Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 8

ALL ABOARD THE KNOWLEDGE EXPRESS

WOOT WOOT! Welcome to a new way of looking at the classroom – and a new way to learn. We’re 
going to be doing something totally different in our calculus classroom. You aren’t going to get three 
or four tests which determine your quarter grade. You aren’t going to see scores like “82%” which, if 
you think about it, don’t tell you a whole lot about what you know and what you don’t know. For once 
in your schooling lives, you’re going to have a lot more control over things.  

“Things?” you ask?  

Yeah, I mean everything. Your grade, your homework, your way of learning. You are finally in the 
driver’s seat.  

PRELUDE: THE PROBLEM WITH GRADES 
I’ve been doing a lot of thinking about grades, and to me, there are a couple things that strike me – as 
a teacher – as a little bit absurd.   

1. You take a test on, say, trigonometry. You get a 73% on it. I put that in my gradebook. What 
does that 73% tell me as a teacher, or you as a student? Does it mean that you know 73% of 
the material? Probably not. Does it mean that you are really weak in one area and strong in a 
few others? Who knows! Does it mean that you made a bunch of algebraic errors, but 
understood the concepts? Yo no se! 
 
2. Let’s say I give you a test and things just weren’t going your way. You know, one of those off 
days, and you froze up. Or you fell asleep studying the night before. Or you thought you knew 
the stuff but it turned out you didn’t. Or (and this has happened to me) you totally forgot there 
was a test. And you bombed. I return the test to you, and you sigh, maybe cry, maybe shrug 
your shoulders. Then life goes on. Let’s be honest here. Do you go back and relearn the things 
you didn’t know?  
 
I thought not.  But as a math lover, that hurts. My heart breaks a little. 
 
 
 

I don’t want grades to be a stick – I don’t want you to be scared of them. I want 
grades to be a carrot – a motivator. And I want them to mean something.  
OUR SOLUTION TO GRADES 
At the start of each unit, you’ll get a list of skills that we’re going to learn. Our first unit will look like:  

(1) Identify the holes, vertical asymptotes, x‐ and y‐intercepts, horizontal asymptotes, and domain 
of any rational function 
(2) Perform a sign analysis for a rational function 
(3) Sketch the basic shape of a rational function 
(4) Identify an equation for a rational function given a sketch of the function 
(5) Explain clearly what a hole and an asymptote are 
(6) Identify the equations of basic piecewise functions given simple piecewise graphs 
(7) Sketch the graph of a piecewise function given the piecewise equation 
 
You’ll also get a grade sheet that looks like this for you to keep track of your grades: 

 
 
Every so often (probably every week or two) we’ll have an assessment (announced in advance). These 
are going to be short assessments, lasting probably 20‐30 minutes, testing you on a few skills. On 
each of these skills, you’ll get a score from 0 to 4, representing how well you know each skill (there is 
a rubric in this packet). So after the first assessment, your grade sheet might look like this: 
 
(And that’s exactly what my gradebook will look like too._  

But crust! You really messed up on Skill #1. YEEEEARGH! Luckily, the next week I hand out another 
short assessment and it tests Skills #1, #3, #4, and #5. Notice I’m asking you to show me your ability to 
do Skills #1 and #3 again. Throughout the quarter, I will continually be asking you to show me older 
skills to make sure you’ve retained what you’ve learned. (I’ll probably assess most skills twice at some 
point in the quarter.)  

So you’ve taken the newer assessment, and you get scores for those. Your sheet will look like this: 

 
Guess what? You did so much better on Skill #1! Unfortunately you went a little down on Skill #3. 

So, Mr. Shah, what the heck does this mean? 

I want your grade to reflect what you know, and what you don’t know, at any point in time. So I don’t 
care if you got a 1 on Skill #1 early on. You showed me the second time around that you really do 
understand the material better. HOLLA! So your current grade for Skill #1 is a 4. On the flip side, you 
went down on Skill #3. So your current grade for Skill #3 is a 2.  
You get points for what you know. That’s the only way to get points. 
But here’s where the magic comes in. Let’s say you aren’t happy with your scores for Skill #3 and Skill 
#5 and want to improve them.  

No problem! As a teacher, I’m all for you showing me you’ve learned something. My heart swells! 
It almost bursts! 

You can re‐assess on any skill to show me you understand it better. You just have to send me an 
email (see below for details) and you can re‐assess1! The point is: if you can show me you have 
mastered a skill, I’ll give you credit for mastering the skill!  

You can reassess until a week before the quarter ends. (I’ll announce the exact date in class.) 

The point of this is: I want you to succeed. I am on your side. 

So let’s say you email me and then reassess Skill #3 and Skill #5. Your sheet might look like: 

 
Remember, only the last score matters, so you are doing pretty well!2 (The Rs are to designate 
reassessments.)  

If you want to know your current grade is, just divide up the points you have earned over the total 
points: (4+4+3.5+4+3)/(4+4+4+4+4)=0.925. You have a 92.5%. 

Is this making sense? 

                                                            
1
 You can reassess up to two skills at a single time. Also, if you are struggling and have reassessed a particular skill twice and you 
want to reassess it a third time, I’d like to meet with you to hear what’s giving you trouble. 
2
 A caveat! Your grade can also go down with a reassessment. So say you reassessed Skill #3, and you earned a 1 on it . Your grade 
for that skill will be a 1. However, you can always reassess a second time! 
In short, we’re going to have a bunch of smaller assessments, which will test specific skills. I’m going 
to try to assess you at least two different times on most skills (but no promises). Your latest grade 
stands. If you aren’t content with your score, you can always reassess individual skills to show that 
you really do get it. 

THE MEANING OF GRADES 
In this new system, grades have a very specific meaning. For each entire quarter, I will be putting new 
and old skills on the short assessments. And you will be allowed to reassess at any point. So at the end 
of the quarter, your quarter grade will reflect simply two things: your mastery and ability to retain 
the material from the course.  

I don’t want to be the teacher who gives all As. But heck, I want to be the teacher who has students 
who earn all As.  

RUBRIC 
4 You have totally mastered the skill, meaning you have demonstrated a full understanding of the 
concepts involved, have clearly showed all steps of your reasoning, have used notation correctly, 
wrote exemplary and clear prose, and have made no algebraic errors. 

3.5 You have totally mastered the skill, but you might have made a small notational error, or a very 
small (non‐fatal) algebraic error.  

3 You have a firm grasp of the skill, meaning you have demonstrated a full or almost understanding 
of the concepts involved, but you possibly didn’t show steps of your reasoning, didn’t use notation 
totally consistently, could have written clearer prose, and/or made a slight (but non‐fatal)3 algebraic 
error. 

2 You have demonstrated some conceptual understanding of the skill. You possibly have some 
confused reasoning, did not completely answer the question, did not use consistent notation, wrote 
muddled prose, and/or made more than one (non‐fatal) algebraic errors. 

1 You have demonstrated a weak or no conceptual understanding. You possibly have confused 
reasoning, poor prose, and/or made one or more serious (fatal) algebraic errors. 

0 You left the problem blank. 
                                                            
3
 What’s a “non‐fatal” algebraic error? These are smaller errors which don’t change the nature of the problem, nor impede on the 
expected method to get a solution. “Fatal” algebraic errors change the nature of the problem.   
THE PROCESS FOR REASSESSMENT 
1. Work on improving your understanding the skills you didn’t do as well as you’d like on. Do old 
homework problems, work with another student, meet with me, whatever!4 
 
2. Fill out the reassessment email (a blank version is on the course conference… fill it out) with 
the details about one or two skills you want to reassess. (You can’t reassess more than two 
skills at a time.)  
 
If you want to reassess on Tuesday’s E band study hall…   email me by Sunday at 5pm.  

If you want to reassess on Friday’s E band study hall…   email me by Wednesday at 5pm. 
 

Howdy Mr. Shah, 

I would really like to reassess Skill #___.  

The reasons I think I didn’t do well on that skill are: 

  [list reasons here] 

Since the assessment, I have done the following specific things to make sure 
I understand the skill: 

  [list the different things you did to work on the skill] 

Would it be possible to reassess the skill during E band Study Hall on this 
upcoming [pick one: Tuesday / Friday]? 

[If you want to reassess a second skill, copy the above and fill it in for the 
second skill.] 

Always a devoted math student, 

Henny 

If you have shown me you’ve done concrete things to fix your misunderstandings, I’ll approve 
the re‐assessment and off you go to study hall! Every so often, I may ask you to bring your 
completed, corrected homework and your class notes for me to see before letting you to re‐
assess. 

3. That’s all. You’re done! Your score on this reassessment is your current score for your skills.  
                                                            
4
 There’s only one thing. You can’t reassess the same day you meet with me. I don’t want you just parroting what we talked about. I 
want to make sure you really understand the material, independent of me! 
FINE POINTS 
1. You can’t reassess more than 2 skills at once. 
2. If you want to reassess a particular skill more than twice, let’s meet and talk about your 
understanding of the skill beforehand. 
3. You can reassess any skill until about a week before the end of the quarter. I will give you the 
exact date each quarter. (That’s just to allow me enough time to grade and enter all the scores 
in the gradebook.) 
4. Watch out for days when we don’t have school on Tuesdays or Fridays. Clearly you can’t 
reassess those days. 

SEMESTER GRADES 
There will be a midterm, and an end of year exam. (The end of year exam will be given near the end 
of the fourth quarter – not during finals.) Your semester grades will be: 

Semester I = 40% Quarter 1 + 40% Quarter 2 + 20% Midterm 
Semester II = 40% Quarter 3 + 40% Quarter 4 + 20% End of Year Exam 
Final Yearlong Grade = 50% Semester I + 50% Semester II 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WHAT THIS MEANS FOR YOU 
This new grading system has about a gazillion advantages to it. And hopefully it’s going to take the 
stress out of testing, and put the focus on really learning the material. At the same time, with the 
independence that this class is going to give you, it will force you to be responsible. 

I suspect the biggest challenge will be keeping up with the homework, and studying for assessments.  

Picture this. You’re at home, it’s 11pm, and you have to do an intense biology packet (or study for a 
European history test, or… well, you get the picture) and your math homework. You think ah, well, 
homework isn’t for a grade in math. I’ll figure it out later… really, I promise myself I will! I must!. You 
come to class, you’re a little lost, you try to do the next night’s homework and it’s somewhat 
impossible because you didn’t quite get the material you hadn’t practiced. Great. And you still 
promise yourself to do the homework from the night before. 

The next calculus assessment comes about and you get a few things, but you bomb a few things, and 
you think hey, I can just reassess. But the work of senior year keeps piling on, and you have already 
made some gaps in your understanding, and you can only reassess a couple skills at a time. 

You’re digging a hole for yourself, and you keep putting things off, thinking oh, I can deal with it later. 
I can assess it again. Later. It’ll all work out.  

It won’t.  

You’re going to learn that doing your homework every night, and studying for assessments, are the 
two most important actions you can take to succeed in calculus.  

You might not believe me, and want to tempt fates… well, so I’ll just say: with freedom comes great 
responsibility.