ..................................................................................................................... 8
Assessment of Extra Answers in Examinations ............................................................................................. 9
Use of Electronic Devices, including Calculators, in Examinations ................................................................... 9
Use of Dictionaries in Examinations ............................................................................................................ 9
Resit Examinations .................................................................................................................................. 9
Student Portfolios .................................................................................................................................... 9
Appealing Against the Published Result for a Course................................................................................... 10
Students with Disabilities ........................................................................................................................ 10
VII.
Communication Between Staff and Students ........................................................................................ 10
How to Contact Staff .............................................................................................................................. 10
Notices to Students ................................................................................................................................ 10
Staff-Student Liaison Committees and representation of the student voice .................................................... 11
Student Questionnaires .......................................................................................................................... 11
Written Complaints ................................................................................................................................ 11
VIII.
Student Support ............................................................................................................................. 11
How the Students Representative Council (SRC) can help you .................................................................... 11
Personal Problems ................................................................................................................................. 12
Year 3 Biology courses ........................................................................................................................... 12
IX.
School of Life Sciences Policy Statements ............................................................................................ 13
Code of Discipline .................................................................................................................................. 13
Graduate Attributes, Employability and Personal / Professional Development Planning (PDP) ........................... 13
Ethics in School of Life Sciences Courses .................................................................................................. 13
XII.
Personal Data ................................................................................................................................... 13
X.
Exchange/ Study Abroad Opportunities: .............................................................................................. 13
XI.
Session Dates .................................................................................................................................. 14
TextbooksSummary ............................................................................................................................. 15

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TABLE OF CONTENTS (FOR COURSE INFORMATION)


1c: Ecology And Conservation.........................................................................................................................
2c: Microbiology ...........................................................................................................................................
3c: Molecules Of Life .....................................................................................................................................
4c: Physiology & Neuroscience ........................................................................................................................
1a: Essential Genetics ...................................................................................................................................
2a: Forensic Bioscience ..................................................................................................................................
3a: Exercise Science......................................................................................................................................
4a: Animal Diversity ......................................................................................................................................
7a: Human Form and Function ........................................................................................................................
12a: Bioengineering & Global Change ..............................................................................................................
13a: Immunology .........................................................................................................................................
2b: Evolutionary Biology ................................................................................................................................
3b: Infection and Immunity ............................................................................................................................
4b: Building an Organism...............................................................................................................................
7b: Drugs and Disease ..................................................................................................................................
8b: Cells & Tissues in Health & Disease ............................................................................................................
15b: Extreme Biology ....................................................................................................................................
16b: Physical Principles of Biological Processes .................................................................................................

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I.

INTRODUCTION

Course Information Document


This document covers all the Year 2 courses Coordinated by the School of Life Sciences. Your timetable this year
will be varied and you will have many deadlines for submitting coursework. It is therefore very important that you
read this Course Information Document (CID) carefully, particularly the sections on Assessment, and keep it for
future reference. If you require the information after graduation, the Undergraduate School will make a charge for
providing it. You should also keep the booklet Information for Year 1 Students given out last session. The current
versions of these booklets are available on Moodle

Dates for Session 2015-2016


Monday 14 September 2015Friday 18 December 2015
Monday 11 January 2016Friday 25 March 2016
Monday 18 April 2016Friday 27 May 2016
You must be available during teaching periods. Do not make holiday or work arrangements.
Exam dates are available on the Registry website http://www.gla.ac.uk/services/registry/support/exams/#tabs=4

Year 2 Biology Contacts


Year 2 Year Coordinator:

Dr Maureen Griffiths

School of Life Sciences Office, Bower Building


ext. 2699, email: Maureen.Griffiths@glasgow.ac.uk

The Coordinators for each course are listed in the Information for Individual Courses section of this booklet.

School Office
All coursework should be handed in to the School Office, which is located in Room 220 of the Bower Building. Your
submitted coursework must comply with the instructions you will be given at the start of the year.
Your submitted coursework must have an attached front page with printed barcode and a separate completed
Plagiarism statement. These are available on the Year 2 Moodle site.
Opening hours for enquiries are:
Monday to Friday: 9am to 5pm

II.

Opening hours for hand-ins are:


Monday to Thursday: up to 4pm

INFORMATION ABOUT THE COURSES

Place of the Courses in your Degree Programme


The Year 2 courses build on the knowledge gained in the Year 1 Biology courses. Each course is worth 10 or 20
credits. They are grouped in two blocks, the first block (courses 1a-13a) in Semester 1 (Weeks 1-11) and the
second block (courses 2b-16b) in Semester 2 (Weeks 1-11). Several courses (courses 1C, 2C, 3C and 4C) will run
through both Semesters.

The Main Possible Combinations of Year 2 Courses


Any of the following combinations of courses will provide you with qualifications for entry to a range of Honours
courses in Life Sciences:

12 Biology L-2 courses (6 from Semester 1 + 6 from Semester 2)

Chemistry-2X & Y + 6 Biology L-2 courses (3 from Semester 1 + 3 from Semester 2)

Psychology-2A & -2B + 6 Biology L-2 courses (3 from Semester 1 + 3 from Semester 2) + 20 other credits

Other combinations are possible, but please note that for entry to a Life Sciences Honours course you must have at
least 60 credits in Biology Year 2 courses.
If you wish to change your course choices, you should discuss this with your Adviser of Studies. For
Semester 2 courses 2b-16b, this must be done by the end of Semester 2, Week 2 AT THE LATEST.

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Overall Aims of the Year 2 Biology courses

to provide a broad-based understanding of modern biology in those areas selected for study

to provide the knowledge appropriate for entry to a wide range of Biological Honours subjects

to encourage the acquisition of general scientific skills relating to the systematic assembly, critical analysis,
interpretation and discussion of factual information and data

III.

ESSENTIAL INFORMATION ABOUT PROGRESS

Throughout your time at the University, you will only be allowed to progress from one level to the next if you
satisfy the Schools Minimum Progress Requirements (see below) in terms of the number of credits you have
completed and your grade point average (GPA). In addition, particular courses require you to have completed
specified courses at a lower level at grade D or better; these are known as Requirements of Entry (see below).

Credit Refused
If you do not complete at least 75% of the assessment for a course, your end-of-course result will be Credit
Refused. If you are awarded CR for one of your Year 2 courses, this will prevent you progressing to Year 3 if you do
not have 240 credits. Therefore, it is extremely important to make sure that you submit enough coursework during
the year. See later section.

Progress to Year 3
Minimum Progress Requirements (Credits and Grade Point Average)
You will only be allowed to progress from Year 2 to Year 3 if you achieve the stipulated minimum progress
requirements. These are:

to gain entry to a Year 3 Honours course, you must have at least 240 credits, a grade-point average of 9 and
at least 200 credits at D or above at the end of second year
to gain entry to a Year 3 Designated course, you must have at least 240 credits and a grade-point average of
9 at the end of second year

Requirements of Entry for Year 3 Courses in Life Sciences (Year 1 and Year 2
Results)
The essential (prerequisite) courses required for entry to Year 3 Honours and Designated biology courses in
September 2015 are listed in the Biology Information about Level-2 Biology courses 2015-2016 booklet which
was distributed to you in March 2015.
Note that entry to Year 3 (in particular, a Year 3 Honours course) is not guaranteed and depends on whether the
overall standard of your work in the first two years is good enough; some subjects are very popular and require a
high standard of results to gain entry to the Year 3 course. For any Year 3 course, a minimum of D grades are
normally required in the prerequisite Year 2 courses to be considered, although you will only be guaranteed entry
to your chosen Year 3 course if you achieve the grades specified on MyCampus at the first sitting in all the
prerequisite Year 2 courses.
In addition, there is a requirement for at least 60 credits in biology courses at Year 2 for entry to Year 3 biology
courses.
All your results in Year 1 and Year 2 will count towards your GPA and will affect your eligibility for Year 3 courses.

Attendance at Teaching Sessions


An acceptable level of participation is required from you if you are to gain the credits from a course. Therefore, you
should attend all scheduled meetings of the course. Attendance will be taken at all pre-requisite courses, and we
will also check that you are at the correct session.
All locations for lectures and laboratories are subject to change. Check Moodle and MyCampus timetable regularly
for notification of any changes.

Timetables
MyCampus will provide you with a personalised timetable at the start of the Semester showing which lecture and
lab groups you have been assigned to. You must attend the laboratory group you have been assigned to, unless
you have obtained prior permission from the Course Coordinator, giving reasonable notice.

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Lectures
There is a strong correlation between the final grade awarded and recorded attendance at lectures and
laboratories. Very few students with a poor attendance record achieve a grade D or above. While some absences
may be unavoidable, using lecture notes from another student is a poor substitute for attending and taking your
own notes.
The lectures will provide you with a guide to what information you need to know, explain difficult concepts and tell
you the lecturers own viewpoint. The questions for the end-of-course examination in each course will be drawn
largely from the lecture course.
The times of the lectures are shown in the table Lecture TimetableSummary and in the individual course
information in the latter part of this booklet. Your personal timetable on MyCampus indicates your lecture group
and laboratory group.
Where a course is taught twice, you must attend the session indicated on your personal timetable, as the
lecture theatres have a fixed capacity and fire regulations require that no theatre exceed this
You must also attend the correct group for class or lab tests unless you obtain prior permission to change your
group from the Course Coordinator. If you attend the wrong group, your grade for that piece of assessment will be
reduced.

Lecture Tips

Review the lecture slides on Moodle. Lecture notes should be made available on Moodle 48 hours in advance
of each lecture. Checking these will allow you to identify key information to focus on in the lecture itself.

Dont be late. Give yourself time to settle down. Lectures begin promptly at 5 minutes past the hour and
finish at 5 minutes to the hour.

Learn to select the important material. Use headings and note down key words, definitions, diagrams and any
specific references to textbooks.

Review your lecture notes soon after the lecture. Check that they are readable and understandable, otherwise
they will be no help in your study of the text book or in revision. You may find it helpful to re-write notes with
additions from the textbook.

Store your notes and take care of them. Occasionally, students lose all their notes; this is a disaster!

Mobile phones must be switched off during lectures and talking during lectures is strongly discouraged.

Laboratories
Laboratories are designed to give you some experience of practical science and to amplify the material which has
been given in the lectures.
Attendance at all laboratories is compulsory and an attendance register will be taken. Please note:
attendance at teaching sessions must take precedence over jobs, charity work, sport, OTC etc.
If you miss a laboratory you should attend another laboratory session, if possible (consult the Course Coordinator).
Make sure that you arrive on time for all laboratory sessions. If you are issued with a laboratory manual before the
lab, read the introductory material before you come to the lab.

Laboratory Safety
Safety in the laboratory is of key importance. Notes on safe practice are contained in the laboratory manual. Read
these carefully. We require you to follow the practices given and any further instructions given during the
laboratory.
You must bring a lab coat to each laboratory session. Also bring pens, an HB pencil, an eraser, a ruler and a
calculator.
Mobile phones must be switched off during laboratory classes.

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IV.

ASSESSMENT

Coursework Assessments
Remember that the grades you gain from coursework (which includes class tests) will form 30% of your final
assessment for most courses. These coursework grades will also count towards your final grade if you
have to resit the end-of-course examination. Consequently it is vital for you to obtain a decent grade for your
coursework, which means you must hand in all the required assignments and attend class tests. More details of the
assessments for each course are given in the Information for Individual Courses section of this booklet.

End-of-Course Examinations
All of the courses have an end-of-course examination. The examination timetables are published on the Registry
website. Past papers are NOT available for the Level-2 Biology courses. Normally, you must sit the end-of-course
examination at the first set (diet) of examinations after the end of the course. For courses in the first Semester, the
first diet of end-of-course examinations will be held in Week 12 or 13 while for courses in the second Semester, the
first diet will be after the Spring Vacation.

Geoffrey Moores Prize


Each session, the student with the best overall results in Year 2 biology courses will be awarded the Geoffrey
Moores Prize of 200. The prize is to commemorate Dr Geoffrey Moores, Senior Lecturer in Cell Biology, Head of
the School of Life Sciences and Year 2 Year Coordinator.

V.

ASSESSMENT REGULATIONS

The information set out below should be read in conjunction with the Universitys current Calendar, especially the
University Fees and General Information for Students and School of Life Science sections. The Calendar
provides definitive regulations; the information below is an attempt to summarise these regulations.
The Calendar is available online at:
www.gla.ac.uk/services/senateoffice/calendar/
Important material also appears in the Universitys Code of Assessment
http://www.gla.ac.uk/services/senateoffice/policies/assessment/codeofassessment/

Minimum Requirements for the Award of Credits and Incomplete


Assessment
There is a minimum requirement for the award of credits for a course. In summary, you must:

complete at least 75% of the assessment for the course (lab reports, class tests, exams)

attend all laboratories and tutorials (and fieldwork, if appropriate)

If you do not meet these requirements, you will not normally be awarded an overall grade, or credits,
for the course.
If you are prevented from completing one or more of the items of assessment, or attending the exams at the end
of a course because of illness or adverse personal circumstances, you must submit through MyCampus, a medical
or other written report (see Absence section below). Further details on incomplete assessment is provided on
Moodle.

Absence
You must complete a MyCampus absence report for any significant absence from the University. Significant
absence is defined by the Universitys Absence Policy. Supporting documentary evidence will be required and
should be scanned electronically and linked to the MyCampus absence report.
The Universitys Student Absence Policy can be found here:
http://www.gla.ac.uk/services/senateoffice/policies/studentsupport/absencepolicy/

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Absence from End-of-Course Examinations


If you do not sit the end-of-course examination at the first diet, you must submit written documentary evidence to
explain why you could not sit the exam at the normal time. Full details of the requirements are given in the
Universitys Student Absence Policy and on Moodle.

Illness, or Adverse Circumstances affecting performance during Endof-Course Examinations


If you attended the end-of-course examination but you believe that there are circumstances before or during the
exams that may have affected your performance, please let us know promptly. It is essential that this information
is available before the Board of Examiners meets. There is sometimes an assumption that illness or other adverse
circumstances will inevitably attract favourable consideration. A Board of Examiners may take the view that the
evidence is unconvincing or that the impact of illness is marginal when performance on the day is compared to
coursework submitted through the session. The University regulations explaining these sorts of issues are
explained here:
http://www.gla.ac.uk/services/senateoffice/policies/assessment/codeofassessment/guide/ in the section titled
Incomplete assessment resulting from good cause More details on this issue are available on Moodle.

Absence from Class Tests


If you are absent from a class test, you must submit written documentary evidence. Full details of the
requirements are given in the Universitys Student Absence Policy and further explanation is provided on
Moodle.
If the written evidence is accepted, your final assessment for the course will be based on the assessment that you
have completed, provided that you have completed at least 75% of the assessment (if necessary, your
Course Coordinator may set you an alternative exercise of equal academic weight).
If you do not provide written evidence of a good reason for your absence or if the written evidence is
not accepted, you will be given zero for the class test.

Illness or Adverse Circumstances affecting hand-in of Assessed


Coursework
In the event of illness or adverse circumstances, non-submission is not an option. The work MUST ALWAYS be
handed in, but may be handed in late according to the guidelines below.
1.

If illness or adverse circumstances permit, send notification of the situation to the member of staff who has set
the assessed work. If your circumstances are compelling and can be supported with documentary evidence, it
may be possible to arrange an extension of the deadline for submission of the assessed coursework.

2.

If you are absent on the date of submission or unable to submit the work, you must submit written
documentary evidence through MyCampus and hand in the work after your return from absence to a revised
deadline agreed with staff. Failure to complete this process may attract penalties set out below for late
submission.

3.

If the period of illness or adverse circumstances extends to the point that the work has been returned to other
students on the course before you have handed it in, you must contact the Programme Coordinator who will
set you an alternative exercise of equal academic weight.

Late Submission of Coursework


Normally, unless you have been certified absent, coursework which is submitted late will be marked as usual, but a
total of 2 secondary bands will be deducted per full or part working day beyond the published deadline. So,
if work is due for submission on Monday at noon, but is submitted at 2 pm on Tuesday, a grade of C1 (see
Assessment Procedure) would be reduced to D2. Work due in at noon on a Friday but delivered at 10 am the
following Monday would fall by 2 secondary bands, C1 to C3.
This applies to a maximum of five working days. Work submitted thereafter will be graded H and will not
normally be accepted after it has been marked and returned to the rest of the class.

Replacement assessment for students with Good Cause:


If the assessment affected by good cause is replicable the assessment will be taken again under the same
conditions as the original assessment. The replacement assessment must be completed within the same academic

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session. The majority of assessments in Level-2 courses are class tests that take place in lecture sessions, and are
not replicable
If good cause is agreed and the assessment affected by is not replicable the grade for the assessment will be
compared to the other items of assessment in the course.

If the original assessment grade is comparable to the other assessment grades the original grade will remain.

If the original assessment grade is significantly different from the other assessment grades this grade will be
removed from the course grade calculation. NOTE: The requirement to complete at least 75% of the
course assessment still applies.

The resit exam is always available to students who miss the formal course exam.

Reassessment for students who fail to achieve an Overall D3 grade


for the course:
A student who fails to achieve the threshold grade for the course at the first diet (D3 for undergraduate courses,
including students awarded CW) can ask to be reassessed in any of the assessments for the course identified as
replicable.

This also applies to coursework assessments where the student achieved a passing grade at the first
attempt and to items which the student missed without Good Cause at the first opportunity.

Reassessment is not available for assessments which are designated as not replicable.

The reassessment will be in essentially the same form as that for the original assignment.

Reassessment is limited to one further attempt of the assessment for the course and must be taken within
the same academic session.

Where a student has been prevented by Good Cause from completing a reassessment, a further
reassessment opportunity can be offered but this must be completed before the end of the academic
session.

Reassessment can only take place after the results of the first diet are published and must be completed by
the end of the academic session.

Even if the student chooses to be reassessed only in some in-course assessments (and chooses not sit the
end of course exam at the resit diet examination), the reassessment course result will only be published after
the resit diet.

The course result after reassessment will be flagged as Result from resit.

Cheating
Cheating in Examinations
The use of any unfair means in class and end-of-course examinations, or assisting anyone to do so, is always
regarded as a disciplinary offence. If you are caught cheating in examinations, you will be referred to the Senate
Assessors for Discipline.

Copying of Coursework: Plagiarism


Assessment of your coursework is intended to assess your own personal effort. If you use work that has been
prepared by other people work from your classmates, from the literature or from internet sites this is an
attempt to subvert the assessment process and is regarded very seriously.
The University policy on plagiarism is at http://www.gla.ac.uk/services/senateoffice/studentcodes/staff/plagiarism/

Year 1 and Year 2 first offences will be dealt with by the Course Team

Year 1 and Year 2 repeat offenders will be dealt with by the Director of the Undergraduate School

For any subsequent breaches of the University policy on plagiarism, they will be referred on to the Senate
Assessors for Discipline via the Head of the School of Life Sciences (see Error! Reference source not found.)

Attendance checks at lectures and Labs


You must attend only the lecture / lab time you selected when enrolling on MyCampus, as the lecture
theatres and labs have a fixed capacity and fire regulations require that this is not exceeded. We will be monitoring
attendance at lectures for pre-requisite courses and all labs, to ensure that only the allocated students are in
attendance at a given time.

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This information will also be used to identify student engagement with the course, and will be taken into
consideration when offering places in Level-3. Please bring your student card to all lectures as attendance will be
checked electronically.

VI.

ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES

How you will be Assessed: Code of Assessment


All assessment is governed by the Universitys Code of Assessment. The Code of Assessment is published in the
University Fees and General Information for Students section of the University Calendar and a guide for students
is available from the Senate Office at:
http://www.gla.ac.uk/services/senateoffice/policies/assessment/codeofassessment/
The basic principles underlying the code are that:

Each item of assessment (end-of-course exam, project report, class test, laboratory reports, essays etc.) will
be judged against a series of generic verbal descriptors (excellent through to very poor; see Schedule A at
the UGS website [see Quick Links in the section for students in Year 2]). These determine the primary grade
to be awarded. The descriptors define the grade in terms of how well the candidate has demonstrated
attainment of the Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs).

Each item of assessment will also be given a secondary band within the primary grade. The combination of
primary grade and secondary band defines a numerical score which can be used to aggregate and weight
appropriately the assessed components of the course.

The aggregation score derived from each assessed piece of work is multiplied by the appropriate relative
weighting for that assessment and summed to give an overall aggregation score. This is rounded to give an
integer (0.5 is rounded up, while <0.5 is rounded down). The overall aggregation score is then converted to
the equivalent grade (e.g. 17.6 is rounded up to 18 A, 11.45 is rounded down to 11 D).

Schedule A
Primary
Grade

Gloss

Secondary
Band

Aggregation
Score

Primary verbal descriptors for attainment of


Intended Learning Outcomes

Excellent

A1
A2
A3
A4
A5

22
21
20
19
18

Exemplary range and depth of attainment of intended


learning outcomes, secured by discriminating
command of a comprehensive range of relevant
materials and analyses, and by deployment of
considered judgement relating to key issues, concepts
and procedures.

Very Good

B1
B2
B3

17
16
15

Conclusive attainment of virtually all intended


learning outcomes, clearly grounded on a close
familiarity with a wide range of supporting evidence,
constructively utilised to reveal appreciable depth of
understanding.

Good

C1
C2
C3

14
13
12

Clear attainment of most of the intended learning


outcomes, some more securely grasped than others,
resting on a circumscribed range of evidence and
displaying a variable depth of understanding.

Satisfactory

D1
D2
D3

11
10
9

Acceptable attainment of intended learning outcomes,


displaying a qualified familiarity with a minimally
sufficient range of relevant materials, and a grasp of
the analytical issues and concepts which is generally
reasonable, albeit insecure.

Weak

E1
E2
E3

8
7
6

Attainment deficient in respect of specific intended


learning outcomes, with mixed evidence as to the
depth of knowledge and weak deployment of
arguments or deficient manipulations.

Poor

F1
F2
F3

5
4
3

Attainment of intended learning outcomes appreciably


deficient in critical respects, lacking secure basis in
relevant factual and analytical dimensions.

Very Poor

G1
G2

2
1

Attainment of intended learning outcomes markedly


deficient in respect of nearly all intended learning
outcomes, with irrelevant use of materials and
incomplete and flawed explanation.

No convincing evidence of attainment of intended


learning outcomes, such treatment of the subject as
is in evidence being directionless and fragmentary.

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Results Codes
Result code

How and when awarded

Outcome

AH

The student has completed at least 75% of the


summative assessment and has met the minimum
attendance criteria.

Credits will be awarded.

MV
Approved compassionate
or certified medical
absence

The student has not completed at least 75% of the


summative assessment but has provided evidence of
good cause.
This result is normally used when the student has
missed the end-of-course (or resit) examination with
good cause.
Where the student has missed a class test or assessed
coursework worth more than 25% with good cause, the
Programme Coordinator is encouraged to set an
alternative piece of work before the end-of-course
examination.

The student will be


permitted to take the endof-course examination at
the next diet as a first
attempt; grade points will
not be capped.
Credits will be withheld
until the student has
completed the
requirements.

CW
Credit Withheld

The student has not completed at least 75% of the


summative assessment and has not provided evidence
of good cause.
This result is normally used when the student has
missed the end-of-course examination at the main diet
without good cause.

The student will be


permitted to take the endof-course examination at
the next diet but as a
resit; grade points will be
capped.
Credits will be withheld
until the student has
completed the
requirements.

CR
Credit Refused

The student has not completed at least 75% of the


summative assessment (and / or has failed to comply
with attendance requirements) and has not provided
evidence of good cause and where no opportunity exists
to redress the situation within the same academic year.
This result is used for the main diet of examinations if
the student has not met the attendance requirements
for the course or has not submitted assessed
coursework without good cause.
This result is also used for the resit diet of examinations
if the student was awarded CW in the main diet and has
missed the resit examination without good cause.

The student will not be


permitted to take the endof-course examination in
any future diets.
No credits will be awarded.

End-of-Course Examination Procedures


Setting of papers: Question papers are reviewed by internal examiners and the External Examiner.
Marking: Answer books are identified by registration number only.
Each question is normally set and marked by a different member of staff so the answers of a given candidate may
be marked by several markers. Each script is marked once. Grades are assigned according to the Code of
Assessment.
Board of Examiners: This committee confirms the final grade for the course.
It is at the Board of Examiners meeting that special circumstances and medical certificates are considered.
Note that the School must be in receipt of all such material and Good Cause claims in advance of the
Examiners meeting.

External Examiners
Each course has its own External Examiner, listed in the individual course information. Their function is to oversee
the nature of the examination papers and the standard of marking of examination papers and coursework
assessment.

End-of-Course Examinations
It is your responsibility to ensure that you know the time, date and place for each of your
examinations. As it is sometimes necessary to change the examination timetable, you should check for yourself
your timetable, on the Registry web page, in the week before the examination period. If you miss an

Page 8

examination, for any reason, you can only take the examination at the next diet (e.g. the resits);
special sittings cannot be arranged. If you are late for an examination, you will not be given extra time.

Assessment of Extra Answers in Examinations


It is common for examination papers to ask students to answer a particular number of questions from a larger
choice (say three from six). It occasionally happens that students answer more questions than required. At the end
of an examination, you should check your work to ensure that you have not answered more than the required
number of questions, and score out any extras you do not want to be assessed.
If extra answers are left for the examiners, the examiners will assess all the answers, then give a grade which is
the average based on the number of questions submitted. This will have the effect that the poorest extra answers
will bring down the overall grade.

Use of Electronic Devices, including Calculators, in Examinations


You may use a calculator provided it does not have a facility for either textual storage or display, or for graphic
display.
You must not use mobile telephones and other electronic devices such as personal music players during
examinations. You must switch off and remove all such items (including headphones) prior to the start of the
examination and place them with other personal possessions in a closed bag or container which will normally be
kept under your seat, or at the front of the hall, for the duration of the examination.

Use of Dictionaries in Examinations


If your first language is not English, you may be permitted to use an appropriate dictionary in a class or end-ofcourse examination. You should lodge the dictionary with the Course Coordinator at least 24 hours prior to the start
of the examination. Following inspection, the dictionary will be returned to you by the invigilator at the start of the
examination.

Resit Examinations
If you are awarded a grade A, B, C, D or CR at the first examination diet, you will not normally be allowed to resit
the end-of-course examination. If you have an E, F, G or H grade, or Credit Withheld result, you will be entitled to
resit the examination, but normally only once and at the next available diet; the grade points awarded as the result
of the resit examination will be capped at 10. You will see your actual grade on MyCampus.
The grade you gain from the coursework will again be used as 30% of your assessment in the resit examination.
Consequently it is vital for you to as well as you can in your coursework.
It is your responsibility to check your results and to establish whether you should sit any resit exams.
Admission to Year 3 is dependent on your achievement in Year 1 and Year 2 in terms of your overall grade point
average, your total number of credits and your performance (i.e. grade) in specified Year 2 courses. If you are
unsure, contact your Adviser of Studies.
Resit examinations take place in August (check the timetable on the Registry webpage); bear this in mind when
you are planning work or holidays. It is important to register for resits at the correct time so that proper
arrangements can be made for the resit exams, including any special examination requirements for students with
special needs or disabilities.
If you are normally resident outside the UK, you may be permitted to take your resits at an approved centre in
your home country, if you have difficulty in returning to the University to sit exams in vacations. For more
information, please see the Registrys website.

If you are resident within the UK, you are expected to take resits at the University of
Glasgow.

Student Portfolios
The University requires that all coursework contributing to the final assessment for each course should be available
for inspection by the External Examiner; this includes both assessed coursework and end-of-course examination
scripts. Consequently, you must keep all marked coursework together in a portfolio and be prepared to submit this
portfolio to the External Examiner, if necessary. You may find it useful to consult your portfolio of marked work
before preparing further assessed coursework.

Page 9

Appealing Against the Published Result for a Course


The University Code of Procedure for Appeals is set out at length in the University Fees and General Information
for Students section of the University Calendar, Section 27.3 Code of Procedure. Fundamentally there are only
two grounds for appeal:

unfair or defective procedure;

a failure to take account of medical or other adverse personal circumstances (if these circumstances were not
previously presented, then good reason must be provided for the failure to present these circumstances in
accordance with standard procedure).

The most important parts of the Appeals procedure are:

Appeals will not be entertained against marks or decisions of examiners, or other matters of
academic judgement, but only on grounds of unfair procedure or of medical evidence.

You should first consult your Advisor of Studies.

If you decide to go ahead with an appeal, you must send a written account of your grounds for appeal within
10 working days of receiving the decision against which you are appealing. The appeal should be sent to the
Head of Student and Academic Administration for the attention of Head of School Administration, Room 220,
Bower Building.

In addition to the provisions above, we urge you to first talk to the Course Coordinator if you are dissatisfied over
any academic matter. Any relevant medical certificates must be uploaded to MyCampus. If you are not satisfied
with the outcome of this discussion, you can make an appointment to see the Head of School. Appointments should
be made through the School Office, Room 220 Bower Building (Ext. 3994).

Students with Disabilities


Special provisions, including special examination and other assessment arrangements, may be made for students
with a temporary or permanent disability. The special arrangements are intended to enable students to perform to
the best of their ability: they are not intended to give any unfair advantage to a candidate.
All students with ongoing disabilities are invited to register with the Disability Service
www.gla.ac.uk/services/disability/ as soon as possible and by the published deadlines in order for
recommendations to be made for departmental and examination support. You should consult the Disability Service
for the deadlines.
Students who are dyslexic must produce evidence of an up-to-date Dyslexia Assessment Report, which meets the
requirements of the University and includes specific mention of recommendations for examinations.
Special arrangements will not be made unless a student is registered with the Disability Service and arrangements
are listed on their MyCampus record.

VII.

COMMUNICATION BETWEEN STAFF AND STUDENTS

How to Contact Staff


If you wish to contact a member of staff, the offices, telephone numbers and e-mail addresses of staff teaching the
courses are listed on Moodle. If you need to discuss some topic at length, you should arrange an appointment for
some time suitable to both of you. Please remember that lecturers also have extensive commitments to other
courses and may not always be available.
The extension numbers listed are for phone calls within the Universitys telephone network. If you are calling from
outwith the University, you should precede this number with 0141 330 ####.
If you contact staff by e-mail, you should use your student e-mail address; it is School of Life Sciences policy that
personal information will not be sent to non-University e-mail addresses. Please remember that you are e-mailing a
member of staff, and do not use language more suited to communicating with your friends.

Notices to Students
You should check Moodle regularly for special announcements, e.g. seminars, timetable changes or job offers etc.
Important messages to the class will also be sent to you at your student e-mail address; you should therefore
check your e-mail regularly and ensure that your Inbox does not exceed it allocated storage limits,
thereby preventing you from receiving further inbound messages.

Page 10

Display of Personal Data


The School of Life Sciences may display personal student data (i.e. names, registration numbers, results) on notice
boards and Moodle sites. Results will only be identified by student number/ if you prefer not to have your data so
displayed, you must inform your Course Coordinator as soon as possible. You will then be responsible for making
an appointment with the Course Coordinator to receive your results in person.

Staff-Student Liaison Committees and representation of the student


voice
There are 8 Staff-Student Liaison Committees which cover the full range of Life Sciences courses at all levels. We
regard Staff-Student Liaison Committees as vital channels for communication of information between staff and
students, and we urge you to consider acting as a student representative. The University will record on your
transcript any periods undertaken as a student representative, subject to confirmation that you have completed the
training and satisfactorily served your term of office. Student representatives are invited to attend meetings of the
Year 2 Forum and the School of Life Science Undergraduate Education Committee (which discusses a wide range of
issues affecting teaching at all Levels).
You are strongly encouraged to communicate comments, criticisms or complaints to your student representatives
before the meeting of the committee. In addition, you should not hesitate to bring problems to the attention of
individual lecturers or Programme Coordinators.

Student Questionnaires
Questionnaires provide us with essential information about the organisation, teaching and content of the course.
The questionnaires will normally be handed out and collected within a teaching period. We are keen to get the
opinion of all students taking a course; therefore, we urge you to complete and return all questionnaires.
Summaries of the returns of questionnaires will be sent to the Course Coordinating Committee for discussion. Any
action taken, as a result of the questionnaires, will be reported to the appropriate Staff-Student Committee in the
following session.

Written Complaints
If you have a specific problem concerning a Life Sciences course or a member of staff, which you feel has not been
adequately dealt with or cannot be dealt with through the Staff-Student Committee, or by discussion with the
Course Coordinator you should send a written complaint to:
The Head of School
School of Life Sciences
Bower Building, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ.
You should receive an acknowledgement of your complaint within 7 working days and an account of any action
taken, within 4 weeks of the receipt of your complaint.

VIII. STUDENT SUPPORT


You can find links to useful information from the Universitys Current Students website
(http://www.gla.ac.uk/students/) as well as the Registrys webpage (www.gla.ac.uk/services/registry).

How the Students Representative Council (SRC) can help you


Course Representatives:
During the early weeks of each course, you will select course representatives who receive training from the SRC
and represent your views on Staff-Student Committees. The role of these students is very important and its
imperative that you let them know when things are going well and not so well with your course so that they can
keep the department informed on everything from teaching to facilities, to ensure that there is continuous
improvement.

Advice Centre:
The SRC employs professional advisers to help you through any problems you might be having. These can range
from welfare issues such as money and accommodation to representation in academic appeals and disciplinary
matters. This is a free service, no appointment is necessary and their doors are open from 11.30-4.00 (Mon-Fri).
You can also contact this service via advice@src.gla.ac.uk.

Page 11

Vice President (Education):


The VP-Ed oversees the whole course representative system, including providing the training. He/she also
represents the views of all students to the University on a variety of Committees. If you have a matter relating to
Education, either within the University or beyond, which you feel requires attention, do not hesitate to get in touch
via vp-education@src.gla.ac.uk or by dropping in to the SRC offices in the John MacIntyre Building on University
Avenue.
This and any other information about the SRC is available from the website at www.glasgowstudent.net

Personal Problems
If at any time you encounter financial, family, health or learning difficulties, the University has a range of specialist
support; this information is available at the Universitys Information for Current Students website
(http://www.gla.ac.uk/students/).

Advice about Academic Work and Private Study


The lectures, laboratories, etc. provide the teaching for the course. Learning what is required to gain a high grade
in the course is largely your responsibility. The individual course information lists the intended learning outcomes
for each course. More detailed intended learning outcomes may be given at appropriate points of the course. You
should use all of these to direct your private study, because achievement of the outcomes will require not only your
attendance at the scheduled lectures, labs and tutorials but also private study on your part. Appropriate reading
from the textbook will be given for each topic.
The amount of private study you do will depend upon your interest and ambition for excellence in the subject. To
ensure that you gain the grade you require in a course and that you consolidate your knowledge, a considerable
amount of private study is necessary. To achieve an average grade, an average student should expect to spend a
total of 200 hours of learning, both in attending the formal coursework and in private study.
On average, the number of hours allocated to each course is: approximately 50 hours for lectures and
approximately 30 hours for laboratories and tutorials. To complete the 200 learning hours recommended for
a 20 credit course course, you must also spend about 140 hours in private study. The guidelines below will
help you to apportion your private study.

Guidelines for Private Study


Lectures/Revision: 2.5 hours per lecture on average for regular consolidation of material
given in each lecture, using your notes, reading the text book and using any computerassisted learning
Laboratories: 1 hour of preparation before the lab (e.g. reading the laboratory manual) and
about 1 hour for any lab write-ups
Tutorial: 1 hour preparation time
Revision (minimum)

After Year 2

Year 3 Biology courses


During Year 2, you will be asked to apply for a place in your chosen Year 3 Honours or Designated Degree course.

Work Placement Degrees


If you have a grade point average of at least 12 at end of Year 2, you have the opportunity to apply for selection
onto the Work Placement degree scheme. If selected, and a position is obtained for you, then you would take a
year out between the L3 and L4 years and would graduate with a MSci (with Honours) degree.
More details at www.gla.ac.uk/schools/lifesciences/informationforcurrentstudents/workplacementmsciprogrammes/

Careers Information
The University has an excellent Careers Service situated at 3 University Gardens. You are encouraged to go along
and meet the Careers Adviser and gain familiarity with the programme of events, publications and the possible
types of individual advice available from the Service.
www.gla.ac.uk/services/careers/

Page 12

IX.

SCHOOL OF LIFE SCIENCES POLICY STATEMENTS

Code of Discipline
All students are subject to the Universitys Code of Discipline. For more information, please see the University
Calendar (http://www.gla.ac.uk/services/senateoffice/calendar/)

Graduate Attributes, Employability and Personal / Professional


Development Planning (PDP)
In Higher Education (HE), PDP is a process whereby students reflect on what they have learnt and on how their
learning has contributed to their personal and professional development. Graduate Attributes are emphasised as a
language for students to articulate their skills and strengths, and a framework to self-assess their personal
development.
In any HE course, learning can be both subject-specific and generic. The generic aspects are all the skills and
abilities students develop in an HE programme and which are transferable to future employments, such as IT skills
and the ability to research, critically appraise and report on information, both in written and oral formats. The
planning aspect of PDP encourages students to take control of their learning, rather than to be passive consumers
of the educational process.
More information on the importance of Graduate Attributes can be found at www.gla.ac.uk/students/attributes/

Ethics in School of Life Sciences Courses


The nationally agreed Benchmark for Biosciences states that one of the generic standards expected of honours
graduates is that they be able to construct reasoned arguments to support their position on the ethical and
social impact of the advances in the biosciences, and one of the intellectual skills expected is recognising the
moral and ethical issues of investigations, and appreciating the need for ethical standards and professional codes of
conduct.
In the School of Life Sciences, we aim to achieve these outcomes by:

Including discussion of personal and professional ethics issues related to biosciences from Level-1 upwards

Inclusion of ethical policy statements in all course information documents. At course induction meetings, all
students are strongly encouraged to read these statements, and to discuss them with staff.

XII. PERSONAL DATA


The University collects and processes information, including images, about its students, applicants and potential
applicants, for academic, administrative, management, pastoral, and health and safety reasons. Some of this
information is considered as sensitive personal data in the terms of the Data Protection Act 1998. The information
is provided by a student, applicant or potential applicant or on his/her behalf. It is not possible to become, nor
remain, a matriculated student, nor to process an application without agreement to provide this information. The
information is processed in accordance with the Universitys Notification with the Information Commissioner under
the Data Protection Act 1998, and is disclosed to third parties only with students consent, or to meet a statutory
obligation, or in accordance with the Universitys Notification with the Information Commissioner, or in accordance
with the terms of the Act.
The full statement on the processing of personal data is contained in the Fees and General Information for
Students: http://www.gla.ac.uk/students/
Supporting information and resources are available from the School of Life Sciences web pages at:
www.gla.ac.uk/schools/lifesciences/informationforstudents/

X.

EXCHANGE/ STUDY ABROAD OPPORTUNITIES:

As a School of Life Sciences student you can take advantage of some exciting opportunities to study abroad as an
integral part of your degree programme.
There are two study abroad opportunities available to you:
1.

Erasmus+ allows you to access links to lots of Universities throughout the European Union.

2.

International Exchange opens up opportunities to study with partner Universities throughout the world.

Page 13

Both systems involve course matching your curriculum at Glasgow to the curriculum at the partner University you
are considering. This matching is essential to ensure that you will return to your studies with the required
understanding for the next academic year. If you enter the MSci programme in year 3, then it may be possible to
spend your placement year abroad.
It is important to note:

It is easiest to organise an exchange during your second year

Some students have managed to agree an exchange in their third year but it becomes more difficult to find
courses abroad that cover the same (or similar) material as the third year programme in Glasgow. The
content of your third year course is very important since it is the grounding for the final honours year.

It is not possible to study abroad for two consecutive years, such as third year followed by a work
placement year.
All details on the application process etc. can be found at:
http://www.gla.ac.uk/schools/lifesciences/informationforstudents/studyabroadexchangeopportunities/

XI.

SESSION DATES

Dates for the current and following academic session are published by the University here:
www.gla.ac.uk/services/senateoffice/sessiondates/
You must be available for teaching and assessments throughout these periods do not make holiday or
work arrangements that may conflict with teaching or examinations. Note that the Spring diet examinations may
be scheduled right up until the end of the designated examination periods and final results may be published
sometime thereafter once the Schools Boards of Examiners have met.

Page 14

TextbooksSummary
E = Essential. R = Recommended, U = Useful
1c
Abbas et al
Basic Immunology
Abbas et al
Cellular & Molecular Immunology
Alberts et al
The Molecular Biology of the Cell
Barton N. et al
Evolution (Cold Spring Harbour Laboratory Press)
Bear et al
Neuroscience: Exploring the Brain
Begon et al
Ecology: individuals, populations and communities
Berg, Tymoczo & Stryer
Biochemistry
Black
Microbiology
Butler
Forensic DNA Typing
Campbell et al
Biology
Dale & Haylett
Pharmacology condensed
Davidovits
Physics in Biology & Medicine
Davies et al
Physical Education & the Study of Sport
Denny
Air and Water
Dickinson et al
Ecosystems
Dodson
Ecology
Freeman & Herron
Evolutionary Analysis
Gibson et al
Introduction to Drug Metabolism
Goodenough et al
Perspectives on Animal Behaviour
Graham et al
Plant Biology
Griffiths et al
An Introduction to Genetic Analysis, 8th Edition
Groom, M.J., Meffe, G.K. &Carroll, C.R.
Principles of Conservation Biology
Hademenos
Physics for Pre-Med, Biology & Allied Health Students
Hardman & Stensel
Physical Activity & Health
Hickman & Roberts
Animal Diversity
Janeway et al
Immunobiology
Krebs
Ecology
Madigan and Martinko
Brock Biology of Microorganisms
McArdle, Katch and Katch
Exercise Physiology
McNeill Alexander
How Animals Move
Newman
Applied Ecology and Environmental Management
Pullin
Conservation Biology

2c

3c

4c

1a

2a

4a

7a

12a

13a

2b

3b

4b

7b

8b

9b

15b

16b

18b

U
U
U

R
U

R
R
R
U

U
U

R
E

R
U
U
R
U
U
R

U
U

U
U
R
R

U
U

U
R

U
R
U

U
R

1c
Ridley
Evolution
Russell
i Genetics
Saferstein
Forensic Science Handbook
Salyers & Whitt
Microbiology: Diversity, Disease and environment
Slater et al
Plant Biotechnology
Seeley
Anatomy & Physiology
Smith et al
Plant Biology
Sompayrac
How the Immune System Works
Vander
Human Physiology
Wharton
Life at the Limits
White
Crime Scene to Court
Wolpert
Principles of Development
Practical Skills In Biology
Cappuccino & Sherman
Microbiology: A laboratory manual
Wilson & Hunt
Molecular Biology of the cell: Problem book
Gunn A
Essential Forensic Biology
Taiz & Zeiger
Plant Physiology

2c

3c

4c

1a

2a

4a

7a

12a

13a

2b

3b

4b

7b

8b

9b

U
U

15b

16b

18b

U
R

U
R
R

R
E

R
U
R

U
U
U
U
R

For more details, refer to the entries for individual courses. All books are available in the University Library & Reading Room. Contact Dr Griffiths if any book is unavailable for more
than 2 weeks.

1C: ECOLOGY AND CONSERVATION


Aims of the Course
The overall aims of the course are to:

provide a basic understanding of the interactions which control the distribution and abundance of animals and
plants as species, populations and communities;

outline the main threats to wild plants, animals and habitats;

discuss why conservation is necessary and important;

outline the biological bases of conservation practice;

illustrate conservation-in-action by means of detailed case studies.

Overall Intended Learning Outcomes of the Course


You should be able to:

recall facts related to (or demonstrate knowledge of): threats to wildlife; definition of wildlife conservation;
biodiversity and its measurement; conservation legislation and conventions; role of both government and
pressure groups in conservation; nature reserves; captive breeding; the variety and importance of urban
wildlife; fishery-wildlife interactions;

discuss controversial aspects of nature conservation;

appreciate the value of wildlife reserves and their problems of management from visiting a nature reserve;

analyse particular problems in wildlife conservation and compose detailed reports based on the research
work done;

demonstrate an understanding of the principles of Ecology;

describe the interactions which control the distribution and abundance of animals and plants as species,
populations and communities;

give some examples of these interactions involving particular species, especially in a Scottish context;

outline examples of the applications of ecology and ecological techniques in environmental management.

Staff
Course Coordinator:

Dr Stewart White, Room 514, Graham Kerr Building, ext. 2505,


email: Stewart.White@glasgow.ac.uk

Deputy Coordinator:

Dr Anna McGregor, Room 513, Graham Kerr Building, ext. 4775,


email: Anna.McGregor@glasgow.ac.uk

Additional Teaching Staff:

Professor Sarah Cleaveland, Room 314c, Jarrett, ext. 5346,


email: Sarah.Cleaveland@glasgow.ac.uk
Dr Ruedi Nager, Room 425, Graham Kerr Building, ext. 5976,
email: Ruedi.Nager@glasgow.ac.uk
Professor Rod Page, Room 222, Graham Kerr Building, ext 4778,
email: Roderic.Page@glasgow.ac.uk
Dr Michelle Bellingham, Room 236c, Jarrett Building, ext.5728,
email: Michelle.Bellingham@glasgow.ac.uk
Dr Alan Law, Room 516, Graham Kerr Building. ext 4958,
email: Alan.Law@glasgow.ac.uk
Dr Sofie Spatharis, Room 515, Graham Kerr Building. ext 3560,
email: Sofie.Spatharis@glasgow.ac.uk
Guest Lecturers: Dr Paul Walton, Royal Society for the Protection of Birds
Dr Cameron Easton, Scottish Office Ecological Advisers Unit
Dr Willie Yeomans Clyde River Foundation
Dr Bernard Zonfrillo, Graham Kerr Building

Page 16

Robyn Stewart, SNH Water Vole Ambassador

Textbooks
Recommended:

Campbell and Reece (2008) Biology 8th Edition, The Benjamin/Cummings Publishing Co.
Chapters 50-54

Useful:

Begon, M. Harper, J.L. and Townsend, C.R. (2006) Ecology: from individuals to
ecosystems(Blackwell Science, Oxford) 4th Edition
Dickinson, G. & Murphy, K. (2006) Ecosystems (Routledge, London and New York) 2nd
Edition
Pullin, A.S. (2002) Conservation Biology, (Cambridge)

Assessment
Minimum requirements for the award of credits
Credits will normally be awarded for completion of coursework, attendance at laboratories and sitting the
end-of-course examination.

Assessment of the course is based on:


1.

A 2-hour examination at the end of the course, which counts as 70% of the final assessment which comprises
both objective and short answer questions.

2.

Assessment of coursework, which counts as 30%:

Class test (10%)

PBA Report (15%)

Excursion Report (5%)

Assessed coursework: class test, field excursion report (or essay) and problem
based assignment
The class test will comprise both multiple-choice and short note questions and will be held during lecture times.
See Assessment Timetable for dates, times and locations. The problem-based assignment will comprise a written
report and should be submitted via Turnitin. Full details will be given on the course Moodle site.

Field Excursion
Field excursion report (or essay)
You will be required to complete a report on the field excursion. This must be submitted as a Word file, named as
FIELD followed by your surname and matriculation number (e.g. FIELDmcgregor0402977.doc). This file must be
submitted via Turnitin (see Assessment Timetable for submission deadline). If you were unable to attend the
field excursion your assessment will be based on an essay of not more than 2000 words on the topic Discuss the
conservation importance of nature reserves This file must be submitted via Turnitin (see Assessment Timetable
for submission deadline).

External Examiner
To be confirmed

Classes
This course consists of 40 lectures, 1 field excursion, 1 tutorial, 1 session for providing advice on the problembased assignment and 1 Q&A revision session.

Page 17

Lectures
Semester 1

Semester 2

Tuesdays

12:00-13:00

Thursdays

12:00-13:00

Tuesdays

11:00-12:00

Thursdays

11:00-12:00

Lecture handouts
Detailed lecture notes will not be made available electronically.but where possible summary powerpoint
presentations will be uploaded to the course moodle site. It is not intended that the summary presentations
contain sufficient information to enable you to complete the assessment for this course to a satisfactory standard
without attending lectures or taking your own lecture notes. We expect you to attend lectures, take your own
notes and to read references to which you are directed.

Detailed Intended Learning Outcomes


Each lecturer on the course will provide you with detailed intended learning outcomes for their part of the course.

Tutorial, Excursion and Problem-based Assignment


Aims
The aims of this part of the course are to:

give an opportunity to discuss controversial aspects of wildlife conservation;

show conservation in action by visiting a wildlife reserve;

analyse particular problems in wildlife conservation and compose detailed reports based on the research
work done.

Tutorial and Excursion


Why should we conserve wildlife? A discussion of the ethical and practical motives underlying a conservation
policy, the 2-hour tutorial will be in Week 3 or 4 of Semester 2.
Possil Marsh Nature Reserve: an opportunity to see, at first hand, what is necessary for the management of a
Reserve, especially one set in a deprived urban background. The 3-hour excursion will be in Weeks 4 and 5 of the
course. The meeting place for the Excursion will be outside the Boyd Orr Building on University Avenue. Please
bring warm and waterproof clothing and wellington boots or walking boots.
For both the tutorial and excursion you will be given a personalised lab timetable at the start of the course,
showing which groups you have been assigned to. Please then refer to Laboratory TimetableSummary for
dates and locations of your own sessions. Note that not all laboratory groups listed in the Laboratory Timetable
Summary will run, as the final number of groups will depend on the eventual class size; do not assume that you
can attend any listed group.
Note that the class test and end-of-course examination will include questions based on the tutorial and excursion.

Problem-based Assignments

Assignment 1: Involving indigenous communities in conservation

Assignment 2: Elephants, rhinoceroses and tigerslarge mammals in poor countries

Assignment 3: How to save marine turtles

Assignment 4: The major threats to tropical forests

You choose one assignment from the list above. All assignments will be introduced during the session in Week 2 of
Semester 2. You will collect and analyse relevant information then compile a written report outlining what you
have learned about the problem, and discussing your favoured solutions. Advice on the writing of the reports will
be provided at the assignment discussion and, if necessary, also by the mentors. Your field excursion report or
essay will be marked and returned to you by email with feedback.

Page 18

Lecture Timetable
Week

Day

Date

S1/Wk 1

Tue
Thu

22-Sep Dr White
24-Sep Dr Spatharis

Lecturer
1
2

Topic
What is Ecology & Conservation?
Ecosystems: Structure and Functioning I

S1/Wk 2

Tue
Thu

29-Sep Dr Spatharis
01-Oct Dr Spatharis

3
4

Ecosystems: Structure and Functioning II


Ecosystems in High-Stress Environments

S1/Wk 3

Tue
Thu

06-Oct Dr Spatharis
08-Oct Dr Spatharis

5
6

Ecosystems in Disturbed Environments


Ecosystems in Productive and Intermediate Environments

S1/Wk 4

Tue
Thu

13-Oct Dr White
15-Oct Dr White

7
8

Urban Wildlife
Local Conservation Issues

S1/Wk 5

Tue
Thu

20-Oct Dr Bellingham
22-Oct Dr McGregor

9
10

Human Impacts on Ecosystems


Plant Survival Strategies in Ecosystems: The CSR Approach

S1/Wk 6

Tue
Thu

27-Oct Dr McGregor
29-Oct Dr McGregor

11
12

S1/Wk 7

Tue
Thu

03-Nov Dr McGregor
05-Nov Dr McGregor

13
14

Plant Design: Acquiring Resources from Ecosystems


Plant Design: Tolerating Environmental Pressure in
Ecosystems
Pattern in Ecosystems; Zonations of Plant Communities
Pattern in Ecosystems; Cyclical Change in Plant Communities

S1/Wk 8

Tue
Thu

10-Nov Dr Nager
12-Nov Dr Nager

15
16

Life-history Strategies
Population Abundancies

S1/Wk 9

Tue
Thu

17-Nov Dr Nager
19-Nov Dr Nager

17
18

Dispersal
Species Interactions

S1/Wk 10

Tue
Thu

24-Nov Dr Nager
26-Nov Dr Yeomans

19
20

Community Structure
Ecosystem Service

S1/Wk 11

Tue
Thu

01-Dec Dr Yeomans
03-Dec

21

Using ecology to manage freshwater fisheries


No lecture

S2/Wk 1

Tue
Thu

12-Jan
14-Jan

Dr White

22

Class Test
Introduction to Problem-based Assignments

S2/Wk 2

Tue
Thu

19-Jan
21-Jan

Dr Law
Dr Law

23
24

Aquatic water Pollution


UK Martine Conservation- The Beginnings

S2/Wk 3

Tue
Thu

26-Jan
28-Jan

Prof Adams
TBA

25
26

UK Martine Conservation- Present and Future


TBA

S2/Wk 4

Tue

02-Feb Prof Cleaveland

27

Thu

04-Feb Prof Cleaveland

28

Managing Protected Areas: Changing Paradigms in


Conservation Management
Sustainable Utilisation of Wildlife

S2/Wk 5

Tue
Thu

09-Feb Prof Cleaveland


11-Feb Prof Cleaveland

29
30

People and Wildlife


Wildlife Tourism and Conservation

S2/Wk 6

Tue
Thu

16-Feb Prof Cleaveland


18-Feb Prof Page

31
32

Management Interventions and Conservation


Measuring Biodiversity: Systematics and the Agony of Choice
1

S2/Wk 7

Tue

23-Feb Prof Page

33

Thu

25-Feb Dr Easton

34

Measuring Biodiversity: Systematics and the Agony of Choice


2
Role of Government in Conservation 1

S2/Wk 8

Tue
Thu

01-Mar Dr Easton
03-Mar Dr Zonfrillo

35
36

Role of Government in Conservation 2


Conservation in Practice

S2/Wk 9

Tue
Thu

08-Mar Dr Walton
10-Mar Dr Walton

37
38

Role of Pressure Groups in Conservation 1


Role of Pressure Groups in Conservation 2

S2/Wk 10

Tue
Thu

15-Mar Dr Stewart
17-Mar Dr White

39
40

Glasgows Fossorial Water Voles


The Payamino Project - Conservation and Community

S2/Wk 11

Tue

22-Mar Dr White

Question and Answer Session

Page 19

2C: MICROBIOLOGY
Aims of the Course
The overall aims of the course are to:

highlight the unique aspects of microorganisms and their diversity;

provide an introduction to the beneficial and detrimental activities of microorganisms;

provide an introduction to practical and applied aspects of Microbiology;

highlight the industrial, economic and environmental impact of Microbiology;

provide a broad-based introduction to Microbiology, preparing students for further studies in the subject.

Overall Intended Learning Outcomes of the Course


By the end of the course you should be able to:

describe the basic biology of microorganisms and the diverse environments in which they survive;

discuss information relating to current knowledge of applications of microbiology in industry;

describe human flora in health and disease;

discuss microbial growth, pathogenesis, disease transmission, epidemiology and control of microbes and
infectious disease;

describe the techniques by which you can identify microorganisms and diagnose disease;

independently research and describe a current topic in microbiology;

demonstrate competence in safely performing laboratory-based techniques in microbiology;

perform and analyse calculations relating to your lab-based practice in the field of microbiology;

demonstrate a broad-based knowledge of laboratory-based practices in the field of microbiology.

Staff
Course Coordinator:

Dr Nicola Veitch, Room 350, West Medical Building, ext. 5143,


email: Nicola.Veitch@glasgow.ac.uk

Deputy Coordinator:

Dr Andrew Roe, Room B340, Sir Graeme Davies Building, ext. 2980,
email: Andrew.Roe@glasgow.ac.uk

Additional Teaching Staff:

Professor Sheila Graham, Room 312, Jarrett Building, ext. 6256,


email: Sheila.Graham@glasgow.ac.uk
Professor Malcolm Kennedy, Room 302, Graham Kerr Building, ext. 5819,
email: Malcolm.Kennedy@glasgow.ac.uk
Dr Donal Wall, Room B2-22, Sir Graeme Davies Building, ext. 7123,
email: Donal.Wall@glasgow.ac.uk
Dr Tansy Hammarton, Room B6-25, Sir Graeme Davies Building, ext. 6766,
email: Tansy.Hammarton@glasgow.ac.uk
Dr Helen Gadegaard, Room 350 West Medical Building, ext. 5143
email: Helen.Gadegaard@glasgow.ac.uk

Page 20

Textbooks
Recommended:

Madigan, Martinko, Dunlop, Clark (2012) Biology of Microorganisms 13th edition


(Pearson)
You can access this textbook on the Internet at www.prenhall.com/brock/ where you
will also find some very useful self-assessment exercises
Black (2008) Microbiology 7th edition (Wiley)

Useful:

Practical Skills in Biology


Salyers, Whitt (2001) Microbiology: Diversity, Disease and the Environment
(Fitzgerald Science Press)
Cappuccino and Sherman (2011) Microbiology: A Laboratory Manual (Pearson)

Assessment
Minimum requirements for the award of credits
Credits will normally be awarded for completion of coursework, attendance at laboratories and sitting the
end-of-course examination.

Assessment of the course is based on:


1.

A 2-hour examination at the end of the course, which counts as 70% of the final assessment which comprises
objective and short answer questions and an essay.

2.

Assessment of coursework, which counts as 30%:

Moodle test 1, Semester 1, week 11 (6%)

Moodle test 2, end Semester 2, week 11 (6%)

Assessment of key laboratory techniques, Semester 1 virtual lab (6%), Semester 2 labs (12%)

Assessed coursework: class tests, essay and laboratory assessment


Moodle test 1 (40 objective questions in 30 mins) will examine lectures 1-20 inclusive.
Moodle test 2 (40 objective questions in 30 mins) will examine lectures 21-30 inclusive, the self-directed learning
task (available on Moodle at end of Semester 1) and the Semester 2 lab practicals.
You will do the Moodle test in a monitored computer cluster on the timetabled days. You will be asked to sign up to
a slot within this time period to complete these tests and the location will be given to you nearer the time. Please
check the Moodle site and your University e-mail address regularly for more details.
The assessment of laboratory techniques will comprise regular checks on your laboratory skills and achievement of
key competencies. These will take place throughout the lab course in Semester 2 and via a virtual lab exercise in
Semester 1
For the essay in the end of course examination, you will be expected to write an essay on one of four topics which
will be notified during Semester 1.

External Examiner
Professor Paul Williams, University of Nottingham

Classes
This course consists of 30 lectures, a laboratory-based tutorial, a virtual lab exercise and 10 laboratory classes.

Page 21

Lectures
Semester 1

Semester 2

Wednesdays

12:00-13:00

Fridays

12:00-13:00

Fridays

10:00-11:00

Detailed Intended Learning Outcomes


You should be able to:

describe the major discoveries in the history of microbiology;

show an understanding of the taxonomy and phylogenetics of microorganisms;

discuss the diversity of size of microorganisms;

understand the functions and importance of cell walls and plasma membranes;

describe the differences in cell wall structure/membrane structure for bacteria, archaea, extremophiles, fungi,
algae & protozoan parasites and understand how these differences may be exploited for diagnostics and
control strategies;

discuss the diversity of shape of microorganisms;

describe a variety of differentiation processes including endospore formation, asymmetric division and life
cycle differentiation events in fungi and protozoan parasites;

demonstrate an understanding of the key differences between bacteria, archaea, viruses, protozoan parasites
and fungi;

describe structural components & organelles of bacterial, archaeal, fungal and protozoan parasite cells,
understand their functions and discuss key differences between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells;

describe the structure and function of flagella and cilia in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, and discuss the
importance of motility for microorganisms;

describe a diverse range of viruses and discuss differences in their structure, genetic material, replication
strategies and life cycles;

list examples of a range of viruses infecting diverse hosts e.g. viruses of bacteria, archaea, animals, humans
and plants;

discuss the diverse range of microbial habitats and how the metabolic and physiological properties of a
microorganism will determine the range of environmental conditions in which it can live;

describe the growth of communities of microorganisms in biofilms;

define the terms symbiosis, parasitism, mutualism and commensalism, and give examples of symbiotic
relationships;

describe molecular methods for assessing diversity and activity of microorganisms within a microbial
community;

give examples and locations of microorganisms characteristic of the natural human and animal flora;

describe how some microorganisms acquire the ability to cause disease in their host;

describe a range of animal and plant pathogens and the strategies they use to avoid host defences during
infection;

understand what nematodes are and appreciate their disease impact globally;

be able to describe the different ways nematodes attack plants and generate their dispersal phases;

be able to describe how nematodes control the differentiation of plant cells;

to be able to give examples of horizontal gene transfer and the advantages to nematodes in plant parasitism;

give examples of microbial catabolic processes fermentation versus respiration;

understand the central role of the carbon cycle;

define chemolithotrophy and phototrophy; give examples of both pathways;

describe how microorganisms can be used in biofuel production;

understand the important role of the nitrogen cycle;

appreciate and understand how microbial metabolic properties are exploited in sewage treatment and
bioremediation;

describe how microorganisms and their products can be used in biological warfare and as biological weapons;

Page 22

outline the role of microbiology within the field of molecular biology;

describe differences in the molecular composition of microorganisms;

discuss applications of molecular microbiology in diagnostics and research;

describe methods for enrichment, isolation and enumeration of microorganisms;

discuss the nutritional and environmental requirements of microorganisms, and how microorganisms can be
cultured and maintained in the laboratory environment;

discuss cell and population growth of microorganisms and describe the phases of microbial growth;

define key terms relating to epidemiology, including epidemic, pandemic, endemic, incidence, prevalence,
mortality and morbidity, and give examples of epidemic and pandemic outbreaks of disease;

outline the modes of transmission of infectious disease and the importance of carriers and reservoirs of
infection;

discuss a range of public health measures taken to reduce infection and list a range of notifiable diseases;

give examples of emerging and re-emerging diseases;

discuss problems associated with sampling microorganisms from their natural environments;

explain the importance of selective and differential media in microbiology and describe a panel of phenotypic
tests to identify microorganisms including microscopy, biochemical and molecular tests and basic staining
methods, outlining the rationales underlying these tests;

describe with examples how serological and genetic tests can be used to identify microorganisms of medical
importance;

describe a range of physical and chemical methods that can be used to control microbial growth;

describe how food spoilage occurs, list the principle microorganisms responsible for spoilage, and discuss
how spoilage can be prevented or minimised;

list a range of antimicrobial agents, describe their discovery, production and mechanism of action and discuss
the need for continuing drug discovery programmes for microbial diseases;

describe, with examples, how large scale microbial culturing and the application of biotechnology is used
industrially to produce a range of pharmaceutical products;

describe the roles of microorganisms in the food and drink industries;

describe how drinking and recreational water can be tested for microbial contamination and describe the
standards of water quality which are considered acceptable and how these can be achieved.

Tutorial Session
You will be allocated a specific time and place for the tutorial (Week 3, Semester 1, Thursday and Friday). This is a
laboratory-based tutorial (1 hr) designed as an introduction to the ways that microorganisms are grown and
examined in the laboratory. You must bring a lab coat and a padlock for the lockers to this tutorial.
Personal belongings may not be stored in the lab during the tutorial.

Laboratory Course
Aims & Intended Learning Outcomes
The aims of the laboratory course are to:

Train students in the basic techniques required for handling microorganisms safely.

Encourage a thorough approach to the gathering and processing of scientific data.

Provide practical experience in the topics selected for the lecture programme.

The laboratory course comprises:


There will be one 2.5-hour laboratory every week for 10 weeks in the second semester. You must attend each
session. Please note that a lab coat must be worn at all times during the laboratory classes. You must bring a
lab coat and a padlock for the lockers so that you can store your personal belongings securely during
the lab. Coats and bags are not allowed in the lab.
A separate laboratory manual comprising safety advice, methods of assessment and protocols for the
experimental work will be issued at the first laboratory class. The objectives of each of the laboratory practicals
are listed in the laboratory manual.

Page 23

Laboratory times and locations


The class will be divided into three groups to attend laboratory classes (2.5 hrs) in the Molecular Biology and
Microbiology Teaching Laboratory (Level-2, Joseph Black Building) on either Wednesday, Thursday or Friday of
Semester 2 at 2pm. You may not change your allocated session unless you have been given permission to do so
by the Course Coordinator.

Lecture Timetable
Week

Day

Date

Lecturer

S1/Wk 1

Wed

23-Sep

Dr Gadegaard

Overview of the Course and Introduction to Microbiology

Fri

25-Sep

Dr Gadegaard

Cell Walls and Membranes

Wed

30-Sep

Dr Gadegaard

Morphology & Differentiation

Fri

02-Oct

Prof Kennedy

Organelles & Origins

Wed

07-Oct

Prof Graham

Structure and Function of Viruses

Fri

09-Oct

Prof Graham

Diversity of Viruses

Wed

14-Oct

Prof Kennedy

Motility; Fungi

Fri

16-Oct

Dr Gadegaard

Microbial Habitats

Wed

21-Oct

Dr Gadegaard

Microbial Communities

Fri

23-Oct

Dr Roe

10

The Normal Human Flora

Wed

28-Oct

Dr Roe

11

Transition from Health to Disease

Fri

30-Oct

Prof Kennedy

12

Plant Parasitic Nematodes

Wed

04-Nov

Dr Gadegaard

13

Plant Pathogens

Fri

06-Nov

Dr Gadegaard

14

Animal Pathogens-1

Wed

11-Nov

Dr Gadegaard

15

Animal Pathogens-2

Fri

13-Nov

Dr Gadegaard

16

Virtual lab Bacterial Isolation

Wed

18-Nov

Dr Gadegaard

17

Virtual lab Bacterial Isolation

Fri

20-Nov

Dr Roe

18

Bioterrorism

Wed

25-Nov

Dr Hammarton 19

Molecular Microbiology-1

Fri

27-Nov

Dr Hammarton 20

Molecular Microbiology 2

S1/Wk 11

Wed

02-Dec

S2/Wk 1

Fri

15-Jan

TBA

21

Principles of Epidemiology

S2/Wk 2

Fri

22-Jan

TBA

22

Epidemiology and public health

S2/Wk 3

Fri

29-Jan

Dr Veitch

23

Basic Methods in Microbial Identification

S2/Wk 4

Fri

05-Feb

Dr Veitch

24

Techniques in Medical Microbiology

S2/Wk 5

Fri

12-Feb

Dr Hammarton 25

Control of Microorganisms - 1

S2/Wk 6

Fri

19-Feb

Dr Hammarton 26

Control of Microorganisms - 2

S2/Wk 7

Fri

26-Feb

Dr Hammarton 27

Control of Microorganisms - 3

S2/Wk 8

Fri

04-Mar

Dr Wall

28

Pharmaceuticals

S2/Wk 9

Fri

11-Mar

Dr Wall

29

Water & Food Stuffs

S2/Wk 10

Fri

18-Mar

Dr Wall

30

Alcohol

S2/Wk 11

Tue

22-Mar

S1/Wk 2

S1/Wk 3

S1/Wk 4

S1/Wk 5

S1/Wk 6

S1/Wk 7

S1/Wk 8

S1/Wk 9

S1/Wk 10

Lecture title

Moodle Test 1

Moodle Test 2

Page 24

3C: MOLECULES OF LIFE


Aims of the Course
The overall aims are:

To introduce students to how information is stored, transcribed and translated in the cells of organisms in
order to enable these cells to perform functions essential to life.

To provide an opportunity for students to develop skills in common laboratory techniques as well as analysis,
interpretation and presentation of factual information and data.

To prepare students for further studies in the fields of biochemistry, genetics, molecular cell biology and
immunology.

Overall Intended Learning Outcomes of the Course


By the end of this course, students will be able to:

describe in detail the basic processes and molecules involved in the flow of information from DNA to RNA to
protein;

illustrate how certain molecules within the central dogma of molecular biology can be quantified and
manipulated to determine key characteristics;

explain how the structure of proteins, from their basic amino acid composition to quaternary structure,
relates to their functions in physiological and some pathophysiological conditions;

discuss the mechanisms and inhibition of enzyme-catalysed reactions and determine key kinetic properties of
enzymes;

describe the structure and function of biological membranes and key proteins within them;

explain the processes of energy metabolism in different organisms and relate the control of enzymecatalysed reactions to the function of enzymes within these processes;

demonstrate basic theoretical knowledge and skills in key laboratory practical methods and in data handling,
analysis and presentation.

Staff
Course Coordinator:

Dr Elaine Huston, Room 535, Wolfson Link Building, ext. 2858,


email: Elaine.Huston@glasgow.ac.uk

Deputy Coordinators:

Professor Marshall Stark, Room 504, Bower Building, ext. 5116,


email: Marshall.Stark@glasgow.ac.uk

Additional Teaching Staff:

Dr Cheryl Woolhead, Room 231, Davidson Building, ext. 5161,


email: Cheryl.Woolhead@glasgow.ac.uk
Dr Dan Walker, Room 226, GBRC, ext. 5082,
email: Daniel.Walker@glasgow.ac.uk
Professor Anna Amtmann, Room 229, Bower Building, ext. 5393,
email: Anna.Amtmann@glasgow.ac.uk
Professor William Cushley, Room 315, Davidson Building, ext. 5261,
email: William.Cushley@glasgow.ac.uk
Professor Kevin ODell, Room 319, Davidson Building, ext. 6218,
email: Kevin.ODell@glasgow.ac.uk

Page 25

Textbooks
Recommended:

Berg, Tymoczo and Stryer Biochemistry 6th edition (2006) or 7th edition (2012)(W.H.
Freeman and Co.)

Useful:

Alberts, B., et al (2008) Molecular Biology of the Cell 5 edition (Garland Press)
th

Campbell and Reece (2008) Biology 8th Edition, The Benjamin/Cummings Publishing Co.
Wilson & Hunt Molecular Biology of the Cell: Problem Book (Garland Press)

Assessment
Minimum requirements for the award of credits
Credits will normally be awarded for completion of coursework, attendance at laboratories and sitting the
end-of-course examination.

Assessment of the course is based on:


1.

A 2-hour examination at the end of the course, which counts as 70% of the final assessment. This comprises
objective questions one short answer question and data interpretation.

2.

Assessment of coursework, which counts as 30%:

Class test (5%)

Essay submitted online (10%)

Essay under exam conditions (15%)

Assessed coursework: class test and essay under exam conditions


The class test will comprise objective questions and will be held during lecture times. The essay under exam
conditions will be held during lecture times. See Assessment Timetable for dates, times and locations.

External Examiner
Dr Sreenivasam Ponnambalam

Classes
This course consists of 42 lectures, 2 laboratories and 2 tutorials.

Lectures
Group 1

Group 2

Semester 1

Mondays

12:00-13:00

Fridays

09:00-10:00

Semester 2

Thursdays

09:00-10:00

Fridays

09:00-10:00

Semester 1

Mondays

17:00-18:00

Fridays

13:00-14:00

Semester 2

Thursdays

12:00-13:00

Fridays

12:00-13:00

Detailed Intended Learning Outcomes


You should be able to:

explain the meaning of The central dogma of molecular biology: DNA - RNA - protein, as flow of
information

describe the structures of the nucleotide building blocks of DNA and RNA

describe the primary structures of DNA and RNA

Page 26

explain how the double helix secondary structure of DNA is formed, and the forces holding it together

understand molecular graphics representations of DNA, RNA and protein structures

explain the basic principles of DNA replication and transcription

explain how protein sequence information is encoded in DNA

explain how proteins can recognize DNA sequences

describe the unusual structures that DNA can adopt, and how it can bend and supercoil

explain how DNA is stored in cells and in eukaryotes, how DNA is wrapped around nucleosomes and
packaged into chromatin

explain how RNA can fold into complex structures, including catalytic ribozymes

describe the mechanism of DNA replication, including the functions of the proteins involved, origins of
replication, the replication fork, leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis, and Okazaki fragments; and how
specific problems associated with replication are solved, such as unwinding and untangling the DNA, and
ensuring replication of the ends of linear chromosomes

explain the range of ways that DNA can be damaged

describe how replication errors can be corrected by DNA polymerase proofreading

describe the processes involved in the main systems for repair of damaged DNA: mismatch repair, base
excision repair, and nucleotide excision repair

explain how DNA repair is coupled to other cellular processes, and how defective repair can lead to disease

explain the principles of Sanger DNA sequencing and next generation DNA sequencing methods

understand what can be learnt from DNA sequence information, and how the information is accessed

describe how gel electrophoresis and blotting can be used to analyse DNA

describe what restriction enzymes are, how they work, and how they are used in molecular biology

describe how DNA sequences can be amplified by cloning in E. coli plasmids

describe how PCR works and how it can be used in molecular biology

describe the structure and function of the main types of RNA;

describe the main features of transcription and some of the ways in which this is controlled;

describe the processing of RNA transcripts into their functional forms;

describe the main features of translation;

describe the effects of gene mutation on proteins coded for by these genes;

identify the 20 amino acids from their structures, three-letter and single-letter codes

explain the concepts of primary, secondary, tertiary, quaternary structure, and motifs and domains in relation
to protein structure;

draw the helix and antiparallel pleated sheet;

explain the formation of secondary structure in proteins, and its role in fibrous and globular proteins;

explain the formation of tertiary structure in globular proteins, how two proteins of similar structure may
have similar or different functions, and how two proteins with similar function may have similar or different
structures;

describe structure-function relationships in DNA binding proteins such as p53

describe the changes in the prion protein structure in disease processes;

explain how the quaternary structure of haemoglobin accounts for the co-operativity of its ability to bind
oxygen;

describe how proteins may be separated on the basis of charge, size or affinity for ligands;

describe how the primary structure of a protein is determined and how molecular weight is determined by
SDS PAGE

describe the properties of catalysts and the special properties of enzyme catalysts

explain the concepts of the enzyme active site and transition state stabilisation

explain how enzymes are assayed define Vmax, Km and turnover number and explain how these values can
be determined experimentally distinguish between reversible and irreversible inhibitors;

describe the active site, structure and mechanism of action of chymotrypsin;

explain how some RNAs can act as catalysts, describe some of the medical and biotechnological uses of
enzymes;

describe the fluid mosaic model of a biological membrane;

Page 27

define the main types of membrane proteins and explain the structural organization of membrane proteins
which allows them to function in membranes;

explain the meaning of terms, diffusion, concentration gradient, membrane permeability, membrane resting
potential, action potential etc;

understand how transient changes in sodium and potassium permeability facilitate propagation of nerve
impulses;

describe molecular basis of active transport using P-type ATPase as an example

outline the detailed molecular mechanism of the potassium ion-channel selectivity and the basis for

voltage gating;

describe the molecular basis of operation of a ligand-gated ion channel using acetylcholine receptor as
example;

draw the structure of ATP and explain its biological role in the harvesting and use of energy describe the
processes leading to ATP synthesis in both mitochondria and chloroplasts;

draw the structures of key intermediates in central metabolic pathways;

describe the pathways of glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, the Krebs cycle, glycogen synthesis and
degradation,fatty acid synthesis and degradation, pentose phosphate pathway;

explain how these pathways are regulated via allosteric enzymes and protein phosphorylation;

describe the key role of Rubisco in photosynthetic CO2 fixation and outline the three phases of the

Calvin/Benson cycle;

describe the distribution of the central metabolic pathways between mammalian organs

explain the hormonal integration of metabolism.

outline strategies by which genes and genetic expression can be examined

describe the range of applications of bioinformatics in genetics and biochemistry

identify and show familiarity with use major biological databases and bioinformatics web-based tools;

describe the basic concepts of biological information transfer;

Laboratory Course
Aims
An integrated series of labs will introduce students to basic molecular biology and biochemical techniques. In
semester 1 labs students will analyse a preparation of Taq polymerase cloned into an expression plasmid and will
amplify, express and purify the Taq polymerase. In the first lab of semester 2, this lab-produced purified Taq
polymerase will be used to amplify DNA using PCR. Its commercial value will be calculated by comparing to
commercial Taq polymerase. Two further laboratories will examine characteristics of enzymes and their kinetic
properties.

Lab 1
Students will be provided with Taq polymerase which has been cloned into the plasmid vector pTTQ18. Students
will examine the cloning process by digestion of the cloned DNA using restriction enzymes. This lab will:

illustrate the use of bacterial plasmid DNA in cloning

provide practical experience of conducting reactions in very small volumes

provide practical experience of gel electrophoresis of DNA

consolidate some of the knowledge of the structure and properties DNA provided by the lecture course

provide practice in mapping restriction enzyme sites on DNA molecules;

Lab 2
During this lab students will transform cloned Taq polymerase into E Coli for amplification of the Taq polymerase
and expression of the protein.
This lab will:

introduce the process of transformation of E Coli with plasmid

consolidate knowledge introduced in lectures of how DNA can be manipulated and analysed using basic
molecular biology techniques

Page 28

provide an opportunity to create hypotheses for the control and experimental transformations

Lab 3
During this lab students will be provided with the E coli cell lysate containing expressed Taq polymerase protein,
from lab 2. The thermostable characteristics of Taq polymerase will be exploited to purify the protein from E Coli
cell lysate.
This lab will:

provide practical experience of purifying a protein from a bacterial lysate

provide practical experience of loading SDS PAGE gels and interpreting data from protein gels

consolidate knowledge gained in lectures on structure and characteristics of proteins

consolidate knowledge introduced in lectures on how proteins may be separated on the basis of charge, size
or affinity for ligands

Lab 4
Students will conduct a PCR experiment to amplify a gene of interest. To carry out this PCR reaction, Taq
polymerase expressed and purified by students in labs 1-3 will be used and compared to a commercial Taq
polymerase, to assess the value of the Taq polymerase made during the lab.
This lab will:

provide practical experience of PCR

consolidate knowledge introduced in lectures on how PCR works and how it can be used in molecular biology

provide practical experience of running an agarose gel to visualise a PCR product.

Lab 5 and 6
During these two laboratories, students will examine characteristics of enzymes and perform experiments to look
at the kinetics of enzymes.
These labs will:

provide practical experience of how enzymes are detected and quantified;

provide practical experience of how the kinetic constants of enzymes are determined;

illustrate how the kinetic constants of enzymes help in understanding the effects of inhibitors.

consolidate knowledge gained in lectures on the concepts of the enzyme active site and transition state
stabilisation

consolidate knowledge gained in lectures on how enzymes are assayed define Vmax, Km and turnover
number and explain how these values can be determined experimentally distinguish between reversible and
irreversible inhibitors;

Each of the laboratories detailed above will be accompanied by pre and post lab lessons which are available via the
moodle page for this course. These sessions are essential for the above laboratories and formative feedback will
be given on work completed in these in lab sessions. Work built up from this will increase skills such as numeracy,
graph drawing and scientific figure preparation, scientific notation, interpretation and presentation of data.
Data acquired during the first group of laboratories will feed into the online peer reviewed summative assessment.
Detailed intended learning outcomes of the laboratory course are listed in the manual.
You must attend each session; you must bring your lab coat to all laboratory sessions.

Laboratory times and locations


The class is divided into a number of laboratory groups; you should select your group on MyCampus, and must
attend at the times shown.

Online Exercises
You have the opportunity to test your knowledge and understanding of the course material through short answer
questions and by designing and assessing objective questions.

Page 29

Lecture Timetable
Week

Day

Date

Lecturer

Topic

S1/Wk 1

Mon
Fri

21-Sep
25-Sep

Dr Elaine Huston
Dr Huston

1
2

Teaching and Learning in Molecules of Life


Introduction to the Biomolecular Science L2
Core

S1/Wk 2

Mon
Fri

28-Sep
02-Oct

Prof Marshall Stark


Prof Marshall Stark

3
4

DNA 1
DNA 2

S1/Wk 3

Mon
Fri

05-Oct
09-Oct

Prof Marshall Stark


Prof Marshall Stark

5
6

RNA
DNA Manipulation and Sequencing 1

S1/Wk 4

Mon
Fri

12-Oct
16-Oct

Prof Marshall Stark


Prof Marshall Stark

7
8

DNA Manipulation and Sequencing 2


DNA Replication

S1/Wk 5

Mon
Fri

19-Oct
23-Oct

Prof Marshall Stark


Dr Cheryl Woolhead

9
10

DNA Damage and Repair


Transcription 1

S1/Wk 6

Mon
Fri

26-Oct
30-Oct

Dr Cheryl Woolhead
Dr Cheryl Woolhead

11
12

Transcription 2
Processing of Transcripts

S1/Wk 7

Mon
Fri

02-Nov
06-Nov

Dr Cheryl Woolhead
Dr Cheryl Woolhead

13
14

Translation 1
Translation 2

S1/Wk 8

Mon

09-Nov

Dr Dan Walker

15

Fri

13-Nov

Dr Dan Walker

16

Protein Structure- (amino acids, primary


structure)
Proteins 2 (secondary/tertiary structure 1)

S1/Wk 9

Mon
Fri

16-Nov
20-Nov

Dr Dan Walker

17

Proteins 3 -(secondary/tertiary structure 2)


Class Test

S1/Wk 10

Mon
Fri

23-Nov
27-Nov

Dr Dan Walker
Dr Dan Walker

18
19

Proteins 4 -quartenary structure


Protein Characterisation and Proteomics

S1/Wk 11

Mon
Fri

30-Nov
04-Dec

Dr Dan Walker
Dr Dan Walker

20
21

Enzymes Basic Concepts


Enzymes: Kinetics

S2/Wk 1

Thu
Fri

14-Jan
15-Jan

Dr Dan Walker
Dr Elaine Huston

22
23

Enzymes: Catalysis-How?
Enzyme Kinetics- interactive session

S2/Wk 2

Thu
Fri

21-Jan
22-Jan

Dr Anna Amtmann
Dr Anna Amtmann

24
25

Energy - central role of ATP


Energy Harvesting - Mitochondria

S2/Wk 3

Thu
Fri

28-Jan
29-Jan

Dr Anna Amtmann
Prof Bill Cushley

26
27

Energy Harvesting - Chloroplasts


Carbohydrate Metabolism 1

S2/Wk 4

Thu
Fri

04-Feb
05-Feb

Prof Bill Cushley


Prof Bill Cushley

28
29

Carbohydrate Metabolism 2
Carbohydrate Metabolism 3

S2/Wk 5

Thu
Fri

11-Feb
12-Feb

Prof Bill Cushley


Prof Bill Cushley

30
31

Fatty Acid Metabolism 1


Fatty Acid Metabolism 2

S2/Wk 6

Thu
Fri

18-Feb
19-Feb

Prof Bill Cushley

32

Class Test
Integration of Metabolism

S2/Wk 7

Thu
Fri

25-Feb
26-Feb

Prof Bill Cushley


Prof Bill Cushley

33
34

Enzyme Regulation - Mechanisms


Enzyme Regulation - Homeostasis

S2/Wk 8

Thu

03-Mar

Dr Anna Amtmann

35

Fri

04-Mar

Dr Anna Amtmann

36

Biological Membranes and Membrane


Proteins
Membrane Potentials

S2/Wk 9

Thu
Fri

10-Mar
11-Mar

Dr Anna Amtmann
Dr Anna Amtmann

37
38

Active Transport: Ion Pumps


Passive Transport: Ion Channels

S2/Wk 10

Thu
Fri

17-Mar
18-Mar

Dr Kevin ODell
Dr Kevin ODell

39
40

Bioinformatics
Genetically Modified Organisms

S2/Wk 11

Thu
Fri

24-Mar
25-Mar

Dr Kevin ODell
Dr Kevin ODell

41
42

Transgenic Plants
Transgenic Models of Human Disease

Page 30

4C: PHYSIOLOGY & NEUROSCIENCE


Aims of the Course
The overall aims of the course are to provide:

an overview of the functions of major organ systems and their operation to maintain homeostasis;

an introduction to integrative physiology using examples at the levels of cell physiology, organ physiology
and systems physiology from the cardio-respiratory, gastrointestinal and endocrine systems;

an overview of the structure and function of nervous system;

an introduction to the general structure of nerve cells, their connections and how they are arranged to form
circuits and pathways that underlie sensory motor and cognitive functions.

Overall Intended Learning Outcomes of the Course


By the end of this course students will be able to:

define homeostasis and give examples of physiological homeostasis at the level of cellular and systems
physiology;

describe the basic physiology of the cardio-respiratory system including its control at rest and in times of
stress;

describe the basic physiology of the gastro-intestinal system including its control;

describe the basic physiology of the endocrine system including its control and its function in controlling other
physiological systems at rest and in times of stress;

summarise short-term and long-term integrative physiological control mechanisms using examples of
endocrine and nervous system control;

give examples of modern techniques used to investigate the nervous system;

use diagrams to show an understanding of: the structure of neurones and glia; the anatomical and functional
organisation of the nervous system;

describe the process of the signalling between neurones;

give a simple account of reflexes, aspects of sensory and motor function and aspects of higher brain
functions such as learning and memory.

Staff
Course Coordinator:

Dr Leanne McKay, Room 106, West Medical Building ext. 7727,


email: Leanne.McKay@glasgow.ac.uk

Deputy Coordinator:

Dr Katherine Price, Room 214, West Medical Building, ext. 2805,


email: Katherine.Price@glasgow.ac.uk

Additional Teaching Staff:

Dr Stuart Cobb, Room 317, West Medical Building, ext. 2914,


email: Stuart.Cobb@glasgow.ac.uk
Dr Mike Lucas, Room 311, West Medical Building, ext. 4494,
email: Michael.Lucas@glasgow.ac.uk
Professor David Maxwell, Room 216, West Medical Building, ext. 6455,
email: David.Maxwell@glasgow.ac.uk
Dr James Morrison, Room 441, West Medical Building, ext. 4073,
email: James.Morrison@glasgow.ac.uk
Dr John Riddell, Room 132, West Medical Building, ext. 4495,
email: John.Riddell@glasgow.ac.uk
Professor William Ferrell, Room 407, McGregor Building, ext. 9505
email: William.Ferrell@glasgow.ac.uk
Mr Nairn Scobie, Room 238b, West Medical Building, ext. 3832
email: Nairn.Scobie@glasgow.ac.uk
Dr Craig Daly, Room 437A, West Medical Building, ext. 3920
email: Craig.Daly@glasgow.ac.uk

Page 31

Dr Ron Baxendale, Room 246, West Medical Building, ext. 5344


email: Ronald.Baxendale@glasgow.ac.uk
Dr Chris McCabe, Room 202, WSI Building, Garscube, ext. 5822
email: Chris.McCabe@glasgow.ac.uk
Dr Julia Edgar, Room 310B, Sir Graeme Davies Building, ext. 2082
email : Julia.Edgar@glasgow.ac.uk
Dr Larissa Szymanek, Room 518b, Boyd Orr Building, ext 5293
Email: Larissa.Szymanek@glasgow.ac.uk
Dr Lorraine Work, Room C438, GCRC Building, ext. 5869
Email: Lorraine.Work@glasgow.ac.uk
Dr Debbie Dewar, Room 210, WSI Building, Garscube, ext. 5828
Email: Deborah.dewar@glasgow.ac.uk
Dr Ole Kemi, Room 402, West Medical Building, ext. 5962
Email: Ole.Kemi@glasgow.ac.uk

Textbooks
Recommended:

Tortora and Derrickson (2015) Principles of Anatomy & Physiology, 14th Edition (Wiley,
EMEA Edition) ISBN: 978-1-118-34500-9
Bear, Connors & Paradiso (2006) Neuroscience: Exploring the Brain 3 edition (Williams &
Wilkins)
rd

Useful:

Alberts, et al (2008) Molecular Biology of the Cell 5 edition (Garland Press)


th

Campbell and Reece (2008) Biology 9th Edition, The Benjamin/Cummings Publishing Co.
Seeleys Anatomy & Physiology (10th edition)

Assessment
Minimum requirements for the award of credits
Credits will normally be awarded for completion of coursework and sitting the end-of-course examination.

Assessment of the course is based on:


3.

A 2-hour examination at the end of the course, which counts as 70% of the final mark. The examination will
contain multiple choice, labelling and data interpretation questions.

4.

Assessment of coursework, which counts as 30%. This will consist of three class tests, which are weighted
equally i.e. each class test counts for 10%.

Assessed coursework: class tests


The class tests will comprise multiple choice, labelling and data interpretation questions and will be held during
lecture times. Please see timetable and Moodle site for dates, times and locations.

External Examiner
Professor Susan Deuchars, University of Leeds

Classes
This course consists of 41 lectures, one self-teach workshop and 2 laboratories.

Page 32

Lectures
Group 1

Group 2

Semester 1

Tuesdays

09:00-10:00

Thursdays

09:00-10:00

Semester 2

Mondays

09:00-10:00

Wednesdays

09:00-10:00

Semester 1

Tuesdays

13:00-14:00

Thursdays

13:00-14:00

Semester 2

Mondays

12:00-13:00

Wednesdays

12:00-13:00

Lecture material
We expect you to attend lectures, take your own notes and to read references to which you are directed. Lecture
hand outs and slides will be made available via Moodle; however, please note that lecturers on this course vary in
the style and quantity of material they make available on Moodle.

Detailed Intended Learning Outcomes


Physiology is the science of how organisms function and neuroscience is the study of the structure of the nervous
system. This course will cover the physiology of single cells of several types (neurones, epithelial, gland and
muscle cells) and how they interact. The neuroscience component will range from how relatively simple networks
produce reflex responses to how networks form more complex systems responsible for sensory perception,
movement, and the mental processes of memory and behaviour.
On completion of this course, you should be able to:

understand the concept of steady state and maintenance of cellular homeostasis;

understand the basics of paracrine, synaptic, endocrine, autocrine and contact-dependant cell signalling;

describe plasma membrane and nuclear receptors, and the pathways initiated when receptors are activated;

outline the basic physiology of the autonomic nervous system

understand action potentials in heart cells and the electrocardiogram and the relationship between the hearts
electrical and mechanical cycle;

describe the control of blood flow through the vasculature by neural, hormal and metabolic mechanisms and
the relationship between flow, resistance and pressure

outline the permeability differences between vascular beds and the importance of capillaries in exchange
processes

lung volume and alveolar gas changes that occur during the respiratory cycle;

understand how oxygen and carbon dioxide are transported in the blood and the role of these molecules in
respiratory control;

outline the principles underlying neural control of respiration at rest;

describe the respiratory and cardiovascular responses to exercise;

describe the bodys initial compensatory response to blood loss

describe the bodys response to blood loss following the initial compensatory phase

outline the physiological responses to the environmental challenges of heat, cold, high altitude and
underwater environments

give an overview of the types of skeletal muscle cells and how contraction of skeletal muscle is controlled;

give an overview of the types of smooth muscle and activity patterns of smooth muscles in different organs;

understand the general characteristics of the endocrine system;

outline how steroid and non-steroid hormones are synthesized and how they exert their actions;

describe how negative feedback systems regulate the endocrine system;

describe the structure and function of the pituitary gland;

understand the physiological basis of swallowing, oesophageal motility and gastric filling;

explain the physiological basis of the production and function of gastric, pancreatic and biliary secretion;

Page 33

explain the enterohepatic cycle and the role of gastrointestinal secretions in gastrointestinal absorption;

the physiological basis of intestinal absorption and secretion;

outline the role of insulin, glucagon and other hormones on nutrient metabolism during and after absorption;

describe the structure and functions of the thyroid gland;

describe the structure and functions of the kidney, its role in fluid and electrolyte balance, elaboration of
urine;

understand the role of adrenocortical hormones in nutrient, fluid and electrolyte balance;

understand the endocrine role in the maintenance of blood pressure and volume within normal values;

appreciate what the study of neuroscience involves, why neuroscientists study the nervous system and the
kinds of questions they seek to answer;

appreciate the methodological foundations of neuroscience;

understand the structure and function of neurones and glia;

explain the ideas of ionic concentration gradient, electric potential gradient, inward & outward membrane
currents;

understand the relationship of membrane potential to the sodium and potassium equilibrium potentials;

explain the terms threshold, depolarisation, overshoot, repolarisation, hyperpolarisation;

describe the ionic basis of the action potential in terms of the underlying changes in membrane permeability;

describe how action potentials are propagated by local membrane currents and saltatory conduction;

understand the principles of chemical and electrical synaptic transmission;

understand the concepts of excitation, inhibition, presynaptic inhibition and neuromodulation;

outline the major families of neurotransmitters and neuromodulators;

describe the modes of operation of receptors;

understand the concepts of synaptic integration in terms of facilitation, potentiation depression, and the
summation, of EPSPs and IPSPs;

explain the contribution of dendritic properties to synaptic integration;

summarise the main functions of the nervous system, its functional organisation and the roles of each
division;

distinguish between afferent neurones, interneurones and efferent neurones;

define a reflex and describe the basic elements of a reflex arc;

explain why reflex circuits are suited to control and protective functions;

outline the main aspects of visual processing that take place in the retina;

describe how the organisation of the visual system is suited to the extraction of information on different
features of a visual scene;

explain what is meant by a voluntary movement, a ballistic movement and feedback controlled movement;

outline the roles of motor units, the motor cortex, basal ganglia, cerebellum, spinal reflexes and sensory
feedback in the execution of voluntary movements;

understand what is meant by localisation of function in the cerebral cortex and provide examples and
evidence for it in relation to the primary sensory areas;

understand what is meant by hemispheric asymmetry and what is the evidence for it in relation to the control
of speech;

describe the role of the hippocampus in learning and memory;

describe anatomy of brainstem and outline its functional importance;

describe the cerebral circulation and the control of brain blood flow

understand the cellular components of the neurovascular unit and the blood brain barrier

understand what is meant by ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke;

understand the structure and function of myelin and identify disorders of central nervous system myelin;

give an overview of cognitive functions and how to measure them;

explain how brain lesions in patients have informed us of brain function.

Page 34

Laboratory Course
Aims & Intended Learning Outcomes
The aims of the laboratory course are:

to reinforce understanding of topics taught in the lecture course;

to provide experience of the conduct of experiments and the interpretation of results;

to provide the opportunity to investigate the relationship between work rate and cardiorespiratory variables;

to provide the opportunity to review research papers;

to illustrate differences between reflex responses to stimuli and the mental processes involved in conscious
reactions.

The intended learning outcomes of the laboratory course are listed in the laboratory manual.

The laboratory course comprises:


A. Semester 1 Laboratory: Exercise, Respiration and Heart rate (3 hrs, semester 1: weeks 7 & 8). This
laboratory includes cycle ergometry, Chester step test, respiratory gas analysis and heart rate
measurement to investigate ventilatory, O2 and heart rate changes during exercise. A post lab debrief will
be held during a lecture session and will consist of a review of lab results and will allow time for questions
and answers.
B. Semester 2 Self-teach online workshop: Neuronal and Glial Cell Structure, Imaging Techniques and
Current Research (allow 2 hrs to be completed in semester 1: week 5). The self-teach online workshop
using Digital Slidepath is designed to reinforce your understanding of the structure and function of neurons
and gila, and some of the methods used in Neuroscience. Further details on using the software and where
you can access it will be given in Semester 2. You will be able to complete this session at any time
throughout week 5.
C

Semester 2 Laboratory: Tendon jerk reflex and visual reaction time (2 hrs, semester 2: week 7). This
laboratory illustrates some of the main differences between reflex responses to stimuli and the more
complex mental processes involved in conscious reactions. Instructions for carrying out the experiments
will be provided before the lab and there will be a Moodle-based debriefing after the lab.

Laboratory times and locations


The class is divided into a number of laboratory groups; you should select your group on My Campus. It is very
important that you take into account your other courses when selecting your laboratory sessions for this course.
Due to the large amount of students on this course and limited space in practical laboratories, changes to
booked sessions will not be permitted and you must attend the session you have selected. If you miss
your lab session due to illness or other exceptional circumstance, you must inform Dr Price, deputy course
coordinator as soon as possible and complete an absence report on My Campus, including documentary evidence.
Unfortunately we will not be able to offer alternative laboratory sessions if you are absent.

Laboratory assessment
You will be assessed on your understanding and interpretation of results obtained in laboratories and the workshop
in the class tests and in the end of course examination.

Page 35

Lecture Timetable
Week

Day

Date

Lecturer

Topic

S1/Wk 1

Tues

22-Sep

Dr McKay

Thurs

24-Sep

Dr McKay

S1/Wk 2

Tues
Thurs

29-Oct
01-Oct

Dr Daly
Dr Morrison

3
4

Autonomic nervous system


Control of the heart

S1/Wk 3

Tues
Thurs

06-Oct
08-Oct

Dr Work
Dr Work

5
6

Reflex, hormonal and local blood flow regulation


Capillary function, blood pressure and flow

S1/Wk 4

Tues
Thurs

13-Oct
15-Oct

Dr Morrison
Dr McKay

7
8

Pump function and cardiac cycle


Lung function

S1/Wk 5

Tues
Thurs

20-Oct
22-Oct

Dr McKay
Dr Price

9
10

Control of respiration
Short term physiological response to challenge

S1/Wk 6

Tues
Thurs

27-Oct
29-Oct

Dr Kemi

11
12

Smooth and skeletal muscle


Class Test

S1/Wk 7

Tues
Thurs

03-Nov
05-Nov

Dr Morrison
Dr Morrison

13
14

Gastric secretion
Pancreatic and bile secretion

S1/Wk 8

Tues
Thurs

10-Nov
12-Nov

Dr Morrison
Dr Price

15
16

Intestinal absorption and motility


Physiological aspects of the endocrine system

S1/Wk 9

Tues
Thurs

17-Nov
19-Nov

Mr Lucas
Dr Lucas

17
18

The pituitary gland


The thyroid gland

S1/Wk 10

Tues
Thurs

24-Nov
26-Nov

Dr Lucas
Mr Scobie

19
20

Hormones controlling plasma nutrients


Exercise, respiration and heart rate laboratory review
session

S1/Wk 11

Tues
Thurs

01-Dec
03-Dec

Dr Lucas
Dr Price

21
22

Endocrine control of fluid and salt balance


Longer term physiological responses to challenge

S2/Wk 1

Mon
Wed

11-Jan
13-Jan

Prof Maxwell
Prof Maxwell

23
24

Introduction to neuroscience
Building blocks: Methods of investigating the nervous
system

S2/Wk 2

Mon
Wed

18-Jan
20-Jan

Prof Maxwell

25
26

Building blocks: Structure of neurones and glia


Class test

S2/Wk 3

Mon
Wed

25-Jan
27-Jan

Dr Baxendale
Dr Baxendale

27
28

Building blocks: resting and action potentials


Building blocks: Propagation potential and conduction
velocity

S2/Wk 4

Mon
Wed

01-Feb
03-Feb

Prof Maxwell
Prof Maxwell

29

Building blocks: Principles of synaptic transmission


Building Blocks: Transmitters & receptors in the
Nervous System

S2/Wk 5

Mon

08-Feb

Dr Riddell

30

General Overview of course - Introducing principle


systems, homeostasis, terminology
Cell signalling - introduction to paracrine, endocrine
and synaptic cell signalling.

Wed

10-Feb

Dr Riddell

31

Integration: Functional organisation of the nervous


system
Integration: The cortex and localisation of function

S2/Wk 6

Mon
Wed

15-Feb
17-Feb

Dr Riddell
Dr Riddell

32
33

Integration: Reflexes
Introduction to Laboratory B

S2/Wk 7

Mon
Wed

22-Feb
24-Feb

Dr Riddell
Dr Riddell

34
35

Integration: the visual system


Output: Movement

S2/Wk 8

Mon
Wed

29-Feb
02-Mar

Dr McKay
Dr Cobb

36
37

Integration: brainstem function


Outputs: Memory and learning

S2/Wk 9

Mon
Wed

07-Mar
09-Mar

Dr Dewar

38

Brain blood flow and the blood brain barrier


Class test

S2/Wk 10

Mon
Wed

14-Mar
16-Mar

Dr McCabe
Dr Edgar

Stroke
Disorders of CNS myelin

S2/Wk 11

Mon
Wed

21-Mar
23-Mar

Dr Szymanek
Dr Szymanek

Introduction to cognitive neuroscience


Using brain imaging techniques to study cognitive
neuroscience

Page 36

1A: ESSENTIAL GENETICS


Aims of the Course
The overall aims of the course are to:

present the principles of genes and their inheritance;

describe the nature of mutations, genetic variation and gene mapping;

describe the nature of the genome projects and its applications;

discuss the nature of human genetic disease especially diagnostics and treatments;

enable students to appreciate the role of genetics in the study of many fields of biology.

Overall Intended Learning Outcomes


By the end of the course, you will be able to:

define the term gene;

describe the basic genetic principles of inheritance in a diploid organism, including gene segregations,
sexlinkage, dominance/recessivity, epistasis, linkage, crossing-over, synteny and gene mapping;

describe the major causes and consequences of mutations and explain why most mutations are recessive;

solve simple genetic problems in inheritance using the above principles;

describe the genetic basis of sex determination, and its consequences for dosage compensation;

describe the strategies underlying the genome projects;

understand how to find a gene within a genome: discuss the nature and detection of genetic variation within
genomes, and its application to studies of evolution, forensics and human genetic disease;

describe how we can find genes associated with inherited human disorders;

describe the genetic basis of specific named inherited human disorders, including cancer;

describe the use and application of model genetic organisms to human genetic disease;

understand the genetic basis of diagnostics, risk and treatment, and consider them in an ethical context.

Staff
Course Coordinator:

Professor Kevin ODell, Room 319, Davidson, ext. 6218,


email: Kevin.ODell@glasgow.ac.uk

Deputy Coordinator:

Dr Joe Gray, Room 409, Bower Building, ext. 5114,


email: Joseph.Gray@glasgow.ac.uk

Additional Teaching Staff:

Professor Ed Tobias, Queen Elizabeth University Hospital, ext. 0365


email: Edward.Tobias@glasgow.ac.uk

Textbooks
Recommended:

Reece et al (2011) Campbell Biology 9th Edition, The Benjamin/Cummings Publishing Co.

Useful:

Griffiths et al (2015) An Introduction to Genetic Analysis 9th edition (Freeman)for


students going into Year 3 Genetics, Biochemestry or Molecular & Cellular Biology.

Assessment
Minimum requirements for the award of credits
Credits will normally be awarded for completion of coursework and sitting the end-of-course examination.

Page 37

Assessment of the course is based on:


1.

A 90-minute examination at the end of the course, which counts as 70% of the final assessment which
comprises objective questions and short answer questions.

2.

Assessment of coursework, which counts as 30%:

take-home essay (15%)

take-home test (15%)

Details of the course assessment:


Details of end of course and assessed coursework can be found on Moodle.

External Examiner

Classes
This course consists of 22 lectures, 2 laboratory sessions and optional weekly tutorials.

Lectures
Group 1

Group 2

Mondays

09:00-10:00

Wednesdays

09:00-10:00

Mondays

13:00-14:00

Wednesdays

13:00-14:00

Detailed Intended Learning Outcomes


You should be able to:

define terms: somatic, germ-line, haploid, diploid, genotype and phenotype; define synteny, and describe the
relationships between DNA, chromosomes, genes, loci, alleles, and mutations;

describe the principles of inheritance in a diploid organism, relating the processes of meiosis to autosomal
and sex-linked inheritance, and to independent segregation;

describe the life cycle of a haploid organism (yeast); define the terms prototrophy and auxotrophy, and apply
complementation tests to genetic problems;

describe how dominant, co-dominant, and recessive mutations can be explained through the function of their
mutant protein products;

explain how complementation, gene interaction, and epistasis relate to the function of the products of genes
within a pathway, or in convergent pathways;

define cross-over, genetic linkage and genetic map unit; explain the genotypes of gametes and the
genotypes and phenotypes of individuals that would be used over three generations to set up a backcross to
map the distance between recessive mutations at two loci in genetic linkage;

solve genetic problems that are provided; including one and two factor crosses, independent and linked
segregation, genetic mapping, the inheritance of recessive lethal genes, gene interaction, and epistasis;

describe how sex chromosomes determine sex in mammals, including an analysis of dosage compensation,
human sex chromosome abnormalities, and the effect of the tfm mutation on the secondary sexual
phenotype;

describe the regulation of genes in the lac operon of the bacterium E.coli, including single mRNAs that code
for multiple gene products, and the proteins that negatively and positively control of the transcription of the
lac operon;

correlate the details of the genetic control of the lac operon to the metabolic requirements of E.coli under
different environmental conditions;

describe examples of genes that have evolved by gene duplication and divergence of structure and function;

describe how the globin gene family is organised and regulated to provide haemoglobin with appropriate
molecular properties as development proceeds;

describe the application of the principles of genetics to the study and management of inherited disease in
humans;

explain how mutation and cancer are associated through the control of the cell cycle, and explain why
mutation is central to the cause of cancer, even when cancer is not inherited in a particular family;

describe how DNA sequencing and molecular genetics have influenced our understanding of human evolution.

Page 38

Laboratory Course
Aims & Intended Learning Outcomes
The aims of the laboratory course are to:

provide practical experience of the use of yeast in genetic analysis;

reinforce the material on transmission genetics and gene function provided by the lecture course.

. The intended learning outcomes of the laboratory course are listed in the laboratory manual.

The laboratory course comprises:


A. Laboratory 1: Inheritance in Yeast part 1 (2hr)
B. Laboratory 2: Inheritance in Yeast part 2 (2hr)
You must attend both laboratory sessions; always bring your lab coat.

Laboratory times and locations


The class is divided into a number of laboratory groups; you should select your group on MyCampus, and must
attend at the times shown.

Laboratory report
The lab work will be assessed by multiple choice style questions in the end of course exam.

Lecture Timetable
Week

Day

Date

Lecturer

Mon
Wed

21-Sep
23-Sep

Prof ODell
Dr Gray

1
2

Topic
Why study Genetics
Recessive Mutations

Mon
Wed

28-Sep
30-Sep

Dr Gray
Dr Gray

3
4

Dominant Mutations
Yeast Genetics

Mon
Wed

05-Oct
07-Oct

Dr Gray
Dr Gray

5
6

Complementation
Gene Mapping

Mon
Wed

12-Oct
14-Oct

Prof ODell
Prof ODell

7
8

Bacterial Gene Cluster


Eukaryotic Genes

Mon
Wed

19-Oct
21-Oct

Prof ODell
Prof ODell

9
10

Sex Determination
Dosage Compensation

Mon
Wed

26-Oct
28-Oct

Prof ODell
Prof ODell

11
12

Human Genome Project


Human Genome Organisation

Mon
Wed

02-Nov
04-Nov

Prof ODell
Prof ODell

13
14

DNA Variation & Forensics 1


DNA Variation & Forensics 2

Mon
Wed

09-Nov
11-Nov

Prof ODell
Prof ODell

15
16

Genes & Evolution 1


Genes & Evolution 2

Mon
Wed

16-Nov
18-Nov

Prof ODell
Prof ODell

17
18

Making Mutants
Human Genetic Disease

10

Mon
Wed

23-Nov
25-Nov

Dr Gray
Prof Tobias

19
20

Genes & Cancer


Medical Genetics

11

Mon
Wed

30-Nov
02-Dec

Prof ODell
Prof ODell

21
22

Finding Genes Causing Human Disorders


Diagnostics & Counselling

Page 39

2A: FORENSIC BIOSCIENCE


Aims of the Course
The overall aims of the course are to:

provide students with an insight to the science which forms the basis of Forensic Bioscience;

demonstrate the importance of Forensic Bioscience in the provision of evidence relating to a crime or identity
of individuals.

Overall Intended Learning Outcomes


You should be able to:

Demonstrate knowledge of: basic aspects of forensic bioscience; hair and fibre analysis; body fluid and blood
type identification; DNA profiling; drug analysis; the use of skeletal remains for identification/cause of death;
forensic entomology; forensic botany; document analysis;

Write a comprehensive unbiased scientific report, which can be understood by a layperson.

Staff
Course Coordinator:

Mrs Angela Watt, Room 217, Bower Building, ext. 6824,


email: Angela.Watt@glasgow.ac.uk

Deputy Coordinator:

Dr Paul Rea, Thomson Building, ext. 4366,


email: Paul.Rea@glasgow.ac.uk

Additional Teaching Staff:

Dr Jennifer Miller, Dickson lab, Kelvin Campus, ext. 3597,


email: Jennifer.Miller@glasgow.ac.uk
Dr Stuart Mc Donald, Room 305, Thomson Building, ext. 4185,
email: Stuart.McDonald@glasgow.ac.uk
Dr Victoria Paterson, Graham Kerr Building, ext.
email: Victoria.Paterson@glasgow.ac.uk
Dr Paul Skett (Guest Lecturer)
Miss Emma Skett (Guest Lecturer)
Dr Stephanie Sharp (Guest Lecturer)

Textbooks
Recommended:

Jackson, RW; Jackson, JM Forensic Science

Useful:

White, PC Crime Scene to Court (The Essentials of Forensic Science)


Butler, JM Forensic DNA Typing
Gunn, A Essential Forensic Biology

Assessment
Minimum requirements for the award of credits
Credits will normally be awarded for completion of coursework, attendance at laboratories and sitting the
end-of-course examination.

Page 40

Assessment of the course is based on:


1.

A 90-minute examination at the end of the course, which counts as 70% of the final assessment which will
comprise of MCQ and short answer questions based on the lecture and laboratory content.

2.

Assessment of coursework, which counts as 30%:

class test (20%)

assessment of case study: written report (10%)

Assessed coursework: class test and case study report


The class test will comprise two short essay questions and will be held during lecture times. You will be informed
of any changes to this format. The assessment of the case study will comprise the hand-in of a report and short
answer questions within the end of course examination. See Assessment Timetable for dates, times and
locations.

External Examiner
Dr Sreenivasan Ponnambalam, School of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Leeds

Classes
This course consists of 18 lectures and a laboratory session.

Lectures
Mondays

13:00-14:00

Wednesdays

13:00-14:00

Detailed Intended Learning Outcomes


You should be able to:

describe the main and related areas of Forensic Science;

outline the basic principles of Forensic Science;

demonstrate the importance of Chain of evidence/contamination;

describe the common Approach Path when at a crime scene;

detail the relevance of Locards Principal at the crime scene;

describe the various specialists who may be involved in the investigation at a crime scene and their specific
roles;

describe the types of trace evidence and their recovery;

explain the analysis of hair and fibres;

describe the identification of biological evidence including blood, semen and saliva;

explain the identification of body fluids, blood types and blood patterns;

outline the principles of DNA analysis;

describe the uses of DNA analysis in identification of an individual;

describe the roles of the forensic archaeologist and environmental profiler in search and open air body
recovery;

explain how changes in vegetation and insect activity can help determine duration of human remains and
explain the sequence of events at a locus;

outline how the anthropologist can assist in determination of identity of skeletonised remains;

list the effects of alcohol;

describe the clearance of alcohol from the human body;

describe how alcohol concentrations in the body are determined;

describe how the effects of alcohol are related to legal cases (both criminal and civil);

list the effects of named drugs of abuse and named prescription drugs e.g. opiates, cannabis, ecstasy,
benzodiazepines;

describe how drugs are detected in the body;

Page 41

describe how use of the drugs is related to legal cases (both criminal and civil);

outline the properties of insect biology that makes them of value to forensic science;

describe which insect groups are generally found in forensic situations;

examine the normal anatomy of the skull and the dura mater;

differentiate primary and secondary head injuries, explaining the causes and clinical effects of them;

define diffuse axonal injury and detail the neuropathology of it relating it to what the victim may present with
clinically;

list the legal process when someone dies, comparing Scotland and other legal systems in the United
Kingdom;

describe the post-mortem changes that are known to happen;

list and describe the main causes of natural death in Scotland;

list and describe the more common causes of deaths not related to natural causes in Scotland;

describe the identification of handwriting;

describe the procedures used in the analysis of documents;

demonstrate the role of a Forensic Scientist within the court of law;

explain the ethical issues relating to Forensic bioscience;

Apply practical skills in fundamental forensic techniques and analyse and interpret results obtained from
using these techniques.

Laboratory Course
Aims & Intended Learning Outcomes
The aims of the laboratory course are to:

work as a team to analyse data and write a clear and concise report on the information provided;

relate scientific information in an articulate manner which can be understood by your peer group.

The intended learning outcomes of the laboratory course are listed in the laboratory manual.

The laboratory course comprises:


A.
Forensic case study (3hr)
B.
Report
There will be physical material available to examine, together with case notes. From this, you are required to
examine the material relevant to the case, and write a scientific report detailing the evidence; the written report
should be handed-in on the date specified on the assessment timetable.
You must attend the session; always bring your lab coat.

Laboratory times and locations


The class is divided into a number of laboratory groups; you should select your group on MyCampus, and must
attend at the times shown.

Page 42

Lecture Timetable
Week

Day

Date

Lecturer

Mon

21-Sep

Mrs Watt

Forensic Science - what is it?

Wed

23-Sep

Dr Rea

The Crime Scene (and the specialists involved)

Mon

28-Sep

Mrs Watt

Trace Evidence

Wed

30-Sep

Dr Miller

The Role of the Specialists in Body and Trace Evidence


Recovery

Mon

05-Oct

Dr Miller

Environmental Profiling and Anthropology

Wed

07-Oct

Mrs Watt

Forensic Biology - blood & body fluids

Mon

12-Oct

Mrs Watt

DNA Technology

Wed

14-Oct

Mrs Watt

The Use of DNA for Identification

Mon

19-Oct

Mrs Watt

Document Analysis

Wed

21-Oct

Dr Paterson

10

What Makes Insects Suitable for Forensic Purposes?

Mon

26-Oct

Dr Skett

11

Alcohol: Forensic Aspects

Wed

28-Oct

Dr Sharp

12

Drugs: Forensic Aspects

Mon

02-Nov

Miss Skett

13

The Lawyers Perspective

Wed

04-Nov

Mon

09-Nov

Dr Rea

14

Head Injuries

Wed

11-Nov

Dr Rea

15

Causes of Death - Natural & Otherwise

Mon

16-Nov

Dr Rea

16

Medical Impact of Alcohol

Wed

18-Nov

Dr Rea

17

The Expert Witness

Mon

23-Nov

Dr McDonald

18

Forensic Anatomy 1

Wed

25-Nov

Dr McDonald

19

Forensic Anatomy 2

Mon

30-Nov

Mrs Watt

20

More trace evidence?

10

11

Topic

Class Test

Page 43

3A: EXERCISE SCIENCE


Aims of the Course
The overall aims of the course are to:

expand the students understanding of physiology in active humans;

expand the students understanding of physical activity, well being and health;

allow students to study science in the context of sports performance.

Overall Intended Learning Outcomes


You should be able to:

demonstrate knowledge of: the relationships between physical activity, nutrition and health; the physiological
and metabolic responses to exercise; the effects of training, nutrition, genetics and drugs on these responses
and sporting performance; the influence of non-physiological factors on sporting performance;

conduct a test of aerobic fitness and interpret the data obtained.

Staff
Course Coordinator:

Mr. Nairn Scobie, Room 238b, West Medical Building, ext. 3832,
email: Nairn.Scobie@glasgow.ac.uk

Deputy Coordinator:

Dr Jason Gill, Room C250, GCRC Building, ext. 2916,


email: Jason.Gill@glasgow.ac.uk

Additional Teaching Staff:

Dr Niall MacFarlane, Room 240a, West Medical Building, ext. 5965,


email: Niall.MacFarlane@glasgow.ac.uk
Dr Ron Baxendale, Room 246, West Medical Building, ext. 5344,
email: Ronald.Baxendale@glasgow.ac.uk
Professor William Cushley, Room 315, Davidson Building, ext. 5261
email: William.Cushley@glasgow.ac.uk
Ms Viki Penpraze, Room 239, West Medical Building, ext. 2456,
email: Victoria.Penpraze@glasgow.ac.uk

Textbooks
Recommended:

Exercise Physiology: Energy, Nutrition and Human Performance McArdle, Katch and
Katch. This text will also be useful for Level-3 Physiology & Sports Science/Sports Science.
Alternatively, the same material is also covered in a number of other standard exercise
physiology textbooks, e.g. Plowman & Smith, Powers and Howley.
Physical Activity and Health. The Evidence Explained: Hardman and Stensel. Routledge.
This text is useful for the physical activity aspects of the course.

Assessment
Minimum requirements for the award of credits
Credits will normally be awarded for completion of coursework, attendance at laboratories and sitting the end-ofcourse examination.

Page 44

Assessment of the course is based on:


1.

A 90 minute end-of-course examination, comprising short-answer questions based on the laboratory course
and multiple-choice questions based on the whole course. This counts for 70% of the final assessment.

2.

A timed coursework essay, which counts as 25% of the final assessment.

3.

Peerwise assessment worth 5%:


Students must submit two questions each and answer twenty questions. One question to be submitted by
Monday the 19th of October, and ten questions to be answered by Friday the 23rd of October. One question to
be submitted by Monday the 16th of November, and ten questions to be answered by Friday the 20th of
November.
Grades will be broken down as follows:
2.5% for the first question submitted and answering ten questions. You will receive a grade from the 22-point
scale for the quality of the question submitted. If you submit a question but fail to answer ten questions, you
will receive zero (i.e. H grade). You will receive a grade of zero if you answer ten questions but fail to
submit one.
The same applies for the second question.

Assessed coursework
The coursework will comprise of a 45-minute timed essay held during lecture time. The essay title will be chosen
from a list of essay titles provided to you at the start of the course, but you will not know which specific essay title
will be chosen until the time of the assessment. You will be given a choice of two questions on the day of
assessment.

External Examiner
Dr Grant Abt, University of Hull

Classes
This course consists of 20 lectures, 2 laboratory classes and 1 laboratory data analysis session.

Lectures
Mondays

16:00 17:00

Tuesdays

16:00 17:00

Detailed Intended Learning Outcomes


By the end of this course you should be able to:

examine the structure of skeletal, cardiac and smooth muscle;

determine the physiology of muscular contractions;

describe the factors which limit maximal oxygen uptake;

discuss the cardiovascular adaptations to endurance training;

examine the physiological factors that effect endurance performance;

determine the concepts underlying the anaerobic threshold;

look at the metabolic and peripheral adaptations that occur during endurance training;
examine the effects training at altitude can have on athletic performance;

determine the content of a healthy diet, and the impact a poor diet can have on a persons well-being;

examine the effects of manipulating carbohydrate, fat and protein content of the diet, and the impacts on
athletic performance;

discuss the literature associated with physical inactivity leading to the development of cardiovascular disease;

describe the issues surrounding drug use in sport;

discuss whether genetics plays a role in sporting performance;

introduce students to key concepts and theories surrounding sport and exercise psychology;

describe the common pathways by which humans utilise the major fuel molecules carbohydrate, fat and
protein;

Page 45

describe how anaerobic and aerobic systems contribute to energy production in events of varying length and
intensity.

Laboratory Course
Aims & Intended Learning Outcomes
The aims of the laboratory course are to:

Provide practical experience of measuring resting metabolic rate and conducting a submaximal exercise test;

Provide experience of data analysis and interpretation of experimental data.

The laboratory manual will be handed out at the first laboratory session. The intended learning outcomes of the
laboratory course are listed in the laboratory manual.

The laboratory course comprises:


A. Laboratory part 1: Oxygen uptake, metabolic rate and substrate utilisation at rest
B. Laboratory part 2: An incremental submaximal cycle ergometer exercise test
C. Post-lab data analysis session in lecture slot
You must attend each session. You must bring a calculator and clothes to exercise in to the laboratory and bring a
calculator and your completed lab book to the post-lab session.

Laboratory times and locations


The class is divided into a number of laboratory groups; you should select your group on MyCampus, and must
attend at the times shown.

Lecture Timetable
Week

Day

Date

Lecturer

Mon
Tue

21-Sep
22-Sep

Mr Scobie
Dr MacFarlane

1
2

Introduction
Muscle contraction and fibre types 1

Mon
Tues
Wed
Fri

28-Sep
29-Sep
30-Sep
02-Oct

Dr MacFarlane
Prof Cushley
Mr N Scobie
Mr N Scobie

3
4

Muscle contraction and fibre types 2


Energy Metabolism in sport 1
Exercise Science lab. Group 1
Exercise Science lab Group 2

Mon
Tue
Wed
Fri
Mon
Tue
Wed
Fri
Mon
Tue
Wed
Fri
Mon
Tue

05-Oct
06-Oct
07-Oct
09-Oct
12-Oct
13-Oct
14 Oct
16 Oct
19-Oct
20-Oct
21-Oct
23- Oct
26-Oct
27-Oct

Prof Cushley
Prof Cushley
Mr N Scobie
Mr N Scobie
Dr Gill
Dr Gill
M Mr N Scobie
Mr N Scobie
Dr Gill
Mr Scobie
Mr Scobie
Mr Scobie
Dr Baxendale
Ms Penpraze

11
12

Energy Metabolism in sport 2


Energy Metabolism in sport 3
Exercise Science lab Group 3
Exercise Science lab Group 4
Maximal Oxygen Uptake
Cardiovascular adaptation to endurance training
Exercise Science lab Group 1
Exercise Science lab Group 2
Physiological factors affecting performance
The Anaerobic Threshold
The Exercise Science lab Group 3
The Exercise Science lab Group 4
Altitude training and performance
Sport and Exercise Psychology 1

Mon
Tue

02-Nov
03-Nov

Ms Penpraze
Dr Gill

13
14

Sport and Exercise Psychology 2


Physical activity and health epidemiology

Mon
Tue
Mon
Tue

09-Nov
10-Nov
16-Nov
17-Nov

Dr
Mr
Dr
Mr

Gill
Gill
Scobie
Scobie

15
16
17
18

Physical activity and cardiovascular disease risk factors


Physical activity for health guidelines and prescription
Nutrition for Health
Nutrition for Sports Performance

10

Mon
Tue

23-Nov
24-Nov

Mr Scobie
Dr Gill

19
20

Class Test
Lab Data Analysis Session

11

Mon
Tue

30-Nov
01-Dec

Dr Baxendale
Dr Baxendale

21
22

Excellence in Sport nature or nurture


Drugs in Sport

Topic

9
10

Page 46

4A: ANIMAL DIVERSITY


Aims of the Course
The overall aims of the course are to:

survey the variety of animal life, from protozoa to mammals, with an emphasis on the evolutionary forces that
have created this diversity;

demonstrate the fundamental unity of animal life, in terms of the mechanisms that organise body plans;

illustrate the adaptations of animals to different lifestyles in different habitats;

examine the causes of mass extinctions and new waves of adaptive radiation;

to analyse the interactions of human beings with other animals.

Overall Intended Learning Outcomes


You should be able to:

recall the variety of animal life, from protozoa to mammals, with an emphasis on the evolutionary forces that
have created this diversity;

understand the fundamental unity of animal life, in terms of the mechanisms that organise body plans;

appreciate the adaptations of animals for different lifestyles in different habitats.

Staff
Course Coordinator:

Professor Rod Page, Room 222, Graham Kerr Building, ext. 4778,
email: Roderic.Page@glasgow.ac.uk

Deputy Coordinator:

Professor Malcolm Kennedy, Room 322, Graham Kerr Building, ext. 5819,
email: Malcolm.Kennedy@glasgow.ac.uk

Additional Teaching Staff:

Professor Roger Downie, Room 207, Graham Kerr Building, ext. 5157,
email: Roger.Downie@glasgow.ac.uk
Dr Kathryn Elmer, Room 402 Graham Kerr Building, ext. 6671,
email: Kathryn.Elmer@glasgow.ac.uk

Textbooks
Essential:

Campbell and Reece (2008) Biology 8th Edition, The Benjamin/Cummings Publishing Co.

Recommended:

Hickman et al., Animal Diversity, any recent edition

Assessment
Minimum requirements for the award of credits
Credits will normally be awarded for completion of coursework, attendance at laboratories and tutorial and sitting
the end-of-course examination.

Assessment of the course is based on:


1.

A 90-minute examination at the end of the course, which counts as 70% of the final assessment which will
comprise of MCQ and short answer questions.

2.

Assessment of coursework, which counts as 30%:

Wiki online assignment (15%)

Laboratory report (15%)

Assessed coursework: Laboratory reports and written assignments


The Wiki assignment consists of an online exercise, which must be completed midway through the course. The
Vertebrate laboratory report should be handed-in at the end of the laboratory session. See Assessment
Timetable for dates, times and locations.

Page 47

External Examiner
Professor James Spicer, University of Plymouth

Classes
This course consists of 21 lectures, 2 laboratories and 1 tutorial.

Lectures
Wednesdays

11:00-12:00

Fridays

11:00-12:00

Detailed Intended Learning Outcomes


You should be able to:

outline the principles used in the classification of animals;

describe the main groups of single-celled animals and outline their ecological importance;

discuss the main differences between single-celled and multi-celled animals;

outline the universal role of HOX genes in the establishment of metazoan body plans;

distinguish the main groups of animal body plans based on development, symmetry and form;

discuss the costs and benefits of a sedentary life for animals;

outline the main characteristics of sponges, corals and other marine sedentary forms;

discuss the importance of corals in tropical marine ecosystems;

list the characteristics of the main classes of Arthropods;

discuss the role of the jointed exoskeleton in the success and diversification of Arthropods;

account for the distribution of the main groups of Arthropods;

outline how Arthropods move;

distinguish between commensalism, symbiosis and parasitism;

discuss the costs and benefits (to the parasite) of a parasitic way of life;

outline the occurrence of parasitism within the main groups of animals;

describe the life cycles of some parasites of medical importance;

discuss the relationship of the vertebrates to their non-vertebrate allies;

outline the body plan of vertebrates;

discuss the relative diversity of the main groups of vertebrates;

describe the relationships of the main groups of fish to each other and to the tetrapods;

compare the main features of ancient and modern Amphibians;

describe reproduction and the life cycles of modern Amphibians;

discuss the costs and benefits of endothemic and ectothemic lifestyles to the vertebrates;

show how the reptile egg overcame the problems of reproduction on land;

describe the main groups of extinct and modern reptiles;

discuss the selective pressures that may have led to the evolution of flight in vertebrates;

outline the main features of Archaeopteryx;

list the main features of the body organisation of birds;

describe how the avian lung differs from that of all other land vertebrates;

outline the reproductive strategies used by birds;

outline the development of mammalian organisation from reptilian ancestors;

list the main features of mammals;

describe the general features of primates and compare lower primates and monkey;

discuss the ecology of modern apes;

outline the evidence used to trace human ancestry;

Page 48

describe the basic features of hominid evolution;

describe how domestication influences an animal species;

outline the main animal species that have become domesticated, and why ;

give the geological perspective on extinction;

show how extinction as a process has been influenced by human activity.

Laboratory Course
Students taking this course are expected to make use of the permanent exhibits in the Zoology Museum, both for
reinforcing and extending material covered in lectures, and for revision.

Aims & Intended Learning Outcomes


The aims of the laboratory course are to:

provide practical experience in recognition and direct study of different groups of organisation;

reinforce the knowledge of biodiversity.

Instructions for the Wiki online exercise will be provided at the start of the course. The manual for the Vertebrate
laboratory will be handed out before the laboratory and will list the intended learning outcomes of the laboratory.

The laboratory course comprises:


A. Online exercise: Wiki (to be completed in own time midway through the course)
B. Laboratory: Vertebrates (3hr)
You must attend the Vertebrate laboratory; always bring your lab coat to laboratory classes.

Laboratory times and locations


The class is divided into a number of laboratory groups; you should select your group on MyCampus, and must
attend at the times shown.

Laboratory Report
The Vertebrate laboratory report must be handed in at the end of the laboratory session.

Tutorials
A set of problems about animal ways of life will be discussed in small groups, which then report back their
conclusions to the whole group. Topics covered in the tutorial will appear in the end-of-course examination.

Topics for problems are likely to be:

Costs and benefits of the parasitic mode of life.

Costs and benefits of the sessile mode of life.

Account for the abundance of arthropods.

Page 49

Lecture Timetable
Week

Day

Date

Lecturer

Fri

25-Sep

Prof Page

Topic
Coping with diversity (1)

Wed
Fri

30-Sep
02-Oct

Prof Page
Prof Page

2
3

Coping with diversity (2)


Coping with diversity (3)

Wed
Fri

07-Oct
09-Oct

Prof Page
Prof Page

4
5

Coping with diversity (4)


Coping with diversity (5)

Wed
Fri

14-Oct
16-Oct

Prof Kennedy
Prof Kennedy

6
7

Gaining complexity 1
Gaining complexity 2

Wed
Fri

21-Oct
23-Oct

Prof Adams
Prof Adams

8
9

Aquatic Ecosystems 1
Aquatic Ecosystems 2

Wed
Fri

28-Oct
30-Oct

Prof Kennedy
Prof Kennedy

10
11

Living together 1
Living together 2

Wed
Fri

04-Nov
06-Nov

Prof Page
Dr Elmer

12
13

Vertebrates 1
Vertebrates 2

Wed
Fri

11-Nov
13-Nov

Prof Downie/ Prof Roger


Prof Page

14
15

Vertebrates 3
Vertebrates 4

Wed
Fri

18-Nov
20-Nov

Prof Page
Prof Page

16
17

Vertebrates 5
Vertebrates 6

10

Wed
Fri

25-Nov
27-Nov

Prof Kennedy
Prof Kennedy

18
19

Mammals 1
Mammals 2

11

Wed
Fri

02-Dec
04-Dec

Prof Kennedy
Prof Kennedy

20
21

Mammals 3
Mammals 4

Page 50

7A: HUMAN FORM AND FUNCTION


Aims of the Course
The overall aims of the course are:

to introduce students primarily to gross topographical aspects of the human body stressing the interactions
between structural and functional characteristics;

to provide knowledge of those features of the basic body plan which have been uniquely adapted in humans

to provide an introduction to human form and function which prepares students for further study of Human
Biology.

Overall Intended Learning Outcomes


You should be able to:

recall facts related to: the levels of structural organisation of the human body, the gross structure and
function of the major regions and systems of the body, an understanding of upper and lower limb anatomy,
major landmarks of the brain/spinal cord and their functional significance;

develop skills in relating structure to function when examining human material;

identify the major organs and musculo-skeletal elements of prosected human specimens.

Staff
Course Coordinator:

Dr Val Fallon, Room 342, West Medical Building, ext. 7726,


email: Val.Fallon@glasgow.ac.uk

Deputy Coordinator:

Dr Barbara Cogdell, Room 214, West Medical Building, ext. 2805,


email: Barbara.Cogdell@glasgow.ac.uk

Additional Teaching Staff:

Dr Michelle Welsh, Room 342, West Medical Building, ext. 5926


email: Michelle.Welsh@glasgow.ac.uk
Dr Lieve Desbonnet, Room 238, West Medical Building, ext. 2675
email: Lieve.Desbonnet@glasgow.ac.uk
Dr Paul Rea Room 349, Thomson Building, ext 4366
email: Paul.Rea@glasgow.ac.uk
Professor Anthony Payne, Room 137, Thomson Building, ext. 5870
email: Anthony.Payne@glasgow.ac.uk

Textbook
Recommended:

Tortora and Derrickson Principles of Anatomy & Physiology, 14th Edition (Wiley, EMEA
Edition) ISBN: 978-1-118-34500-9

Assessment
Minimum requirements for the award of credits
Credits will normally be awarded for completion of coursework, attendance at laboratories and sitting the
end-of-course examination.

Assessment of the course is based on:


1.

A 90-minute examination consisting of multiple choice questions plus a written assessment based on
Laboratory 2 material at the end of the course which counts as 70% of the final assessment.

2.

Assessment of coursework, which counts as 30%:

Laboratory test (15%)

Class test (15%)

Page 51

Assessed coursework: visual laboratory test and class test


The visual laboratory test examines material covered in laboratory 1 and will comprise multiple-choice questions
based on visual images and will be held during lecture times. The class test will comprise multiple-choice questions
and will examine material from lectures 1-15 and the museum assignment, and will be held during lecture times.

External Examiner
Professor Peter Dockery, National University of Ireland, Galway

Classes
This course consists of 1 e-lecture, 19 lectures, 2 laboratories and a student-directed museum assignment.

Lectures
Group 1

Group 2

Tuesdays

09:00-10:00

Thursdays

09:00-10:00

Tuesdays

13:00-14:00

Thursdays

13:00-14:00

Detailed Intended Learning Outcomes


These relate to the course as a whole (i.e. e-lecture ,lectures, and laboratory classes) Therefore, on completion of
the course you should be able to:

define the levels of structural organisation: cellular, tissue, organ, system, and body;

list the principal body cavities and the organs associated with them;

define the anatomical position;

describe the vertebral column;

classify joints;

describe a synovial joint;

identify the organs of the respiratory system;

describe the nasal cavity;

describe the tracheo-bronchial tree;

identify the larynx;

explain the divisions of the lung including lobules;

identify the bones of the thorax;

discuss mechanisms of breathing;

describe the location and surface features of the heart and identify its borders;

identify the chambers, valves of the heart;

identify the bodys major blood vessels;

describe the oral cavity;

list the parts and adaptations of the digestive tract;

describe the liver and pancreas;

distinguish between arteries and veins;

describe blood cells;

identify the kidney, ureter and urinary bladder;

describe gross anatomy of skeletal muscle;

discuss muscle architecture and its contribution to force generation;

describe upper limb bones, main muscle groups and movements;

describe upper limb skeletal and joint adaptations relating to mobility/stability;

describe lower limb bones, main muscle groups and movements;

describe lower limb skeletal and joint adaptations relating to mobility/stability;

describe the testes and the male reproductive system;

describe the ovaries and the female reproductive system;

describe the basic anatomy and functions of the cortex and subcortical structures of the brain;

describe the structure of the spinal cord.

Page 52

Laboratory Course
Aims & Intended Learning Outcomes
The aims of the laboratory course are to:

encourage the exploration of human morphology in greater detail;

provide practical experience of human morphology and function.

The laboratory course comprises:


A. Self-directed museum assignment in the Anatomy Museum (1hr)
B. Laboratory 1: Nasal cavity, oral cavity, neck, thorax and abdomen (2hrs)
C. Laboratory 2: Limbs, pelvis and brain (2hrs)
Admission into laboratory classes 1 and 2 will only be permitted on completion of a signed declaration form
complying with the Rules and Regulations of the Laboratory of Human Anatomy. This declaration form will be
issued to students in the first lecture.
Students should be aware that prosected cadaveric material will be used in laboratory classes 1 and 2 and as such
a laboratory coat must be worn; otherwise, entry will be refused. The embalming fluid used in preparing
cadavers has a low health risk; however, students should take appropriate care, and may wish to bring gloves to
wear in practicals to preclude any possible dermatological reactions which can occasionally arise. Always wash
your hands at the end of the laboratory.

Laboratory times and locations


The self-directed museum assignment will be in the Anatomy Museum (Thomson Building). You should aim to
complete this by the end of week 3.
Laboratory 1 and laboratory 2 will be held in weeks 5 and 11 respectively . The class will be divided into a number
of laboratory groups; you should select your group on MyCampus and, due to capacity restrictions, must attend at
the time shown. The Laboratory classes will be in the Anatomy Museum (Thomson Building).

Laboratory Report
Practical worksheets will be distributed when students sign in to the laboratory classes. Evidence of attendance
and completion of all practical exercises will form the basis of awarding full credit for this course. Material in the
laboratories is an integral part of the course and will be included for assessment in the laboratory test, class test
and in the end-of-course examination.
A completed worksheet must be available as evidence of attendance at the self-directed museum assignment.
Although this will not be formally marked, feedback will be published for self-assessment purposes and material
covered may be assessed in the class test and end-of-course examination.
Laboratory 1 will be assessed by a visual MCQ test using images of material on the nasal cavity, oral cavity, neck,
thorax and abdomen as demonstrated in the laboratory.
Laboratory 2 will cover the limbs, pelvis and structures of the brain. The contents of this laboratory class will be
assessed by way of short answer questions in the end of course examination.

Page 53

Lecture Timetable
Week

Day

Date

Lecturer

Tue
Thu

22-Sep
24-Sep

Dr Fallon
Dr Fallon

1
2

Topic
Introduction to Human Form and Function
Joints

Tue
Thu

29-Sep
01-Oct

Prof. Payne
Prof. Payne

3
4

Ribs Diaphragm, Mechanisms of Breathing


The Respiratory Tract from Nose to Air Sac

Tue
Thu

06-Oct
08-Oct

Dr Fallon
Dr Fallon

5
6

The Heart and Major Blood Vessels


The Digestive Tract 1

Tue
Thu

13-Oct
15-Oct

Dr Fallon
Dr Fallon

7
8

The Digestive Tract 2


Accessory Digestive Glands

Tue
Thu

20-Oct
22-Oct

Dr Fallon
Dr Rea

9
10

Vasculature and Blood cells


Muscle Form and Function

Tue
Thu

27-Oct
29-Oct

Dr Rea

11

Visual Laboratory Test


Upper Limb 1

Tue
Thu

03-Nov
05-Nov

Dr Rea
Dr Rea

12
13

Upper Limb 2
Lower Limb 1

Tue
Thu

10-Nov
12-Nov

Dr Rea
Dr Welsh

14
15

Lower Limb 2
The Male Reproductive Tract

Tue
Thu

17-Nov
19-Nov

Dr Welsh

16

Class Test
The Female Reproductive Tract

10

Tue
Thu

24-Nov
26-Nov

Dr Desbonnet
Dr Desbonnet

17
18

Major Landmarks of the Brain


Structure of the Spinal Cord

11

Tue

01-Dec

Dr Fallon

19

Course Overview

Page 54

12A: BIOENGINEERING & GLOBAL CHANGE


Aims of the Course
The overall aims of the course are to address:

Assess the current state of global food supply and demand;

Consider the advantages and disadvantages of traditional and novel methods of food production;

Evaluate the importance of environmental factors on the suppression of crop yield and consider how these
may be overcome;

Assess the importance of pests, pathogens, and weeds on crop yields; traditional and novel methods of
control;

Contemplate the impact of Climate Change on food security;

Consider the rise of innovative agriculture such as BioPhaming, Biofuel production, and other novel practices.

Overall Intended Learning Outcomes


At the end of the course, you will be able to:

Demonstrate a knowledge of the limitations of current methods of food production and the consequences for
human welfare;

Discuss the role of biotechnology and traditional farming methods in the development of sustainable
agriculture in the 21st Century;

Assess the potential of Bioenergy; describe different production methods and processes and assess their
impact on the environment;

Provide details on how agriculture could be developed to produce new products and novel harvests;

Describe the practical techniques involved in breeding and bioengineering crops.

Staff
Course Coordinator:

Dr Peter Dominy, Room 410, Bower Building, ext. 4390,


email: Peter.Dominy@glasgow.ac.uk

Deputy Coordinator:

Dr Joel Milner, Room 322 Bower Building, ext. 5836,


email: Joel.Milner@glasgow.ac.uk

Textbooks
Recommended:

Campbell and Reece (2008) Biology 8th Edition, The Benjamin/Cummings Publishing Co.
Slater, Scott & Fowler (2008) Plant Biotechnology (Oxford University Press)
Smith et al. (2009) Plant Biology (Garland Science, Taylor Francis)
Taiz and Zeiger (2007) Plant Physiology (3rd edition) Sinauer Press

Assessment
Minimum requirements for the award of credits
Credits will normally be awarded for completion of coursework, attendance at tutorials and sitting the
end-of-course examination.

Assessment of the course is based on:


1.

A 90-minute examination at the end of the course, which counts as 70% of the final assessment which will
comprise of MCQ and short answer questions.

2.

Assessment of coursework, which counts as 30%:

class test (15%)

tutorial and essay (15%)

Page 55

Assessed coursework: class test and tutorial essay


The class test will comprise objective questions and will be held during lecture times. All students should attend
the tutorial where the topics for the essay will be presented and discussed, and then write an essay 1000-1500
words in length on the chosen topic; the essay must be submitted through Turnitin. Details of the essay and
relevant material on the topic will be posted on the course Moodle site. See Assessment Timetable for dates,
times and locations.

External Examiner
Professor George Banting, University of Bristol

Classes
This course consists of 18 lectures and 1 tutorial. Additional examinable information will be provided during the
lectures and the tutorial that will not appear in the lecture summaries mounted on the course Moodle site;
students should attend all timetabled sessions.

Lectures
Tuesdays

10:00-11:00-

Thursdays

10:00-11:00-

Tutorial
Aims & Intended Learning Outcomes
The Aims of the tutorials are:

Research a topic related to sustainable food production

Assess traditional and new approaches to increasing crop yields

The tutorial comprises:


A. Tutorial: Discussion on reading material on Plant Genetic Manipulation (2 hr)
B. Self-learning exercise consisting of literature searches and a written essay
You must complete both parts

Tutorial times and locations


The class is divided into a number of tutorial groups; you you should select your group on MyCampus, and must
attend at the times shown.

Surgery
Surgery hours will be arranged just prior to the class test and final examination during which time the teaching
staff will be available for questions and discussion.

Self-Instruction Material
See the course Moodle site for resources and lecture summaries.

Page 56

Lecture Timetable
Week

Day

Date

Lecturer

Tue
Thu

22-Sep
24-Sep

Dr Dominy
Dr Dominy

1
2

Topic
Introduction
The Major Crops

Tue
Thu

29-Sep
01-Oct

Dr Dominy
Dr Dominy

3
4

Plant Breeding
Biotechnology & Transgenesis

Tue
Thu

06-Oct
08-Oct

Dr Dominy
Dr Dominy

5
6

Abiotic Stress: Temperature


Abiotic Stress: Water

Tue
Thu

13-Oct
15-Oct

Dr Milner
Dr Milner

7
8

Biotic Stress: Plant Pathogens I


Biotic Stress: Plant Pathogens II

Tue
Thu

20-Oct
22-Oct

Dr Dominy/ Dr Milner

Tue
Thu

27-Oct
29-Oct

Dr Milner
Dr Milner

9
10

Biotic Stress: Insect Resistance


Biotic Stress: Weeds

Tue
Thu

03-Nov
05-Nov

Dr Milner
Dr Dominy

11
12

Biotic Stress: Nematodes


Abiotic Stress: Light

Tue
Thu

10-Nov
12-Nov

Dr Dominy
Dr Dominy

13
14

Abiotic Stress: Nutrients & Salinity


Bioenergy: Biomass

Tue
Thu

17-Nov
19-Nov

Dr Dominy
Dr Dominy

15
16

Bioenergy: Fermentation & Biogas


Biopharming

10

Tue
Thu

24-Nov
26-Nov

Dr Dominy
Dr Dominy/ Dr Milner

17
18

Climate Change
Course Summary & Conclusions

Revision session for Class Test


Class Test

Page 57

13A: IMMUNOLOGY
Aims of the Course
The overall aims of the course are:

to introduce students to the immune system, how it recognises and responds to infection;

to promote an appreciation of the involvement of the immune system in infectious disease, autoimmunity,
allergy, transplantation and cancer;

to explain the importance of the immune system and how it can be usefully manipulated e.g. in vaccination,
treatment of inflammatory disease.

Overall Intended Learning Outcomes


You should be able to:

demonstrate knowledge of the immune system, how it recognises and responds to infections;

appreciate the consequences of involvement of the immune system in infectious disease, autoimmunity,
allergy, transplantation and cancer;

explain the importance of the immune system and how it can be usefully manipulated by e.g. in vaccination,
antibody therapy, treatment of inflammatory disease, immunosuppression.

Staff
Course Coordinator:

Dr Simon Milling, Room B421, GBRC, ext. 6419,


email: Simon.Milling@glasgow.ac.uk

Deputy Coordinator:

Dr Rob Nibbs, Room B326, GBRC, ext. 3960,


email: Robert.Nibbs@glasgow.ac.uk

Additional Teaching Staff:

Dr Charlie McSharry, GBRC, ext. 2282,


email: Charles.McSharry@glasgow.ac.uk
Professor Allan Mowat, Room 419, GBRC, ext. 8414,
email: Allan.Mowat@glasgow.ac.uk
Professor Maggie Harnett, Room B418, GBRC, ext. 8413
email: Margaret.Harnett@glasgow.ac.uk
Professor Tom Evans, Room B425, GBRC, ext. 8418,
email: Tom.Evans@glasgow.ac.uk
Dr Carl Goodyear, Room B421, GBRC, ext. 3865,
email: Carl.Goodyear@glasgow.ac.uk
Professor Jim Brewer, Room B424, GBRC, ext. 8417
email: James.Brewer@glasgow.ac.uk
Dr Pasquale Maffia, Room B423, GBRC, ext. 7142
email: Pasquale.Maffia@glasgow.ac.uk
Dr Alasdair Fraser, Scottish National Blood Transfusion Service, Edinburgh
email: Alasdair.fraser@nhs.net
Professor Iain McInnes, Room B415, GBRC, ext. 8411
email: Iain.McInnes@Glasgow.ac.uk
Dr Shana Coley, GBRC, Ext 4925
email: Shana.Coley@Glasgow.ac.uk
Dr Ruaidhri Carmody, GBRC, Ext 5945
email: Ruaidhri.Carmody@Glasgow.ac.uk

Page 58

Textbooks
Recommended:

David Male, Immunology: An illustrated outline.


K Murphy et al, Janeway, Immunobiology, 8th Edition

Moodle
All notes will be posted on Moodle before lectures if available but otherwise shortly afterwards. There will also a
Moodle forum to allow students to ask questions and to clarify anything relating to lectures and learning
objectives. Moodle will also be used to post any messages to class such as timetable changes and further
information during session.

Assessment
Minimum requirements for the award of credits
Credits will normally be awarded for completion of coursework and sitting the end-of-course examination.

Assessment of the course is based on:


1.

A 90-minute examination at the end of the course, which counts as 70% of the final assessment which will
comprise of MCQ and short answer questions.

2.

Assessment of coursework, which counts as 30%:

essay (25%)

class test (5%)

Assessed coursework: class test and essay


A choice of essay titles will be provided at the start of the course. You will be required to sign up for one of the
essays, review the literature and then write an essay on your chosen topic in your own time.

External Examiner
Professor Awen Gallimore, Cardiff University

Classes
This course consists of 22 sessions, a mixture of lectures and revision tutorials

Detailed Intended Learning Outcomes


At the end of the course students should be able to understand/explain/describe/know:

the cells and anatomy of the immune system;

the cells of the innate immune response and their contribution to the control and resolution of inflammation;

the benefits and potential dangers of acute and chronic inflammatory responses as illustrated by clinical
examples and outcomes of each;

the role of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in the immune response;

molecular events associated with the activation of immune cells.

the existence of distinct subsets of T cells, their characteristics, functions and regulation;

the molecular basis of T cell education within the thymus;

the existence of different B cell subsets and their role in the immune response;

structure and function of antibodies;

the necessity of interactions between T and B lymphocytes for optimal immune responsiveness;

the requirement for the immune system to be unresponsive in particular circumstances (tolerance) and the
mechanisms of this unresponsiveness;

how the immune system responds to a variety of different types of infection;

the process, stages and mechanisms of transplant rejection as an immunological event;

the mechanisms of allograft and xenograft rejection;

Page 59

that activation of the immune system can be harmful as well as beneficial e.g. autoimmunity;

how vaccines can be used to manipulate the immune response to induce immunological memory;

the role of immunological memory in protection against infectious diseases;

the causes of cancer and how the immune system responds.

Lecture Timetable
Week
1

Day
Mon
Wed

Date
21-Sep
23-Sep

Lecturer
Dr Milling
Dr McSharry

1
2

Topic
Introduction
Cells & Anatomy of the Immune Response

Mon
Wed

28-Sep
30-Sep

Dr McSharry
Prof Harnett

3
4

Innate Immunity & Inflammation


MHC & antigen processing

Mon
Wed

05-Oct
07-Oct

Dr Goodyear
Prof Mowat

6
7

Antibodies Structure & Function


T Cell Activation & Tolerance

Mon
Wed

12-Oct
14-Oct

Prof Mowat
Prof Mowat

8
9

T Cell Development
T Cell Subsets

Mon
Wed

19-Oct
21-Oct

Prof Harnett
Dr R Carmody

10
11

B Cell Development, Function & Activation


Molecular Immunology

Mon
Wed

26-Oct
28-Oct

Dr Milling

12

Putting It All Together


Class Test

Mon
Wed

02-Nov
04-Nov

Prof Evans
Prof Evans

13
14

Immune Response to Infection I


Immune Response to Infection II

Mon
Wed

09-Nov
11-Nov

Prof Brewer
Dr S Coley

15
16

Memory & Vaccination


Transplantation

Mon
Wed

16-Nov
18-Nov

Dr Milling
Dr McSharry

17
18

Immunodeficiency
Allergy & Asthma

10

Mon
Wed

23-Nov
25-Nov

Prof McInnes
Dr Maffia

19
20

Autoimmunity
Cardiovascular Immunology

11

Mon
Wed

30-Nov
02-Dec

Dr Fraser
Dr Milling

21
22

Cancer Immunology
Revision Tutorial

Page 60

2B: EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY


Aims of the Course
The overall aims of the course are:

to introduce students to the basic concepts underlying evolution and its effects on living things, and to show
how current studies of genetic variation and taxonomy can be integrated to provide new insights into
evolution, population biology and biodiversity;

to introduce the methods used in reconstructing evolutionary trees, and discuss the role of phylogenies in
understanding evolutionary processes;

to show how evolutionary processes are reflected in the development of organisms and in their behaviour;

to describe and interpret macroevolutionary processes including speciation and extinction.

Detailed Intended Learning Outcomes


You should be able to:

evaluate the alternative theories that account for the diversity of life on earth;

summarise and explain evolution in terms of fitness and selection;

explain the role played by mutation and polymorphism in the evolutionary process and in the study of
evolution;

summarise and discuss the influence of variation on phenotypes, including the concept of heritability;

summarise and discuss the importance of genetic diversity to the survival and conservation of species, and
the effects of inbreeding and outbreeding;

explain how speciation occurs and summarise and discuss the barriers that prevent species hybridization;

explain and evaluate evidence about relationships between different organisms using phylogenetic trees, and
explain and discuss the role of this form of analysis in conservation biology, agriculture and medicine;

explain how and why rates of evolutionary change may differ between lineages, and discuss the factors that
influence the distribution and survival of groups of organisms;

summarise and discuss how animal behaviour and development are shaped by evolution in relation to life
history strategies;

summarise and discuss the main evolutionary changes in the human lineage and evaluate the factors likely to
have influenced them.

Laboratory Course
Aims & Intended Learning Outcomes
The aims of the laboratory course are to:

provide practical experience in thinking about and understanding evolutionary problems and concepts;

provide practical experience in performing quantitative analyses associated with addressing evolutionary
problems and concepts.

The laboratory manual will be handed out before the labs. The specific intended learning outcomes are listed in the
laboratory manual.

Page 61

Staff
Course Coordinator:

Professor Barbara Mable, Room 404, Graham Kerr Building, ext. 3532,
email: Barbara.Mable@glasgow.ac.uk

Deputy Coordinator:

Dr Martin Llewellyn, Room 302, Graham Kerr Building, ext. 5819


email: Anna.McGregor@glasgow.ac.uk

Additional Teaching Staff:

Dr Mark Bailey, Room 425, Davidson Building, ext. 5994,


email: Mark.Bailey@glasgow.ac.uk
Professor Roderic Page, Room 222, Graham Kerr Building, ext. 4778,
email: Roderic.Page@glasgow.ac.uk
Professor Kevin ODell, Room 319, Davidson Building, ext. 6218,
email: Kevin.ODell@glasgow.ac.uk
Dr. Kathryn Elmer, Room 402, Graham Kerr Building, ext. 6617,
email: Kathryn.elmer@glasgow.ac.uk
Dr. Kevin Parsons, Room 313, Graham Kerr Building, ext. 6643,
email: Kevin.Parsons@glasgow.ac.uk

Textbooks
Recommended:

Reece, J.B, Urry, L.A , Cain, M.L, Wasserman, S.A, Minorsky P.V, Jackson and Campbell, N.A.
(2008) Biology 9th Edition, The Benjamin/Cummings Publishing Co

Useful:

Ridley, M. Evolution 3rd Edition, Blackwell Scientific Publications


Barton N. Et al Evolution (Cold Spring Harbour Laboratory Press)
Freeman & Heron Evolutionary Analysis
Griffiths et al An Introduction to Genetics Analysis, 8th Edition
Russell i Genetics

Classes
This course consists of 19 lectures, 2 laboratories and a poster session. There will also be a revision tutorial.

Lectures
Thursdays

13:00-14:00

Fridays

13:00-14:00

The laboratory course comprises:


A.

Laboratory 1 (2 hrs): Activities to demonstrate key evolutionary concepts and quantitative analyses.

B.

Laboratory 2 (2 hrs): Museum and computer practical to demonstrate phenotypic and genetic variation.

Laboratory times and locations


The class is divided into a number of laboratory groups; you should select your group on MyCampus, and must
attend at the times shown. You must attend both sessions to receive full credit.

Assessment
Minimum requirements for the award of credits
Credits will normally be awarded for completion of coursework, attendance in laboratories and sitting the
end-of-course examination.

Page 62

Assessment of the course is based on:


1.

A 90-minute examination at the end of the course, which counts as 70% of the final assessment and
comprises objective, short answer and problem based questions.

2.

Assessment of coursework, which counts as 30% of the final assessment:

Attendance and completion of in-class laboratory assignments week 1 (2.5%)

Attendance and completion of in-class laboratory assignments week 2 (2.5%)

Post-laboratory assignment (10%)

Group poster presentation (15%)

Assessed coursework: class tests and poster presentation


For the poster presentation, students will work in groups of four to present a poster on any Evolutionary Biology
topic, subject to approval, at one of two sessions in week 11. Groups and titles must be chosen by the end of
week 9, and finished posters should be submitted by the start of week 11. Poster sessions will be held in the
atrium of West Medical Building. Posters will be assessed jointly for content and presentation and individuals will
be assessed based on their participation in discussions with markers at the poster sessions. Individuals also will
provide peer scores for participation by other group members. Please see the MOODLE2 site for instructions.

External Examiner
Professor John Spicer, Plymouth University

Revision Sessions
One revision session will be held (room and time to be notified via Moodle). This is not a compulsory session, but
is an opportunity for students to discuss various aspects of the course, including assessed work and exam
question format, with members of staff. It will also be an opportunity to practice exam problem questions.

Self-Instruction Material
Course material will be made available on Moodle. Peerwise will also be available for the course, to enable practice
with writing and answering questions through interactions with peers.

Lecture Timetable
Week

Day

Date

Lecturer

Thu

14-Jan

Prof Mable

Introduction

Fri

15-Jan

Prof Mable

Evolution in Context

Thu

21-Jan

Prof Mable

Evolutionary Ecology

Fri

22-Jan

Prof Mable

Inheritance of Phenotypic Variation

Thu

28-Jan

Prof Mable

Natural Selection 1

Fri

29-Jan

Prof Mable

Natural Selection 2

Thu

04-Feb

Dr Bailey

Sexual Selection 1

Fri

05-Feb

Dr Bailey

Sexual Selection 2

Thu

11-Feb

Prof Page

Reconstructing Evolutionary Trees

Fri

12-Feb

Prof Page

10

Molecular Phylogenies

Thu

18-Feb

Prof Page

11

Reconstructing Ancestors

Fri

19-Feb

Prof Page

12

Macroevolutionary Patterns 1

Thu

25-Feb

Prof Page

13

Macroevolutionary Patterns 2

Fri

26-Feb

Dr Elmer

14

Speciation & Adaptive Radiations 1

Thu

03-Mar

Dr Elmer

15

Speciation & Adaptive Radiations 1

Fri

04-Mar

Dr Parsons

16

Evolution and Development 1

Topic

Page 63

10

11

Thu

10-Mar

Dr Parsons

17

Evolution and Development 2

Fri

11-Mar

Prof Mable

18

Evolutionary Applications

Thu

17-Mar

Prof ODell

19

Human evolution

Fri

18-Mar

Prof Mable/Prof Page

20

Revision session

Wed

23-Mar

Dr McGregor

Poster Session

Thu

24-Mar

Dr McGregor

Poster Session

Page 64

Lab Timetable
Week

Day

Date

Time

Group

Location

Tue

16-Feb

14:00-16:00

Graham Kerr 209

Wed

17-Feb

10:00-12:00

Graham Kerr 209

Wed

17-Feb

14:00-16:00

Graham Kerr 209

Thu

18-Feb

14:00-16:00

Graham Kerr 209

Fri

19-Feb

14:00-16:00

Graham Kerr 209

Tue

01-Mar

14:00-16:00

Graham Kerr Museum and Computer Cluster

Wed

02-Mar

10:00-12:00

Graham Kerr Museum and Computer Cluster

Wed

02-Mar

14:00-16:00

Graham Kerr Museum and Computer Cluster

Thu

03-Mar

14:00-16:00

Graham Kerr Museum and Computer Cluster

Fri

04-Mar

14:00-16:00

Graham Kerr Museum and Computer Cluster

Page 65

3B: INFECTION AND IMMUNITY


Aims of the Course
The aims of the course are to consider selected examples of bacterial, parasite, viral and fungal pathogens, and
prions, in order to develop an understanding of:

how these agents infect their hosts;

how they evade or subvert the innate and acquired defenses of the hosts immune system;

how they cause disease;

how they can be controlled;

how the immune system can be manipulated by vaccines, where appropriate, to establish immunity in
advance of infection.

Overall Intended Learning Outcomes


You should be able to:

Demonstrate knowledge of how bacterial, parasite, viral and fungal pathogens and prions cause disease and
how they can be controlled;

Recall facts, for selected examples of disease-causing agents, related to: routes of transmission; life-cycles
or replication cycles, where appropriate; pathogenic mechanisms; clinical features of the disease;
socio-economic impact; treatment; control by vaccination or other methods;

Demonstrate skills in the interpretation and critical analysis of factual information and its systematic
assembly in essay form.

Staff
Course Coordinator:

Professor Malcolm Kennedy, Room 322, Graham Kerr Building, ext. 5819,
email: Malcolm.Kennedy@glasgow.ac.uk

Deputy Coordinator:

Dr Mary Tatner, Room 247, West Medical Building, ext. 6246,


email: Mary.Tatner@glasgow.ac.uk

Additional Teaching Staff:

Professor Mike Barrett, Room B5-21, GBRC, ext. 6904,


email: Michael.Barrett@glasgow.ac.uk
Dr Gill Douce, Room B2-27, GBRC, ext. 2842,
email: Gillian.Douce@glasgow.ac.uk
Dr Paul Everest, Room B225, GBRC, ext. 4520,
email: Paul.Everest@glasgow.ac.uk
Dr Ruth Fulton, Room 127, West Medical Building, ext. 3464,
email: Ruth.Fulton@glasgow.ac.uk
Professor Brian Willett, Room 432, Henry Wellcome Building, ext. 3274
email: Brian.Willett@glasgow.ac.uk

Textbooks
Students should consult the 3b Moodle site and the page Study Guide and Resources where suitable reading
material for this course is listed. This range of reading material should prevent any problems which might arise
with bookshops or libraries not being able to provide sufficient copies of one prescribed text. You are not expected
to read all of the books.

Assessment
Minimum requirements for the award of credits
Credits will normally be awarded for completion of coursework and sitting the end-of-course examination.

Page 66

Assessment of the course is based on:


1.

A 90-minute end-of-course examination, which counts as 70% of the final assessment. The examination will
comprise objective questions and short answer questions.

2.

Assessment of coursework (two class tests), which count for 20% and 10% of the final assessment. The class
tests will comprise objective questions and will be held during lecture times. The first class test (week 7),
worth 20%, will be a paper based test. The second class test (week 11), worth 10%, will be quiz based,
with questions projected on to the lecture theatre screen. See Assessment Timetable for dates, times and
locations.

External Examiner
Professor Mark Field, University of Cambridge

Classes
This course consists of 20 lectures.

Lectures
Boyd Orr
Lecture
theatre 1

Mondays

13:00-14:00

Wednesdays

13:00-14:00

Detailed Intended Learning Outcomes


At the end of the course students should be able to explain/describe/know:

the terms pathogenicity and virulence, the chain of events in infectious disease, the spectrum of
host-microbe interactions, the importance of both microbial and host factors in these interactions and the
different categories of pathogenic agents;

the clinical features, pathogenesis, treatment and prevention of the respiratory diseases diphtheria
(Corynebacterium diphtheriae ) and tuberculosis (Mycobacterium tuberculosis);

the distinction between food-borne disease and food poisoning, the characteristics of Salmonella species and
Campylobacter jejuni as pathogens, their treatment and methods of prevention;

the importance of water-borne transmission of pathogens, the clinical features, pathogenesis, treatment and
prevention of cholera (Vibrio cholerae), and dysentery (Shigella dysenteriae) their treatment and prevention;

the clinical features, pathogenesis, treatment and prevention of the sexually-transmitted diseases caused by
Neisseria gonorrhoea and Chlamydia trachomatis;

the unusual properties of Chlamydia species as obligate intracellular pathogens with a distinct life cycle
involving elementary bodies and reticulate bodies;

the importance of nosocomial (hospital-acquired) infections, especially those caused by methicillin resistant
Staphylococcus aureus and Clostridium difficile, the role of antibiotics, clinical features, pathogenesis,
treatment and prevention;

the clinical features, pathogenesis and treatment of fungal infections, especially those due to Candida,
Aspergillus and Cryptococcus species;

the life-cycle of the malaria parasite (Plasmodium species), its vectors, the disease and its characteristic
symptoms, the various approaches to control of the infection and its transmission, problems with vaccine
development;

the life cycles of the major gut helminths, especially Ascaris and hookworms, the effects of the infections, the
diseases caused, methods of transmission and control, prospects for vaccination;

the life cycles of filarial parasites, especially Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi and Onchocerca volvulus,
the associated diseases and their socio-economic impact, methods of transmission and control, prospects for
vaccination;

the life cycles of the causative agents of bilharzia (schistosomiasis) and hydatid disease (echinococcosis), the
diseases caused, control measures, prospects for vaccination;

the life cycles of Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium parvum, methods of control of transmission,
immune avoidance, immune surveillance, immunopathology and immune dysfunction: prevalence in AIDS
patients;

Page 67

the life cycle of African trypanosomes and their vectors, the importance of reservoir hosts and the process of
antigenic variation, its value to the parasite and the consequent implications for the development of vaccines;

the agents of leishmaniasis and characteristics of the disease, pathogenesis, treatment and prevention;

the past and present epidemiology of, the structure of the virion of, replication cycle of, routes of
transmission of, basic clinical features of, vaccines against and treatments for influenza, measles and other
morbilliviruses poliomyelitis, hepatitis C and HIV;

the human risk groups and the cells which HIV infects, the replication cycle and the role of the tat and rev
proteins;

the distinction between HIV infection and AIDS;

the range of viruses that cause haemorrhagic fevers with particular emphasis on the Filoviruses (e.g. Ebola)
and Flaviviruses (e.g. Yellow Fever and Dengue), including the routes of transmission and infection, the role
of arthropod vectors, disease pathogenesis, prevention and treatment

the impact of humans on the environment which may influence exposure to viruses;

the differences between the live attenuated and killed polio vaccines, the advantages and disadvantages of
each and why the application of them is changing, the prospects for eradication;

the great influenza epidemic of 1918, the origin of new epidemic strains and the role of birds, the crucial
surface proteins of the virus, their use in classification of influenza virus strains, and how antigenic changes
can cause new epidemics;

the spongiform encephalopathies of humans (e.g. Kuru and CJD) and wild and domestic animals (e.g. mad
cow disease), controversy about the nature of the transmissible agents, the prion hypothesis.

Lecture Timetable
Week

Day

Date

Lecturer

Mon

11-Jan

Prof Kennedy

Host pathogen interactions and the chain of events in


infectious diseases

Wed

13-Jan

Prof Kennedy

Malaria

Mon

18-Jan

Dr Douce

Air-borne bacterial infections: tuberculosis and diphtheria

Wed

20-Jan

Dr Douce

Sexually-transmitted bacterial infections: gonorrhoea and


Chlamydia

Mon

25-Jan

Dr Douce

Hospital-acquired bacterial infections: MRSA and Clostridium


difficile

Wed

27-Jan

Dr Everest

Food-borne bacterial infections: Salmonella and


Campylobacter

Mon

01-Feb

Dr Everest

Water-borne bacterial infections: cholera and dysentery

Wed

03-Feb

Dr Everest

Fungal pathogens: Candida, Aspergillus, Cryptococcus

Mon

08-Feb

Dr Tatner

Opportunist protozoal infections, Cryptosporidium,


Toxoplasma

Wed

10-Feb

Prof Kennedy

10

Soil-transmitted helminths: Ascaris and hookworms

Mon

15-Feb

Prof Kennedy

11

Vector-borne helminths: filariasis and river blindness

Wed

17-Feb

Prof Kennedy

12

Tapeworms and blood flukes

Mon

22-Feb

Wed

24-Feb

Prof Barrett

13

Sleeping sickness and leishmaniasis

Mon

29-Feb

Dr Fulton

14

Viral infections: hepatitis C

Wed

02-Mar

Dr Fulton

15

Viral infections: HIV and AIDS

Mon

17-Mar

Prof Willett

16

Viral infections: measles and morbilliviruses

Wed

09-Mar

Dr Fulton

17

Viral infections: haemorrhagic fevers

Mon

14-Mar

Prof Kennedy

18

Viral infections: poliomyelitis

Wed

16-Mar

Prof Kennedy

19

Viral infections: influenza

10

Topic

Class test 1

Page 68

11

Mon

21-Mar

Prof Kennedy

20

Prions: vCJD and BSE

Page 69

4B: BUILDING AN ORGANISM


Aims of the Course
The overall aims of the course are to:

Provide a basic understanding of the developmental processes that produce multi-cellular organisms;

Provide information on key cellular processes, including how cells divide, differentiate, perceive external
stimuli and communicate;

Introduce the concept that genes produce molecular instructions that determine the organisation and
behaviour of multi-cellular organisms;

Explain, through lectures and practical work, how development is studied;

Prepare students for further study at the molecular, cellular and organismal levels.

Overall Intended Learning Outcomes


At the end of the course you should be able to:

explain how model organisms, in particular the worm Caenorhabditis, the fruit fly Drosophila and the plant
Arabidopsis, can be used to study the cellular and genetic basis of development;

describe and interpret the phenotypes of Caenorhabditis, Drosophila and Arabidopsis mutants altered in
specific aspects of development;

demonstrate knowledge of the molecular genetic basis of fundamental developmental processes, including cell
commitment and differentiation, morphogenesis, determination of organ identity and programmed cell death;

explain how external signals are detected and transduced to initiate cellular processes;

explain the molecular nature of a biological clock and describe how organismal behaviour may be controlled
by circadian rhythms.

Staff
Course Coordinator:

Professor Gareth Jenkins, Room 310, Bower Building, ext. 5906,


email: Gareth.Jenkins@glasgow.ac.uk

Additional Teaching Staff:

Dr Iain Johnstone, Room 403, Davidson Building, ext. 2844,


email: Iain.Johnstone@glasgow.ac.uk
Dr Chris McInerny, Room 243, Davidson Building, ext. 3208,
email: Chris.McInerny@glasgow.ac.uk
Professor Shireen Davies, Room 325, Davidson Building, ext. 2317
email: Shireen.Davies@glasgow.ac.uk
Prof Hugh Nimmo, Room 418, Bower Building, ext. 5058,
email: Hugh.Nimmo@glasgow.ac.uk

Textbook
Recommended:

Alberts, B., et al (2008) Molecular Biology of the Cell 5 edition (Garland Press)
th

Campbell and Reece (2008) Biology 8th Edition, The Benjamin/Cummings Publishing Co.
Wolpert, L. et al. (2002) Principles of Development 2nd ed, OUP

Assessment
Minimum requirements for the award of credits
Credits will normally be awarded for completion of coursework, attendance at laboratories and sitting the
end-of-course examination.

Page 70

Assessment of the course is based on:


1.

A 90-minute examination at the end of the course, containing both multiple choice questions and short answer
questions, which counts as 70% of the final assessment.

2.

Assessment of coursework, which counts as 30%:

laboratory report (15%)

class test (15%)

Assessed coursework: class test and laboratory report


The class test will comprise multiple choice questions and short answer questions and will be held during lecture
times. The laboratory assessment will comprise a written laboratory report which should be handed-in at the end
of the laboratory session. See Assessment Timetable for dates, times and locations.

External Examiner
Dr Jeremy Brown, Newcastle University

Classes
This course consists of 21 lectures and 1 laboratory.

Lectures
Wednesdays

17:00-18:00

Thursdays

17:00-18:00

Detailed Intended Learning Outcomes


On completion of this course, you should be able to:

explain how model organisms can be used to study development;

describe the processes involved in the establishment of polarity in animal and plant cells;

describe the composition and dynamic nature of the cytoskeleton;

explain how the cytoskeleton is involved in determining cell shape;

outline the stages of the cell cycle ;

list the major components regulating the cell cycle;

describe processes involved in cell movement and cell adhesion;

name components involved in intercellular communication;

describe examples of signal perception and signal transduction within cells;

describe the processes involved in early embryogenesis in Caenorhabditis;

describe the role of programmed cell death in development;

explain how aging and longevity are genetically controlled;

describe processes and name genes involved in the control of development in plants;

explain how control of cell division and cell expansion underlies morphogenesis in plants;

describe how selected environmental factors control aspects of plant development;

understand the importance of epithelial tissue and function in complex organisms;

attain knowledge of epithelial polarity including types of epithelial junctions;

appreciate the use of model organisms for studies of epithelial morphogenesis;

describe central and peripheral clocks in mammals and the role of the clock in behaviour;

Explain the involvement of the plant circadian clock in flowering time;

Outline implications of the circadian clock for humans.

Page 71

Laboratory Course
Aims & Intended Learning Outcomes
The aims of the laboratory course are:

describe features of development in wild-type Arabidopsis and several mutants;

interpret mutant phenotypes in terms of gene function;

describe how mutants can be used to study behaviour in Caenorhabditis;

The intended learning outcomes of the laboratory course are listed in the laboratory manual.

The laboratory course comprises:


Laboratory: Genetic analysis of development and behaviour (3hr)
You must attend the session; always bring your lab coat.

Laboratory times and locations


The class is divided into a number of laboratory groups; you should select your group on MyCampus, and must
attend at the times shown.

Laboratory report
The laboratory report will be completed during the laboratory session, and handed in when you leave.

Lecture Timetable
Week

Day

Date

Lecturer

Wed

13-Jan

Prof Jenkins

Introduction to Development: Key Processes,


Molecular and Cellular Basis, Experimental Approaches

Thu

14-Jan

Prof Jenkins

Establishment of Cell Polarity

Wed

20-Jan

Prof Jenkins

The Cytoskeleton and the Control of Cell Shape

Thu

21-Jan

Dr McInerny

Control of Cell Movement and Adhesion

Wed

27-Jan

Dr McInerny

Stages of the Cell Cycle

Thu

28-Jan

Dr McInerny

Control of the Cell Cycle and Cell Division

Wed

03-Feb

Dr Johnstone

Receptors

Thu

04-Feb

Dr Johnstone

Intracellular Signal Transduction

Wed

10-Feb

Thu

11-Feb

Dr Johnstone

Communication Between Cells

Wed

17-Feb

Prof Jenkins

10

Key Events in Early Development

Thu

18-Feb

Prof Jenkins

11

Genetic Basis of Cell Commitment

Wed

24-Feb

Prof Jenkins

12

Control of Orientated Cell Division and Expansion

Thu

25-Feb

Prof Jenkins

13

Molecular Genetic Basis of Morphogenesis

Wed

02-Mar

Dr Johnstone

14

Early Caenorhabdits Elegans Development, The Role of


Asymmetric Cell Cleavages and Cell Signalling

Thu

03-Mar

Dr Johnstone

15

Controlling Cell Number-Programmed Cell Death in


Plants, Worms and Vertebrates

Wed

09-Mar

Prof Davies

16

Epithelial morphogenesis 1

Thu

10-Mar

Prof Davies

17

Epithelial morphogenesis 2

Wed

16-Mar

Dr Johnstone

18

Ageing

Thu

17-Mar

Prof Jenkins

19

Environmental Regulation of Development

10

Topic

Class Test

Page 72

11

Wed

23-Mar

Prof Nimmo

20

Introduction to Circadian Rythmicity and Operation of


the Mammalian Circadian Clock

Thu

24-Mar

Prof Nimmo

21

Importance of the Plant Circadian Clock and how it


Affects Flowering Time

Page 73

7B: DRUGS AND DISEASE


Aims of the Course
The overall aims of the course are to:

introduce the principles of pharmacology;

describe the effects, mechanisms of action and clinical uses of drugs.

Overall Intended Learning Outcomes


You should be able to:

demonstrate knowledge of: drug administration, distribution, metabolism and elimination;

drug-receptor theory;

signal transduction and second messenger systems;

drug treatment of hypertension, asthma, infection and cancer;

drugs used during surgery;

drug effects on nerves;

drugs affecting the endocrine system;

design experiments to investigate drug action;

construct and analyse log dose-response curves.

Staff
Course Coordinator:

Dr Stephen Yarwood, Room 239, Davidson Building, ext. 3908


email: Stephen.Yarwood@glasgow.ac.uk

Deputy Coordinator:

Dr Dorothy Aidulis, Room 346, West Medical Building, ext. 6033,


email: Dorothy.Aidulis@glasgow.ac.uk

Additional Teaching Staff:

Professor Graeme Milligan, Room 253, West Medical Building, ext. 5557,
email: Graeme.Milligan@glasgow.ac.uk
Dr Harry de Koning, Room B518, GBRC, ext. 3753,
email: Harry.de-Koning@glasgow.ac.uk
Dr Brian Hudson, Room 253, Wolfson Link Building
email: Brian.Hudson@glasgow.ac.uk
Dr Simon Kennedy, Room 415, West Medical Building, ext. 4763
email:Simon.Kennedy@glasgow.ac.uk

Textbooks
Essential

Dale, M.M. & Haylett, D.G. (2008) Pharmacology Condensed 2nd ed, Churchill
Livingstone.

Recommended:

Campbell and Reece (2008) Biology 8th Edition, The Benjamin/Cummings Publishing Co.

Assessment
Minimum requirements for the award of credits
Credits will normally be awarded for completion of coursework, attendance at laboratories and sitting the
end-of-course examination.

Page 74

Assessment of the course is based on:


1.

A 90-minute end-of-course examination consisting of both objective and data analysis/numeracy questions,
which counts as 70% of the final assessment.

2.

Assessment of coursework, which counts as 30%:

laboratory test (15%)

class test (15%)

Assessed coursework: class test and laboratory test


The class test will comprise multiple choice questions and will be held during lecture times. The laboratory report
will comprise a computer-marked sheet filled in at the laboratory test session. Students should have completed
the typed laboratory sheets during their laboratory session and drawn the required graphs prior to the post-lab
session. The completed laboratory sheets and graphs should be brought to the post-lab session and laboratory
test. The completed computer-marked sheet will be collected at the laboratory test session and used as the
assessment for the laboratory. See Assessment Timetable for dates, times and locations.

External Examiner
Professor Stephen Hill, University of Nottingham

Classes
This course consists of 19 lectures and 1 laboratory.

Lectures
Group 1

Group 2

Mondays

09:00-10:00

Wednesdays

09:00-10:00

Mondays

12:00-13:00

Wednesdays

12:00-13:00

Detailed Intended Learning Outcomes


At the end of the course, students should be able to:

list the routes of drug administration;

describe what a receptor is and how it relates to drug action;

define the terms agonist, antagonist and the different types of antagonism;

define the terms signal transduction and second messenger and describe how they are related to drug
action;

describe the various ways in which drugs can modify neurotransmission;

describe how drugs can control hyper-secretion, inflammation and bronchoconstriction in asthma;

describe the different mechanisms by which drugs can be used to lower blood pressure and treat angina;

describe the ways in which drugs can protect the patient during anesthesia;

describe the mechanisms by which drugs can selectively damage micro-organisms;

list the major types of anticancer drugs and describe their mechanisms of action and toxicity;

describe how the endocrine system can malfunction;

list the physiological effects of thyroid and adrenal hormones;

describe how drugs can be used to counteract excess thyroid and adrenal function;

describe how drugs can be used to counteract an underactive thyroid and adrenal gland.

Laboratory Course
Aims & Intended Learning Outcomes
The aims of the laboratory course are to:

introduce the concept of experimental design and interpretation;


Page 75

provide illustration of the interactions of drugs with their receptors;

reinforce the material on drug-receptor interaction provided in the lecture course.

The laboratory manual will be handed out before the laboratory classes. The intended learning outcomes of the
laboratory course are listed in the laboratory manual.

The laboratory course comprises:


A.

Laboratory: The interaction of agonists and antagonists with their receptors (2 hr)

Laboratory times and locations


The class is divided into a number of laboratory groups; you should select your group on MyCampus, and must
attend at the times shown.

Lecture Timetable
Week

Day

Date

Lecturer

Topic

Mon

11-Jan

Dr Yarwood

Introduction

Wed

13-Jan

Dr Yarwood

Drug target sitesreceptors

Mon
Wed

18-Jan
20-Jan

Dr Hudson
Dr Hudson

3
4

Receptor transduction systems1


Receptor transduction systems2

Mon
Wed

25-Jan
27-Jan

Dr Yarwood
Dr Yarwood

5
6

The thyroid hormones


The adrenal hormones

Mon
Wed

01-Feb
03-Feb

Dr Aidulis
Prof Milligan

7
8

Pre-lab
Drug-receptor interactions1

Mon
Wed

08-Feb
10-Feb

Prof Milligan

9
10

Drug-receptor interactions2
Class test

Mon
Wed

15-Feb
17-Feb

Dr Kennedy
Dr Aidulis

11
12

Drug Administration
Drugs control in asthma

Mon
Wed

22-Feb
24-Feb

Dr Aidulis
Dr Aidulis

13

Drugs used in surgery


Post-lab

8
9

Mon
Wed
Mon

29-Feb
02-Mar
07-Mar

Dr Aidulis
Dr Kennedy

15

Laboratory test
Drug Affecting neurotransmission
Drug treatment of angina

10

Wed
Mon

09-Mar
14-Mar

Dr Kennedy
Dr de Koning

16
17

Drug treatment of hypertension


Chemotherapy of infection

11

Wed
Mon

16-Mar
21-Mar

Dr de Koning
Dr de Koning

18
19

Chemotherapy of cancer
Drug Targeting and Resistance

Page 76

8B: CELLS & TISSUES IN HEALTH & DISEASE


Aims of the Course
The overall aims of the course are to:

describe how cells are studied;

provide knowledge of the basic structure of cells;

introduce students to micro-anatomical aspects of tissues;

stress the interactions between structural and functional characteristics;

describe the changes resulting from disease processes.

Overall Intended Learning Outcomes


At the end of the course you should be able to:

demonstrate knowledge of: the major microscopical techniques used to study cells; the methods used to
culture cells; the structure and functions of cellular membranes in cells; the structure and functions of
microfilaments and microtubules; the four basic tissues; human tissues in both health and disease;

use a microscope to examine fixed and stained cells and record what you see;

identify the major cellular organelles in electron micrographs;

interpret light and electron micrographs by undertaking a systematic tissue analysis;

distinguish tissues and their interactions in the major body systems and define changes induced by disease
processes.

Staff
Course Coordinator:

Dr Maureen Griffiths, Room 216, Bower Building, ext. 2699,


email: Maureen.Griffiths@glasgow.ac.uk

Deputy Coordinator:

Dr Val Fallon, Room 342, West Medical Building, ext. 7726,


email: Val.Fallon@glasgow.ac.uk

Additional Teaching Staff:

Dr Michelle Welsh, Room 342, West Medical Building, ext. 5926,


email: Michelle.Welsh@glasgow.ac.uk
Dr Shona McQuilken, Room 238, West Medical Building, ext. 2681,
email: Shona.Mcquilken@glasgow.ac.uk
Dr Karin Oien, Wolfson Building, ext. 3506,
email: Karin.Oien@glasgow.ac.uk

Textbook
Recommended:

Tortora and Derrickson Principles of Anatomy & Physiology, 14th Edition (Wiley, EMEA
Edition) ISBN: 978-1-118-3450 0-9
Alberts, B., et al (2008) Molecular Biology of the Cell 5 edition (Garland Press)
th

Alberts et al Essential Cell Biology 3rd or 4th Edition (Garland Press)

Page 77

Assessment
Minimum requirements for the award of credits
Credits will normally be awarded for completion of coursework, attendance at laboratories and sitting the
end-of-course examination.

Assessment of the course is based on:


1.

A 90-minute end-of-course examination, which counts as 70% of the final assessment which comprises both
objective and short answer questions.

2.

Assessment of coursework, which counts as 30%:

10% based on first laboratory material

20% for the second assessment will be based on second laboratory material and lectures will be
completed in a lecture slot

External Examiner
Professor Peter Dockery, National University of Ireland, Galway

Classes
This course consists of 19 lectures and 2 laboratories.

Lectures
Thursdays

12:00-13:00

Fridays

12:00-13:00

Laboratory Course
Aims & Intended Learning Outcomes
The aims of the laboratory course are:

to introduce the use of the light microscope for studying cells;

to compare light microscopy images with electron microscopy images;

to encourage the exploration of human tissue in health and disease in greater detail;

to provide practical experience of human tissue analysis.

The intended learning outcomes of the laboratory course are listed in the laboratory manual.

Detailed Intended Learning Outcomes


By the end of the course you should be able to:

list the techniques currently used to study cells& their structure & function;

describe the main classes of cells;

describe the principles of cell culture;

describe the structure and functions of cell membranes, and the changes in diseased states;

describe the structure and functions of cell organelles, in plant and animal cells;

describe the processes involved in protein targeting;

compare the structure and function of the components of the cytoskeleton;

describe the sliding filament model;

categorize the morphological features of the four basic tissues;

explain the advantages of different types of microscopes in studying cells and tissues;

gain the ability to interpret light and electron micrographs;

compare the characteristics of simple and stratified epithelial tissues;

Page 78

identify glandular tissue:

sweat glands.

salivary glands.

pancreas.

describe the liver in health and cirrhosis;

define serous and mucous membranes;

classify connective tissues;

contrast CT proper in health and in diseased states;

describe the structure and function of cartilage;

describe structure of bone and the steps in the repair of a fracture;

describe osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and osteoporosis;

list the layers of the epidermis;

describe the dermis and changes with age;

describe the effects of sunburn and skin cancer;

describe the structure of muscle types;

describe skeletal muscle disorders and dystrophies;

describe cardiac muscle in health and disease;

discriminate between nerve cells and glia;

describe structural and functional changes in neurodegenerative diseases;

define stem cells and discuss their potential therapeutic uses.

The laboratory course comprises:


A. Laboratory 1: Cell and Tissue Structure (3hr)
B. Tutorial (1hr) : in lecture slot
C. Laboratory 2: Human Tissue Analysis (3hr)
You must attend each session. Always bring your lab coat.

Laboratory times and locations


The class is divided into a number of laboratory groups; you should select your group on MyCampus, and must
attend at the times shown. The 2nd lab will be in the Anatomy Museum (Thomson Building). Detailed times of
opening will be posted on Moodle, announced in lectures and in the Thomson Building to inform you of when Staff
Members and Demonstrators will be available to answer queries. Please note you will NOT be assigned to a
specific lab group for lab 2.

Laboratory reports
The assessment for Laboratory 1 will be based on the material from the laboratory session. The Laboratory 2
assessment will be during a lecture slot.

Lecture Timetable
Week Day

Date

Lecturer

Thu
Fri

14-Jan
15-Jan

Dr Griffiths
Dr Griffiths

1
2

Introduction
Principles of Microscopy

Thu
Fri

21-Jan
22-Jan

Dr Griffiths
Dr Griffiths

3
4

Cell Culture
Experimental Cell Biology

Thu
Fri

28-Jan
29-Jan

Dr Griffiths
Dr Griffiths

5
6

Cellular Membranes
Major Cellular Organelles

Thu
Fri

04-Feb
05-Feb

Dr Griffiths
Dr Griffiths

7
8

Protein Targeting
Cytoskeleton I

Thu
Fri

11-Feb
12-Feb

Dr Griffiths
Dr Welsh

9
10

Cytoskeleton II & Lab Tutorial


Epithelial Tissues

Thu
Fri

18-Feb
19-Feb

11
12

Glands & Secretion


Skin & Skin Problems

Thu
Fri

25-Feb
26-Feb

13
14

Basic Connective Tissues


Skeletal Connective Tissue: Cartilage & Bone

Dr Fallon
Dr Fallon

Topic

Page 79

Thu
Fri

03-Mar
04-Mar

Dr Fallon
Dr Oien

15
16

Bone Fracture & Repair: Arthritis & Osteoporosis


The Liver & Cirrhosis

Thu
Fri

10-Mar
11-Mar

Dr Fallon/ Dr McQuilken
Dr McQuilken

17

Post-lab Tutorial: Tissue Analysis


Muscle & Myopathies

Thu
Fri

17-Mar
18-Mar

Dr McQuilken
Dr Griffiths

18

Nervous Tissue & Neurodegenerative Disorders


Class Test

Thu

24-Mar

Dr Welsh

19

Stem Cells: Tissue Regeneration & Future Prospects

10
11

Page 80

15B: EXTREME BIOLOGY


Aims of the Course
The overall aims of the course are:

to create an understanding of how key biological processes can be modulated to function in extreme
conditions and where the limits are;

to offer a fully integrated view of biology;

to provide the chance for independent investigation.

Overall Intended Learning Outcomes


By the end of this course you should be able to:

identify diverse extreme habitats on earth and describe their geology and climate;

identify the most important physical parameters that limit biological processes;

identify biological processes that are challenged by extreme environments;

understand why and how physical parameters affect biological processes;

describe life forms that are adapted to extreme temperatures, pressure, pH, salinity and drought as well as
chemical pollutants and radiation;

describe the biological concepts that underlie adaptation;

describe possible applications of extreme biology in science, industry and agriculture.

Staff
Course Coordinator:

Professor Anna Amtmann, Room 229, Bower Building, ext. 5393,


email: Anna.Amtmann@glasgow.ac.uk

Deputy Coordinator:

Dr Victoria Paterson, Graham Kerr Building, ext. 4958,


email: Victoria.Paterson@glasgow.ac.uk

Additional Teaching Staff

Professor Richard Cogdell, Room B324, GBRC, ext. 4232,


email: Richard.Cogdell@glasgow.ac.uk
Professor Malcolm W. Kennedy, Room 322, Graham Kerr Building, ext. 5819,
email: Malcolm.Kennedy@glasgow.ac.uk

Guest Lecturers

Professor Charles Cockell, UK Centre for Astrobiology, University of Edinburgh,


email: C.S.Cockell@ed.ac.uk

Textbooks
Useful:

Graham et al Plant Biology


Madigan and Martinko Brock Biology of Microorganisms
Hickman and Roberts Animal Diversity
Dodson Ecology
Ridley Evolution

Assessment
Minimum requirements for the award of credits
Credits will normally be awarded for completion of coursework, attendance at project sessions and sitting the
end-of-course examination.

Page 81

Assessment of the course is based on:


1.

2.

A 90-minute end-of-course examination, which counts as 70% of the final assessment which comprises both
objective and short answer questions:

objective questions (65%)

short-answer questions (35%)

Assessment of coursework, which counts as 30%:

class test (10%)

group project (15%)

guest lecture summary (5%)

Assessed coursework: class test and group project


The class test will comprise objective questions and one short-answer question and will be held during lecture
time. Projects will be assessed on the basis of a group report and a group presentation. Presentations will take
place during lecture times and should be attended by all students. You will also write a report on the guest lecture
in the style of a newspaper article.

External Examiner
Dr Jeremy Brown, Newcastle University

Classes
This course consists of 16 lectures, 3 facilitated group project sessions, 2 tutorials and 5 project presentation
sessions.

Lectures
Tuesdays

12:00-13:00

Wednesdays

10:00-11:00

Expanded Intended Learning Outcomes


By the end of this course you should be able to:

understand DNA repair mechanisms;

understand the changes in protein structure leading to enhanced temperature resistance;

understand the strategies that extremophiles use to protect protein structure;

understand how lipid composition affects membrane integrity in extreme temperatures;

describe metabolic adaptations to extreme environments in animals, plants and bacteria;

describe physiological solutions to cold, heat and other harsh conditions;

understand the climate and geology and wildlife at the poles;

list individual products that have arisen from extremophiles;

describe molecular strategies to enhance salt and drought tolerance of crops;

appreciate the challenges of space travel and life on Mars.

Projects
You will work in small groups on one out of several offered problems using simple experimental tools, computer
programmes or websites and your imagination! You will receive material and guidance for your project during
three scheduled afternoon sessions. You will summarise your results in a written report and present your results to
staff and students as short oral presentations (scheduled during lecture time).

Project problems:

Discover extremophiles: Ever dreamt of discovering a new species? Here is your chance. You will obtain
a simple tool kit to collect extremophile microorganisms in your direct environment and analyse them in the
lab. This project provides ample opportunity for putting your own ideas into practice and developing skills in
experimental design.

Page 82

Food Security: Feeding an ever growing world population relies on expansion of crop production into
harsh environments. In this class you will be given different plant species and test their ability to withstand
abiotic stress conditions.. The project provides you with the opportunity to carry out self-designed
experiment in a highly tropical area of biological research.

Into the future and beyond: You will exploit the unique properties of extremophiles to tackle (more or
less) important problems of mankind ranging from developing renewable energy sources, forgery-proof ID
cards or anti-aging sun cream to growing tomatoes in the desert and colonising Mars. This web-based project
will teach you to transform your knowledge and ideas into practical applications. Who knows, you might sell
them.

Lecture Timetable
Wk

Day

Date

Lecturer

Tue

12-Jan

Prof Amtmann

Introduction: What is Extreme?

Wed

13-Jan

Prof Amtmann

Extreme Microorganisms 1: Salt & Vinegar

Tue

19-Jan

Prof Cogdell

Extreme Microorganisms 2: The Deep and the Dark

Wed

20-Jan

Prof Kennedy

Extreme Animals 1: Adaptations to high and low


pressure

Tue

26-Jan

Prof Kennedy

Extreme Animals 2: Adaptations to the cold (Arctic


& Antarctica)

Wed

27-Jan

Prof Kennedy

Extreme Animals (and humans) 3 Adaptations to


heat and UV

Tue

02-Feb

Prof Amtmann

Extreme Molecules 1 - How to protect your DNA

Wed

03-Feb

Prof Cogdell

Extreme Molecules 2 - How NOT to cook proteins

Tue

09-Feb

Prof Amtmann

Extreme Molecules 3 - How NOT to melt your lipids

Wed

10-Feb

Prof Amtmann

10

Extreme Molecules 4 - Epigenetic memory

Tue

16-Feb

Prof Kennedy

11

Extreme Plants 1: Hot and Dry

Wed

17-Feb

Prof Kennedy

12

Extreme Plants 2: Cold and Lonely

Tue

23-Feb

Prof Amtmann

13

Extreme Industry: Tough Products

Wed

24-Feb

Prof Amtmann

14

Extreme Agriculture: Food and Water

Tue

01-Mar

Prof Cockell

15

Guest Lecture: Astrobiology

Wed

02-Mar

Dr.Paterson /Prof Amtmann

16

Class Test

Tue

08-Mar

Dr.Paterson /Prof Amtmann

Wed

09-Mar

Dr Paterson/Prof Cogdell

18

Project Presentations

Tue

15-Mar

Dr Paterson/Prof Kennedy

18

Project Presentations

Wed

16-Mar

Dr.Paterson /Prof Amtmann

19

Project Presentations

Tue

22-Mar

Dr Paterson/Prof Cogdell

20

Project Presentations

Wed

23-Mar

Dr Paterson/Prof Kennedy

21

Project Presentations

10

11

Topic

Project Presentations

Page 83

16B: PHYSICAL PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGICAL PROCESSES


Aims of the Course
The overall aims of the course are to:

to show how forces can be exerted by muscles, and describe what range of movements results from
muscular action;

to demonstrate that the different sizes of living organisms subject the tissues to different stresses and
strains, and that there are important consequences for the forms and the movements of animals and plants
depending on whether they are large or small;

to discuss the different type of motion exhibited by animals on land, in water and in the air;

to be familiar with elementary thermodynamic concepts relating to free energy and energy transformation
processes;

to understand the importance of diffusion and the implications for organisms of the much higher diffusion
rates of gases in air than in water;

to recognise that different mechanisms exist for the transfer of heat and understand how animals control
their body temperature in air and water.

Staff
Course Coordinator:

Dr Lars Eklund, Room 455, Kelvin Building, ext. 8460,


email: Lars.Eklund@glasgow.ac.uk

Associate Coordinators:

Dr Peter Sneddon, Room 251a Kelvin Building, ext. 5312


email: Peter.Sneddon@glasgow.ac.uk

Textbooks
Recommended

Paul Davidovits Harcourt/Academic Press Physics in Biology and Medicine (3rd edition
0-12-369411-6 or 4th edition 0-12-386513-1)

Useful:

Davies, R.J., Bull, C.R., Roscoe, J.V., Roscoe, D.A. Physical Education and the Study of
Sport (Mosby)
Denny, M.W. Air and Water (Princeton University Press)
Hademenos, George J., Physics for Pre-Med, Biology and Allied Health Students (Schaums
Outlines, pub. McGraw-Hill)
McNeill Alexander, R. How Animals Move (CDROM, Maris Multimedia)

Assessment
Minimum requirements for the award of credits
Credits will normally be awarded for completion of coursework, attendance at laboratories and sitting the
end-of-course examination.

Assessment of the course is based on:


1.

A 90-minute end-of-course examination, which counts as 70% of the final assessment. The exam will consist
of both multiple-choice and short-answer questions.

2.

Assessment of coursework, which counts as 30%:

laboratory exercises (10%)

class test (5%)

marked essay of 800-1000 words (15%)

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Assessed coursework: class test, essay and laboratory exercises


The class test will comprise objective questions and will be held during lecture times. For the essay, you will
choose one from the titles given below and write an essay of 800-1000 words. The essay should be handed in to
the UGS Office. See Assessment Timetable for dates, times and locations. The laboratory exercises will comprise
five computer lab sessions with exercise sheets to be filled in during the lab and handed in by the end of the lab.

Essay Topics

Describe how the strength of biological materials affects the size and shape of living organisms.

Discuss the different gaits used by bipeds and quadrupeds.

Compare and contrast motion involving swimming in water and flying in air.

External Examiner
Dr Norval Strachan, School of Natural & Computing Sciences, University of Aberdeen.

Classes
This course consists of 20 lectures and 5 laboratories.

Lectures
Wednesdays

11:00-12:00

Fridays

11:00-12:00

Intended Learning Outcomes


By the end of the course you should be able to:

describe the operation of muscles from the point of view of the forces which are exerted by muscle cellsthe
sliding filament theory;

describe the different ways of deforming objects and what forces are required;

understand how the different movements of the skeleton can be regarded as lever systems;

list the different types of force which may affect an object;

understand how slower prey can evade capture by faster predators;

explain why there is a maximum velocity for walking;

explain why animals use particular gaits for different speeds;

decide whether it is an advantage to be larger or smaller for a particular type of sporting activity;

understand the difference between geometric and elastic similarity;

calculate how high different animals can leap;

explain the movement of a fish in terms of the various forces acting on it;

describe the principle of flight by looking at the wing as an aerofoil;

explain what is meant by air resistance and its consequence for flight;

illustrate the forces exerted on and by a birds wings;

compare the speed/size and energy cost/size relations for various modes of locomotion;

define a trajectory and the variables that describe it;

calculate the best angle to throw a ball or any other projectile in the absence of air resistance;

compute the range of javelins, balls, etc. in the absence of air resistance;

explain the circumstances under which a large or small angle of launch should be used for a golf ball,
basketball etc. in terms of range and time to land;

explain the effect of air resistance on the trajectory, range and optimum angle of launch of a ball, javelin,
etc;

explain what is meant by the internal energy of a system;

explain what is meant by free energy;

define the efficiency of an energy transformation process;

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explain how heat can be transferred by conduction, convention and radiation;

write an account of the relationship between body temperature and metabolic rate;

discuss how small animals keep warm in winter and large animals keep cool in summer;

explain why it is difficult for aquatic organisms to maintain a body temperature different from their
surroundings;

write a quantitative account of the thermal cost of respiration in air and in water;

explain what is meant by diffusion and write down the factors determining the diffusion rate;

explain the consequences the widely differing diffusion coefficients of gases in air and water and the
consequences for the respiratory systems of organisms;

illustrate diffusion in tubes with reference to insect tracheae and birds eggs;

write a brief account of diffusion, osmosis, sedimentation and centrifugation.

Computer Laboratory Course


Aims & Intended Learning Outcomes
The aims of the computer laboratory course are to:

provide insight into biomechanics, bioenergetics, thermal and diffusive processes by computer aided
modelling and analysis

reinforce the material on biophysical processes presented in the lectures

The computer laboratory manual will be handed out before the labs, and the intended learning outcomes of the
class will be listed in the manual.

The computer laboratory course comprises:


Students will attend five x 50-minute sessions. You must attend each session.

Laboratory times and locations


The class is divided into a number of laboratory groups; you should select your group on MyCampus, and must
attend at the times shown.

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Lecture Timetable
Week

Day

Date

Lecturer

S2/Wk 1

Wed

13-Jan

Dr Eklund

Introduction to Physical Principles

Fri

15-Jan

Dr Eklund

Forces; Stress & Strain; Forces Developed by Muscles

Wed

20-Jan

Dr Eklund

Mass & Weight; Work & Power; Strength & Deformation

Fri

22-Jan

Dr Eklund

Torque; Levers; Force decomposition

Wed

27-Jan

Dr Eklund

Posture & Stance; Gaits

Fri

29-Jan

Dr Eklund

Scaling laws; Geometric & Elastic Similarity

Wed

03-Feb

Dr Eklund

Tutorial

Fri

05-Feb

Dr Eklund

Energy; Jumping & Landing

Wed

10-Feb

Dr Eklund

Drag Force; Pressure & Buoyancy; Swimming

Fri

12-Feb

Dr Eklund

10

Momentum; Swimming; Buoyancy & Propulsion

Wed

17-Feb

Dr Eklund

11

Flying; Lift & Drag; Gliding & Soaring

Fri

19-Feb

Dr Eklund

12

Comparison of Locomotions; Projectie Motion (I)

Wed

24-Feb

Dr Eklund

13

Projectile Motion (II); Tutorial

Dr
Sneddon

14

26-Feb

Elementary Thermodynamics; Heat & Temperature


Scales; Heat Transfer Processes; Enthopy

15

Class test

S2/Wk 2

S2/Wk 3

S2/Wk 4

S2/Wk 5

S2/Wk 6

S2/Wk 7

Fri

S2/Wk 8

Wed

02-Mar

Fri
04-Mar
S2/Wk 9

Wed

Topic

Dr
Sneddon

Diffusion; Random Walk; Diffusion in Air and Water;


Diffusion versus Movement and Gravity

Dr
Sneddon

16

Metabolism as a Source of Heat; Metabolic Rate & Size;


Oxidation of Food; Temperature Regulation; Properties of
Water

Dr
Sneddon

17

11-Mar

Thermal Conductivity and Convection; Convective Cooling


in Air and Water; Radiative Cooling

Dr
Sneddon

18

16-Mar

Keeping Warm and Keeping Cool; Evaporative Cooling by


Sweating; Strategies for Keeping Warm and Keeping Cool

Dr
Sneddon

19

18-Mar

Respiration; Thermal Cost of Respiration; Breathing Air


versus Breathing Water

Dr
Sneddon

20

Tutorial

23-Mar

25-Mar

Dr
Sneddon

09-Mar
Fri

S2/Wk 10

Wed

Fri

S2/Wk 11

Wed

Fri

Revision Session

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