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Name: Lindsay Tiddes


Developmental Level/Grade Level: 6th
Topic:

Reading

Discipline Focus: English and literacy

TABLE OF CONTENTS
GOALS AND RATIONALE
CURRICULUM STANDARDS
OBJECTIVES
UNIT ASSESSMENT
OVERVIEW
WEB/WHEEL
ACTIVITIES EXPLANATION PAGE
VISUAL DISPLAY
TECHNOLOGY
LESSONS
LESSON
LESSON
LESSON

1
2
3

BACKGROUND INFORMATION
FAMILY INVOLVEMENT
SERVICE LEARNING/COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT
ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY

UNIT REFLECTION

Goals and Rationale


In this unit, students will continue to develop their reading
comprehension skills through reading the chapter book The Enormous Egg,
by Oliver Butterworth. Reading comprehension skills guides the student to
read books for meaning. The students will read the book to analyze
meanings behind actions and different characters motivations. Some of the
ways students will work on reading comprehension skills is by answering
questions about the book. These questions will consist of summarizing,
about the theme or main idea, and the plot. Along with these ideas, students
will talk about the plot of this story. By the end of the unit, students will be
able to find the main parts in the plot of the story. Students will have
different writing projects relating to the chapter book. Reading
comprehension is an important part of each grades curricum standards.
Students work on this throughout grades beginning right when they learn
how to read.
By reading this book students will be able to connect to the main
characters life. The main character is a boy in 6th grade, which this lesson
will be taught to a 6th grade class. This character also works on a farm, which
multiple students in my class either have some farm animals or have
gardens. Also, the setting of the story is in New Hampshire. So, students
have multiple opportunites to connect with the character. In my opinion the
topic is something interesting for both males and females. This story talks

about science topics and dinosaurs, which is a topic that both genders can
be interested in.
Some of the essential questions that students will answer throughout
the unit are, what is the plot of the story, what are some character traits,
what movtivated a character to do something, and how does the character
change throughout the book. While reading the story students will be asked
about the main idea of the whole book; as well as, individual chapters. Some
other questions deal with writing. These include, How can you use the
knowledge you have gained from reading the story to write an article about a
dinosaur; as well as, using the information you read from the website given,
summarize the important components.

Curriculum Standards
National Standards

Students apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret,


evaluate, and appreciate texts. They draw on their prior experience,
their interactions with other readers and writers, their knowledge of
word meaning and of other texts, their word identification strategies,
and their understanding of textual features (e.g., sound-letter

correspondence, sentence structure, context, graphics).


Students conduct research on issues and interests by generating ideas
and questions,
and by posing problems. They gather, evaluate, and synthesize data
from a variety of sources (e.g., print and nonprint texts, artifacts,
people) to communicate their discoveries in ways that suit their
purpose and audience.

Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their


own purposes (e.g., for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the
exchange of information).

New Hampshire Curriculum Standards


R:V:6:1.1: Using strategies to unlock meaning (e.g., knowledge of word
structure, including prefixes/suffixes and base words; or context clues; or
other resources, such as dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses; or prior
knowledge) (State)

R:LT:6:1.1: Identifying or describing character(s), setting, problem/ solution,


or plot, as appropriate to text; or identifying any significant changes in
character or setting over time (State) EXAMPLE (of setting changing): In this
poem, how does the farms appearance change over the years?
R:V:6:2.2: Selecting appropriate words or explaining the use of words in
context, including content specific vocabulary, words with multiple
meanings, or precise vocabulary (State)
SS:GE:6:1.3: Utilize maps, globes, graphs, charts, models, and databases to
analyze spatial distributions and patterns, e.g., climate zones, natural
resources, or population density. (Themes: C: People, Places, and
Environment)
R:LT:6:2.3: Making inferences about cause/effect, external conflicts (e.g.,
person versus person, person versus nature/society/fate), or the relationship
among elements within text (e.g., how the historical era influences the
characters actions or thinking) (State)
R:LT:6:2.2: Describing characters traits, motivation, or interactions, citing
thoughts, words, or actions that reveal characters traits, motivations, or
their changes over time (State)
R:LT:6:3.1: Demonstrating knowledge of use of literary elements and devices
(i.e., imagery, exaggeration, simile, metaphor, foreshadowing, or suspense)
to analyze literary work (State)

W:EW:6:1.1: Creating a clear and coherent (logically consistent) story line


W:EW:6:1.2: Establishing context, problem/conflict/ challenge, and resolution,
and maintaining point of view, (1st person, 3rd person, or omniscient)
R:LT:6:1.2: Paraphrasing or summarizing key ideas/plot, with major events
sequenced, as appropriate to text (State)
W:RC:6:1.3: Connecting what has been read(plot/ideas/concepts) to prior
knowledge or other texts, by referring to relevant ideas (Local)
W:RC:6:2.1: Stating and maintaining a focus(purpose), a firm judgment, or
point of view when responding to a given question (Local)
SS:GE:6:1.3: Utilize maps, globes, graphs, charts, models, and
databases to analyze spatial distributions and patterns, e.g., climate
zones, natural resources, or population density. (Themes: C: People,
Places, and Environment)

References
National Council of Teachers of English (1996) Standards for the english
language arts. Retrieved from
http://www.ncte.org/library/NCTEFiles/Resources/Books/Sample/Standar
dsDoc.pdf
New Hampshire Department of Education (2006). K-12 Reading New
Hampshire curriculum framework. Retrieved from
http://www.ed.state.nh.us/EDUCATION/doe/organization/curriculum/Cur
riculumFrameworks/CurriculumFrameworks.htm#ss
New Hampshire Department of Education (2006). K-12 Social Studies New
Hampshire curriculum framework. Retrieved from

http://www.education.nh.gov/instruction/curriculum/social_studies/docu
ments/frameworks.pdf
New Hampshire Department of Education (2006). K-12 Written and oral
communication New Hampshire curriculum framework. Retrieved from
http://www.ed.state.nh.us/EDUCATION/doe/organization/curriculum/Cur
riculumFrameworks/CurriculumFrameworks.htm#ss

Objectives

After reading chapters 1 and some of 2, students will be able to discuss


with another student the setting, characters, and what perspective the

story is being told from.


After reading the first three chapters in The Enormous Egg, students
will answer questions and complete a puzzle using vocabulary words

from chapters 1-3 with 80% error rate.


After looking through an assigned chapter, students will be able to
locate places in New Hampshire that are mentioned in The Enormous

Egg and find the population density of the locations.


After reading chapter 5, students will complete a worksheet
summarizing what they have read and determining the effect of

specific causes.
After reading chapter 5, students will analyze how Nate has changed

since the beginning of the book.


After reading chapter 6, students will analyze the main characters

traits and create a character web.


After reading chapter 7, students will construct a Venn diagram

comparing and contrasting birds with dinosaurs.


After making a Venn diagram comparing birds and dinosaurs, students
will construct a newspaper article about how it is possible for dinosaurs

to hatch out of chicken eggs.


As a class students will create a childrens book in a different point of

view compared to The Enormous Egg


After completing the story The Enormous Egg, as a class students will
create a plot diagram of the book.

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Unit Assessment
Throughout the unit, students will be working on a variety of
activities that I will be assessing them on. Many of the objectives throughout
the unit deal with reading comprehension; so, in order to know if my
objectives have been met, I will need to listen to students resposes. Students
will receive different worksheets during the unit. These worksheets will
consist of reading comprehension questions, vocabulary practice, and
writing topics; such as, syllables, sequencing, or context clues. Students will
also have different in class assignments to complete. After reading the third
chapter, students will have to find different locations in New Hampshire by
looking through the chapters. After, they will need to find the population
density of that area. To know that my objectives have been met, I will have
the students plot the locations on an empty New Hampshire map and explain
the population density of the areas.
After students read chapter 7 they will begin a writing assignment.
First, students will research the the differences and similarities between birds
and dinosaurs. With this information, they will fill out a Venn diagram. During
the next lesson, students will take the information they researched and
create a newspaper article explaining that it is possible for birds to have
evolved from dinosaurs. I will be reading both the Venn diagram and the
newspaper article to see if my objective was met. Towards the end of the
book, the students will create a childrens book as a class. They will need to

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decide on the plot and help with the writing. The finished product will tell me
if the objective was met.
The final project they will have to do is to make a brochure. This
integrates their Social Studies project they are working on as well as
information they learned throughout the book. Many points during the book
different parts about taking care of a dinosaur is mentioned. The students
will take what they learned while writing the newspaper article and the
information they learned in the book to write a section in the brochure about
a fake dinosaur exhibit in a zoo or museum. For the rest of the aritcle, they
will use the research skills they practiced in the beginning of the unit and
summarize parts about their zoo or museum. I will observe students working
on their brochures; as well as, look at the final product to see if my objective
was met.

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Overview
Before starting this unit, the students took a mid year reading
comprehension test. The results of this were broken down into different
categories which consisted of reading comprehension, reading analysis, and
writing/grammar. This was able to tell me the parts the students needed
more practice with. Before this unit was started, the students were split into
two different reading groups. The reading groups were decided by state
testing scores and a evaluation from the reading specialist. When I introduce
the book, I will ask students about any previous experience with farming or
chickens in general. This will begin getting students interested because the
question is a little hint about what the story will be about. I will then ask
them about what they notice about the cover. The cover has a picture of a
boy, a hens nest, and a very shocked looking hen. From the title and the
picture this will get students thinking about what the story is about. After
both of those, I will then read the back cover and a little about the author.
Week 1
Lesson 1

Introduce The Enormous Egg by Oliver Butterworth.


Read chapter 1.
Ask questions about the problem that is introduced and other

reading comprehension questions.


Have students talk about the characters, setting, and point of
view.

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Lesson 2

Read chapter 2.
Ask reading comprehension questions about why people are

doing/thinking about things.


Homework- Syllable practice and vocabulary crossword.

Lesson 3

Read chapter 3.
Ask multiple comprehension questions while the story is being

read.
Have students find locations in New Hampshire mentioned in the

story. Then they will plot the places on a map of NH.


They will also need to find the population densities of the

locations.
Homework- Finding base word practice.
I have planned these lessons in this order because the activities

go along with the chapters they are reading. After the first lesson,
which has students read chapter one, I want them to talk about the
characters that were introduced, the setting, and the perspective
the story is being told. In the next lesson, the students continued to
read the story and ask questions about the story. The third lesson
has the students find the location of places that were mentioned in
the first 3 chapters. I wanted to have this activity go along with
lesson three, because most of the places mentioned throughout the
story were mentioned in the first three chapters.

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Week 2
Lesson 4

Read chapters 4 and 5.


Ask about what Nates parents think about Dr. Ziemer, how
Kennedy would react to the telegram, to predict what will

happen next, and what the new conflict is.


Homework- Simile practice and cause and effect practice.

Lesson 5

Read chapter 6.
Ask what would happen if this happened today and other

questions about the chapter.


As a class, students will make a character web about Nate and
Dr. Zeimer. On this web they will include physical as well as

emotional traits about the two characters.


Homework- Students will receive a pacet to complete. It will
have vocabulary context clues, a vocabulary crossword, and
reading comprehension questions.

Lesson 6

Read chapters 7 and 8.


Ask about how the dinosaur was name and why Dr. Ziemer said

he needed to tell other scientists about the dinosaur.


Have students complete a venn diagram comparing birds versus

dinosaurs.
Homework- Work on packet.

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The lessons this week mainly deal with getting farther into
reading the book. I choose to do the character mapping with
chapter 6 because that chapter is when Dr. Ziemer is
introduced. In that chapter there are many details about Dr.
Ziemer for students to add to the map. In lesson six I wanted
students to make the venn diagram because during the chapter,
Nate and Dr. Ziemer have a discussion comparing birds and
dinosaurs. So, I wanted students to go more in depth with this
research.
Week 3
Lesson 7

Read chapter 9.
Ask about when this story took place (what year approximately),
what they would do if they were Nate, and to predict what Nate

is going to do.
Once the students complete the venn diagram they will turn it

into a newspaper article.


Homework- Hand out a new packet. This will have vocabulary
practice, reading comprehension questions, and event mapping.

Lesson 8

Read chapter 11.


Ask someone to predict what the secret is.

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As a class the students are going to make a picture book of the


story, but instead it will talk about what if the hen was the

famous one and not the dinosaur.


Make a plot diagram and plot important events that they will
turn into writing and pictures.
Introduce the final travel brochure project.
Homework- work on packet.
This week the story will contine to be read . In lesson 7,
students will do more with venn diagram they made comparing
dinosaurs and birds. So, they will write a newspaper article
about it telling the world how it was possible for this to happen.
If students can not think of a beginng, they will get an example
first few setences to an article. In the next lesson the students
will write a picture book , as a class, about what happened to
the hen because the hen is rarely mentioned after the dinosaur
is born. This was also a way to practice writing and finding
events to put on plot diagrams. There will be a plot diagram on
the board and students will help to brainstorm events that could
have happened.

Week 4
Lesson 9

Read chapter 17.


Ask about why Nate had a parade, what the main conflict was
and what the solution is.

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Make a plot diagram and as a class plot the important events,

introduction, rising action, climax, falling action, and resolution.


Finish travel brochure.
Homework- Final packet includes, a multiple choice test,
sequencing practice, cause and effect, and writing a book
recommendation.
For the final lesson, the class will summarize the entire book. So,

there will be another plot diagram drawn on the board and this time
they will pick events from the story to put on the diagram. This gives
students more practice with plot diagrams. I wanted to do this activity
at the end of the book, so students can see what the conflict and
solution of the story was. This will conclude the entire unit because of
the summarization of the story.
There were two days about of the four weeks that the students didnt
work on the reading unit. Many of the days were spent silently reading and
working on work. Since I had little control over the random events that have
happened, many of the days were cut short and I had to be flexible about my
planning.

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Web/Wheel

Persuasiv
e Speech

Travel
Brochure

Langua
ge Arts

Newspap
er Article

Venn
Diagram

Graph of
Growth

Hen and
dinosaur
to egg
Proportio
ns

Mathemati
cs

Length of
Drive

Landmar
ks for
Growth

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Study
Dinosaurs

Herbivore
vs.
Carnivore

Scien
ce

New
Hampshri
e Mapping

Learn
about the
Smithsoni
an
Museum

Draw a
Scene
from the
Book

Draw
what will
hatch our
of the
egg

Ar
t
Make a
mural

Act out a
speech
they
would
give

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Activities Explanantion Page


Travel Brochure- At the end of the unit, studetns will create a travel
brochure. Each student will be given one zoo and one museum to pick
from. They will read the entire website and use the information on the
website to create a brochure about it. Students will need to write at
least three different articles about the information on the website. The
most important part of this brochure is to write an article about a
pretend dinosaur exhibit they recently got in their zoo. This component
relates to their book because the dinosaur is taken to the Washington
D.C. zoo.
Newspaper Article- The students wil do some research about a
specific topic relating to the chapter book. They will be comparing and
contrasting birds and dinosaurs because in chapter 7 the two main
characters to this in the book. After they do their research they will be
given a writing prompt and have to write a short informative
newspaper article.
New Hampshire Mapping- After reading the first 3 chapters,
students will go through the chapters and find locations in New
Hampshire. Once they have all the locations they will use maps to find
the location and then plot the locations on an empty New Hampshire
map. They will then use a population density map to discover the
population density of the specific areas.

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Study Dinosaurs-Throughout the story there are many discussions


about different aspects of dinosaurs lives. For example, what they eat,
the climates they need to live in, and their aggressive behaviors. This
book leaves a lot of information about dinosaurs out, so students could
study one particular dinosaur or some in general to learn more about
them.
Graph the Growths- This story follows the growth of the main
characters dinosaur. Each chapter gives an update of how long it has
been, how long the dinosaur is, and how much it weighs. So, a
mathematics related activity I would do is to make a table and graph
this data. I would also have them make the same graphs on excel.
Hen and Dinosaur to Egg Proportions-For this activity, students
would need measurements from the book; as well as, data they
research online. They would need to find the length and width of
normal dinosaur and hen eggs. They would also need to research the
average length and width of a hen. I would have the students compare
these ratios working on proportional reasoning.
Draw a Scene from the Book-For this activity I would have the
students pick an important scene from the book and draw it how they
think it looks. They will have to draw there version of the main
characters and settings.

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Act Our a Speech they Would Give- Close to the end of the book,
the main character has to give a speech on the television about how
they should save the dinosaur. I would have the students write up a
speech about what they would say if they had to try and save their
dinosaur.

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Visual Display
The following pictures are three examples of the studetns final project.

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26

27

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29

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Technology
Technology in Troy Elementary is rather limited; yet, I will still be using
it throughout my unit. Each classroom has a few comupters in their room and
there is also a cart of netbooks for student use. There are also projectors in
every room for teachers to use. In this lesson the most used technology will
be the computers in the classroom.
In lesson 3, students will use computers in their classroom t o look up
locations in New Hampshire and population densities. They will need to be
able to search the internet for quality maps to see locations; as well as, look
for accurate population density maps. In lesson 6 students will use the
computer in their classroom again. For this lesson they will need to use the
internet to research information about birds and dinosaurs and how they
compare. This is different from their research with the population densities
because the population density maps can be found on government websites
and students can look up pictures instead of websites; whereas, students will
need to look up accurate websites to research information. The students final
techonology interaction will be with a website from a different country. They
will need to use Microsoft Publisher and the website given to them to create
a travel brochure.
Before planning this unit I did research about websites I could use as a
reference during the unit. My teacher gave me a website where I could find
worksheets and writing prompts to give to the students. There were not

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many websites specifically about the book, but I looked up ideas for activities
that students could do throughout the lesson. Closer to the end of the book I
plan to use the projector to show students the places the book talks about in
Washington D.C.
Technology will be used throughout this unit. Even though the same
type of technology is being used, students are using it in different ways.
They will be researching different ideas and learning how to search within
one website. Students will need to problem solve, do research, and be
innovative with their travel brochure design.

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Lessons
Lesson 1
Name__Lindsay Tiddes____________ Date_1/23/12__________Grade
Level__6th___
Subject_Language Arts______________ Topic__Reading____________________
Purpose: Introduce and begin reading the book The Enormous Egg,
by Oliver Butterworth. Also, discuss the setting and characters of the
book.
Curriculum Standards
R:V:6:1.1: Using strategies to unlock meaning (e.g., knowledge of word
structure, including prefixes/suffixes and base words; or context clues;
or other resources, such as dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses; or
prior knowledge) (State)
R:LT:6:1.1: Identifying or describing character(s), setting, problem/
solution, or plot, as appropriate to text; or identifying any significant
changes in character or setting over time (State) EXAMPLE (of setting
changing): Inthis poem, how does the farms appearance change over
the years?
Objective(s): After reading chapters 1 and some of 2, students will be
able to discuss with another student the setting, characters, and what
perspective the story is being told from.

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Materials Needed for Learning Experience:


Teacher: 7 The Enormous Egg books, big notepad, and
homework worksheet
Students: None
Anticipated Length of Learning Experience: 1 hour
Student Grouping: Small group of 7 students. The class will be split
up by reading levels. At the end of the lesson the students will be
randomly split into three groups.
Prerequisite Knowledge:
Teacher: The teacher should have already read the book and
have figured out any vocabulary or statements that students
may have difficulty understanding. The teacher needs to know
the characters in the book and how they relate to each other.
Student: Students need to be able to listen to someone read
and be able to figure out who characters are. They might have
difficulty finding the main characters because they are only in
the first or second chapter.
Procedure:
1. Introduction

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Introduce the book the students will be reading. The


Enormous Egg by Oliver Butterworth.
Tell them we will read this book over the next month and we
will be doing some activities to go along with the book.
Ask if any of the students have had experiences with taking
care of chickens or chickens eggs?
What do you notice about the cover of the book?
Before they read tell them they will need to be aware of the
setting and the characters.
Begin reading chapter on out loud to the students.
2. Body of Learning Experience
Read till page 4, stop where it says He is more dependable
than an almanac. Ask students what they think that means.
Read till page 6, stop where it says we dont want to
sentence him without a trial. Ask students what they think
that means.
Read the rest of the chapter.
At the end of the chapter ask the following questions:
o What problem were they having with their rooster and
how did Nate fix it?
o What did the family think of the egg?
o What did the chicken think of the egg?

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Begin chapter 2. Have students read out loud.


Stop when there is approximately 30 minutes left
Have students discuss with another student the following
things:
o What is the setting? Support with details from the book.
o Who are the characters that have been introduced?
Support with details from the book.
o How is this story being told? What perspective? Support
with details.
3. Conclusion
Have the groups share what they think. Write this down on the
whiteboard or notepad.
Have students take out agenda books and write down they
have a prediction worksheet.
Before they get their homework, they need to show a teacher
their agenda books.
Make sure they leave their books in their desks.
Assessment:
Formative: I will listen to students when they answer questions
to see if they have comprehended what I have read. I will also
walk around and listen to the discussions the pairs have. I will

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also listen to when students explain their reasoning about the


questions.
Summative: I will use the list the entire class makes of the
characters as assessment. I will look at this list to assess the
objective by seeing if they found details from the book to support
this.

Child Guidance:
Proactive Considerations:

Reactive Considerations:

To prevent confusion I will explain

If students are socializing, I will

what I expect students to listen for split them up or switch their


while the book is being read and

partners. If they continue to not

tell the students what I expect

do their work I will warn them they

their groups to talk about. I will

will need to stay in for recess to

also explain the homework before

finish this and find more details in

they take it home.

the story. If there is any worse


behavior than socializing or
persistent socializing, I will have

To prevent behavioral issues, I will


keep the students in a small group
so I can see everyone. I will split
up the students who socialize too

the student go sit in the back


corner of the room at the desk
facing the window until the end of

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much. I will give students things to the lesson. Also, a behavior plan
listen for while the book is being

may be written if student severely

read.

misbehaves.

To promote cooperative student

If directions are confusing I will

learning I will have students work

explain them again, but more

in pairs to answer basic questions

detailed or slower. I will also take

about the book. Students will need them through the assignment and
to work together to find details

explain what I expect from them.

within the book.

If students are still having


difficulty I will try to explain them
differently.

To promote participation, I will ask


each group one question. When
one person is finished answering, I
will ask the other if they found
anything else. I will also try to call
on the same people for each
question.

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Differentiation:
Needs for Lesson Participation:

Modification Required:

While reading this book, students

To help students succeed with

are going to have to determine

determining the meaning, I will

the meaning of metaphors.

break down each part. Ask the


students if they know what each
part means which will help them

Students will need to work


together to discuss the setting,

to understand the entire


metaphor.

characters, and point of view.

Students may have difficulty


narrowing down the setting and
characters to talk about the most
important aspects. I will help
students look at the most
important aspects, by asking why
they think aspects are important
instead of other aspects.
When students break into groups
to discuss the setting, characters,
and point of view some students

For this, I will tell the students

may not talk about what they

before we read to look for the

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should b talking about.

settings and characters. Also, I will


tell them what they should be
talking about and then having
them write their ideas on the
board. The students will also be
split up into different parts of the
room. This will help them stay on

The questions I ask need

task.

modification to promote full


engagement for the group of
students.

I will ask different types of


questions because some students
may be able to answer some
rather than others. I want to try
and have everyone participate, so
this will help that.

Resources Used:
Butterworth, O. (1956). The enormous egg. Canada. Litlle, Brown & Company.
Edhelper. The enormous egg. Retrieved from
http://www.edhelper.com/books/Enormous_Egg.htm
New Hampshire Department of Education (2006). K-12 Reading New
Hampshire curriculum framework. Retrieved from

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http://www.ed.state.nh.us/EDUCATION/doe/organization/curriculum/Cur
riculumFrameworks/CurriculumFrameworks.htm#ss
Perfection Learning Corporation. (1995). Portals to reading series: The
enormous egg. Logan, Iowa.
Lesson Reflection:
Analysis:
This lesson flowed well, students were mostly engaged, and
answered my questions with enthusiasm. I wanted to use this lesson to
test the students to see how they work in a reading group, learn about
their reading abilities, and begin to learn their comprehension. I
wanted to talk about the setting and the characters, so they would
know what they were reading and who the people were in the story.
Students were not confused; this lesson did not give them anything to
be confused with. Some students were not confused by what I asked
them to do, but did not really put effort into the questions. I think the
students enjoyed having a different teacher and working in a smaller
group.
Planning:
If I were to do this lesson again in the future, I would keep the
reading portion the same and the questions the same. I would do many
things differently if I had to teach this again. I would change the
assignment to something different. Before I had them do a simple

41

worksheet that asked prediction question, but we talked about that


during the lesson. After going through the lesson, I decided that the
worksheet was too easy for them, so I wanted to change it to
something different. I also should have given more direction to the
writing prompt I gave them. The students wrote one or two sentences
about their reaction to an enormous egg, but I should have given them
details to include that would make the writing longer than two
sentences. Another thing I would change is to make the questions
more challenging or given them questions that would actually make
them think. The questions gave them were very straight forward and
easy for them to find. This was my first lesson teaching in a room
without another teacher. It was very strange at first, but then it felt
good to be able to make my own decisions and not have anyone to
watch me teach.

42

Lesson 2
Name__Lindsay Tiddes______________ Date___1/25/12______Grade Level__6th
____
Subject__Language Arts_____________ Topic___Reading____________________

Purpose: This lesson has students read chapter 2 and 3 of The


Enormous Egg, by Oliver Butterworth, and has them complete
vocabulary assignments.
Curriculum Standard:
R:V:6:2.2: Selecting appropriate words or explaining the use of words in
context, including content specific vocabulary, words with multiple
meanings, or precise vocabulary (State)
Objective(s): After reading the first three chapters in The Enormous
Egg, students will answer questions and complete a puzzle using
vocabulary words from chapters 1-3 with 80% error rate.

Materials Needed for Learning Experience:


Teacher: The Enormous Egg book and Worksheets
Students: Their copies of The Enormous Egg, pencil

43

Anticipated Length of Learning Experience: 1 hour


Student Grouping: Small group of 7 students. The class will be split
up by reading levels.
Prerequisite Knowledge:
Teacher: The teacher should have already read the book and
have figured out any vocabulary or statements that students
may have difficulty understanding. The teacher needs to know
the meanings of the vocabulary words given and how to use
them in a sentence.
Student: Students need to be able to read out loud. Prior
knowledge of some of the vocabulary words would help them
understand the meanings. Students may have difficulty writing a
sentence with the words, but they will be allowed to look in their
books or a dictionary.
Procedure:
Introduction
Review what we read yesterday.
Body of Learning Experience
Finish reading chapter 2.
o Why does the man from Laconia want to see the egg?
o What is the mood at the end of chapter 2?

44

Have students partner read or read chapter 3 silently.


Ask, what is our problem so far in this story?
Give the students some questions to answer on a piece of
paper.
o Give as many physical details about Dr. Ziemer.
o What evidence from the story so far, gives you an idea
about what might come out of the egg?
o What is the problem so far in the book?
o Predict how Dr. Ziemer will impact Nates problem.
If students finish early they can start on their homework.
Conclusion
Have students hand in their questions
Give the students a vocabulary crossword puzzle to complete.
Before they leave, have students write down their favorite
character in the book and why it is their favorite on a piece of
paper.

Assessment:

Formative: I will check in on students when I ask them


questions about the chapters and by walking around while they

45

work on the questions and worksheet. If students are having


trouble with any of the questions because the wording is
confusing, I will be able to adjust the questions to meet the
needs of the students.
Summative: To know if my objectives have been met I will have
the students pass in the questions as well as the puzzle
worksheet.

Child Guidance:
Proactive Considerations:

Reactive Considerations:

To prevent confusion with

If students are socializing, I will

directions, I will type the

split them up or switch their

directions on the worksheets the

partners. If they continue to not

students will get. I will also say the do their work I will warn them they
directions for the students.

will need to stay in for recess to


finish this and find more details in
the story. If there is any worse

To prevent behavioral issues, I will


keep the students in a small group
so I can see everyone. I will split
up the students who socialize too
much. I will give students things to

behavior than socializing or


persistent socializing, I will have
the student go sit in the back
corner of the room at the desk

46

listen for while the book is being

facing the window until the end of

read.

the lesson. Also, a behavior plan


may be written if student severely
misbehaves.

For this lesson I will be having


students partner read if they
would like. This will help them with To redirect attention, I will talk to
working with another student as

the students about what I expect

well as listening to another

them to be doing and ask them

student. They will need to listen to

why they are not reading or

what their partner so they know

answering the questions.

what is going on in the book.

If directions are confusing I will


To promote participation, I will

explain them again, but more

make sure to ask a variety of

detailed or slower. I will also take

questions to the students. Some

them through the assignment and

questions will be opinion

explain what I expect from them.

questions, some more detailed

If students are still having

oriented, and some predicting

difficulty I will try to explain them

questions. A students may be

differently.

more comfortable answering one


type of question versus the other.

47

Differentiation:
Needs for Lesson Participation:
Students will need to work
together or by themselves to read
the book.

Modification Required:
I will let the students decide how
they will read the chapter. Some
students may want to
independently read, while others
will want to partner read.

Resources Used: Butterworth, O. (1956). The enormous egg. Canada.


Litlle, Brown & Company.
Edhelper. The enormous egg. Retrieved from
http://www.edhelper.com/books/Enormous_Egg.htm
Perfection Learning Corporation. (1995). Portals to reading series: The
enormous egg. Logan, Iowa.
New Hampshire Department of Education (2006). K-12 Reading New
Hampshire curriculum framework. Retrieved from

48

http://www.ed.state.nh.us/EDUCATION/doe/organization/curriculum/Cur
riculumFrameworks/CurriculumFrameworks.htm#ss
Lesson Reflection:
Analysis:
This lesson went well, but I was missing 4 of my students. Since many
of the students were out, I had to change my plans for the day, as well as the
rest of the week. I was originally going to assign students roles to read, but
there were not enough students so I gave them the option of partner reading
or silently reading. My objective was not met. The students answered the
questions and completed the crossword, but the questions were poorly
answered. Students were confused by my prediction question. They could
not figure out how to use what they learned about one of the characters to
predict how he would impact the story. The students learned some new
vocabulary words. While they were working on the crossword, some students
would ask what a word meant and they would have to look it up in the
dictionary. The good thing about having a small group is it makes it easier for
me to help individual students. I think the size of the group had a positive
impact on the students.

Planning:

49

If I had to teach this again, I would like to teach it the way I originally
planned. I would keep the questions mostly the same, but I would change the
wording of the prediction question. I would keep the homework the same. If I
taught this again, I would assign students roles so they can be involved in
the reading. This lesson is my first experience with having to be flexible with
my plans. After students were absent, I had to go over my plans and change
them. This was a great thing to experience before I get a job.

50

Lesson 3
Name_Lindsay Tiddes_______________ Date__1/26/2012______Grade Level__6th
__
Subject__Language Art __________Topic__Reading_________________________
Purpose: Students will plot points on a New Hampshire map that they
find in their books.
Curriculum Standard:
SS:GE:6:1.3: Utilize maps, globes, graphs, charts, models, and
databases to analyze spatial distributions and patterns, e.g., climate
zones, natural resources, or population density. (Themes: C: People,
Places, and Environment)
Objective(s): Students will be able to locate places in New Hampshire
that are mentioned in The Enormous Egg.
Materials Needed for Learning Experience:
Teacher: The Enormous Egg, map of New Hampshire, post- its
for plotting, blank maps for the students, homework assignment
Students:The Enormous Egg books, pen or pencil
Anticipated Length of Learning Experience: 1 hour

51

Student Grouping: Small group of 7 students. The class will be split


up by reading levels. At the end of the lesson the students will be
randomly split into three groups
Prerequisite Knowledge:
Teacher: The teacher needs to know where each location the
students are plotting, as well as the approximate population
density. Also, needs to know which locations are in which
chapters, so the locations can be split up evenly.
Student: The students need to know how to find locations on a
map, as well as use a population or population density map. I
expect the students to think New Hampshire is a lot less
populated than it is because they do not live near a highly
populated area; such as, Manchester or Nashua.
Procedure:
1. Introduction
Have the students who have not finished reading chapter two,
read chapter two.
2. Body of Learning Experience
Once they are finished students will be put with another person
in the class. Someone that they did not work with in lesson 1.

52

Each group will be given a chapter. Within the chapter they will
need to search for locations mentioned that are in New
Hampshire.
o Each group will also receive some extra locations that
appear in the rest of the book. This will help to make each
group have the same amount of locations.
Students will need to find the location as well as the approximate
population density.
o They can do this by searching on the internet for
population density maps.
Have students crowd around one computer. Show them how to
search for the location and where to find the maps.
Give students enough time to find all of the locations
o If students finish early have them compare the population
densities of the locations they found or have them find the
location and population density for Troy.
Have each group plot their locations. They will tell what they have
and then plot.
Once everyone has finished, there will be a discussion based on
the population densities of parts of the state.
When the discussion is finished, talk about the reading questions
they had about chapter 3.
Read the first question.

53

Ask for student response, write them on the board


o Have someone find the pages they can find this on.
Read the second question
Ask for student responses, write them on the board
o Have students find the pages they can find this on.
Talk about the importance of supporting your opinions and
predictions with details from the book. Also remind them that in the
future these assignments will be graded and I will want supporting
details and details.
3. Conclusion
Before they leave, have students write their homework in their
agenda books. They will not be handed their homework until it is
checked by a teacher.
Assessment:
Formative: I will constantly walk around while the students are
on the computer to check in on what they are doing. If students
are having trouble, I will give the students hints as to how to find
things. There will also be a discussion about the populations
which will help me to know if the objective is made.
Summative: I will use the map we create as a summative
assessment. This part will help me to know if my objective is
made.

54

Child Guidance:
Proactive Considerations:

Reactive Considerations:

To prevent confusion with

If students are socializing, I will

directions, I will type the

split them up or switch their

directions on the worksheets the

partners. If they continue to not

students will get. I will also say the do their work I will warn them they
directions for the students.

will need to stay in for recess to


finish this and find more details in
the story. If there is any worse

To prevent behavioral issues, I will


keep the students in a small group
so I can see everyone. I will split
up the students who socialize too
much.

behavior than socializing or


persistent socializing, I will have
the student go sit in the back
corner of the room at the desk
facing the window until the end of
the lesson. Also, a behavior plan

To promote cooperative student


learning I will have students work

may be written if student severely


misbehaves.

in pairs together to find locations


in New Hampshire as well as
populations.

To redirect attention, I will talk to


the students about what I expect
them to be doing and ask them
why they are not reading or

55

To promote participation I have

answering the questions.

made this lesson relatable to each


student because they live in New
Hampshire. There are also
different parts to this activity, so

If directions are confusing I will

students will be encouraged to

explain them again, but more

split up responsibilities.

detailed or slower. I will also take


them through the assignment and
explain what I expect from them.
If students are still having
difficulty I will try to explain them
differently.

Differentiation:
Needs for Lesson Participation:

Modification Required:

Students will need to skim over

When students make their groups,

the pages of the book.

I will purposely give the group


with the lowest effort level
chapter 1. I will do this because
chapter 1s locations are all on the
first page and I know it will take

56

them a long time to find the


locations on a map.

Students will need to work on a


computer.

To help students who do not work


well on computers, I will give them
places where they can go to find
the locations.

Resources Used: Butterworth, O. (1956). The enormous egg. Canada.


Litlle, Brown & Company.
Edhelper. The enormous egg. Retrieved from
http://www.edhelper.com/books/Enormous_Egg.htm
New Hampshire Department of Education (2006). K-12 Social Studies New
Hampshire curriculum framework. Retrieved from
http://www.education.nh.gov/instruction/curriculum/social_studies/docu
ments/frameworks.pdf
Perfection Learning Corporation. (1995). Portals to reading series: The
enormous egg. Logan, Iowa.

57

Lesson Reflection:
Analysis:
I was very happy with the outcome of this lesson. The students were
engaged in the activity and worked diligently with each other. I wanted to
teach this lesson so the students could see where the towns are that are
mentioned in this book. This lesson also connects to them because they all
live in New Hampshire. To connect to social studies, I wanted them to find
the populations and compare them to the other towns. We also had a
conversation about the population densities. My objective was mostly met. I
made the mistake of showing the students a map that showed population.
So, they used that map more than the population density map. To meet the
curriculum standard, I had a conversation about the population densities and
what it means. The students learned where the setting of the story is
because each group looked for the town this story takes place in. I also think
the students were happy to do something different then just read a book and
answer questions.
Planning:
If I taught this lesson again I would keep mostly everything the same. I
would keep the concept of the lesson the same as well as the homework the
same. One thing that I would have done differently was make the students
find the population density and not just the population. This was an
important part of the lesson because it related to the curriculum standard. I

58

would also have the students write on the map instead of use post it notes.
This is just personal preference each way works the same. I really enjoyed
watching the students actively engaged in this activity and working
cooperatively with little distraction. This lesson was another experience that
connecting lessons to the students is effective.

59

Lesson 4
Name__Lindsay Tiddes______________ Date__1/30/12_______Grade Level__6th
___

Subject__Language Arts______________ Topic__Reading______________________


Purpose: Students will read up to chapter 6 and complete a
summarizing work sheet.
Curriculum Standard:
R:LT:6:1.1: Identifying or describing character(s), setting, problem/ solution,
or plot, as appropriate to text; or identifying any significant changes in
character or setting over time (State) EXAMPLE (of setting changing): In this
poem, how does the farms appearance change over the years?
R:LT:6:2.3: Making inferences about cause/effect, external conflicts (e.g.,
person versus person, person versus nature/society/fate), or the relationship
among elements within text (e.g., how the historical era influences the
characters actions or thinking) (State)
R:LT:6:2.2: Describing characters traits, motivation, or interactions, citing
thoughts, words, or actions that reveal characters traits, motivations, or
their changes over time (State)

60

Objective(s): After reading chapter 5, students will complete a


worksheet summarizing what they have read and determining the
effect of causes.
After reading chapter 5, students will analyze how Nate has changed
since the beginning of the book.

Materials Needed for Learning Experience:


Teacher:The Enormous Egg book, worksheets, homework
Students: The Enormous Egg book, pen or pencil
Anticipated Length of Learning Experience: 1 hour
Student Grouping: There will be a whole group of 7 students. The
students in the group will be students who have the lower reading
levels in the class.
Prerequisite Knowledge:
Teacher: The teacher will need to have read the entire book to
be able to ask appropriate questions as well as help students
answer predicting questions.
Student: Students will need to have read the first 3 chapters
before this lesson.

61

Procedure:
1. Introduction
Have some students remind the group where they left off
in the book at the end of the last lesson.
Ask, at the end of chapter 3 what makes Nate less
discouraged about the egg?
2. Body of Learning Experience
Begin reading chapter 4 out loud.
At the end ask.
o What do Nates parents think about Dr. Ziemer? How
can you tell?
o Why doesn't Nate notice that the egg has hatched?
Begin reading chapter 5. Have students volunteer to read.
o At pg. 46 ask what it means by hullabaloo.
o Ask, What kind of doctor is Dr. Ziemer?
o How do you think Albert Kennedy is going to react to
the telegram?
o What is Nates new conflict now that the dinosaur is
born?
o What trait is Nate going to have to gain to begin
taking care of a dinosaur?
3. Conclusion

62

Leave 10-15 minutes for students to work on the cause and


effect worksheet. This should be done independently.
Assessment:
Formative: I will check in on the students by listening to their
responses to the questions about the book. This will show me if
students can identify how Nate has changed since the beginning
of the book.
Summative: I will use the worksheet as a summative
assessment. This will show me if I have met my objective by
looking at the students grades.
Child Guidance:
Proactive Considerations:

Reactive Considerations:

To prevent confusion with

If students are socializing, I will

directions, I will type the

split them up or switch their

directions on the worksheets the

partners. If they continue to not

students will get. I will also say the do their work I will warn them they
directions for the students.

will need to stay in for recess to


finish this and find more details in
the story. If there is any worse

To prevent behavioral issues, I will


keep the students in a small group
so I can see everyone. I will split

behavior than socializing or


persistent socializing, I will have

63

up the students who socialize too

the student go sit in the back

much. I will give students things to corner of the room at the desk
listen for while the book is being

facing the window until the end of

read.

the lesson. Also, a behavior plan


may be written if student severely
misbehaves.

To promote positive social


interaction, the students will need
to be able to listen to one another.

To redirect attention, I will talk to

Students will need to be courteous

the students about what I expect

and listen to what their peers are

them to be doing and ask them

reading out loud instead of

why they are not reading or

socializing with another student.

answering the questions.

If directions are confusing I will


explain them again, but more
detailed or slower. I will also take
them through the assignment

Differentiation:
Needs for Lesson Participation:

Modification Required:

64

Student will be asked to volunteer


to read out loud.

Some students will be asked to


read longer sections than others.

The questions I ask need


modification to promote full
engagement for the group of
students.

I will ask different types of


questions because some students
may be able to answer some
rather than others. I want to try
and have everyone participate, so
this will help that.

Resources Used: Butterworth, O. (1956). The enormous egg. Canada.


Litlle, Brown & Company.
Edhelper. The enormous egg. Retrieved from
http://www.edhelper.com/books/Enormous_Egg.htm
New Hampshire Department of Education (2006). K-12 Reading New
Hampshire curriculum framework. Retrieved from
http://www.ed.state.nh.us/EDUCATION/doe/organization/curriculum/Cur
riculumFrameworks/CurriculumFrameworks.htm#ss
Perfection Learning Corporation. (1995). Portals to reading series: The
enormous egg. Logan, Iowa.
Lesson Reflection:
Analysis:

65

This lesson went okay. Overall, the readings and work went well. The
only thing that I am having trouble with is behavior management because
some students keep talking while we are reading or discussing about the
book. I taught this lesson the way I did because I wanted to read two
chapters for one of my lessons so I could finish a few days before the week of
vacation. I wanted to leave some time in case we fell behind and time for the
students to work on their final project. I gave the students the worksheet I
did to look at their cause and effect skill and also work with metaphors. For
homework I gave the students practice with similes because the students
midyear reading comprehension test said they needed help with similes. The
objective was met by most students. Some students did better with the
cause and effect than others. The students had difficulty analyzing how Nate
has changed since the beginning of the book. Most of them needed to be
prompted to figure out the correct answer. Students were confused with the
question about what person the story is being told from. I tried to explain it
by asking what perspective, but they still did not understand. The students
were happy to learn finally what came out of the egg.
Planning:
If I taught this lesson again, I would teach it the same way. I would
have read the two chapters and asked the same questions as well as give
the same worksheets. I would have dealt with the misbehaving students
differently. If I did this same lesson again I would have disciplined one of the

66

students by making him move to the corner sooner than rather later. This
time I had him move closer to the end of the lesson, which did not have any
impact on the students. This makes me feels that I need to learn how to be
stricter and be consistent with my disciplining. I have known this for awhile,
but this reminded me I need to change sooner rather than later.

67

Lesson 5
Name_Lindsay Tiddes____________ Date_1/31/12_____________Grade Level__6th
__
Subject_Language Arts_______________ Topic__Reading_____________________
Purpose: Students will make a character web of the two main
characters.
Curriculum Standard:
R:LT:6:2.2: Describing characters traits, motivation, or interactions, citing
thoughts, words, or actions that reveal characters traits, motivations, or
their changes over time (State)
R:LT:6:1.1: Identifying or describing character(s), setting, problem/ solution,
or plot, as appropriate to text; or identifying any significant changes in
character or setting over time (State) EXAMPLE (of setting changing): In this
poem, how does the farms appearance change over the years?
R:LT:6:3.1: Demonstrating knowledge of use of literary elements and devices
(i.e., imagery, exaggeration, simile, metaphor, foreshadowing, or suspense)
to analyze literary work (State)
Objective(s): After reading chapter 6, students will analyze the main
characters traits and create a character web.
Materials Needed for Learning Experience:

68

Teacher:The Enormous Egg book, worksheet, white


board/notepad, markers
Students:The Enormous Egg book
Anticipated Length of Learning Experience: 1 hour
Student Grouping: There will be a whole group of 7 students. The
students in the group will be students who have the lower reading
levels in the class.
Prerequisite Knowledge:
Teacher: The teacher should have read the chapter and
developed questions for the students based on the chapters.
Also, the teacher needs to know the physical and emotional traits
of the characters.
Student: Students need to have read the book up to chapter 6.
They also should have past experience analyzing characters.
Procedure:
Introduction
Go over the worksheet from the day before.
Talk about what has happened so far.

Touch upon the major events without labeling


them as events.

Body of Learning Experience

69

Read chapter 6.

Ask if anyone knows what they mean when they


are talking about gizzard. (It helps birds to grind
food)

When the chapter is finished talk about:


If this happened in real life what aspects would it affect?
Bring up scientists.

Ask, Why did Mr. Ziemer say he needed to tell


other scientists about the dinosaurs?

What did Dr. Ziemer tell Nate to feed the


dinosaur?

Why couldnt Dr. Ziemer tell Nate how fast the


dinosaur would grow?

On the white board make a character web for Nate and


Dr. Ziemer
Ask the students what they know about Nate

Write it on the web.

Ask about physical traits and emotional traits

Talk about how Nate has changed from the beginning of


the book.
Make another web about Dr. Ziemer

Write it on the web

Ask about physical traits and emotional traits.

70

3. Conclusion
Hand the students the packet that will be due on Friday.
Assessment:
Formative: I will check in with the students with the questions I
ask as well as the responses to the character web we make
together.
Summative: The finished product of the character web will be
the summative assessment. I will know if the objective has been
met by looking at the character web.
Child Guidance:
Proactive Considerations:

Reactive Considerations:

To prevent confusion with

If students are socializing, I will

directions, I will type the

split them up or switch their

directions on the worksheets the

partners. If they continue to not

students will get. I will also say the do their work I will warn them they
directions for the students.

will need to stay in for recess to


finish this and find more details in
the story. If there is any worse

To prevent behavioral issues, I will


keep the students in a small group

behavior than socializing or


persistent socializing, I will have

71

so I can see everyone. I will split

the student go sit in the back

up the students who socialize too

corner of the room at the desk

much. I will give students things to facing the window until the end of
listen for while the book is being

the lesson. Also, a behavior plan

read.

may be written if student severely


misbehaves.

To promote positive social


interaction, the students will need

To redirect attention, I will talk to

to be able to listen to one another.

the students about what I expect

Students will need to be courteous

them to be doing and ask them

and listen to what their peers are

why they are not reading or

reading out loud instead of

answering the questions.

socializing with another student.

If directions are confusing I will


explain them again, but more
detailed or slower. I will also take
them through the assignment

Differentiation:
Needs for Lesson Participation:

Modification Required:

72

Student will be asked to volunteer


to read out loud.

Some students will be asked to


read longer sections than others.

The questions I ask need


modification to promote full
engagement for the group of
students.

I will ask different types of


questions because some students
may be able to answer some
rather than others. I want to try
and have everyone participate, so
this will help that.

Resources Used: Butterworth, O. (1956). The enormous egg. Canada.


Litlle, Brown & Company.
Edhelper. The enormous egg. Retrieved from
http://www.edhelper.com/books/Enormous_Egg.htm
New Hampshire Department of Education (2006). K-12 Reading New
Hampshire curriculum framework. Retrieved from
http://www.ed.state.nh.us/EDUCATION/doe/organization/curriculum/Cur
riculumFrameworks/CurriculumFrameworks.htm#ss
Perfection Learning Corporation. (1995). Portals to reading series: The
enormous egg. Logan, Iowa.

Lesson Reflection

73

Analysis:
This lesson went about the same as yesterdays lesson. Most of the
students read the book well. There were again a few students that were
being distracting to the rest of the students. I taught the lesson the way I did
because I wanted the students to have practice analyzing characters. I
wanted the students to look at the characters actions and figure out what
mental trait goes along with it. The objectives were almost fully met. It took
awhile to get students to think the way I wanted them too, but eventually
they got there. They didnt figure out many traits, but they did figure out a
few. Students were confused with what I meant by traits. Once I explained
they used very simple adjectives when I wanted them to think of more
complex ones.
Planning:
If I taught this lesson again, I would do the activity a little differently,
but I would keep the same sequence of activities. I would still have students
read the chapter and then we would do a character web. If I did the
character web again I would make sure to have certain situations ready to
tell the students. By telling them the situations I would hope they would
think of more descriptive adjectives. I could have also given them a
descriptive adjective and had them find a situation that reflects it. If I had to
teach this again, I would have definitely given two students behavior reports.
This showed me that I cant hesitate when it comes to disciplining. I have

74

worked too hard on these lessons for students to fool around the whole time.
Teaching the group of students I have makes me realize that some students
care a lot more about school than others. Unfortunately, a few students in
this group do not put much effort into their work and complains whenever
they get any sort of work. It is also hard to get answers that relate to the
topic being discussed.

75

Lesson 6
Name__Lindsay Tiddes_____________ Date_2/1/12__________Grade Level__6th __

Subject_Language Arts________________ Topic_Reading________________________


Purpose: Students will create a Venn diagram comparing birds with
dinosaurs.
Curriculum Standard:
W:IW:6:3.1: Including facts and details relevant to focus/controlling idea, and
excluding extraneous information (Local)

W:IW:6:3.2: Including sufficient details or facts for appropriate depth of


information: naming, describing, explaining, comparing, using visual images
(Local)
Objective(s): After reading chapter 7, students will construct a Venn
diagram comparing and contrasting birds with dinosaurs.
Materials Needed for Learning Experience:
Teacher: The Enormous Egg book, Venn diagram worksheets
Students: Pencil, The Enormous Egg Book.
Anticipated Length of Learning Experience: 1 hour

76

Student Grouping: There will be a whole group of 7 students. The


students in the group will be students who have the lower reading
levels in the class.
Prerequisite Knowledge:
Teacher: Teachers will need to have read chapter 6. They also
need to know where students can find information about birds
and dinosaurs, so they can help students create the diagrams if
they need it.
Student: Students will need to know how to compare and
contrast things.
Procedure:
Introduction
1. Start by asking students to summarize some of the important
events in the plot.
2. If this happened in real life what aspects would it affect? Bring
up scientists.
o Ask, Why did Mr. Ziemer say he needed to tell other
scientists about the dinosaurs?
o What did Dr. Ziemer tell Nate to feed the dinosaur?

77

o Why couldnt Dr. Ziemer tell Nate how fast the dinosaur
would grow?
3. Begin having students read chapter 7 out loud.
Body of Learning Experience
4. When finished Ask, who is Uncle Beazley?
5. Read chapter 8.
6. Tell students they will be activity comparing and contrasting
birds with dinosaurs.
7. Tell them they have two options, they can pick one specific
dinosaur and one specific bird or they can compare birds in
general with dinosaurs in general.
8. I want more than one word statements. I want an explanation
or details from the website you found it from.
9. They will be using a Venn diagram. If they think there is not
enough room, they can write numbers in the diagram and
write it on another page.
Conclusion
10.

If students finish have them work on the packet.

11.

Have some students share what they have found.

12.

When time runs out, have student hand their Venn

diagrams in, so they will not lose them.


Assessment:

78

Formative: I will check in on the students by listening to the


students answers to the questions I ask before we start reading
the book. I will also be walking around while students are
working on their Venn diagrams to see if they are on the right
track.
Summative: At the end of the class I will be collecting their
Venn diagrams. I will be looking at these to see if my objective
was met. I will also be looking at this to see if I need to adjust the
activity for the next day which uses the Venn diagrams they
made.
Child Guidance
Proactive Considerations:

Reactive Considerations:

To prevent confusion with

If students are socializing, I will

directions, I will type the

split them up or switch their

directions on the worksheets the

partners. If they continue to not

students will get. I will also say the do their work I will warn them they
directions for the students.

will need to stay in for recess to


finish this and find more details in
the story. If there is any worse
behavior than socializing or
persistent socializing, I will have

To prevent behavioral issues, I will

the student go sit in the back

79

keep the students in a small group

corner of the room at the desk

so I can see everyone. I will split

facing the window until the end of

up the students who socialize too

the lesson. Also, a behavior plan

much. I will give students things to may be written if student severely


listen for while the book is being

misbehaves.

read.

To redirect attention, I will talk to


the students about what I expect
To promote positive social
interaction, the students will need
to be able to listen to one another.

them to be doing and ask them


why they are not reading or
answering the questions.

Students will need to be courteous


and listen to what their peers are
reading out loud instead of
socializing with another student.

If directions are confusing I will


explain them again, but more
detailed or slower. I will also take
them through the assignment

Differentiation
Needs for Lesson Participation:

Modification Required:

80

Student will be asked to volunteer

Some students will be asked to

to read out loud.

read longer sections than others.

The questions I ask need

I will ask different types of

modification to promote full

questions because some students

engagement for the group of

may be able to answer some

students.

rather than others. I want to try


and have everyone participate, so
this will help that.

Resources Used: Butterworth, O. (1956). The enormous egg. Canada.


Litlle, Brown & Company.
Edhelper. The enormous egg. Retrieved from
http://www.edhelper.com/books/Enormous_Egg.htm
New Hampshire Department of Education (2006). K-12 Reading New
Hampshire curriculum framework. Retrieved from
http://www.ed.state.nh.us/EDUCATION/doe/organization/curriculum/Cur
riculumFrameworks/CurriculumFrameworks.htm#ss
New Hampshire Department of Education. (2006) K-12 Written and Oral
Communication New Hampshire Curriculum Framework. Retrieved from
http://www.education.nh.gov/instruction/curriculum/english_lang/docu
ments/writing_frame.pdf

81

Perfection Learning Corporation. (1995). Portals to reading series: The


enormous egg. Logan, Iowa.

Lesson Reflection:
Analysis:
Overall this lesson went well. The students finally behaved and we
were able to work well through the chapter and activity. I taught the lesson
the way that I did because the activity related to the chapter in the book.
During the chapter, the two main characters have a conversation about how
dinosaurs relate to birds. So, I had the students find out more information
about how dinosaurs and birds relate. My objective was met. Each student
was able to create a Venn diagram comparing and contrasting the topic. The
students were interested in the fact that dinosaurs and birds could compare
in general. I know this because before I introduced the activity, they asked
questions about the conversation in the story. Some students were confused
by how the two could compare because they did not know about any sort of
evolution between the two.
Planning:
If I taught this lesson again, I would do mostly everything the same. I
would use the same questions and the same activity. If I did teach this again,
I would have found specific websites for students to look at. This would have
given the teacher the opportunity to know what the student is looking at and

82

give students websites that are filled with accurate information. I would have
also told the students what they will be doing with the Venn diagram. During
the activity I wasnt exactly sure what I was going to have them do. So, I
should have figured it out so students could be thinking how they would have
used the information they found. Another thing I could have done would have
been to give students different options of how they wanted to write this
information down. This goes along with my teaching philosophy because I
like to try to teach to as many different learning styles as I can. That is also a
new strategy I could have used during the lesson. I could have also found
books for students to look in, instead of just the internet.

83

Lesson 7
Name_Lindsay Tiddes_______________ Date_2/5/2012_______Grade Level_6th _
Subject__Language Arts_______________ Topic__Reading____________________
Purpose: Students will write a newspaper article about how it is
possible for dinosaurs to hatch out of chicken eggs.
Curriculum Standard:
W:RC:6:1.1: Selecting appropriate information to set context/background
(Local)
W:RC:6:1.3: Connecting what has been read(plot/ideas/concepts) to prior
knowledge or other texts, by referring to relevant ideas (Local)
W:RC:6:2.1: Stating and maintaining a focus(purpose), a firm judgment, or
point of view when responding to a given question (Local)
Objective(s): After making a Venn diagram comparing birds and
dinosaurs, students will construct a newspaper article about how it is
possible for dinosaurs to hatch out of chicken eggs.
Materials Needed for Learning Experience:
Teacher:The Enormous Egg book, packets, activity directions
Students: The Enormous Egg book, pencil
Anticipated Length of Learning Experience: 1 hour

84

Student Grouping: There will be a whole group of 7 students. The


students in the group will be students who have the lower reading
levels in the class.
Prerequisite Knowledge:
Teacher: The teacher should have read the chapter and
developed questions for the students based on the chapters.
Student: Students will need to remember the reasons why they
picked the things they put in their Venn diagrams, they also need
to have read the past chapters.
Procedure:
Introduction
1. First go over what has happened in the past few chapters.
2. How did the dinosaur escape from the chicken coop?(found
an opening in the fence and squeezed through it)
3. Where did they find Beazley?
4. Ask, if anyone knows what a gladiola is?
5. How much had Uncle Beazley grown in one day?(doubled
its weight in one day)
Body of Learning Experience
1. Start reading chapter 9.

85

2. At the end of pg. 85, ask does this story take place close to
now? (No 100 dollars is not a lot now a days)
3. What would they do if their egg hatched out a dinosaur?
4. Ask, what do you think Nate is going to do with the
dinosaur?
5. Tell students they will be writing a newspaper article about
how it is possible for a dinosaur to come out of a chicken
egg.
6. They will be using what they wrote in their Venn diagrams.
7. Hand out the little piece of paper.
8. Explain that I have written a beginning for them if they
want to use that or write their own.

Conclusion
1. Make sure students have handed in their packets and tell
students what they have not handed in.
2. Hand out the new packet. Have them write the assignment
in their agenda books and check it with a teacher before
they leave.
Assessment:
Formative: I will be checking in on the students by listening to
their answers to the questions I ask about the book.

86

Summative: I will use the newspaper article the students write


as hard evidence. This will help me to know if my objectives have
been met.
Child Guidance
Proactive Considerations:

Reactive Considerations:

To prevent confusion with

If students are socializing, I will

directions, I will type the

split them up or switch their

directions on the worksheets the

partners. If they continue to not

students will get. I will also say the do their work I will warn them they
directions for the students.

will need to stay in for recess to


finish this and find more details in
the story. If there is any worse
behavior than socializing or
persistent socializing, I will have
the student go sit in the back
corner of the room at the desk
facing the window until the end of
the lesson. Also, a behavior plan
may be written if student severely

To prevent behavioral issues, I will


misbehaves.
keep the students in a small group
so I can see everyone. I will split
up the students who socialize too

87

much. I will give students things to To redirect attention, I will talk to


listen for while the book is being

the students about what I expect

read.

them to be doing and ask them

To promote positive social


interaction, the students will need

why they are not reading or


answering the questions.

to be able to listen to one another.


Students will need to be courteous
and listen to what their peers are
reading out loud instead of
socializing with another student.

If directions are confusing I will


explain them again, but more
detailed or slower. I will also take
them through the assignment

Differentiation
Needs for Lesson Participation:

Modification Required:

Student will be asked to volunteer

Some students will be asked to

to read out loud.

read longer sections than others.

The questions I ask need

I will ask different types of

modification to promote full

questions because some students

88

engagement for the group of

may be able to answer some

students.

rather than others. I want to try


and have everyone participate, so
this will help that.

Resources Used: Butterworth, O. (1956). The enormous egg. Canada.


Litlle, Brown & Company.
Edhelper. The enormous egg. Retrieved from
http://www.edhelper.com/books/Enormous_Egg.htm
New Hampshire Department of Education. (2006) K-12 Written and Oral
Communication New Hampshire Curriculum Framework. Retrieved from
http://www.education.nh.gov/instruction/curriculum/english_lang/docu
ments/writing_frame.pdf
Perfection Learning Corporation. (1995). Portals to reading series: The
enormous egg. Logan, Iowa.
Lesson Reflection:
Analysis:
Overall this lesson went well. The reading part went well, but the
writing activity did not go as well as I hoped for some students. I
taught this lesson the way I did because I wanted the students to take
what they researched about and write something with it. I choose to

89

have them write a newspaper article because throughout the story,


there are many different newspaper articles. Also, the main characters
father works for a newspaper, so it was mentioned often. My objectives
were met. There was a wide range grades, some students greatly
exceeded my expectations and some did not meet my expectations at
all. Many of the students were confused as to how to write the article,
but I did I gave them resources and a writing prompt for them to
follow. Some students were very creative with their writing and they
definitely enjoyed writing it.
Planning:
If I taught this lesson over again I would do the reading part and
the activity the same. If I did teach it again I would have thought about
how to write the newspaper article. One of my students handed in a
very creative article that I was very impressed with. So, I should have
told the students more of what I expected and could have also given
them examples of some newspaper articles about different animals. I
would have also been more structured with the writing. Some students
could have used the extra structure of how to write a newspaper
article. What I have noticed throughout this unit is some students do
not put much effort into schoolwork which definitely puts a damper on
the effort that I have put in to planning the lesson. This didnt change
my teaching philosophy or values, but it made me aware that not all
students put effort into school.

90

91

Lesson 8
Name_Lindsay Tiddes_______________ Date__2/8/12______Grade Level_6th _____
Subject__Language Arts_____________ Topic__Reading/Writing_________________
Purpose: The class will create a childrens book about the hen instead
of the dinosaur.
Curriculum Standard:
W:EW:6:1.1: Creating a clear and coherent (logically consistent) story line
W:EW:6:1.2: Establishing context, problem/conflict/ challenge, and resolution,
and maintaining point of view, (1st person, 3rd person, or omniscient)
R:LT:6:1.1: Identifying or describing character(s), setting, problem/ solution,
or plot, as appropriate to text; or identifying any significant changes in
character or setting over time (State) EXAMPLE (of setting changing): In this
poem, how does the farms appearance change over the years?
R:LT:6:1.2: Paraphrasing or summarizing key ideas/plot, with major events
sequenced, as appropriate to text (State)
Objective(s): As a class students will create a childrens book in a
different point of view compared to The Enormous Egg
Materials Needed for Learning Experience:

92

Teacher:The Enormous Egg book, whiteboard, markers,


computer
Students: The Enormous Egg book
Anticipated Length of Learning Experience: 1 hour
Student Grouping: There will be a whole group of 7 students. The
students in the group will be students who have the lower reading
levels in the class.
Prerequisite Knowledge:
Teacher: The teacher will need to have read the entire book.
They will also need to plan events that could take place in the
picture book just in case students are having trouble with it. Also,
know some different ways to write pages.
Student: Students will need to have read the entire book, up to
chapter 11.
Procedure:
Introduction
1. Read chapter 11 for fifteen minutes.
2. Ask someone for a prediction about the secret. Ask why they
think that
Body of Learning Experience

93

1. We are going to rewrite the story as a picture book, if the


hen was the famous animal and got all of the attention.
2. Explain that the beginning will be like the story so far and
then since we have not finished the book, we are going to
make up our own ending.
3. Draw a plot curve on the board. Tell them that one side is
the beginning, the highest point is the climax, and the end
is the end.
4. Ask, If this is the climax what should all of the events on
this curve (between beginning and climax) be? (Write
about what leads up to the climax)
5. Ask, What should the events on this curve (between climax
and ending) be? (Write how problem is solved)
6. Tell them that the climax will be what they are going to do
with the hen and its dinosaur. They have three options for
the climax, Sell the hen, give it to a museum or zoo, or
keep it.
7. Ask, what the beginning is. (The hen lays the egg)
8. What is the second major event that will happen (The
dinosaur is born, newspapers go crazy)
9. Ask, what should happen between the second event and
the climax. (Scientists and Reporters make propositions to

94

Nate) If they have trouble, remind them about the three


options that they have for the climax.
10.

Have students vote on what they want to do for the

climax, remind them to think of the option that will make


the story the most interesting and not what they want to
do.
11.

Once they pick the climax, ask what the ending is

going to be.
12.

Once they pick the ending, brainstorm major events

that could happen in between, than pick two.


13.

Next, we need to describe our characters and

setting, so everyone is on the same page when they draw.


14.

Write on the board the characters, settings and

descriptions
15.

Start explaining the project.

16.

Ask, if anyone has ever made a brochure before?

17.

Have students pull out their directions, or give them

a new one.
18.

So, I have already told you that you will be making a

travel brochure. You will be using a location in your biome


country.
19.

So, the first step is to research the place in your

country. Since many websites dont have an English option,

95

I researched and found some options of websites that are


in English.
20.

Once you find the website, I want you to read over

the entire thing. Get comfortable with the place.


21.

So now for the things you need to have:


i. A section dedicated to the dinosaur exhibit, where it
is in the place and how it got there
ii. 3 other sections about various parts of your place
that is on your website.
iii. Finally a cover page

22.

Go on the projector to show students how to make

one and what it looks like.


23.
Point out that on the back shows how I will be
grading the brochures as well as different options for
sections you can write about.
24.
Tell them that it might be easier to write out the
article, sections, first. If you do that then you can give it to
me to revise and look over.

Conclusion
25.

Ask students if they would like to draw or write a

page of the book.


26.
Assessment:

Have students give an answer before they can leave.

96

Formative: I will be checking in on the students by asking them


about the events that should happen in the picture book. This
will help me to know if I have met my objective by seeing if they
can turn what they know has happened in the book and apply
that knowledge to a different point of view.
Summative: The hard evidence will be the finished product. This
will show me how well the entire class formulated the book. I will
look at the pictures to make sure they align.
Child Guidance:
Proactive Considerations:

Reactive Considerations:

To prevent confusion with

If students are socializing, I will

directions, I will type the

split them up or switch their

directions on the worksheets the

partners. If they continue to not

students will get. I will also say the do their work I will warn them they
directions for the students.

will need to stay in for recess to


finish this and find more details in
the story. If there is any worse

To prevent behavioral issues, I will


keep the students in a small group
so I can see everyone. I will split
up the students who socialize too
much. I will give students things to

behavior than socializing or


persistent socializing, I will have
the student go sit in the back
corner of the room at the desk
facing the window until the end of

97

listen for while the book is being

the lesson. Also, a behavior plan

read.

may be written if student severely


misbehaves.

To promote positive social


interaction, the students will need

To redirect attention, I will talk to

to be able to listen to one another.

the students about what I expect

Students will need to be courteous

them to be doing and ask them

and listen to what their peers are

why they are not reading or

reading out loud instead of

answering the questions.

socializing with another student.

If directions are confusing I will


explain them again, but more
detailed or slower. I will also take
them through the assignment

Differentiation:
Needs for Lesson Participation:

Modification Required:

Student will be asked to volunteer

Some students will be asked to

to read out loud.

read longer sections than others.

98

The questions I ask need

I will ask different types of

modification to promote full

questions because some students

engagement for the group of

may be able to answer some

students.

rather than others. I want to try


and have everyone participate, so
this will help that.

Resources Used: Butterworth, O. (1956). The enormous egg. Canada. Litlle,


Brown & Company.
Edhelper. The enormous egg. Retrieved from
http://www.edhelper.com/books/Enormous_Egg.htm
New Hampshire Department of Education (2006). K-12 Reading New
Hampshire curriculum framework. Retrieved from
http://www.ed.state.nh.us/EDUCATION/doe/organization/curriculum/Cur
riculumFrameworks/CurriculumFrameworks.htm#ss
New Hampshire Department of Education. (2006) K-12 Written and Oral
Communication New Hampshire Curriculum Framework. Retrieved from
http://www.education.nh.gov/instruction/curriculum/english_lang/docu
ments/writing_frame.pdf
Perfection Learning Corporation. (1995). Portals to reading series: The
enormous egg. Logan, Iowa.

99

Lesson Reflection:
Analysis:
This lesson went very well. The students were happy that they were
able to talk about how the story would have gone from a different point of
view. I taught this lesson because I wanted to use the questions the students
continued to ask and turn it into a lesson they would enjoy. I also wanted
students to have an opportunity to do something they enjoyed more, either
writing or drawing. Students got an option of which they would prefer to do
for the book. During this lesson, the students learned more about how to find
a climax or how to write a story using a plot diagram. I know this because I
had students decide on the climax first, which allowed them to see that the
climax is the most important part of the story. We then used the climax to
write the rest of the story. During this lesson I also wanted to introduce their
final project. I wanted students to begin thinking about it because they would
soon start working on it. Overall, my objectives were met.
Planning:
During this lesson there were many aspects that did not go well. The
schedule for the day was different in the afternoon, so students spent the
first 15 minutes of the reading period working on something else. This made
the rest of the lesson much shorter and this lesson needed a lot of time. I
also had to go to a different room which was bigger and had more
distractions. There was also multiple behavior issues that made this lesson

100

not go as smoothly as it could have. If I taught this lesson again I would have
done everything the same because the main problem was the shortened
time. I would have dealt with the behavior issues in a more strict way. It was
mostly talking, so there were multiple ways I could have disciplined the
students. I could have given them seats, moved their seats, sent them to
their teacher, or if it was very bad given them a behavior plan. I would have
liked to do it in a different room with a larger white board to write on. The
plot diagram ended up being small and hard to write on. If I did this again I
would have figured out an easier way to finish this whole idea within one day.
This experience gave me another lesson in flexibility. There have been many
times throughout the semester that I have had to be flexible and I know
there will be many more times.

101

Lesson 9
Name___Lindsay Tiddes_______________________ Date__2/9/12___________Grade
Level__6th ____
Subject____Language Arts_________________________
Topic____Reading___________________________
Purpose: As a class the students will bring closure to the entire book.
Curriculum Standard: R:LT:6:1.1: Identifying or describing character(s),
setting, problem/ solution, or plot, as appropriate to text; or identifying any
significant changes in character or setting over time (State) EXAMPLE (of
setting changing): In this poem, how does the farms appearance change
over the years?
R:LT:6:2.3: Making inferences about cause/effect, external conflicts (e.g.,
person versus person, person versus nature/society/fate), or the relationship
among elements within text (e.g., how the historical era influences the
characters actions or thinking) (State)
R:LT:6:2.2: Describing characters traits, motivation, or interactions, citing
thoughts, words, or actions that reveal characters traits, motivations, or
their changes over time (State)
Objective(s): After completing the story The Enormous Egg, students
will work in groups to create a plot diagram of the book.

102

Materials Needed for Learning Experience:


Teacher: The Enormous Egg, White board and mini white boards,
dry erase markers, erasers, paper, strips of paper, masking tape
Students: The Enormous Egg book
Anticipated Length of Learning Experience: 1 hour
Student Grouping: There will be a whole group of 7 students. The
students in the group will be students who have the lower reading
levels in the class. In the middle of the lesson students will be in
groups of 3 that are going to be decided by the teacher.
Prerequisite Knowledge:
Teacher: The teacher needs to have read the entire book and
have questions ready to ask. They also need to know all of the
important events that have happened that students might bring
up when they talk about the plot. Teacher should also know what
the climax of the story is.
Student: Students should have read the rest of the chapters
before reading the final chapter. They should also have prior
knowledge of what the plot of a story is. I expect some students
to have difficulty finding the climax of the story.
Procedure:

103

Introduction
1. Read the last chapter of the book.
2. Ask about why the town of Freedom has a parade for Nate.
3. Have a discussion about the main idea of the story and the
authors purpose for writing this story.
Body of Learning Experience
1.
2.
3.
4.

Draw a plot diagram on the board.


As a class, decide what the climax of the story is.
Write that on the plot diagram.
Then give students their own whiteboards or paper to create

the rest of the plot in groups.


5. Once they figure out what different parts of the plot diagram
is they will get strips of paper. On the strips of paper they will
write the different parts on them.
6. Once each group has finished writing on their strips of paper
they will tape it to the parts of the plot diagram on the board.
7. Then have a discussion about what people wrote down.
Conclusion
1. Before students hand in their final packet have them turn to
the page that had them write a book recommendation.
2. Have students read their answers to that page before they
hand in the packet and leave.
Assessment:
Formative: I will check in on my students while they are working
as a group on their plot diagrams as a group. If students are
having trouble, I will come together as a class and discuss the

104

introduction and resolution of the story. Also, I will listen to the


students explanations as to why they picked that event. I will
also listen in on their answer to the book recommendation to see
how they felt about the book.
Summative: To assess the students, I will look at the strips of
paper they put on the board. These will tell me if the objectives
have been met. I will also look at the final packet they hand in.
This will have questions about the end of the book and if they
would recommend the book.
Child Guidance:

Proactive Considerations:

Reactive Considerations:

To prevent confusion with

If students are socializing, I will

directions, I will type the

split them up or switch their

directions on the worksheets the

partners. If they continue to not

students will get. I will also say the do their work I will warn them they
directions for the students.

will need to stay in for recess to


finish this and find more details in
the story. If there is any worse

To prevent behavioral issues, I will


keep the students in a small group
so I can see everyone. I will split

behavior than socializing or


persistent socializing, I will have

105

up the students who socialize too

the student go sit in the back

much. I will give students things to corner of the room at the desk
listen for while the book is being

facing the window until the end of

read.

the lesson. Also, a behavior plan


may be written if student severely
misbehaves.

To promote positive social


interaction, the students will need
to be able to listen to one another.
Students will need to be courteous
and listen to what their peers are
reading out loud instead of

To redirect attention, I will talk to


the students about what I expect
them to be doing and ask them
why they are not reading or
answering the questions.

socializing with another student.


If directions are confusing I will
explain them again, but more
detailed or slower. I will also take
them through the assignment

Differentiation
Needs for Lesson Participation:

Modification Required:

Student will be asked to volunteer

Some students will be asked to

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to read out loud.

read longer sections than others.

The questions I ask need

I will ask different types of

modification to promote full

questions because some students

engagement for the group of

may be able to answer some

students.

rather than others. I want to try


and have everyone participate, so
this will help that.

Resources Used: Butterworth, O. (1956). The enormous egg. Canada.


Litlle, Brown & Company.
Edhelper. The enormous egg. Retrieved from
http://www.edhelper.com/books/Enormous_Egg.htm
New Hampshire Department of Education (2006). K-12 Reading New
Hampshire curriculum framework. Retrieved from
http://www.ed.state.nh.us/EDUCATION/doe/organization/curriculum/Cur
riculumFrameworks/CurriculumFrameworks.htm#ss
Perfection Learning Corporation. (1995). Portals to reading series: The
enormous egg. Logan, Iowa.
Lesson Reflection:
Analysis:

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This lesson went well. Some groups succeeded on their own with the
plot diagram, while others needed more scaffolding. I taught this lesson the
way I did because I knew from pretesting that students needed practice with
determining parts of the plot. Earlier in the unit, students had practice with
this while working as a class; so, I wanted them to try to figure it out on their
own. Even with the students who needed more support, everyone
understood it eventually, my objective was met. Some students had difficulty
discovering the resolution to the story. The students were excited to be able
to participate with the plot diagram on the board. Being able to write their
own events and taping them to the board, allowed them to participate in a
hands on approach with the topic.
Planning:
If I taught this lesson again I would teach it mostly the same way. I
would keep the activity the same, but I would more strategically make the
groups. One of the problems was students discussing things that were off
topic, so I would try to partner students with people who they would not
socialize with as much. This would also help the students who needed more
help. I would hope that if a student understood the concept they would help
the other students who did not understand. This lesson goes along with my
teaching philosophy because this lesson was more students centered than
teacher centered. They came up with the events and put them on the plot
diagram. The teacher did facilitate the discussion, but the groups did most of

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the talking. So, the students were more engaged with the activity because
they participated throughout it.

109

Background Information
During 6th grade students should be able to read well and also
comprehend what they read. These skills are always improving and are
continuously being worked on throughout each grade. My unit is based
around a chapter book called The Enormous Egg, by Oliver Butterworth.
This book is about a hen that lays an enormous egg. A dinosaur ends up
hatching out of the egg which leads the main character responsible for
figuring out what to do with the dinosaur. The main character meets a
scientist who helps him take care of the dinosaur and takes the dinosaur to a
museum in Washington D.C. Throughout the chapter book students will need
to work on many different aspects of reading comprehension, so it is
important to research what each part means and how to have students
practice it. When working on reading comprehension, students are working
on reading for meaning. They can do this through looking at parts like the
plot, vocabulary, theme, finding evidence to support ideas, and there are
many other parts to reading comprehension. During the unit students will
also have practice with word identification strategies through syllable and
vocabulary work.
During 5th grade students should be able to figure out syllables through
the rules and sounds. When working with vocabulary, context clues and prior
knowledge will help them decode a word. Students should have also had
practice with identifying characters, setting, and plot. There are not that
many differences between what students do in 5th grade than 6th grade. The

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same occurs in 7th grade. Students continuously practice using strategies to


figure out how many syllables a word has and the meaning of the word. In 7th
grade, students learn more about using the root word of a word to decode
meaning. They also concentrate more on finding the climax, falling and rising
action in a plot. Students also learn more about how to find the theme of the
story. Then when they find the theme, they learn about how to support it
with details. Some new literacy devices that are concentrated on in 7th grade
are flashback, repetition, and personification. As students get into older
grades, they concentrate more on finding evidence to support a given
opinion or idea. This is a difficult skill for students to grasp, so it is important
for them to practice during earlier grades (*-New Hampshire Department of
Education).
There are many aspects that go into reading comprehension. The
reader must understand the difficult vocabulary in order to understand what
is going on. If a student does not understand a word there are a few different
strategies for them to figure it out. Using the context around the word as a
clue about the words meaning is a very important strategy to teach. Some
ways that teachers can help students develop strategies are through reading
or listening to others read, talking about new words before reading, having
students read the same word used in different contexts, or using a more
difficult word instead of easy ones. Knowing vocabulary will help students
understand what is happening during a story.

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When students understand the context of the story, they can then
discover more about the actual plot. A plot of a story includes events that
make up the story. There are many pieces to the plot of a story. In the
introduction or exposition, the characters and setting is introduced. During
this section, it is important for students to determine which characters are
the main characters. The reader learns how the characters relate to each
other, some of their traits, and goals. Also, the reader will learn who the
protagonist and antagonist is. The protagonist of the story is the character
that the story circles around; whereas, the antagonist is the character that
goes up against the protagonist. There are also minor characters who
support the protagonist. Throughout the book there are characters that make
an obvious change. Those characters are called dynamic and the characters
that stay the same are static (Roane State Community College).
Along with the characters and setting the main problem for the story
is introduced in the exposition. The next part of a plot is the rising action. In
this section there are a series of events where the main character begins to
work toward the main problem and develop it. The climax is the next part of
a plot. This is the turning point of the story and decides how the rest of the
story is going to go. Once a decision is made by the main character about
the major conflict, the next part is the falling action. The falling action is
made up of events that occur because of the decision made by the main
character. Finally, the last piece of a plot is the resolution, or conclusion. This
is where the main character finally has a solution for the conflict that

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happened during the climax. Talking with students about these parts of the
plot will help them to find what the main conflict and solution of the story is
(Annenberg Foundation).
Along with finding the conflict and solution, the theme is important to
find. This is one of the most difficult aspects to find in a story. The theme of a
story is the moral or message the whole story is trying to tell. It can also be
the main idea or concept of the story(Annenberg Foundation).
Another concept to talk about when reading picture books or chapter
books is the point of view the story is being told in. The narrator is the
person or thing that tells the story; yet, the narrator isnt always in the story.
Stories can be told in first-person, second-person, third-person, or can be told
from an omniscient narrator. A story told in first-person is when someone
who is in the story and involved in the conflict tells the story. Second-person
narrator is when the narrator addresses the main character by saying you
while telling the story. A narrator speaking in third-person is not involved in
the story and is just telling the story. The other type of narrator is an
omniscient narrator. This type is known as an all knowing
narrator(Annenberg Foundation).
Learning about and practicing reading comprehension is an important
part of literacy in all grades. In 6th grade the literacy is becoming more
advanced and requires students to know more about what is going on in the
story. Students in grades prior begin doing this, but in 6th grade it is

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important to begin looking for evidence to support an idea. Students in every


grade are learning more about reading comprehension and applying what
they know to the books they read. In this unit they will use what they know
to answer questions about The Enormous Egg, by Oliver Butterworth.
References
Annenberg Foundation (2012). Literature: What makes a good story?
Retrieved from
http://www.learner.org/interactives/literature/read/pov1.html
Horowitz, S. H. (2009) Reading comprehension- Reading for meaning.
Retrieved from http://www.education.com/reference/article/readingcomprehension-for-meaning/?page=3
New Hampshire Department of Education (2006). K-12 Reading New
Hampshire curriculum framework. Retrieved from
http://www.ed.state.nh.us/EDUCATION/doe/organization/curriculum/Cur
riculumFrameworks/CurriculumFrameworks.htm#ss
Roane State Community College. Online writing lab. Retrieved from
http://www.roanestate.edu/owl/ElementsLit.html

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Family Involvement
Dear Parents or Guardians,
I wanted to take this opportunity to first introduce myself and
express my excitement to be working with your child these next few
months. Over the course of the next month, students will be reading
the chapter book, The Enormous Egg, by Oliver Butterworth. This
fictional story is about a young boy from a small town in New
Hampshire whose chicken hatched out a dinosaur. This made the boy
famous. He ended up raising the dinosaur and taking it to Washington
D.C. where it was going to live. The main goal of this reading unit is
having more practice with reading comprehension. Students will be
analyzing characters, learning new vocabulary, and working on
different projects relating to the book.
There will be a few different assignements students will be
getting throughout the unit. Multiple different worksheets will be
assigned for students to complete. There will be some vocabulary
worksheets. If students have difficulty with this I encourage you to
direct them to a dictionay. Within the worksheets will be questions
about the book. These studetns will be able to answer by looking
through their book. During the final week of the unit, students will
create a brochure pretending they own a zoo that has a live dinosaur
exhibit. For this assignment, some students may want to work on it at

115

home or not finish it by vactation. If this happens, students should take


flash drives to school to copy the file on or bring an adults email
address for their project to be emailed home.
If you have any questions or comments about anything you can
email me at ltiddes@yahoo.com. I am excited to work with your child
and look forward to working on some fun projects.
Sincerely,
Lindsay Tiddes

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Service Learning/Community Involvement


There are many different opportunites for students to be involved with
the community while reading The Enormous Egg. Throughout the book many
different ideas were mentioned that related to a community. The main
characters father works for a newspaper, the whole family works on their
own farm, and and talking about topics from history.
Since the main characters father works with a newspaper and
throughout the book there are multiple chapters that have newspaper
articles in them, students could take a field trip to one of the local
newspapers to see how a newspaper is made. While at one of the newspaper
locations, one of the employees at could talk about how the newspaper as a
whole is put together as well as how one article is written. This connects to
the students assignment that they have to write a newspaper article.
Throughout the story, the main character has different chores around
the house relating to their farm animals and yard. One of my students owns
farm animals similar to the family in the book. That students family could
come in as a guest speaker and talk about how to take care of the animals
and talk about any weird things that have come out of any of their chickens
eggs. There are many parts of the unit where we talk about the characters
responsibilities. One of the main responsibilities of the main character is to
take care of the animals on his families farm. Students could take a field trip
to Stonewall Farm to learn more about farm animals. Stonewall farm has a

117

school program that teaches students about farm animals and taking care of
them on a daily basis. This program also allows students to see and interact
with some of the farm animals(Stonewall Farm).
If the teacher wants to take students on a full day field trip, students
can go to the Boston Museum of Science in Boston, Massachusetts. This
museum has a wide variety of exhibits. In this museum there is a 65 million
year old fossil of a triceratops that students can get a look at. They will be
able to see exactly how big this dinosaur can get. There are also other
dinosaur exhibits for students to look at. There is a Dinosaurs Alive! film in
the imax theater and other fossils from different time periods. Going to this
museum relates directly to one of the main characters of the book, the
dinosaur. At the museum students can see how big a dinosaur can get, so
there can be a discussion about having that large of an animal in New
Hampshire(Museum of Science Educators).
There are many opportunites to get involved with the community or
take different field trips while reading this book. The Enormous Egg discusses
different ideas relating to farm animals, newspapers, and dinosaurs. Luckily,
in this area there are many different places to visit and people to talk to that
can teach students more about these topics.

References

118

Stonewall Farm. (2011-2012). Tapline stonewall farms school program guide.


Retrieved from http://www.stonewallfarm.org/sites/all/files/Tapline
%20Binder_0.pdf
Museum of Science Educators. (2012). Exhibit Investigations. Retrieved from
http://www.mos.org/educators/field_trip_resources/field_trip_activities/li
ve_presentations&d=4997

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Annotated Bibliography
Annenberg Foundation (2012). Literature: What makes a good story?
Retrieved from http://www.learner.org/interactives/literature/read/pov1.html
This website gives different definitions to parts of reading
comprehension. The topics consist of ideas like point of view, setting,
plot, characters, and main idea. It also gives different questions you
can ask students while talking about a specific topic.
Butterworth, O. (1956). The enormous egg. Canada. Litlle, Brown & Company.
This story is about a boy whose family has a hen that laid an enormous
egg. The egg contains a triceratops. This instantly made the boy
famous, but also caused a problem because the dinosaur needed to be
moved to somewhere safe. The story is about the boys journey through
being famous and trying to save the dinosaur.
Edhelper. The enormous egg. Retrieved from
http://www.edhelper.com/books/Enormous_Egg.htm
This source gives teachers different worksheets for students to
complete. These worksheets consist of vocabulary, analogies, and
quizzes. It also can make tests for once the entire book has been read
and differnet writing prompts for students to complete daily.
Headley, A., Smith, V. (1998). Do reading: The enormous egg. Splash
Publications. Retrieved from https://docs.google.com/viewer?

120

a=v&q=cache:cf8LzIPtrYMJ:www.splashpublications.com/files/enormousegg.p
df+&hl=en&gl=us&pid=bl&srcid=ADGEESgHeHdsl0pytoomM_D4kOV1gSGW
PHTHIhKxgwBsiFzHlYRK6_MUsdk2finCw3ZsOPP3_qq15oDPR8xXHpOFBv1EwUOxjcJDFI0uJh16N8TfoOgqad2IyH8NkZKL6d91wEvRgK&sig=AHIEtbSFPQAsJyQA8zvF-mZKK95yDoUnMw.
This publication gives teachers a resource to get ideas about different
activities to do with their students. The link above is only a peek of the
entire publication, which can be purchased. It gives different
worksheets relating to geography and context clues that relate to The
Enormous Egg.
Horowitz, S. H. (2009) Reading comprehension- Reading for meaning.
Retrieved from http://www.education.com/reference/article/readingcomprehension-for-meaning/?page=3
This is an article that talks about the different techniques talking about
how reading comprehension can be implemented. It also gives real life
examples of these strategies being used.
Museum of Science Educators. (2012). Exhibit Investigations. Retrieved from
http://www.mos.org/educators/field_trip_resources/field_trip_activities/li
ve_presentations&d=4997

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This website tells educators what exhibits and films that can be used
for educational purposes. You can pick what grade levels and topics to
look for and the list is narrowed down to your topic.
New Hampshire Department of Education (2006). K-12 Reading New
Hampshire curriculum framework. Retrieved from
http://www.ed.state.nh.us/EDUCATION/doe/organization/curriculum/Cur
riculumFrameworks/CurriculumFrameworks.htm#ss
This is a resource for teachers that consists of the New Hampshire
curriculum standards for reading for grades K-12.

New Hampshire Department of Education (2006). K-12 Social Studies New


Hampshire curriculum framework. Retrieved from
http://www.education.nh.gov/instruction/curriculum/social_studies/docu
ments/frameworks.pdf
This is a resource for teachers that consists of the New Hampshire
curriculum standards for social studies for grades K-12.
New Hampshire Department of Education. (2006) K-12 Written and Oral
Communication New Hampshire Curriculum Framework. Retrieved from
http://www.education.nh.gov/instruction/curriculum/english_lang/docu
ments/writing_frame.pdf
This is a resource for teachers that consists of the New Hampshire
curriculum standards for writing and oral language for grades K-12.

122

Perfection Learning Corporation. (1995). Portals to reading series: The


enormous egg. Logan, Iowa.
This resource for teachers provides different worksheets for students.
There are multiple worksheets per chapter. Also, the worksheets relate to
many different topics; such as, sequencing, syllables, vocabulary, and
context clues.
Roane State Community College. Online writing lab. Retrieved from
http://www.roanestate.edu/owl/ElementsLit.html
A list of different literacy definitions is given on this website. For
example, different terms relating to characters like protagonist and
antagonist are defined. Also, definitions of figurative language are
listed.
Stonewall Farm. (2011-2012). Tapline stonewall farms school program guide.
Retrieved from http://www.stonewallfarm.org/sites/all/files/Tapline
%20Binder_0.pdf
This site is for schools or groups to see what programs Stonewall Farm
has. There are many different programs for different age ranges as well
as different subjects. The topics range from farm animals to physics.

123

Unit Reflection
This project took me through the process of developing a unit for a
group of students. Going through all of the different steps in this unit
allowed me to see the different opportunites one chapter book can ha ve
within the curriculum. Throughout this unit I learned different strategies for
teaching reading; as well as, all of the parts of a unit to think about while
creating one. I learned that there are many different aspect of reading to
teach and it is important to figure out what aspects students need practice
with the most. Also, that there are many different ways to present reading
concepts to students. While teaching this unit with the book The Enormous
Egg, I learned that every subject can be integrated into reading. I was able to
take this one book and integrate it into social studies, reading, arts, and
writing. There were also many parts of this book that related to mathematics.
Also, I was reminded of all of the different topics that can be taught along
with reading. These consist of the basics of character, setting, and plot; but,
then go deeper into ideas like main idea, protagonist, or figurative language.
Teaching this unit showed me that I like to try to differentiate the
lessons I teach to reach the students interests. This consist of making more
hands-on lessons or taking some of their questions they ask and turn it into a
lesson. If I could teach this again, I would try to find other ways to do some of
the lessons I had to make them more hands-on. I would want to try making
the lessons more student centered than teacher centered. The lessons that
went the smoothest were the lessons the students participated in more.

124

Especially the lesson with students drawing pictures. Many students really
enjoyed drawing a picture. Knowing this, I could have had students draw a
picture of a major event and answer a writing prompt that went along with it.
If I did teach this lesson over again, I would have like to complete all of
the steps of this unit, besides the lessons, before I taught the lessons. This
would have given me more ideas of how and what to teach. Unfortunately,
this time there was not enough time to write everything before I had to
concentrate on the lessons. Overall, this unit proved to me what my teaching
style is and how I like to interact with students while teaching reading.