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Writing: Harley Stroh

Editing: Aijalyn Kohler, Shawn Merwin, Aeryn “Blackdirge” Rudel, Jessica Van Oort

Cover Art: David Griffith

Interior Art: Brad McDevitt

Graphic Design: jim pinto

Publisher: Joseph Goodman

Playtesters: Kale “Silverlock Duncan, Amber “Maralithtrix” Ebert, Max “Cathedral” Foster, John “Mo’ Money” Spear, Will “Crazy Ben” Stroh

Original Concept: Joseph Goodman

table of contents

Introduction: A Crime Lord’s Primer

3

Chapter 1: The Making of a Mob

7

Chapter 2: Crimes & Punishments

17

Chapter 3: The Mob Turn

30

Chapter 4: Gang War!

37

Chapter 5: The Crime Campaign

40

Chapter 6: Founding Scenarios

46

Chapter 7: The Slave Lords

51

appendices

Appendix A: Sample Made Men

71

Appendix B: The Vulgar Tongue

79

Appendix C: Neighborhood Mapping

82

Appendix D: Neighborhood Design

91

Append E: Sample Boons

93

tables and charts

Table I. Territories

7

Table II. Mob Strength

11

Table III. Made Men

11

Table IV. Mob Muscle

14

Table V. Holdings & Network

15

Table VI. Initial Mob Composition

16

Table VII. Punishments

21

Table VIII. Oldtimers & Retired Coves

21

Table IX. Random Events

30

Table X. Boon Bonuses

32

Table XI: Law Events

32

Table XII. Underworld Events

35

Table XIII. Gang War Challenge

38

Table XIV. Respect & Infamy

43

Table XV. Boon Generator 94 Appendix F: Crime Templates/Mob Sheet 94 2
Table XV. Boon Generator
94
Appendix F: Crime Templates/Mob Sheet
94
2
Growing up on the miserable streets, you learned early on that no man is free.

Growing up on the miserable streets, you learned early on that no man is free.

Every knight answers to his lord. Every lord to his king. Every king to his patriarch, and every patriarch to his god.

The thief, alone, dares to defy both man and god, answering to none — save his godfather.

Beneath the rain-slick cobblestones that line the

foggy streets, behind the ratty curtains hung over

the back of smoky taverns and gambling dens,

there is a secret city — as real and as vibrant as the

bejeweled palaces and wide promenades — ruled by its own sinister princes and lords of the night.

ruled by its own sinister princes and lords of the night. the underworld A world of
ruled by its own sinister princes and lords of the night. the underworld A world of
ruled by its own sinister princes and lords of the night. the underworld A world of
ruled by its own sinister princes and lords of the night. the underworld A world of

the underworld

A world of black markets and shadowy

principalities; a hidden society that rewards treachery between allies and honor among thieves, where glittering fortunes can be won by the bold,

and anything can be had for a price. A culture that

thrives in the shadows of every city-state, hamlet

and town — anywhere that a handful of tarnished

coins and a few bright jewels can trump a man’s sense of duty and principle.

But you already know all this. By now, you’re probably an aspiring cutpurse, making a few nips

here and there, working the square on market day, gambling it all away in the night, and waking up

just as poor the morning after. Maybe you already

have a crew of coves, like-minded souls that are your partners in crime. Perhaps you’ve even done a turn or two in the workhouses and gaols, atoning for the crime of poverty.

Your father was an honest man. He died in the workhouse, his body and spirit broken by the yoke of law. You swore to be something greater, that you would never indenture yourself to a man of privilege and rank, that you would call no man lord.

You

swore to become a master of rogues, above the

law,

answering to no one but yourself.

A godfather.

not just for rogues

The work of a crimeboss isn’t just for rogues. Godfathers hail from every walk of life — the one thing that unites them is the will to make their own way in life, and their disregard for authority.

Any character possessing these traits can become the boss of a few dozen coves. To be truly successful, to earn the title of Master Cove or Godfather, the character will need something special to elevate him above the common magsman. This quality varies from boss to boss. For some, it is an unflinching cruelty towards those that oppose them. For others, it is a powerful charisma coupled with a sharp mind for political stratagems. Others find their way to the top through ruthless betrayal and backstabbing.

How you make your way is up to you, and will determine whether your career as a godfather is short lived or enduring. In the end, though, the best godfathers must be all of these things in turn: ruthless and cruel towards their enemies, benevolent and generous to their allies, brilliant in their stratagems, and unforgiving in their wrath.

Contrary to the stories told in the back of taverns and inns, bosses aren’t necessarily evil. In truth, quaint notions like good and evil have very little to do with the choices you make. It is a vicious world, and you do what you need to in order to survive.

Sometimes, certainly, you might accomplish some good. In the course of your career, you offer protection to the poor and strength to the weak. You make certain beggars have meals of warm gruel and crusty bread in the depths of winter, and when a knight claims rights to an innkeeper’s daughter on her wedding night, you see that he lives to regret it. Perhaps the beggars play your informants later on and maybe the innkeeper hides your rogues when they are on the run, but they do it willingly, out of love, not fear.

But evil comes just as readily. When the slightest sign of weakness invites attack from all sides, you must be willing to be ruthless at any moment. For every hand extended in friendship, another lies in wait, clutching a poison-slicked dagger. You must anticipate attacks from every quarter, and respond in kind.

3
3

Do you have what it takes to survive when legions of foes are arrayed against you, and all you have to rely on are your friends and your wits? To flaunt authority and risk your life to become a legend among the underworld?

Of course you do. You’re a godfather.

You weren’t born a prince, heir to a kingdom. You weren’t chosen by some shining god, to lead his holy people. But you were born with a keen mind and a forked tongue, and most importantly, the will to cheat, steal, and slay your way to top of the swarming rats that perch atop the throne of this dark underworld.

rats that perch atop the throne of this dark underworld. And that, you know, is true
rats that perch atop the throne of this dark underworld. And that, you know, is true
rats that perch atop the throne of this dark underworld. And that, you know, is true
rats that perch atop the throne of this dark underworld. And that, you know, is true

And that, you know, is true freedom. that, you know, is true freedom.

crime lord’s primer

Never mind the prince and his sycophantic retinue. Once the red orb of the sun drops beneath the horizon and the fat lamps sputter to life, the godfather rules the night; answering to no man, reaping the fruits of the city and all its riches, heir to all its vices and sins.

Those riches inevitably bring dangers, especially when you are forced to associate with villains that would love to draw a poisoned dagger across your neck and leave you to bleed out in the back of a filthy alley, all for a handful of grubby copper coins.

And these are the ones you call allies.

In order to rise to power in the grim underworld, you will need territory — the neighborhood or ward that is your dominion; and a family — the loyal enforcers, bravos, assassins, and troops that do work on your behalf. A family working a territory is a mob. When you begin your career as a boss, you will have just one mob, but successful godfathers control many.

Simple enough? Rogues without territory are just a band of brigands. And a neighborhood that isn’t worked by family doesn’t earn any income. It’s only when a crew of rogues works a neighborhood that you have a criminal organization. Lose either, be it to rival mobs or the law, and the mob collapses.

But before your start sharpening your fighting knife and dipping your shuriken in black lotus poison, let’s go over the basics of an underworld empire.

4
4

the fundamentals

You’re a crime boss, not an accountant. The action taking place in your mob serves as a backdrop to your adventures, creating new adventure hooks and drama as you navigate the grim underworld, dealing with rival bosses, corrupt officials, and cruel overlords with your skills and cunning, and

— when things get ugly — your skill with a blade.

You aren’t on hand to direct every mugging or every time a shopkeeper gets shaken down for a few copper pieces. You dole out that work to your mob, giving directions and orders, but always keeping your hands clean of the actual crime. Any time you take a direct hand in an action, the mob turn is temporarily suspended.

Like a character, your mob is defined by a set of

statistics that change over the course of your rise

to power. These statistics determine how much

income your mob earns from your territory, how well your mob holds up to outside attacks, and how well it attacks others. It serves as a measure of your success as a crime boss and godfather.

Things progress slowly on the mob level. When you send out a band of thugs to intimidate a rival mob, they do their work over the course of days and weeks. A mob turn is 1 month long.

A mob is never static. In addition to whatever

nefarious plots you cook up for your band of charry outlaws, every month you risk three types of events: Law, Underworld, and Random. The events can introduce plot hooks for your

godfather’s adventures, stymie his plans, and offer opportunity to the cunning. The specific timing

of the events is up to the DM; at any moment a

godfather needs to be prepared for a raid from the

authorities or an assault from a rival crime boss.

The Law roll determines whether the authorities take any action against you that month, and how

draconic that action is. The Law role is influenced

by the number and severity of crimes committed in

the past month, as well as by your territory’s social class. A dramatic burglary in the noble quarter will earn a quick response from the prince, whereas beggars turning up dead in the slums are routinely ignored. You can mitigate the chances of a raid

by bribing corrupt officials, ordering your mob to

stick to low profile (and low profitability) crimes, and — when worse comes to worst — making sure that you have spry lookouts watching for a raid.

The Underworld roll determines whether a rival mob attempts to make a move on your territory, and how militant the action is. Like the Law roll, the Underworld roll is influenced by the strength of your mob and the cruel ministrations of fate. You can decrease the likelihood of an attack by keeping enforcers visible on your streets, working deals with the corrupt officials, and using spies and snitches to report attacks before they happen.

Finally, Random Events are rolled each month. These events bid weal or woe to a crime lord, depending on how intelligently the boss can react to a changing world. Cunning bosses are quick to turn nearly any event to their favor, while passive mob lords are forever cursing the fates for their poor fortune.

the mob sheet

By and large, your mob’s statistics are determined by the cutpurses and thieves you gather to your banner, and how you direct them to conduct their business. The wealthiest mobs, led by powerful, charismatic crime lords, have their pick of coves, while poor mobs, led by weak bosses, will be hard pressed to win the loyalty of talented rogues.

Your mob’s statistics can vary quickly with the composition of your mob. When you are asked to make check against your mob’s statistics, the core mechanic is 1d20 plus:

• The mob stat, either Streetwise, Muscle, or Respect;

• Made man bonuses (if any)

Following is a brief summary of your mob’s statistics. Each is detailed later in the grimoire.

The Muscle of a mob is based on the number of coves you have and the martial composition of your mob. Stronger mobs are more expensive to keep, but help to defend against attacks from other mob lords, and a strong mob is crucial to staging a coup on another territory. Note that coves are typically cowardly and untrained in battle and a single trained warrior can easily cut his way through a mob of panicking coves. You’ll want to be careful to augment your raw coves with trained sellswords.

5
5

A mob’s Streetwise represents your eyes and

ears on the street. Beggars, orphans, tavern keepers, and snitches — they all work to provide a constant stream of reports. Some arrogant crime

bosses disregard these, the meekest of their peers, but cunning bosses recall their own humble beginnings, knowing well that their fortunes rise and fall on their ability to stay connected

to the street. Streetwise also reflects how quickly

your rogues can hide themselves, vanishing into safehouses and boltholes when rival mobs or the authorities make raids.

Respect is a measure of how you and your people are treated by other criminals. The more powerful you are and the stronger your mob, the more other organizations will fear and respect you. Godfathers that always stand by their coves, no matter the danger, will earn high Respect. Godfathers that

abandon their coves to the gallows will lose Respect

in the eyes of the underground.

Every mob lords is infamous. The degree of your

Infamy is determined by the number and severity

of crimes you direct your mob to undertake in

a month. Infamy is a delicate balancing act:

Godfathers need to undertake crimes to support their mobs, but a high infamy invariably draws the attention of the prince and his executioners.

Your mob’s monthly base Income is determined by your territory’s social class. This is the amount you earn through protection rackets, extortion, and petty crimes. Your family can undertake additional crimes to boost your income, but this increases your infamy.

Your mob’s monthly Upkeep is determined by the total cost of keeping up your coves, made men, and defenses.

Your Made Men are the lieutenants and captains of your crew. While your coves perform all the petty crimes and extortions, made men provide the leadership necessary for more sophisticated rackets. Unlike the nameless coves working beneath you performing petty crimes, your made men are specific personalities with talents and skills. The more made men under your command, the more actions you can make in a month.

6
6
By now you’re itching to hit the streets and start your own mob. In order

By now you’re itching to hit the streets and start your own mob. In order to make an informed choice — rather than spend your career shaking down fish mongers and charcoal burners — it’s important to know the specifics of the two key factors to any mob: your territory and the family.

territory

The wealth of a territory is a measure of the power of the boss. Weaker bosses are always on the hunt to expand their dominion; established godfathers must always fight to defend it.

Regardless of your level or wealth, no character begins play with territory. It must always be won. Chapter 6 offers a handful of scenarios for acquiring your first territory, so start thinking about how you’d like to begin your career as a boss. But don’t worry too much about your initial mob; you’ll have plenty of chances to expand your territory and build the family.

The exact dimensions of your territory are unimportant, though most are roughly 10 city blocks. What is important is the nature of the neighborhood; that determines the base income, and how likely you are to run afoul of the law or underworld.

lower class holdings

Ruins: The ruins are the very worst holdings a mob boss can hope for. Composed of desolate shells of moldering buildings, inhabited by starving pox- ridden peasants with little or no hope of bettering themselves, there is no industry in ruins apart from what the beggars steal from adjacent wards.

This abject poverty also plays to the ruins’ greatest asset: authorities want absolutely nothing to do with ruins, leaving the destitute inhabitants to fend for themselves. A godfather can rule uncontested from the ruins, without fear of raids or crackdowns by the authorities. And because the ruins are so poor, it is rare for any rival godfather to make a play for the territory.

In order for a godfather to make ruins sustainable, they must almost always create some sort of income. Whether that be black market trade, smuggling, or other nefarious schemes, the income of a ruin alone is seldom enough to sustain a mob.

Slums: Citizens of the slums suffer from the same abject poverty as those in the ruins, with one key difference: ambition. Whereas the downtrodden of the ruins have given up all hope of a better life, the people of the slums are like feral dogs, hungry for a taste of a better life. Amid the dilapidated tenements, and crumbling row houses, there exists a passion and hunger unlike any other, save that of rising prince. In rare instances, true heroes can rise above their fellows to become legendary thieves, assassins, or scoundrels.

The slums are ignored by authorities almost as much as the ruins, but they have a slightly better income. Thus, many godfathers get their start ruling a territory in the slums. However, much like the ruins, there is very little industry in the

table i. territories

Social Class

Territory

Base Income/

Month

Law

Underworld

7
7

forsaken slums; godfathers with aspirations of wealth will need to create it.

Special: The slums are awash with beggars eager to serve as the eyes and ears of a crime lord. Any mob operating out of the slums receives a +2 bonus to Streetwise.

Trade Ward: Wharfs, warehouses, caravansaries, and any district used primarily for the storage and exchange of goods fall under the general heading of trade ward. There are few residents in a trade ward, and consequently, few potential witnesses. This, combined with the constant influx of wealth (in the way of trade goods) makes trade wards ideal for criminal activity.

These assets make trade wards coveted by criminal organizations; gang wars are common in the empty streets, as godfathers vie for control over the docks and warehouses.

By the same token, the absence of a local population makes it difficult to raise cohorts. Crime lords hoping to build strong mobs need to aggressively recruit coves from the bars, gambling dens, and even from rival mobs.

Special: Attempts to raise coves or made men in trade wards suffer a –3 penalty to Hire and Recruit checks.

upper class holdings

Merchant Ward: Merchant wards bustle day and night with the lively sounds of commerce: carriages come and go at every hour, lusty caravan masters hawk their wares, and everywhere, the ceaseless clink and clatter of coin trading hands.

Merchant wards are as varied and unique as the cities that birth them. They run from the great houses of the merchant-lords to the dense, narrow streets given to artisans and master craftsfolk. The chief defining characteristic of a merchant ward is the ready exchange of gold and silver for goods and services.

The great merchant houses pose a threat to the other, more established upper classes. Whereas the nobility, clergy, and magi base their claims upon centuries of tradition, lineage, and ritual, a merchant lord might rise to prominence in the span of no more a few years.

8
8

The same social restlessness that strikes fear in the established social classes is also the merchant ward’s greatest strength. The influx of trade and talent means that a merchant ward is always brimming with rogues and thugs willing to take up with a rising mob lord. The constant activity also provides ample cover for any number of illegal activities. This intoxicating mix of wealth, ambition, and talent lures talented rogues of every stripe and ambitious godfathers find it easy to secure their oaths.

Special: +3 to attempts to Hire or Recruit checks to recruit made men from the merchant ward.

Temple Ward: Temple wards encompass not only the great temples and shrines that grant the wards their name, but also the collegiums of sagacious magi and the other great places of learning and study. While wealth abounds, in temple wards it is often said that rogues must always suffer because priests are better at stealing. Though this sort of duplicity isn’t true of all religious orders, most do an extraordinary job of securing their wealth and making the life of a working rogue a living hell. It is difficult — to say the least — to disguise the activities of a large number of rogues in the temple ward, and much of the wealth is tied up in architecture and statuary, and protected by divine enchantments or worse.

For mobs that do succeed in establishing a foothold amidst the spiritual, the return is well worth the effort. Meek clergy and distracted sages seldom have the spirit or muscle to defend themselves against urban predators. On rare occasions, a charismatic, choleric priest might take a stand, calling upon political connections and the faith of his flock to oust particularly trying rogues, but more often, it is easiest to simply accept the coves and expect the tithing parishioners to make up the difference.

Special: Mobs without a corrupt priest made man earn only a maximum 100 gp per month base income in a temple ward.

Noble Ward: Greatest in wealth and splendor, thoughts of noble wards have sparked the flame of greed in many a young cove’s eyes. Gold for the taking, lovely nobles ripe for seduction, and jewels the size of fists — there is no end to the tall tales told by aging coves around pots of ale.

9
9

The truth is markedly different. The noble houses have spent centuries consolidating their might behind tradition and ritual, and are utterly unforgiving when their sacred sanctums are violated. It takes more than a fancy cloak and clean trousers to masquerade as nobility, and if ever a rogue is caught in the act, the consequences are immediate and (most often) lethal. Running a cove among the nobility requires constant attention to the attitudes of the prince. It is all too easy for an offended noble house to petition the prince to bring the wrath of all his lords and soldiers down upon a band of coves, and once a godfather has earned the personal wrath of the prince, his life is surely forfeit.

Still, for mobs that favor grace and guile over threats of force, working the noble ward can prove lucrative indeed. For these rare mobs, the noble ward lives up to the stories, offering them wealth beyond imagination, all for the taking.

Special: Beggars, and any bonuses associated with their guilds or made men, are prohibited among the nobility. Mobs without a corrupt noble made man can earn only a maximum 150 gp base income.

gathering of the coves

Now that you have an idea of the territory where your mob will be founded, it is time to start gathering the band of rogues that will make up your family. Your organization will live or die by the scoundrels, thieves, thugs, and muscle serving beneath your banner.

The members of you mob fall into two categories:

• Coves , the generic rogues and thugs that make up your family. Though not uniquely talented by most accounts, they are your soldiers on the street, the ones that carry your banner and put in work. However, while your coves are dedicated, alone, they aren’t skilled enough to lead jobs or scams. To do that, you’ll need…

• Made men are the lieutenants of your organization. Each has a specific talent or skill that makes them stando ut from the mob. As your lieutenants, they are capable of leading coves on specific missions and

10
10

jobs, and the more made men you have in your mob, the more actions you can undertake each campaign month. Recruiting and keeping made men isn’t cheap, so most mobs hire on only the rogues that are essential to their schemes. Mobs that are incredibly successful (or well funded by their godfather’s connections) can afford to retain made men that aren’t essential to the day-to-day workings of a mob.

role of the cove

The basic work of a cove in your mob is to perform the tasks that earn your mob’s base income. These tasks run the gamut from protection rackets, small time gambling, and petty thievery, to the hundreds of other small time scams that earn a copper here and a silver there, all ultimately adding up to your base income for the month. This is a mob’s most reliable income, your criminal bread and butter.

To run any territory, regardless of social class, you need at least 10 coves. These rogues devote all their working hours to protections rackets and small time crimes. If, by some misfortune, the size of your mob drops below 10 coves, it reduces your base income by half.

Example: Torval One-Thumb is running a small mob out of the slums of Punjar. His mob is hit by a rival organization in a raid that kills all but four members. The next month, when it comes time to collect the mob’s base income, the player rolls a 10. But instead of collecting 10 gp, Dougal’s 3 coves only collect 5 gp — a serious dent in the mob’s coffers.

It’s up to the godfather to determine how many of his coves he dedicates to working the collections in any given month, and how many he assigns to other more lucrative (though risky) assignments.

Secondly, the number of coves determines your mob’s base Streetwise and Muscle scores. These scores are specific to a mob, so that even when a godfather runs several mobs, he must recruit for each mob. Unlike armies, coves dislike being assigned to other mobs, viewing them as competition, even when they serve the same godfather. For this reason extra coves cannot be assigned across multiple mobs. The sole exception is that extra coves can be reassigned when a godfather founds a new territory.

 

table ii. mob strength

Number

of Coves

Streetwise

Muscle

1–4

+1

5–7

+2

+1

8–10

+3

+2

11–13

+4

+3

14–16

+5

+4

17–20

+6

+4

21–25

+7

+5

26–30

+8

+5*

31–35

+9

+6**

36–40

+10

+6***

41–45

+11

+7****

46–50

+12

+7*****

* maximum bonus without taskmasters ** with 1 taskmaster *** with 2 taskmasters **** with 3 taskmasters

***** with 4 taskmasters

Coves are inherently lazy. When a family grows too large, the rogues stop working as hard. Under most circumstances, the maximum muscle bonus of any family is +5. After this point, additional coves provide no benefit on their own, and it behooves a godfather to split the ranks of the coves and found a new mob. However, with enough taskmasters, it is possible to continue to gain benefit from up to 50 coves.

Coves do not work for free. Each cove in a family draws a salary of 1 gp per month. A family may have as many coves as it can afford, but retaining more than 50 coves grants no additional benefit to the mob.

New coves are attracted during the recruitment phase of the mob turn. It is up to the godfather (or one of his lieutenants) to determine how many coves, if any, to accept in to the family.

role of made men

Coves are interchangeable, low-ranking thieves and thugs. Made men, by contrast, bring specific, valuable skills and talents to a family. They may be master thieves, mercenary captains, black wizards, occult seers, or any other number of scoundrels of ill repute.

Accordingly, retaining made men comes at great expense. And while every made man is a valuable commodity, not all are equally useful to all mobs, and it is impossible to predict what talent may make itself available. New made men are attracted during the recruitment phase of the mob turn and it is up the godfather to pick and choose which made men to accept into his family.

Finally, made men also serve as lieutenants in a godfather’s organization, leading sophisticated, dangerous — and potentially lucrative — jobs. For each made man in a family, the mob can undertake an additional action per month (see Chapter 2 for mob actions and crimes).

Sample made men statistics are listed in Appendix A. Except when noted, benefits from more than one particular made man do not stack. Bonuses from different made men types do stack.

 

table iii. made men

1d100

Title

Cost/Month

1–7

Arm Breaker Assassin Beggar Master

5 gp

8–9

90 gp

10–12

25 gp

13

Black Magician Body Guard Cat Burglar Charlatan Corrupt Magistrate Corrupt Noble Cutthroat Corrupt Priest Cracksman Diabolist Fence Forger Harlot Junkman Man-at-Arms Mercenary Captain Minstrel Mistress Moneylender Occultist Racketeer Taskmaster Torturer Vagabond Performer Godfather’s pick

150 gp

14–16

50 gp

17–18

40 gp

19–21

45 gp

22–23

250 gp

24

100 gp

25–28

30 gp

29–30

75 gp

31–34

15 gp

35

150 gp

36–38

50 gp

39–43

25 gp

44–50

15 gp

51–55

15 gp

56–60

15 gp

61–62

60 gp

63–66

50 gp

67–69

75 gp

70–75

25 gp

76–77

25 gp

78–83

35 gp

84–89

25 gp

90–93

50 gp

94–98

10 gp

99–100

11
11

Arm Breaker: A professional thug specializing in threat and intimidation, when a talented arm breaker is assigned to petty rackets (and not a gang), he doubles the mob’s base income. Arm breakers are too brutish to ply their trade in Temple or Noble wards.

Assassin: An expert in the arts of death, the assassin is feared throughout the criminal underground. Unlike the more brutish cutthroat, the assassin is an elegant killer, capable of inflicting death upon the highest levels of an organization. When leading a gang on a hit, the assassin grants a +2 bonus to the Crime check. Assigning more than one assassin to a hit does not improve the team’s odds.

Beggar Master: The beggar master takes the poor, diseased, and downtrodden and transforms them into an efficient network of spies. With his ears and eyes spread throughout the city, there is little that the beggar master doesn’t see or hear. A beggar master increases a mob’s Streetwise by +3.

Black Magician: A practitioner of the dark arts, a black magician can alter reality to his designs

(within reason). The black magician can be assigned to a specific venture or crime, granting a +2 bonus to one Crime check. (These bonuses do not stack with multiple magicians.) Alternately,

the black magician can cast the Consult Mystic

Sages ritual twice per month. Black magicians are bitterly jealous of their peers, and refuse to work together.

Bodyguard: Trained swordsmen in their own right, bodyguards specialize in protecting their

clients from danger, placing the values of loyalty, honor (and ready coin) above their own safety. Assigning a bodyguard to a minion increases

the hit points of minion made men to 20. Also,

assigning a bodyguard to a client, increases the

DC for assassinating or kidnapping that client by

+2. Up to 5 bodyguards can be assigned to a single client (this affects only the Crime check DC, not

the client’s hit points).

Cat Burglar: Master thieves specializing in breaking and entering, eluding guards and bypassing traps and wards, cat burglars are the epitome of stealth. Given enough time and talent, there’s no vault or palace that can rebuke a team of

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talented coves led by a cat burglar. Cat burglars can lead burglaries, granting +2 to the Crime check. Up to 5 cat burglars can be assigned to a single job, for a total of +10.

Charlatan: A dabbler in the black arts, the

charlatan is more performer than wielder of arcane secrets. Coves are superstitious folk, however, and charlatans can inspire their courage. Assigned to

a specific crime, a charlatan grants a +1 bonus

to one of the crime’s DC checks. Additionally, a charlatan can cast the Hand of Fate ritual twice per month.

Corrupt Magistrate: Beholden to the mob, corrupt magistrates allow a godfather to subvert the justice system. Once per month a magistrate can reduce the severity of a sentence by up to 2 ranks. This effect can only be used once per cove or made man — only the prince has the power to lift a judgment once a rogue has been sentenced. Corrupt magistrates refuse to lead crimes.

Corrupt Noble: A mob’s entree into the lives of the nobility, a corrupt noble is essential to a mob’s success in a noble ward. In addition, a corrupt noble can act on the behalf of the mob, working to distract the prince from matters of crime, and focus his attention elsewhere. A corrupt noble reduces a mob’s Infamy by –2. Up to 5 nobles can lobby on the mob’s behalf, for a total benefit of –10 Infamy. Corrupt nobles refuse to lead crimes.

Cutthroat: What a cutthroat lacks in subtlety, he makes up in sheer violence. While brutally effective, cutthroats typically aren’t skilled enough to assassinate careful made men or godfathers. A cutthroat assigned to a hit grants a +1 Stealth bonus to the Crime check. Up to 5 cutthroats can work together on a single hit, for a total bonus of +5.

Corrupt Priest: A corrupt priest is essential to a mob’s success in a temple ward. Corrupt priests can also bend the prince’s ear, encouraging him to attend to matters other than the crime taking place beneath his nose. A corrupt priest reduces a mob’s Infamy by –1. Up to 5 priests can lobby on the mob’s behalf, for a total benefit of –5 Infamy. Corrupt nobles refuse to lead crimes.

Cracksman: While not as skilled as a cat burglar,

a cracksman has a knack for picking locks and

disarming wards — key talents for burglary. Assigning a cracksman to a Burglary grants the team a +1 bonus to the Crime check.

Demonologist/Diabolist: Exiled from society for making sinister pacts with infernal powers, these damned exiles often seek solace in the criminal underworld. Once per month, a demonologist or diabolist can summon an infernal power to do his bidding, serving as an otherworldly assassin, an

infernal warrior to defend the mob, or a horrifying engine of destruction sent against an opposing mob. Regardless of the crime, the infernal power grants a +5 bonus to the Crime check. Welcoming

a demonologist or diabolist into your mob comes

at great cost, raising a mob’s Infamy by +5. Demonologists and diabolists refuse to lead crimes.

Fence: An established black market dealer with contacts throughout the civilized world, a fence allows a mob to sell its stolen goods at greater value. Employing a fence in a mob doubles that value of goods stolen in Burglaries. Fences refuse to lead crimes.

Forger : Masters at creating false papers and

letters of writ, forgers are extremely valuable to mobs working in upper class districts. A forgery identifying the bearer as a member of a certain noble house allows catburglars and cracksmen to gain entry into noble districts and wards, and

a letter of writ identifying one as the servant of

the prince can stall authorities long enough for a rogue to make his escape. Assigning a forger to a crime in an upper class neighborhood grants the gang +3 on the Crime check. Forgers refuse to lead crimes.

Harlot: Ladies of the night are a common sight in the lower class wards, permitting a harlot and her associates to avoid suspicion in the execution of a crime. Assigning a harlot to a crime in a lower class neighborhood grants the gang +1 social bonus. Up to 3 harlots can be assigned to the same gang, for a total +3 social bonus.

Junkman: Spending his days and nights in the streets, alleys and byways of a ward, there is very little that escapes a junkman’s notice. A junkman increases a mob’s Streetwise by +1. A mob can retain up to 3 junkmen for a total +3 Streetwise bonus.

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Man-at-Arms: Motley war veterans and bravo ne’er-do-wells, men-at-arms are essential to the defense of a mob or assaulting a rival organization. Whereas coves are loathe to take up the blade, men-at-arms die by it. Princes get leery when their citizens begin to retain mercenary units; when godfathers retain more than 6 men-at-arms in a mob, they earn Infamy.

table iv. mob muscle

table iv. mob muscle

Number of

Men-at-arms

Muscle Bonus/

Infamy Bonus

1–2

+1

3–4

+2

5–6

+3

7–10

+4/+1

11–14

+5/+2

15–20

+6/+3

21–25

+7/+4

26–30

+8/+5 … and so on.

Mercenary Captain: Skilled in tactics and the arts of war, mercenary captains have the training and skill required to direct men in armed combat. Assigning a mercenary captain to a gang grants a +2 martial bonus. Only one captain can be assigned to any gang, but multiple captains can work in a mob. If a captain isn’t assigned to gang, but instead devotes his time to the defense of the mob, the mob’s Muscle is increased by +2.

Mistress: Ladies-in-waiting in the service of the court, mistresses move deftly through social circles that rebuke most rogues. Assigning a mistress to a crime in an upper class neighborhood grants the gang a +1 social bonus. Up to 2 mistresses can be assigned to the same gang, for a total +2 social bonus.

Moneylender: Running pawnshops and small- time fences, moneylenders are always on hand to help a friend down on his luck — for a price. A loan from any moneylender always comes with strings attached, and few are those who are lucky enough to extricate themselves from their devious webs. Employing a moneylender allows a mob to either: recruit an extra 1d4 coves per month, or make a second attempt to recruit a made man each month. Moneylenders refuse to lead crimes.

Occultist: Devoted to the worship of obscene and

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infernal powers, occultists are often driven out of common society and forced to practice in secret. Occultists recruited into a mob throw themselves into their prayers, offering up grim sacrifices to earn the pleasure of their infernal patrons. Assigning an occultist to a gang grants a +1 bonus to the Crime check, regardless of the crime. This comes at a cost of raising the mob’s Infamy by +2. While only 3 occultists can be assigned to a single gang, up to 10 can be recruited by a single mob.

Minstrel: Entertainers in the service of the court, minstrels pass easily among the strata of the upper class. Bards, skalds, actors, and jugglers all qualify as minstrels. Assigning a minstrel to a crime in an upper class neighborhood grants the gang a +1 social bonus. Up to 2 minstrels can be assigned to the same gang, for a total +2 social bonus.

Racketeer: An experienced swindler, racketeers direct coves in sophisticated small crimes, called rackets. These can include gambling dens, elaborate con games, smuggling operations and the like. See the Racket crime action in Chapter 2.

Taskmaster: Also known as “whips,” taskmasters are responsible for keeping coves in line, and hard at work collecting for the godfather. Hiring a taskmaster into a mob increases the total number of effective coves, increasing the mob’s Strength and Streetwise (see Table II: Mob Strength).

Torturer: Trained in the arts of inflicting pain without causing death, torturers dramatically increase a godfather’s ability to interrogate and intimidate coves and made men. Additionally, torturers can coerce a kidnapped magistrate into reducing the sentence of a crime by up to 3 ranks, at a cost of +2 Infamy (this is in addition to the Infamy earned through the kidnapping).

Vagabond Performer: Street entertainers, actors, and musicians, vagabonds are a common sight in lower class wards. Legitimate performers travel in troupes, making it easy to disguise coves as performers traveling with the vagabond Assigning a vagabond to a crime in a lower class neighborhood grants the gang a +1 social bonus. Up to 2 vagabonds can be assigned to the same gang, for a total +2 social bonus. Alternately, if a performer is not leading a crime, he can be used to either recruit an extra 1d6 coves per month or make a second attempt to recruit a made man each month.

defenses

When blood runs in the alleys and blades flash in the night, it always comes at great cost of lives and hard-won gold. When most mobs place their hopes on aggressive, preemptive strikes, it often falls to the mob’s defensive measures to soften the blow.

A mob’s base Defense is equal to its Streetwise or

Muscle modifier (whichever is higher). Mobs with high Muscle are able to better guard their family and turf, while mobs with high Streetwise catch wind of attacks and vacate the streets before they can get hit.

A mob builds up its base Defense by investing in

a mob’s holdings and network. Like the upkeep

for coves and made men, the upkeep for both fortifications and the mob’s network must be paid monthly.

table v. holdings and networks

Holdings

Cost/Month

Benefit

Safehouse

25 gp

+1 Defense/safehouse +5 Defense +3 Defense

Guildhouse

100 gp

Escape Tunnels

150

gp

Network

Beggars’ Guild

15 gp

+1 Defense

Merchant’s Brotherhood 100 gp

+2 Defense

Underworld

250 gp

+5 Defense

Safehouse: A safehouse is a friendly bolthole, usually either the back room of a tavern, a rented room at an inn, or a hidden cellar kept up by someone friendly with the mob, where fleeing mobsters can hide when pursued by rival gangs. The monthly expense ensures that the owner keeps the safehouse secret, as well as maintains a regular supply of fresh food and drink for coves on the run. A mob can have up to 1 safehouse for every 10 coves.

Guildhouse: The headquarters for an established mob, a guildhouse serves as a meeting place for a mob, a home for its fences, and in times of peril, defensive fortifications. The monthly expense ensures that the guildhouse is kept well provided

with food and drink for its rapacious coves, as well as amply stocked with defensive weapons: spears, crossbows, oil for burning, and stones for slinging.

A mob can only benefit from one guildhouse.

Escape Tunnels: Escape tunnels are never built so much as adopted. A typical network of escape tunnels is composed of sewer tunnels, old crypts and tombs, forgotten cellars, and storm drains. A mob cannot benefit from escape tunnels without first acquiring a guildhouse. The upkeep cost of the tunnels ensures the silence of city maintenance workers, specially keyed locks and grates on the tunnel entrances, and the regular repair of aging passageways and corridors.

Beggars’ Guild: By paying out hard cash to the beggars, a godfather ensures that whenever a rival

makes a move on his mob, the beggars are likely to report it to the godfather, giving the mob time to prepare for the attack. The welfare of the beggars

is linked to that of the mob, so if the beggars hope

to keep their stream of ready gold, they will do everything in their (albeit limited) power to aid the godfather and his mob.

Merchant’s Brotherhood: Much like beggars, there is very little that a network of merchants doesn’t see. Furthermore, if weapons, armor, and foodstuffs are being purchased to maintain a small army, the merchants will know about it. Tithing to their society ensures that when the merchants spy another godfather amassing the tools needed to launch an all out gang war, they give the PCs word that they may need to hit the mattresses.

Underworld: Though expensive, generosity towards one’s fellow rogues is a sure way to

earn their goodwill leading into a gang war. If a godfather is known for being a good host to fellow mob bosses, and for treating lesser rogues with respect, chances are good that the scoundrels will return the favor. Though the rogues certainly won’t fight on the godfather’s behalf, they will pass along rumors and bits of intelligence that can make all the difference. The upkeep of the network is the cost of being generous to rogues, thugs, and scoundrels of the city, even when they don’t belong

to your mob.

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Behind every great fortune, there is a crime. — Honoré de Balzac Every turn, you

Behind every great fortune, there is a crime.

Behind every great fortune, there is a crime. — Honoré de Balzac Every turn, you direct

— Honoré de Balzac

Every turn, you direct your mob to take actions, called crimes. In order for your mob to commit crimes, you need a gang. Each gang is composed of a made man, who serves as the leader, and

a number of coves that work underneath him.

Certain crimes allow more than one made man to be assigned to a single gang, increasing their odds

of success.

In a single month, you can commit one crime per gang, with the exception of master hauls, which are described later.

reading a crime

Crimes are the actions you take in a mob turn, and are the core of your criminal organization. Here’s the information you need to understand the crimes.

Na Me (S TaTISTIC ) key wor DS

The first term in a crime entry is the name of the crime. The second term is the applicable mob statistic, either Streetwise or Muscle.

The keywords define the made man bonuses that can apply to the crime.

Gang: The gang number defines the number of

coves you need for the crime. Each gang requires

a made man to lead it; made men never count

towards the number of coves needed for a crime.

Crime DC: The total needed on the Crime check to pull off the crime. The Crime check is always 1d20 + the appropriate mob statistic + any made man modifiers. Unless noted otherwise, if a crime ever fails by 5 or more, not only was it unsuccessful, but the gang was caught in the act and apprehended.

Take: The loot, if any, garnered from the crime.

Infamy: The Infamy earned through committing the crime. Infamy is always earned whether or not the crime was successful.

Punishment: The punishment for the crime if the gang is caught, typically due to a failed Crime check. This can vary in severity according to the culture. An extremely lawful society may increase the punishment of any crime by 1 or more ranks, just as a chaotic city of thieves can reduce the punishment for crimes. Note that in most cases evil- aligned cities have even harsher, more draconian laws than their good-aligned kin.

Cr IM e S

Typically crimes are performed as single jobs done to earn extra income. However, under a godfather’s leadership, sophisticated mobs can commit multiple crimes towards a greater end, often building to a master haul. The rewards of these “master hauls” are up to the adjudication of the DM, but typically exceed 500 gp or more.

Example: Black Dougal and his compatriots have hatched a grand scheme to rob the royal treasury. First, he needs the plan to the vault, details which are known only to the prince’s vizier.

Assembling a team of kidnappers, Black Dougal waits for the prince’s ball, and then kidnaps the vizier from the ball, whisking him away under the cover of darkness to one of the mob’s safe houses.

There, Black Dougal turns the vizier over to his torturer; after many hours, the vizier reveals the plans of the vault, but also that the vault is guarded by a series of arcane wards erected by the prince’s chief magician, a supremely cautious man defended by no less than three bodyguards.

Black Dougal doesn’t have means to deal with the wards, but he can dispose of the magician. Unfortunately, with so many bodyguards, even the finest assassin has little chance of success taking out the magician. Calling in his markers, Black Dougal arranges for four teams off assassins — the first three to eliminate the bodyguards, the last to take care of the magician.

When the signal comes that the fell magician is dead, Black Dougal gives word to his team of burglars. With luck, and no small bit of planning, the royal treasury will be emptied before dawn.

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BriBe (StreetwiSe) Social GanG: Made Man

Your made man plies the target with offers of riches in return for a favor.

Special: While bribes don’t require coves, they do require cash. Attempting a bribe comes at a cost, whether or not the target carries through on his promise. By doubling the total bribe, the Crime DC for the bribe can be reduced by –5.

Note that on a failed Crime check bodyguards and nobles simply take the bribe but do not report it to the authorities; there is no punishment for these failed bribes.

Bribes can also be used to reduce punishments; however, the greater the punishment, the greater it costs to reduce it a single rank. Each magistrate entry below notes a punishment rank, and a cost for reducing the punishment 1 rank. Reducing a punishment multiple ranks requires only a single Crime check, but the cost is cumulative.

Example: Black Dougal’s best assassin is headed to the gallows. In order to get his sentence reduced to a mere lifetime of imprisonment, it will take a successful Crime check and a hefty 1,000 gp. To have the imprisonment shortened to a mere 6 months, will cost another 500 gp.

Target

Crime DC

Cost Infamy

p unishment

Guardsman 15

15 gp

1

Captain

of the Guard 20

50 gp

2

Bodyguard

20

100 gp

+5

Noble

20

250 gp

+5

Magistrate Rank 1 Punishment

 
 

15

20 gp

+5

2

Magistrate Rank 2 Punishment

 
 

15

100 gp

+5

3

Magistrate Rank 3 Punishment

 
 

20

200 gp

+5

4

Magistrate Rank 4 Punishment

 
 

20

500 gp

+5

4

Magistrate Rank 5 Punishment

 
 

25

700 gp

+7

4

Magistrate Rank 6 Punishment

 
 

30

1,000 gp

+10

4

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BurGlary (StreetwiSe) Social, Stealth GanG: 3 + Made Man

Your coves break into a home or business, making off with any items of worth. At a godfather’s direction, they can also attempt to steal a specific item.

Special: In certain cases, targets exceed the wealth expectations of their neighborhood. For example, targeting a moneylender who works out of the slums will net an upper class take. It is up to the DM to determine if a specific target’s worth is greater than the neighborhood’s social class would indicate.

A godfather can free incarcerated coves by breaking into the prison where his men are being held. These targets are treated as DC 25.

Target

Crime DC Take

Infamy p unishment

Lower Class

15

2d20 gp

+2

2

Upper Class

20

1d100 gp

+5

3

Palace/Guildhall 30

5d100 gp

+10

5

Prison

25

+5

3

hit (MuScle) Martial, Social, Stealth GanG: 3 + Made Man

Your coves plan and carry out the assassination of a specific target. This crime can also be used to deliver threats. Bodyguards assigned to the target increase the crime DC. In rare cases, assassins are sent to knock off the bodyguards before a separate team assassinates the target.

Special: A mob’s coves count as lower class targets. Made men are considered upper class targets; a successful hit on a made man belonging to an NPC mob reduces the mob’s actions by 1. A hit ordered against a godfather immediately instigates a gang war.

Target

Crime DC

Infamy

p unishment

Lower Class

15

+2

4

Upper Class

20

+5

5

Prince/Godfather 30

+15

6

infiltration (StreetwiSe) Social, Stealth GanG: 1 + Made Man

You insinuate a made man into a social circle with the specific intent to gather information in preparation for a crime. A successful infiltration grants a +2 bonus to any crime. A crime can only benefit from a single infiltration.

Target

Crime DC

Infamy

p unishment

Lower Class

10

+5

2

Upper Class

15

+5

3

Prince/Godfather 25

+10

4/6

Su CCe SS

The made man eases his way into the social circles, making friends among the social class. If the made man is assigned to the same crime in subsequent turns, the mob receives a +2 bonus on Crime DCs.

If the made man succeeds in infiltrating a rival mob during a gang war, the inside information increases the PCs’ Streetwise by +2.

fa I lure

–1 to –5: The made man is discovered but escapes with his life.

–5 or more: The made man is caught in the ruse. If the made man was infiltrating a legitimate organization, he is apprehended by authorities. If the made man was infiltrating a criminal organization, he is murdered.

hire (StreetwiSe) Social GanG: 1 + Made Man

Eager for additional manpower, you put out the call for coves and talented scoundrels.

In addition to welcoming new rogues during the recruitment phase of the mob turn, you can also actively attempt to hire talent. This is most often done by gangs desperate for coves, or looking to hire a very specific made man.

Hiring coves and made men costs hard gold (spent on bribes, tracking down leads, and drinks). The gold is spent whether the Crime check is successful or not.

Target

Cost

Crime DC

Infamy

Cove

20 gp

15

+1

Made Man

150 gp

20

+3

Su CC e SS

On successful check, the mob manages to recruit either 1d6+1 coves, or a specific made man. The Hire action can only be attempted by a mob twice per month.

KidnappinG (StreetwiSe) Martial, Social, Stealth GanG: 5 + Made Man

Kidnapping targets can be any specific person, ranging from coves or made men of rival gangs, citizens of the city, to members of the prince’s court.

Special: Bodyguards assigned to targets increase the crime DC. Successfully kidnapping a made man from an NPC mob reduces the mob’s actions by 1.

Target

Crime DC r ansom Infamy p unishment

Cove

15

2d20 gp

Lower Class

15

2d20 gp

Made man

20

1d100 gp

+1

2/6

Magistrate

20

1d100 gp

+1

2/6

Upper Class

25

3d100 gp

+5

4

Godfather

30

DM’s choice

+10

6

Prince

30

DM’s choice

+10

6

 

SuCC eSS

 

The kidnappers succeed in abducting the target. The godfather can choose to ransom the kidnapped victim back at his leisure. Note that kidnapping a prince or godfather does not ensure a king’s ransom, but does make it very likely that the entire kingdom (or rival mob) turns against the PCs’ mob.

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racKet (StreetwiSe) Social GanG: 5 + racKeteer

Rackets stand in for crimes that aren’t violent (like hits or raids) or are principally centered on stealth (like smuggling or burglary). Depending on the campaign world, these rackets can range from gambling rings, numbers running, or any other illegal enterprise run with the intent of generating additional income for the mob.

Unlike other crimes, rackets remain active until the coves are caught or the godfather shuts the ring down. A racket’s specifics are determined by the income the mob aims to take in. Riskier ventures generate more income, but also incur greater infamy and harsher punishments. Socially adept mobs with connections in among the nobility and magistrates can thrive on rackets, running extensive black markets beneath the noses of the prince and his cohorts.

Take

Crime DC Infamy

p unishment

1d20 gp

10

+2

1

3d20+25 gp

15

+3

2

5d20+25 gp

20

+5

3

10d20+25 gp 25

+5

4

fa I lure

–1 to –5: The racket fails to earn an income.

–5 or more: The authorities shut down the racket, arresting the gang.

raid (MuScle) Martial GanG: 5 + Made Man

Often a precursor to outright gang warfare, a raid serves dual purposes of weakening a rival gang and muscling in on their territory and income. Raids are extremely risky — failing the Crime DC exposes the gang to violence in turn.

Target

Crime DC

Infamy

p unishment

Rival Mob 10+Mob Defense

+5

3

Racket

20

+5

3

Su CCe SS

The raid reduces the rival mob’s Muscle by 1d4 points. If the target was a racket, the raid loots one half the racket’s take for the month.

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20

fa I lure

–1 to –3: The raiders are met by a strong defense. The PCs lose 1d8 coves.

–4 to –8: The raiders are defeated. The made man and all but 1d4 coves die in the assault.

–8 or more: The raiders are apprehended by the authorities.

SMuGGlinG (StreetwiSe) Social, Stealth GanG: 5 + racKeteer

A ring of smugglers specializes in sneaking items

(or people) in and out of cities without notice. The type of goods being smuggled determines the risk and the rewards. The ring has the choice between smuggling legal items like precious metals and jewels (thereby eluding tariffs and taxes), banned items like illegal substances and mild poisons, or forbidden items (idols to evil deities or infernal powers, powerful poisons, harbinger spells and rituals). The type of good being smuggled (legal, banned, or forbidden) must be chosen when a gang is formed.

A smuggling ring remains active until the coves

are caught or the godfather shuts the ring down.

Special: While a smuggling ring can remain active month after month, the Crime DC increases by +1 each month that the ring is active. Shutting down a ring for a single month brings the Crime DC back to the base DC. A failed smuggling run does not count as shutting down a ring.

Target Crime DC

Take

Infamy p unishment

Legal

10

3d20 gp

+1

2

Banned

15

4d20 gp

+5

3

Forbidden

20

2d100 gp

+10

4

 

SuCC eSS

The gang earns its take. The mob’s infamy increases, and the Crime DC increases by +1.

fa I lure

–1 to –5: The gang is unable to smuggle in the items for the month.

–6 or more: The smugglers are caught by the authorities. Only 1d4 coves make it back to tell the tale.

punishments

Inevitably your coves will be caught in the act of committing a crime. Their punishment is determined by the severity of the crime. Punishments can consist of fines, corporal punishment, and imprisonment, and sometimes all three.

In each case, the godfather is expected to pay the coves’ fine. If the godfather is unable to pay (or chooses not to pay), the cove is sentenced to the workhouse, where he works off his debt to the city at the rate of 1 gp per month.

When multiple coves are captured, the fine applies to each cove. Thus if 5 rogues were captured, and the fine was 10 gp for the crime, the godfather would have to pay 50 gp to spring his boys from the gaol.

 

table vii. punishments

 
 

Corporal

r

ank

f ine

p unishment Imprisonment

 

1

1d20+10 gp

2

1d100+50 gp

Offender’s hand

3 months

 

is removed

 

3

2d100 + 250 gp Offender is blinded

6 months

4

All worldly goods

Execution (one month hence)

Slavery

5

All worldly goods

Execution (one week hence)

6

All worldly goods

Execution (the next dawn)

The punishments for serious crimes are especially harsh, and it won’t be long before once-reckless rogues return to the old neighborhood, haggard and worn from their time in prison. Some will be missing hands, while others will have been blinded by searing brands.

These rogues have nothing to offer a mob, but look for support all the same. If a godfather is willing to welcome these oldtimers back into the mob, it earns him the respect of the underworld.

Oldtimers do not count towards a mob’s total number of coves for purposes of Streetwise or Muscle, but they still cost 1 gp per month each in upkeep.

 

table viii. oldtimers and retired coves

 

r

espect

o

ldtimers

Bonus

1–5

+1

6–8

+2

9–10

+3

11+

+4

bounty hunters, guards and assassins

Before long, even the most careful of mobs draws the unwanted attention of the prince and rival godfathers. As the heroes’ gain infamy, rival gangs are sure to rat them out, blackmailed nobles will seek revenge, and up-and-coming godfathers will try to manipulate the authorities into taking the PCs down a notch.

When it comes time to pit these foes against the PCs, use the following statistics to determine baseline encounters. The balance lies in the consequences that result from how the PCs elect to handle the threat. While assaulting rogue bounty hunters might not draw a lot of infamy, if the PCs wipe out an entire troop of city guardsmen, it won’t be long before the prince declares martial law and sends

in all his best men to wipe out the murderous PCs

and their mob.

Put more simply: As in all things, these choices have consequences. The tact the godfather takes when the authorities come knocking, and the way

he executes these decisions, will determine whether

a godfather escalates a conflict or successfully

redirects it.

Bou NT y Hu NT er

Also known as thief catchers and body snatchers, bounty hunters track down thieves and rogues for a living. In most instances, bounty hunters attempt

to capture their target, but when the bounty on a

godfather’s head is suitably high, amoral bounty hunters swarm for the chance of getting rich.

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21

The archetypal bounty hunter is driven to risk his life for gold, but the reasons behind this need are as varied as the bounty hunters themselves. Most bounty hunters are a motley crew, hailing from any number of backgrounds. Deposed nobles without land or wealth turn to bounty hunting just as readily as “reformed” criminals and out-of-work mercenaries and sellswords. All that is called for is some skill with cudgel and sword, a degree of streetwise, and the dogged willfulness necessary to drive your bounty to ground.

Bounty hunters typically work alone, forcing them to be both self-reliant and extremely tough opponents. Most prefer to attack when the odds are in their favor, retreating to hunt another day when they’ve exhausted their options or the odds turn against them.

huntSMan

Huntsmen are professional bounty hunters, skilled at tracking and capturing their prey. They lead off battle by ambushing their foes with their barbed nets, than finishing off their bounties with a rain

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of deadly blows. Huntsmen prefer to attack while their targets are alone; sometimes even having a single bodyguard is enough to dissuade them.

huntSMan lore

A character knows the following information with

a successful Streetwise check.

DC 15: Huntsmen are deadly lone wolves. If one

is after you, it’s best to lay low till the heat passes.

DC 20: Huntsmen are skilled with the barbed net.

Once caught, it’s all over.

Huntsman

level 16 Solo Soldier

Medium natural humanoid

XP 7,000

Initiative +14 Senses Perception +17

wary Hunter aura 2; if the huntsman is granted a Perception check to spot a hidden, concealed, or invisible creature within the aura, he automatically makes the check H p 790; Bloodied 395 aC 34; fortitude 30, r eflex 28, will 26 Saving Throws +5 Speed 5 a ction points 2

M

l ongsword (standard; at-will) • Weapon

+23 vs. AC; 2d8+7 damage.

R

l ongbow (standard; at-will) • Weapon

Ranged 20; +23 vs. AC; 2d10+7 damage.

m r ain of Blows (standard; at-will) • Weapon The huntsman makes two longsword attacks. If both hit the same target, the huntsman can make a third longsword attack against the same target. If all three attacks hit, the target is stunned (save ends).

a

Barbed Net (standard; recharge 6) Weapon

Burst 2 within 10; +21 vs. Reflex; 2d6 + 6 damage, and the target takes ongoing 10 damage and is restrained (save ends both).

a lignment Unaligned

l anguages Common

Skills Insight +17, Intimidate +17, Stealth +16, Streetwise

 

+17

Str 24 (+15) Con 22 (+14)

Dex 19 (+12) w is 19 (+12)

Int 16 (+11)

Cha 18 (+12)

equipment longsword, barbed net, longbow, quiver with 25 arrows, chainmail

Description Garbed in a forest green cloak over a finely woven coat of mail, the sharp eyed ranger surveys his surroundings with a confidence born of hard experience.

tracKer

Out-of-work mercenaries and adventurers often seek gainful employment as trackers, bounty hunters hired to bring in wanted men. These warriors are often little better than the criminals they hope to apprehend. Indeed, many a time a tracker might be on the side of the law on week, and a brigand the next.

tracKer lore

A character knows the following information with a successful Streetwise check.

DC 15: Trackers are loners, and self-sufficient. Don’t get into a fight with one alone.

DC 20: Keep your eye on his club. With one opening he can take you out.

Tracker

level 7 Solo Soldier

Medium natural humanoid

XP 1,500

Initiative +7

Senses Perception +10

H

p 320; Bloodied 160

aC 25; fortitude 21, r eflex 19, w ill 17 Saving Throws +5 Speed 6 action points 2

M

Spear (standard; at-will) weapon

+14 vs. AC; 2d8+5 damage, and the target is knocked prone.

M

Club (standard; at-will) weapon

+12 vs. Reflex; 2d6+4 damage, and the target is dazed (save ends).

R

Crossbow (standard; at-will) weapon

Ranged 15/30; 2d6+5 damage. m Skullcrushing Blow (standard; recharge 5,6) weapon +14 vs. AC; 3d10+4 damage. If target is bloodied by this attack, it is knocked unconscious (save ends).

alignment Unaligned

l anguages Common

Skills Bluff +9, Insight +10, Streetwise +9

Str 19 (+7) Con 16 (+6)

Dex 14 (+5) Int 13 (+4)

wis 14 (+5) Cha 13 (+4)

e quipment leather armor, spear, crossbow, club, bolt case with 25 bolts

Description The grizzled warrior regards you with hungry eyes, his hand lingering at the scarred, iron-bound cudgel hanging from his belt.

VenGer

A deadly hunter from the plane of shadow, vengers

are only retained for the greatest of bounties, and even then, only when the seeker has sufficient

arcane resources. A venger is ceaseless in the pursuit

of its prey, waiting with inhuman patience until the

target is alone. If pressed, a venger will pick off a prey’s bodyguards one by one, until the target is left alone, cowering for mercy that never comes.

VenGer lore

A character knows the following information with

a successful Streetwise check.

DC 20: Vengers are supernatural beings from the

plane of shadow.

DC 25: Though they are deadly, vengers are also

susceptible to radiant damage. Be sure to kill the venger though, otherwise it will just return when you’re alone.

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Venger

level 26 Solo Soldier

Medium shadow humanoid

XP 45,000

Initiative +24 Senses Perception +23, darkvision Chill of the Hunted (Cold) aura 5; creatures within the aura are slowed. H p 1,225; Bloodied 612 aC 44; fortitude 40, r eflex 38, w ill 36 Immune disease, poison; r esist 15 necrotic; Vulnerable 10 radiant Saving Throws +5 Speed 7 a ction points 2

M Shivering Spear (standard; at-will) Cold, weapon +33 vs. AC; 2d6+9 damage plus 2d6 cold damage, and the target is marked until the end of the venger’s next turn.

Spear of fate (standard; at-will) Cold, weapon Marked target only; requires spear; +31 vs. Fortitude; 4d10+9 cold damage, and the target is blinded and deafened (save ends both). r Venger’s Censure (minor 1/round; at-will) Gaze,

m

 

p

sychic

Ranged 10; +31 vs. Will; 2d6 + 5 psychic damage, and the target can only use basic attacks until the end of its next turn.

m

Shield Blow (immediate reaction, when an enemy ends its turn adjacent to the venger; at-will) weapon +31 vs. Reflex; 2d8+9 damage and target is knocked prone.

a lignment Unaligned

l anguages Common

Dex 28 (+22) w is 21 (+18)

Str 25 (+20) Con 29 (+22)

Int 19 (+17)

Cha 21 (+18)

e quipment spear, shield

Description The otherworldly figure seems carved from misty black onyx. It carries a long spear with a wickedly serrated head, and a heavy shield marked with the sigil of the hunter. Its penetrating gaze passes on, seeking out the one it was sent to slay.

 

Guar DSM e N

Gaurdsmen, the city watch, and men-at-arms are all terms for the men (and oftimes women) that dedicate themselves to the rule of law and the defense of their town or city. Lawful, though not always good, guardsmen stand in opposition of the chaos and lawlessness on which mobs rely. It is a symbiotic relationship: without laws, godfathers would have little or no purpose; it is often the most draconian of states that engenders the strongest criminal underground.

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Unlike bounty hunters and assassins, guardsmen always work in groups, employing strength of

numbers to run their prey to ground. Rarely will

a guardsman be encountered alone when a simple

blow of the warhorn will bring their allies running.

Guardsmen make suitable challenges for heroic- tier groups and the occasional paragon-level group. Rarely can guardsmen provide a challenge for upper paragon or epic tier heroes; when rulers are forced to combat epic-tier godfathers, they typically forgo guardsmen, spending their gold instead on master assassins (see assassin entry below).

Guar DSMa N eNCou NT er Group S

Guar DSMa N eNCou NT er Group S

l

e V el 7 eNC ou NTer (Xp 1,400)

• 5 guardsmen (level 5 soldier)

• 1 man-at-arms (level 9 soldier)

l e V el 10 eNC ouNT er (X p 2,500)

• 5 guardsmen (level 5 soldier)

• 2 men-at-arms (level 9 soldier)

• 1 sergeant of the guard (level 12 soldier)

l e V el 13 eNC ouNT er (X p 4,200)

• 7 guardsmen (level 5 soldier)

• 4 men-at-arms (level 9 soldier)

• 2 sergeants of the guard (level 12 soldier)

GuardSMan

The lowest tier of a city’s watch, guardsmen are often poorly paid and supplied with only the barest equipment, making them apt targets for bribes. Guardsmen work best in teams and are seldom found alone, preferring to face their foes with overwhelming numbers. When outmatched, guardsmen are quick to withdraw, knowing that they can return with more of their allies to finish the job.

GuardSMan lore

A character knows the following information with

a successful Streetwise check.

DC 15: Guardsmen always travel in packs of 2 or more.

DC 20: Most guardsmen can be bribed with enough gold.

Guardsman

level 5 Soldier

Medium natural humanoid, human

XP 200

Initiative +6

Senses Perception +4

H

p 63; Bloodied 31

 

aC 21; fortitude 17, r eflex 16, w ill 16 Speed 5

M

Short Sword (standard; at-will) weapon +12 vs. AC; 1d6+3 damage.

M

Halberd (standard; at-will) weapon

Reach 2; +12 vs. AC; 1d10+4 damage.

R

Crossbow (standard; at-will) weapon

Ranged 15/30; +12 vs. AC; 1d10+4 damage. m wall of Steel (immediate interrupt, when an enemy moves into a square adjacent to the guardsman; encounter) weapon The guardsman makes a melee basic attack with its halberd.

Strength in Numbers While adjacent to at least one ally, when an effect forces a guardsman to move — through a pull, push, or slide — the guardsman moves 1 square less that an effect specifies.

a

lignment Any l anguages Common

Skills Intimidate +9, Streetwise +9

 

Str 16 (+5) Con 15 (+4)

Dex 13 (+3) Int 15 (+4)

w is 15 (+4) Cha 15 (+4)

e

quipment halberd, short sword, crossbow, bolt case with 25 bolts, chainmail

Description The staunch guardsman watches you with suspicious eyes, his hands gripped tight around the haft of his deadly halberd.

Man-at-arMS

Better armed and armored than guardsmen, men- at-arms are often found at the head of a patrol, with four to eight guardsmen serving beneath them. Though better paid, men-at-arms are still susceptible to bribes, and no amount of gold is worth giving their lives.

Man-at-arMS lore

A character knows the following information with a successful Streetwise check.

DC 15: Men-at-arms are skilled leaders found at

the head of a city watch.

DC 20: Taking out a man-at-arms can cause the

morale of a watch patrol to crumble. If you have to fight the watch, go for the man-at-arms first.

Man-at-arms

level 9 Soldier

Medium natural humanoid, human

XP 400

Initiative +9

Senses Perception +6

H p 96; Bloodied 48 aC 25; fortitude 21, r eflex 20, will 19 Speed 5

M Bastard Sword (standard; at-will) weapon +16 vs. AC; 1d10+4 damage.

r

Javelin (standard; at-will) weapon

Ranged 10/20; +16 vs. AC; 1d6+4 damage.

r

p ierce the foe (standard; recharge 5,6) weapon The man-at-arms makes two javelin attacks.

m

Sundering Strike (standard; encounter) weapon Requires bastard sword; +14 vs. AC; 2d10+4 damage, and target is dazed until the end of the man-at-arms’ next turn.

m

Combat Sense (immediate reaction, an enemy moves into a flanking position against the man-at-arms; encounter) weapon The man-at-arms shifts 1 square and makes a melee basic attack.

a

lignment Unaligned

l anguages Common

Skills Insight +11, Intimidate +10

Str 18 (+8)

Con 16 (+7)

Dex 15 (+6) Int 11 (+4)

w is 14 (+6) Cha 12 (+5)

e

quipment bastard sword, heavy shield, scale armor, 6 javelins

Description The world-weary mercenary surveys the room with hardened eyes. A bastard sword hangs over his armored shoulder, and a quiver of carefully sharpened javelins hangs from his belt. With the careless ease of a practiced warrior, he readies himself for the conflict ahead.

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25

SerGeant of the Guard

A sergeant of the guard oversees several patrols, and answers directly to the captain. Like those serving below them, sergeants can be bribed, but unlike guardsmen or men-at-arms, sergeants have cagey, political minds, and are always trying to make the most of an opportunity.

SerGeant of the Guard lore

A character knows the following information with a successful Streetwise check.

DC 15: Watch out when you see a sergeant’s colors flying. That’s when you know you’ve really angered someone in power.

DC 20: Coves should be careful when fighting sergeants of the guard; kill one of them, and you’ll bring all the wrath of the prince down on your head.

Sergeant of the Guard level 12 Soldier (leader)

Medium natural humanoid, human

XP 700

Initiative +12 Senses Perception +13

 

H

p 123; Bloodied 61

aC 28; fortitude 24, r eflex 22, w ill 20 Speed 5 M l ongsword (standard; at-will) weapon +19 vs. AC; 2d8+5 damage.

 

m

Shield Blow (standard; at-will) weapon +17 vs. Fortitude; 1d8+5 damage, and the target is pushed 2 squares.

m

Sword and Board (standard; recharge 5,6) weapon The sergeant of the guard makes a longsword and a shield blow attack against the same target. If both attacks hit, the target is stunned until the end of the sergeant of the guard’s next turn.

c r ally (minor; recharge 5,6) Close burst 3; all allies within the burst gain 10 temporary hit points and shift 1 square.

a

lignment Unaligned

l anguages Common

Skills Insight +13, Intimidate +13

 

Dex 18 (+10) w is 14 (+8)

Str 20 (+11) Con 19 (+10)

Int 13 (+7)

Cha 15 (+8)

e

quipment longsword, heavy shield, plate armor

 

Description The sergeant shouts a command to the guardsman, and then readies himself for battle. His worn sword glints in the faint light, a testament to defeated foes and the battles ahead.

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26

captain of the Guard

Captains of the guard are responsible for overseeing an entire ward. Most captains are very careful when they take bribes, knowing that — if caught — their entire careers could be at stake. Captains only join their subordinates when a master criminal or godfather is involved, knowing that fame, and the gratitude of the prince is a great reward indeed.

captain of the Guard lore

A character knows the following information with a successful Streetwise check.

DC 15: Watch out when you see a captain’s colors

flying. That’s when you know you’ve really angered someone in power.

DC 20: There are two things you don’t do: insult

the godfather, or murder the captain of the guard. One slip and come morning, the prince and all his armies will be standing on your doorstep.

the captain of the guard. One slip and come morning, the prince and all his armies

Captain of the Guard level 18 Solo Soldier (leader)

Medium natural humanoid, human

XP 10,000

Initiative +16 Senses Perception +18

 

Sphere of a uthority aura 4; allies within the sphere gain a +2 bonus to saving throws. When the captain spends an action point to take another action, all allies wiithin aura may make a basic attack. H p 870; Bloodied 435 aC 36; fortitude 34, reflex 31, w ill 28 Saving Throws +5 Speed 5

a

ction points 2

M

Greatsword (standard; at-will) weapon

 

+25 vs. AC; 2d10+7 damage, and the target is marked until the end of the captain of the guard’s next turn.

R

Javelin (standard; at-will) Weapon

 

Ranged 10/20; +23 vs. AC; 2d6+7 damage.

m Maiming Blade (standard; at-will) weapon The captain of the guard makes two greatsword attacks against the same target. If both attacks hit, the target takes ongoing 5 damage and is slowed and weakened (save ends all).

r

r unning Strike (standard; recharge 5,6) weapon

The captain of the guard shifts 3 squares makes two javelin attacks.

c To my side! (minor; recharge 5,6) Close burst 2; all allies within the burst shift 2 squares and gain a +2 bonus to attack and damage rolls until the end of the captain of the guard’s next turn.

a

lignment Unaligned

l anguages Common

 

Skills Insight +18, Intimidate +18, Streetwise +18

Str 25 (+16)

Dex 20 (+14) w is 18 (+13)

Con 22 (+15)

Int 18 (+13)

Cha 19 (+13)

e

quipment greatsword, plate armor, 6 javelins

 

Description With a calm word, the captain steadies his companions. He takes a single step forward, his greatsword casting a long shadow in the late afternoon sun. “Your time has come to pass. Your reign of crime ends here.”

aSS aSSINS

Much like bounty hunters, assassins tend to work alone, but unlike bounty hunters, assassins care naught for capturing their prey alive. Rather, an assassin’s sole aim is to slay his victim and escape without a trace. While no assassin is good aligned, not all are psychotic sociopaths, and nearly all have reasons — or at least justifications — for the bloody work they do.

Differentiating themselves from common thugs, assassins are accomplished professionals, forgoing torture and the darker delights of criminal work for a quick, clean kill. Each assassin prefers his own technique, and the way a murder is carried out can serve as an assassin’s calling card. Master assassins, however, perfect multiple techniques and styles of murder; thus the most accomplished assassins are the least famous, having successfully disguised their handiwork over the course of their bloody careers.

hitoKiri

Trained assassins specializing in the twin-blade technique, most hitokiri are outcasts from their homes, exiles forced to make their living with their skill with the blade. Like most assassins, hitokiri prefer to confront their foes alone and work fast, leaving only the cooling corpse of their prey in their wake.

hitoKiri lore

A character knows the following information with

a successful Streetwise check.

DC 15: Hitokiri are often exiles, wandering the

lands and plying their deadly trade. Honorable to

a fault, they are cold-blooded killers nonetheless.

DC 20: Never face a hitokiri alone — their skills

are formidable and they have nothing to live for.

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Hitokiri

 

level 8 Solo Skirmisher

Medium fey humanoid, elf

XP 1,750

Initiative +11 Senses Perception +13, darkvision

H

p 344; Bloodied 172

 

aC 24; fortitude 20, r eflex 22, w ill 19 Saving Throws +5 Speed 7; see also wild step action points 2

M

l ongsword (standard; at-will) weapon

+13 vs. AC; 2d8+5 damage, and ongoing 5 damage (save ends).

M

Short sword (standard; at-will) weapon

+13 vs. AC; 2d6+5 damage. m Twin Blade Strike (standard; at-will) weapon The hitokiri makes a longsword and shortsword attack; for each attack that hits, the hitokiri can shift 1 square.

Blood walk (immediate reaction, the hitokiri is bloodied; encounter) The hitokiri shifts 3 squares and gains combat advantage on the creature that bloodied it until the end of its next turn.

e

lven a ccuracy (free; encounter) The hitokiri can reroll an attack roll. It must use the second roll even if it’s lower.

Combat a dvantage The hitokiri deals an extra 2d6 damage on melee attacks against any target it has combat advantage against.

 

w

ild Step

The hitokiri ignores difficult terrain when it shifts.

alignment Evil languages Common, Elven

Skills Acrobatics +14, Insight +11, Nature +6, Stealth +14

Str 17 (+7)

Dex 20 (+9) Int 17 (+7)

w is 15 (+6) Cha 13 (+5)

Con 14 (+6)

e

quipment longsword, short sword, leather armor

Description The slim elf is clad in dark leather armor, with a longsword over her back and a short sword at her side. Something sinister passes through her eyes before she steps away into the shadows and is gone.

Shadower

Resembling a shadowy humanoid, shadowers seem to radiate an aura of death. Summoned from the plane of shadow for the sole purpose of killing, very little can stop a shadower once it is set to a task. Legends tell of their ability with the blade and shuriken, but a shadower’s true skill can only be witnessed once it has advantage over its prey.

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Shadower lore

A character knows the following information with a successful Streetwise check.

DC 20: Shadowers are summoned from their home plane for one reason and one reason only: murder.

DC 25: If you turn your back on one of these assassins, it will be the last thing you do.

Shadower

level 18 Solo Skirmisher

Medium shadow humanoid

 

XP 10,000

Initiative +18 Senses Perception +18, darkvision H p 860; Bloodied 430 aC 34; fortitude 28, r eflex 32, will 30

r

esist 10 necrotic

Saving Throws +5 Speed 7

 

a

ction points 2

M

l ongsword (standard; at-will) weapon

 

+23 vs. AC; 3d8+7 damage, and the target is blinded until the end of the shadower’s next turn.

R

Shuriken Barrage (standard; at-will) weapon

Ranged 6/12; 3d4+7 damage, two attacks.

 

m

Shadow Strike (standard; at-will) weapon Blinded target only; +21 vs. AC; 3d10+7 damage, and the target is dazed (save ends).

m

Death Strike (standard; recharge 6) weapon Requires combat advantage; +21 vs. Fortitude; 4d10+7 damage, the target loses 3 healing surges and is stunned (save ends).

a

ssassin’s e scape (immediate reaction, when first bloodied) Healing The shadower regains 215 hit points, shifts 6 squares, and gains a +2 bonus to all defenses until the end of its next turn.

Combat a dvantage Shadower deals an extra 3d6 damage on melee and ranged attacks against any target it has combat advantage against.

a

lignment Evil l anguages Common

 

Skills Acrobatics +21, Insight +18, Intimidate +19, Stealth +21, Streetwise +19

Str 20 (+14)

Dex 25 (+16) w is 18 (+13)

 

Con 20 (+14)

Int 18 (+13)

Cha 21 (+14)

e

quipment longsword, 15 shuriken, leather armor

 

Description You hear the whisper of a blade leaving its sheath, and then feel the lancing pain as something stabs you from behind!

Sword of joMMe

Aspects of the bitter god of death, each Sword of Jomme is created for the sole purpose of killing one specific creature. Once created, the Sword is ceaseless, stopping at nothing in its pursuit of its target. Summoning a Sword of Jomme requires a blood sacrifice as well as a petition to the god of Death, an act that is only taken lightly by fools (or the dying).

Sword of joMMe lore

A character knows the following information with a successful Streetwise check.

DC

20: A Sword of Jomme is an aspect of the god of

Death. Fear them like you would a force of nature.

DC

25: A Sword of Jomme cannot be deterred or

deceived. They are tireless, fearless, and without moral — the perfect killers.

Sword of Jomme

level 24 Solo Skirmisher

Medium immortal humanoid

XP 30,250

Initiative +22 Senses Perception +21, darkvision

H

p 1,120; Bloodied 560

aC 40; fortitude 38, r eflex 36, w ill 33

Immune disease, poison Saving Throws +5 Speed 7 action points 2

M Greatsword (standard; at-will) weapon +29 vs. AC; 3d10+9 damage, and ongoing 5 damage (save ends). First Failed Save: Target is also slowed (save ends).

m

Beheading Strike (standard; 5,6) weapon Bloodied target only; +29 vs. AC; 5d10+9 damage, and the target is stunned (save ends). If this attack reduces the target to 0 hit points or less, it is slain.

Death’s o nslaught (standard; recharge 6) weapon The sword of Jomme shifts 7 squares. It makes a melee basic attack against each enemy it passes adjacent to during the shift. It may not attack a target more than once. r Death’s Gaze (minor 1/round; at-will) fear, Gaze Ranged 5; +27 vs. Will; target is dazed (save ends). Combat a dvantage The sword of Jomme deals an extra 4d6 damage on melee attacks against any target it has combat advantage against.

m

a

lignment Evil languages Common

Skills Insight +22, Intimidate +22, Stealth +25

Str 28 (+21) Con 24 (+19)

Dex 26 (+20) w is 20 (+17) Int 19 (+16) Cha 20 (+17)

e quipment greatsword

Description The shadowed form turns its gaze upon you, and you feel as if Death itself has cast its shroud over you.

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A mob turn runs over the course of 1 month. During a turn, your coves

A mob turn runs over the course of 1 month.

During a turn, your coves commit petty crimes,

earning your base income, while your made men lead teams of coves, committing specific crimes.

In addition to executing these crimes, a mob also

needs to respond to the actions of the authorities, rival mobs, and to random events.

The mob turn runs in the background of a campaign, with the godfather assigning tasks and making decisions, while still continuing his career as an adventurer. As long as a godfather is in regular communication with his mob, he doesn’t need to be present to run the organization.

At any point, a godfather can take a direct role in

the workings of his mob (for example, leading a

raid on a rival mob, or negotiating with the prince), temporarily suspending the mob turn. Once the godfather’s adventure is resolved, the mob turn resumes, with the godfather directing the actions

of his coves.

mob turn sequence of play 1. Roll for Random Events — page 30 2. Determine
mob turn
sequence of play
1. Roll for Random Events — page 30
2. Determine Law and Underworld Events
— pages 32 and 35
3. Declare and Resolve Crimes — page 17
4. Collect Base Income — page 7
5. Record new Infamy, Respect and Wealth
6. Recruit new Coves and Made men — page 36
7. Pay Upkeep for Coves, Made Men and
Defenses — page 37
30

If ever a godfather is captured, imprisoned, or killed, the mob reverts to performing only petty crimes, and unless the mob has especially deep coffers, it quickly dissolves. See The Death of a Mob for more details.

random events

The world is an ever-changing place, and in order to survive, a mob has to change with it. Random events can upset the balance of power in a gangland campaign, creating both opportunities and obstacles where before there were none. They can create adventure hooks, introduce new plot lines, and force complacent, comfortable mobs into action.

The best godfathers are those agile enough to take advantage of this chaos, turning it to their own ends. The worst godfathers are reactionary, cursing the fates for the obstacles set in their path.

The DM rolls random events in secret and weaves then into the natural flow of the campaign. This way a godfather can’t know if seemingly trivial events herald something greater, or are really just that — trivial events. As always, the DM has the final say on an event and how it fits into the living campaign. If an event would be too distracting to the PCs or would ruin an ongoing plotline, the DM has the option to roll another event or discard them altogether for the month.

table ix. random events

1d20

e vent

1–2

Monster

3

Slumming Noble

4

No Event

5

Mistaken Identity

6

Natural Disaster

7

No Event

8

War Veterans

9

Thieves’ Honor

10–13

Godfather’s Grace

14

Turncoat

15

No Event

16

Wanted Man

17

Betrayal!

18

No Event

19

Freelance Coves

20

Misstep

Monster: Cities are not immune to threats of the wild. Monsters can erupt from the sewers beneath the city streets, darken the sky above, or even lurk among the ignorant populace. Whether due to bad luck or fate, the mob suffers the brunt of the fiend’s might.

Anytime a monster (or group of monsters) threatens a mob, the Encounter Level is the godfather’s level +2. If the godfather is present, he and his allies can tackle the monsters in an encounter (potentially leading the heroes back to

the monsters’ lair). If the godfather is not present, or elects to not to take part in the battle, the mob must fend for itself. Make a Muscle check with

a DC equal to the monster(s)’ level; on a failed

check 1d12+3 coves die in the battle against the monster. On a successful check, one of the coves distinguishes himself in battle. Roll on the Made Man Table (Table III) to determine the cove’s emergent gifts.

Slumming Noble: A noble, warded over by an entourage of sellswords and men-at-arms, takes up secret residence in the territory. After quiet investigations, the noble sends a message through the mob, requesting a meeting with the godfather. If the godfather is willing to meet, the noble approaches the mob with a criminal proposition. Perhaps the noble is looking to have a rival assassinated or kidnapped. Perhaps the noble needs the mob’s skills in a heist.

If the crime is a heist, the noble offers the mob 50%

of the take. If the crime is a service to the noble, he

offers the godfather 1,000 gp for the commission of the crime. If the crime is successful, and the mob succeeds on a DC 25 Respect check, the noble joins the mob, becoming a corrupt noble made man.

Mistaken Identity: The godfather is mistakenly accused of assassinating a noble lord. A high reward is offered for the PC’s death, and immediately, every bounty hunter in the city is on the hunt for the godfather. The godfather can leave the city

until the heat passes (1d4 months) or try to find the real assassin, clearing his name. If the godfather captures the assassin and turns him (or them) over

to the prince, he earns +1 Respect.

Natural Disaster: A disaster strikes the city. The disaster can range from fires that sweep through the neighborhood, the plague, a roaring deluge that washes out roads and bridges, hurricanes, or the like. Regardless of the specific disaster chosen by the DM, the effects are largely the same: all income for the month is cut by one-half as the people of his neighborhood work to rebuild their livelihoods. If the godfather comes to the neighborhoods aid, spending at least 500 gp on food and shelter for the poor, the mob earns a +2 bonus to Streetwise and Respect, as the residents of the territory rally behind their benefactor.

War Veterans: A band of soldiers, down on their luck and seeking work, approach the godfather. Desperate for wages, they offer the mob their services for a single mission, in exchange for 100 gp. If the godfather elects to hire the war dogs, they grant a +3 bonus to a single crime with the martial keyword. Following the mission (and a DC 15 Respect check), the soldiers offer to throw their lots in with the mob, becoming men-at-arms in service to the godfather. The band consists of 1d8+1 soldiers; the godfather must hire all or none of them.

Thieves’ Honor: A rogue in the service of the mob commits an atrocious crime against a woman or child, and the neighborhood rises up in arms against the mob. The godfather can ignore the row, at a cost of –2 Respect, or he can investigate the crime, bringing justice down on his own servant.

Godfather’s Grace: A local resident pleads for a boon from the godfather. The specifics of the boon are up to the DM. The supplicant might want a rival intimidated or knocked off; perhaps his daughter was ravaged by a rival gang, and the father wants revenge exacted on the rogues. Or, perhaps the supplicant simply needs a loan. Sample boons are listed in Appendix E.

In most cases, the godfather will need to assemble a team of coves led by a made man. Except in the most unusual cases, the Crime DC should be no higher than 20.

If the godfather successfully grants the boon, he has gained an ally for life. Word is spread throughout the neighborhood that the godfather is an honorable and upright man, willing to fight on behalf of the weak. After successfully granting

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enough boons, the neighborhood begins to respect the godfather as their “own,” and even give the mob warning when rival mobs or the prince’s men raid the mob.

table x. boons bonuses

Boons

r espect

Streetwise

Granted

Bonus

Bonus

1–3

+1

4–9

+2

+1

10–15

+3

+2

16–22

+4

+3

23–30

+5

+4

31+

+6

+5

Turncoat: A made man enters the neighborhood, seeking asylum with the mob. Fleeing from another mob, the made man asks for a conference with the godfather. He asks to join the godfather’s mob, eager to put his skills to work. However, sheltering the made man earns the enmity of the mob he flees from.

The DM should select the specific made man or roll up a random made man.

Wanted Man: Bounty hunters move into the neighborhood stalking one of the mob’s made men. With a DC 20 Streetwise check, the mob identifies the bounty hunters before they strike; it is up to the godfather to determine the mob’s reaction, if any. On a failed check, the bounty hunters strike before the mob can react, abducting a made man and turning him over to the prince and his men.

Betrayal! One of the godfather’s made men turns against the mob. The lieutenant betrays his gang to the authorities and makes off with all the gang’s take for the month, along with another 5d20 gp stolen from the mob’s treasury. The made man seeks asylum with a rival gang, hiring bodyguards for his defense.

Freelance Rogues: A band of freelance rogues sets up shop inside the mob’s territory. The rogues’ crimes cut into the mob’s take, reducing the mob’s monthly take by 3d20+25 gp. (If the freelancers’ take exceeds the mob’s income, the mob has no income for the turn.)

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Misstep: A rival mob makes a critical error, exposing itself to the godfather’s advantage. Perhaps the mob overextends itself, or allows a secret to slip. For the next 3 months, the DM makes two Underworld checks each month, and the godfather chooses which check to accept.

law events

Every month a mob risks an encounter with the law. The severity of that encounter is determined by luck and the mob’s Infamy. While a low Infamy doesn’t ensure that the prince won’t come down hard on the mob, a high Infamy almost certainly does.

For each month, roll the territory’s law dice (see Table I: Territories) + Infamy and consult the following table. If a mob goes for one month without committing any crimes above the protection rackets and extortion necessary to earn your base income, the mob’s Infamy decreases by –1. If a mob goes for an entire month without committing any crimes whatsoever (not bringing in any income, including base income), the mob’s Infamy decreases by –2. A mob’s Infamy score cannot be reduced below 0.

table xi. law events

1d100

l aw e vent

1

Corrupt Captain

2

No event

3–4

Minor Fine

5

Slipshod Job

6

Vigilante Captain

7

Sweep

8

Corrupt Magistrate

9

No Event

10

Beheading

11–12

Major Fine

13

Raid

14

Botched Job

15

Betrayal

16

Bounty Hunter

17

Street Battle

18

Inside Job

19

Snitch

20–23

Martial Law

24

Vigilante Mob

25+

War

Corrupt Captain: The captain of the local watch offers to turn his back on the mob’s illicit activities in exchange for a cut of the take. The captain expects 25 gp per month, reducing the mob’s Infamy by –1. If the offer is rejected, or if the PCs ever stop paying the captain, he redoubles his efforts to shut down the mob, increasing the mob’s Infamy by +1.

Minor Fine: One of your gang is apprehended stealing from a merchant. Sent before a magistrate, the rogue must pay a 50-gp fine or lose a hand. If the godfather pays the fine, the mob’s Respect increases by +1. If the godfather fails to pay the fine, 1d6 coves desert the mob and the mob’s Respect suffers a –2 penalty.

Slipshod Job: One of your gang accidentally murders a mark while robbing a home, increasing your mob’s Infamy by +1.

Vigilante Captain: A watch captain commits himself to the persecution of your gang. Impossible to bribe, he chases the gang relentlessly. Until he is dealt with, he captures and imprisons 1d4 coves each month.

Sweep: A sweep catches your rogues unaware. Roll

a DC 20 Streetwise check. On a failure, 1d8 rogues

are captured, put on trial, and set to be hung 10 days later. The godfather can lead a rescue attempt or bribe the gaoler to let his men free (1d4x100 gp). If the godfather frees his men, the mob’s Respect increases by +1. If the crew is executed, 1d12 coves desert and the mob’s Respect suffers a –2 penalty. If the mob attempts a rescue but fails, no Respect is gained or lost.

Corrupt Magistrate: A magistrate offers to turn his

back on the gang’s illicit activities in exchange for

a cut of the take. The magistrate expects 150 gp per

month, reducing the mob’s Infamy by –2. If the offer

is rejected, or if the mob ever decides to stop paying,

the magistrate instructs the watch to crack down on the mob, increasing the mob’s Infamy by +2.

Beheading: One of the mob’s made men is captured and made to stand trail for the crimes of the gang. The made man is sentenced to beheading 5 days later. The godfather can lead a rescue attempt or bribe the greedy gaoler to free the made man

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(Bribe check DC 20, 1d8x100 gp). If the godfather frees his made man, increase the mob’s Respect by +2. If the made man is executed, 1d12 coves desert and the mob’s Respect score is reduced by –2.

Major Fine: One of your gang is apprehended while robbing a merchant. Sent before a magistrate, the

rogue must pay a 250 gp fine or suffer life in exile.

If the godfather pays the fine, the mob’s Respect

increases by +2. If the godfather fails to pay the

fine, 1d6 coves desert the mob and the mob’s Respect is reduced by –2.

Raid: The watch stages a raid on your territory. Roll a DC 20 Streetwise check. If you fail, the watch captures 1d12+5 of your coves. The rogues are sent before a magistrate and set to be hung 10 days later. The godfather can lead a rescue attempt or bribe the gaoler to let his men free (Bride check, DC 18, 1d4x50 gp per cove). If the godfather frees his men, the mob’s Respect is increased by +1. If the crew is executed, 1d12 coves desert and the mob’s Respect suffers a –2 penalty.

Botched Job: One of your gang accidentally kills

a nobleman’s son while fleeing the scene of a

crime. The mob’s Infamy is increased by +2, and the noble family hires an assassin to take down the godfather. Select a suitable assassin from the Bounty Hunters, Guardsmen, and Assassins chapter.

Betrayal: A competing mob approaches one of the godfather’s made men, trying to steal the made

man with offers of gold or threats of violence. Make

a Respect check, DC 20. On a failure, the made

man goes to work for the opposing mob, stealing 1d12x100 gp from the mob’s coffers.

Bounty Hunter: The lords of the city band together, hiring a bounty hunter to bring the godfather to justice. Over the next month, the bounty hunter stalks the godfather; the bounty hunter attempts

to capture the godfather, but failing that, settles for

killing him, bringing his corpse in for the bounty. Select a suitable bounty hunter from the Bounty Hunters, Guardsmen, and Assassins chapter.

Street Battle: The mob falls into a running street battle with the city guard. In the ensuing battle, 1d12 coves die and 2d10 are captured by the guard and sentenced to death by hanging. The godfather

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can lead a rescue attempt, but no amount of bribes will convince the gaolers. If the godfather frees his men, the mob’s Respect increases by +2. If the crew is executed, 1d12 coves desert and the mob’s Respect suffers a –2 penalty.

Inside Job: A corrupt noble approaches the mob, offering the godfather a chance at a major heist. The noble expects to take 70% of the take. If the heist goes off as planned, the mob earns 3d10x100 gp, less the noble’s cut. If the mob cheats the noble out of his cut, he secretly begins to manipulate the authorities, increasing the mob’s Infamy by +1.

Snitch: One of the mob’s made men secretly turns snitch. The mob’s income is immediately cut in half as the city watch displays an unerring knowledge of the mob’s activities. Ferreting out the snitch requires a thorough investigation on the part of the godfather, or a successful DC 20 Streetwise check.

Martial Law: The city watch instates martial law

over the territory: no one is allowed on the streets after dark, bringing nearly all illegal activity to

a grinding halt. The mob’s monthly base income

drops to nothing as the mob is forced to operate in absolute secrecy. The martial law continues unabated for 1d6+3 months, until the mob collapses, or the godfather succeeds in striking a deal with the prince.

Vigilante Mob: Furious at the crime running rampant in their streets, citizens band together, attacking any coves they cross, stoning them to

death and hanging the corpses from the city walls. Roll a DC 20 Streetwise check. On a successful check, only 1d10 coves are caught in the riots. On

a failed check, 1d20+10 coves die in the attacks.

The prince responds by instating martial law (see above), shutting down the territory for the next month.

War: In response to the ceaseless rise of violent crime, the prince opts to forgo any niceties and razes the territory to the ground. The city watch blockades all streets exiting the neighborhood, stationing troops at every cross-street, and proceeds to torch buildings, burning the neighborhood to the ground. Without immediate and inspired leadership, every citizen, every man, woman and child, dies in the conflagration.

underworld events

The underworld is rife with deceitful villains that eagerly prey upon the weak and helpless. Oftimes,

a young mob’s greatest threat isn’t the prince

and his executioners, but rival mobs. Even when

a mob controls a city’s entire underworld (a rare accomplishment, to be sure!) they face the threat

of newer, more agile young mobs from below and

inter-city crime syndicates from above.

A mob’s best defense against challengers is Respect,

the measure of how the underworld regards and fears the mob and its godfather. A high Respect will thwart many would-be rivals, whereas mobs with low Respect can expect to be attacked from all sides.

Respect is vital to the long-term success of a mob, and Respect quickly decreases once a mob is “out

of the game.” There are always new mobs coming

up through the ranks, new godfathers cutting a swath through the underworld, and new legends

to be told. Much like a shark, a mob must keep

swimming, hunting, and killing, or die.

For each month, roll the territory’s underworld dice (see Table I: Territories) + Respect and consult the following table. If a mob goes for one

month without committing any crimes above the protection rackets and extortion necessary to earn your base income, the mob’s Respect decreases by –2. If a mob goes for an entire month wit