Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 22

Master of Business Administration

(MBA)
2007 ELECTIVE

Presented by

­ VAL JIWA
­ FULL­TIME MBA
2

2
3

Table of contents

Abstract         4

1. Introduction         5

2. Issues and parties         6

3. Process         9

4. Literature Review       11

5. Conclusion       15

References       16

3
4

Appendix 1       17

Appendix 2       18

Abstract

Collins Compact Dictionary defines negotiation as “a talk with others in order to reach an 

agreement”. Why did Jina want to take up the offer of Company X? In retrospect, the 

solution seemed obvious to Marshal and Jina. Negotiation was once considered an art 

4
5

practiced by the naturally gifted. To some extent it still is, but increasingly we, in the 

business   world,   have   come   to   regard   negotiation   as   a   science   –   built   on   creative 

approaches to deal making that allow everyone to walk away winners of sorts. Analyzing 

the   case   of   Marshal   and   Jina   that   was   mentioned   at   the   beginning   of   this   paper,   an 

investigative mind­set of the boss made him ask all the right and relevant questions and 

finally the question why which enabled him to come up with a solution to their problem. 

However, as Coutu opined, that one can’t help feeling that the scholarly ink and classroom 

simulations don’t do enough to prepare businesspeople for the really tough negotiations – 

the ones where failure is not an option.

5
6

1.  INTRODUCTION 

Collins Compact Dictionary defines negotiation as “a talk with others in order to reach an 

agreement”. In other words, negotiation does not happen without a talk. A talk in this 

respect essentially means discussing and asking the right questions in order to derive at 

the right or optimal solution. By asking the right questions, you can at least avoid making 

the wrong decisions or walk away from bad bargains. By asking the right questions, one 

can   practice   to   become   a   skilled   negotiator  as   the   right   answers   put   together   should 

enlighten one to arrive at the right conclusions and find a solution that is favorable to both 

or all parties concerned. 

A healthy negotiation is one that takes into consideration the well­being of all parties 

concerned and strives to achieve that by understanding the inherent problems. It is very 

difficult, if not impossible, to arrive at a favorable position if one or more parties are not 

on the same platform or are trying to outdo each other and find a solution that is favorable 

only to them. Is such a case, negotiation becomes extremely strenuous and requires the 

expertise and skill of a better qualified negotiator. Not only does this consume a lot of 

6
7

time but it can also in some case become a costly affair. For example, in the case of a 

married couple, when the mother of the child denies visitation rights to the father of the 

child,   the   situation   can   become   very   emotional   as   well   as   costly   to   both   the   parties 

concerned as the court has to intervene.

In the next chapter, we’ll have a look at a real life situation where two colleagues, Marshal 

and Jina, were caught up in a dilemma in their lives just when they decided to pursue their 

career. 

2.  ISSUES AND PARTIES 

Marshal and Jina are colleagues who worked in the same department in an airline office. 

More than colleagues there were also the best of friends. They had a wonderful and 

healthy working relationship devoid of any office politics. They have been working in the 

same department for five years in the same position. Having worked for so long, they both 

had enough and more experience to move forward and pursue for the next high rung of 

the corporate ladder. Both of them aspired and dreamt about getting a higher position and 

climbing the ladder. 

7
8

One day they sat and talked about it and decided to work towards it. The alternatives they 

had were either to aim for a promotion within the organization or get a higher paying job 

elsewhere in another organization. On second thoughts they decided to try both and take 

whichever comes first. They both prepared impressive CVs and posted them in various 

recruitment agencies. They also went about enquiring informally about job vacancies and 

even told their boss, who was the General manager of the company, that they would be 

interested in climbing the corporate ladder and to consider their case if they were any 

openings within the organization. The boss was a very understanding man who promised 

very sincerely to consider them if there were any openings in the higher positions. After 

doing their part, both Marshall and Jina decided to wait it out until they were called out 

for interviews.

The following month, there was an announcement within the organization that the airlines 

were opening up new destinations. Hence the CEO of the airline wanted the sales target of 

the company to be up by 40%. This would imply sweating out the sales force and hiring 

more of them. As such Marshal and Jina were both asked by the General Manager to 

apply for the job. They were both thrilled and gladly did so. While they were waiting, Jina 

was called by another airline company, who we’ll call here company X, for an interview. 

Jina began preparing for the interview and was very confident on the morning when she 

8
9

appeared for the interview. The interview went very well and Gina was told by Company 

X that they would contact her 2 weeks later. 

Meanwhile, much to both of their surprise, Marshal too got called out for an interview by 

the airline company where they were working. His interview went very well too. Both 

Marshal and Jina were on top of their world when they heard the news the following week 

that they got selected for the positions that they applied for because both of them stood 

out among the other candidates because of their experience and performances. They went 

about celebrating and informing their friends and families about the good news. Jina was 

given a time of one month to hand in her resignation and join the new company. However, 

Marshal   was   given   only   two   weeks   before   he   could   join   his   colleagues   in   the   new 

department.

However,   the   bombshell   came   unexpectedly.   The   General   Manager   of   the   company 

decided that he could not afford to lose two very experienced people from the same 

department without filling up the same. This would mean a huge loss for the company in 

terms of customer service. Customers would suffer which the company could not afford 

to do so at this stage when they needed more of them to fill up the extra flights flying to 

the   new destinations. Moreover, the  Commercial Director of  the  company, whom the 

General Manager reported to, would not allow such a scenario. 

9
10

This would mean bringing in people from other lower departments to fill the gap within 

this department. However, the glitch was that in order to handle this department, the 

workers would have to undergo three months of training. As Marshal and Jina could not 

wait for that long, they started panicking. On one hand, Company X was pressurizing Jina 

to respond to them immediately and, on the other hand, Marshal was given an ultimatum 

to either stay in the same department or to accept the offer of promotion.

Marshal and Jina were in a dilemma. They did not want to jeopardize their career on 

account of this, a golden opportunity which they were preparing for and had waited for all 

this while, neither did they want to kick out the company that they so long worked for and 

who was loyal to them as well. 

Once   again   they   sat   and   talked   about   how   to   go   about   it.   They   couldn’t   come   to   a 

conclusion. Both of them were feeling bad to let the other person down. At the same time, 

the chances being offered were also too good to be true.

3.  PROCESS 

10
11

Marshal and Jina then decided to approach their boss and ask for help and advice, being 

the kind and reasonable man that he was. The boss on hearing their story was also in a 

dilemma. The negotiation seemed to be at a dead end, with the boss out of ideas for 

pushing through a deal. So they were both asked to come back the next day by when the 

boss   would   have   a   solution   to   their   problem.   The   boss,   who   was   known   within   the 

company as a gifted negotiator, here then decided to act as a negotiator between them and 

try and solve the problem by offering them a couple of choices.

The next day Marshal, Jina and the boss sat at the negotiating table. The boss decided to 

ask them a couple of questions. Then he asked the final question to Jina: Why? Why did 

Jina want to take up the offer of Company X? The response surprised the boss. Company 

X was offering Jina a double promotion and a slightly higher salary. Marshal, on the other 

hand, was offered a small promotion and double the salary by the same company  in 

another department. 

Armed with this knowledge, the boss proposed a solution that allowed both Marshal and 

Jina to quickly wrap up a deal. Marshal would give Jina 10% of his salary every month 

which   would  amount  to  more  than  what  Company X   was  offering  Jina and  a  verbal 

commitment by the company to promote her the next time when the vacancy arrived 

provided Jina trains enough people to take over her department. 

11
12

In retrospect, the solution seemed obvious to Marshal and Jina. But both of them assumed 

that they understood each other’s motivations and, therefore, didn’t explore them further. 

Both were trying to find a solution to a problem that was not fully diagnosed. All it took 

them is do was define the problem and ask the question why. The boss on the other end 

probed and decided to ask questions and got all the relevant and critical answers out of 

Jina. He even attempted to ask what the deal of Company X was. This enabled him to 

come to the conclusion that money was the prime motivation for Jina to take up the offer 

which is exactly what the boss then offered her. 

The boss succeeded in this case because he challenged the underlying assumptions which 

then motivated him to enter into talks with both the parties. In other words, framing the 

right questions would bring out the right answers necessary to find the solution to the 

problem.

Though every case scenario may not be as simple as the above, the rule of thumb is to get 

as much information as possible and challenge underlying assumptions. It would also help 

if one can find out the causes of the problem. 

12
13

4.  LITERATURE REVIEW 

Negotiation was once considered an art practiced by the naturally gifted. To some extent 

it still is, but increasingly we, in the business world, have come to regard negotiation as a 

science – built on creative approaches to deal making that allow everyone to walk away 

winners of sorts. Executives have become experts at “getting to yes”, as the now­familiar 

terminology   goes.   Nevertheless,   some   negotiations   stall   or   worse,   never   get   off   the 

ground (Kolb & Williams, 2001).

The best way to get what you’re after in a negotiation – sometimes the only way –  

is to approach the situation the way a detective approaches a crime scene.

  ­ Malhotra and Bazerman (2007)

Malhotra et al. (2007) in their article “Investigative Negotiation” delineates five principles 

underlying investigative negotiation and show how they appear in myriad situations. In 

nutshell, they are as follows:

1) Don’t just discuss what your counterparts want – find out why they want it.

2) Seek to understand and mitigate the other side’s constraints.

13
14

3) Interpret demands as opportunities.

4) Create common ground with adversaries.

5) Continue to investigate even after the deal appears to be lost.

Negotiation  informs  all aspects  of  business   life.  But  the  costs   of  failure can  be  high 

(Coutu, 2002). Sebenius (2001) reckons many negotiators know a lot about negotiating 

but still fall prey to a set of common errors. The best defense is staying focused on the 

right   problem   to   solve.   In   his   famous   article   titled   “Six   Habits   of   Merely   Effective 

Negotiators”, Sebenius outlines the  six common mistakes  that keep even experienced 

negotiators from solving the right problem. They are the follows:

1) Neglecting   the   other   side’s   problem:   Since   the   other   side   will   say   yes   to   its 

reasons,   not   yours,   agreement   requires   understanding   and   addressing   your 

counterpart’s problem as a means to solving your own.

2) Letting price bulldoze other interests: Negotiators who pay attention exclusively to 

price turn potentially cooperative deals to adversarial ones.

3) Letting positions drive out emotions: Great negotiators understand that the dance 

of bargaining positions is only the surface game; the real action takes place when 

they’ve probed behind positions for the full set of interests at stake.

4) Searching too hard for common ground: Many of the most frequently overlooked 

sources of value in negotiation arise from differences form the parties.

14
15

5) Neglecting   BATNAs:   The   real   negotiation   problem   should   be   “real   versus 

BATNA”, not one or the other in isolation. 

6) Failing   to   correct   for   skewed   vision:   You   may   be   crystal   clear   on   the   right 

negotiating   problem   –   but   you   can’t   solve   it   correctly   without   a   firm 

understanding of both sides’ interests, BATNAs, valuations, likely actions, and so 

on.

Savvy negotiators not only play their cards well, they design the game in their favor even 

before they get to the table. In their analysis of hundreds of negotiations Sebenius & Lax 

(2003) uncovered barriers in three complementary dimensions. The fist is tactics; the 

second   is   deal   design;   and   the   third   is   setup   (See   Appendix   1).   Following   three 

paragraphs  are excerpts from their article titled “3­D Negotiation: Playing the Whole 

Game” that describes in great deal that negotiations succeed or fail based on the attention 

executives pay to these three common dimensions of deal making.

Tactics  are   interactions   at   the   bargaining   table.   The   common   barriers   to   yes   in   this 

dimension include a lack of trust between parties, poor communication, and negotiators’ 

“hardball”   attitudes.   Useful   tips   on   mastering   tactics   include   reading   body   language, 

adapting   your   style   to   the   bargaining   situation,   listening   actively,   framing   your   case 

persuasively, deciding on offers and counteroffers, managing deadlines, countering dirty 

tricks, avoiding cross­cultural gaffes, and so on. 

15
16

Deal design is the negotiators’ ability to draw up a deal at the table that creates lasting 

value.   Here   negotiators   work   to   diagnose   underlying   sources   of   economic   and 

noneconomic value and then craft agreements that can unlock that value for the parties.

Setup refers to reshaping the scope and sequence of the game itself to achieve the desired 

outcome. Here negotiators act away from the table ensuring that the right parties are 

approached in the right order, to deal with the right issues, by the right means, at the right 

time, under the right set of expectations, and facing the right no­deal options.

Even if you follow the above rules and regulations and be meticulous and conscientious 

about deal­making, sometimes they fail in the implementation stage. Techniques that can 

help you seal a deal may end up torpedoing the relationship when it’s time to put the deal 

into operation. The product of a negotiation isn’t a document; it’s the value produced once 

the parties have done what they agreed to do. Negotiators who understand that prepare 

differently   than   deal   makers   do   (See   Appendix   2).   They   also   negotiate   differently, 

recognizing that value comes not from a signature but from real work performed long 

after the ink has dried. If signing the document is your ultimate goal, you will fall short of 

a   winning   deal.   Ertel   (2004)   reckons   making   a   leap   to   an   implementation   mind­set 

requires five shifts. These five approaches can help your negotiating team transition from 

a deal maker mentality to an implementation mind­set.

16
17

1) Start   with   the   end   in   mind:   Imagine   the   deal   12   months   out:   What   has   gone 

wrong?   How   do   you   know   if   it’s   a   success?   Who   should   have   been   involved 

earlier?

2) Help them prepare, too: Surprising the other side doesn’t make sense, because if 

they promise things they can’t deliver, you both lose.

3) Treat alignment as a shared responsibility: If your counterpart’s interests aren’t 

aligned, it’s your problem, too.

4) Send one message: Brief implementation teams on both sides of the deal together 

so everyone has the same information.

5) Manage negotiation like a business process: Combine a disciplined preparation 

process with postnegotiating reviews.

5.  CONCLUSION 

Analyzing the case of Marshal and Jina that was mentioned at the beginning of this paper, 

an investigative mind­set of the boss made him ask all the right and relevant questions and 

finally the question why which enabled him to come up with a solution to their problem. 

The intense pressure that they were facing by the new companies could have resulted in 

costly mistakes. The boss acted as a good negotiator here which prevented them from 

17
18

falling prey to the set of common errors outlined by Sebenius. As for the dimensions 

mentioned earlier, the boss succeeded as a negotiator by using the 2­D dimension which 

is the deal design. Deal design seeks to create value for both parties concerned. The 

solution to the problem created value for both Marshal and Jina. As a negotiator the boss 

also succeeded in designing a deal that worked in practice. In other words, the deal that 

was struck at the beginning was well carried out through the implementation stage as well 

because it was a practical solution. 

Negotiation informs all aspects of life – business, career, social as well as personal life. 

Every   interaction   with   people   involves   to   varying   degrees   some   kind   of   negotiation. 

Bookstores are abounding with endless stream of handbooks on negotiation, many of 

them bestsellers. Most of the top business schools in the world have entire academic 

departments devoted to the subject. All these point to the fact the negotiation is becoming 

an all­important facet of our everyday lives. However, as Coutu opined, that one can’t 

help feeling that the scholarly ink and classroom simulations don’t do enough to prepare 

businesspeople for the really tough negotiations – the ones where failure is not an option.

REFERENCES

18
19

Coutu   D.L,   2002,   “Negotiating   Without   a   Net:   A   Conversation   with   the   NYPD’s 

Dominick J. Misino”, Harvard Business Review, October.

Ertel D, 2004, “Getting Past Yes: negotiating as if Implementation Mattered”, Harvard  

Business Review, November.

Kolb D.M & Williams J, 2001, “Breakthrough Bargaining”, Harvard Business Review”, 

February.

Malhotra   D   &   Bazerman   M.H,   2007,   “Investigative   Negotiation”,  Harvard   Business  

Review”, September, p.73.

Sebenius  J.K,  2001,  “Six   Habits  of   Merely  Effective  Negotiators”,  Harvard  Business  

Review, April.

Sebenius   J.K   &   Lax   D.A,   “3­D   Negotiation:   Playing   the   Whole   Game”,  Harvard  

Business Review, November.

19
20

Appendix 1

FOCUS COMMON  APPROACH


BARRIERS
1­D Tactics Interpersonal issues, Act “at the table” to
(people & processes) poor communication, improve interpersonal
“hardball” attitudes processes and tactics
2­D Deal design Lack of feasible or Go “back to the drawing
(value & substance) Desirable agreements board” to design deals
that unlock value that 
lasts
3­D Setup Parties, issues,  Make moves “away from 
(scope & sequence) BATNAs, the table” to create a 
And other elements more favorable scope and 
don’t support a viable  sequence
process of valuable 
agreement
                 Source: Harvard Business Review

20
21

Appendix 2

DEAL­MINDED NEGOTIATORS         Versus IMPLEMENTATION­
MINDED NEGOTIATORS

21
22

   
Assumption Behaviors Assumption Behaviors
“Surprising   them   helps   me.  Introduce   new   actions   or  Negotiation  “Surprising   them   puts   us   at  Propose agendas in advance.
They   may   commit   to  information   at   strategic  tactics risk.   They   may   commit   to 
something   they   might   not  points in negotiation. something they cannot deliver  Suggest   questions   to   be 
Surprise
have otherwise, and we’ll get  or will regret”. discussed   and   provide 
a better deal”. Raise   new   issues   at   the  relevant data.
end.
Raise issues early.
Assumption Behaviors
Assumption Behaviors “I   don’t   want   them   entering  Create a joint fact­gathering 
“It’s   not   my   role   to   equip  Withhold information. this   deal   feeling   duped.   I  group.
them   with   relevant  want   their   goodwill   during 
information or to correct their  Fail   to   correct   mistaken  implementation,   not   their  Commission   third­party 
Information 
misperceptions”. impression. grudging compliance”. research and analysis.
sharing

Question   everyone’s 
assumptions openly.
Assumption Behaviors
Assumption Behaviors “My job is to create value by  Define interests that need to 
“My   job   is   to   get   the   deal  Create artificial deadlines. crafting   a   workable  be considered for the deal to 
closed.   It’s   worth   putting   a  Closing  agreement.   Investing   a   little  be successful.
little   pressure   on   them   now  Threaten escalation. techniques extra   time   in   making   sure 
and   coping   with   their  both   sides   are   aligned   is  Define joint communication 
unhappiness later”. Make   “this   day   only”  worth the effort”. strategy.
offer. Assumption Behaviors
Assumption Behaviors “If   they   fail   to   deliver,   we  Ask   tough   questions   about 
“As   long   as   they   commit,  Focus   on   documenting  don’t   get   the   value   we  both   parties’   ability   to 
that’s   all   that   matters.  commitments   rather   than  expect”. deliver.
Afterward,   it’s   they   problem  on testing the practicality 
if they don’t deliver”. of those commitments. Realistic  Make   implementability   a 
commitments
shared concern.
Rely   on   penalty   clauses 
for protection. Establish   early   warning 
systems   and   contingency 
plans.
Assumption Behaviors
Assumption Behaviors “If we both fail to involve key  Repeatedly   ask   about 
Decision 
“The fewer people involved in  Limit   participation   in  making and  stakeholders   sufficiently   and  stakeholders.
making   this   decision,   the  discussions   to   decision  stakeholders early   enough, whatever time 
better and faster this will go”. makers. we   save   now   will   be   lost  Whose approval is needed?
during implementation”
Keep outsiders in the dark  Whose   cooperation   is 
until it is too late for them  required?
to derail things.
Who   might   interfere   with 
implementation?
22